Art feed

Curated by Exhibitionary

Christopher Wool
Christopher Wool
London - 41 Dover Street, 1st floor
until 16-05-2020

Christopher Wool Galerie Max Hetzler, London is pleased to announce an exhibition of new works on paper and sculptures by Christopher Wool. This will be the artist’s first solo exhibition in the UK since 2006 and the eighth solo show with Galerie Max Hetzler since 1989.  Integrating both mechanical and analogue processes, the works on paper combine a silkscreen printing process, overpainted with oil and enamel. In these layered works Wool blurs the division between painting and printing, reproduction and original.  Sourced from the open landscape of the desert, the structure of the metal sculptures is drawn from tangled ranching wire found on the artist’s property in Marfa, Texas. The twisted and looping three-dimensional structures evidence Wool’s affinity for the line and continue his open-ended experimentation with form.  Christopher Wool (*1955, Chicago) lives and works in New York and Marfa, Texas. 

Christopher Wool Galerie Max Hetzler, London is pleased to announce an exhibition of new works on paper and sculptures by Christopher Wool. This will be the artist’s first solo exhibition in the UK since 2006 and the eighth solo show with Galerie Max Hetzler since 1989.  Integrating both mechanical and analogue processes, the works on paper combine a silkscreen printing process, overpainted with oil and enamel. In these layered works Wool blurs the division between painting and printing, reproduction and original.  Sourced from the open landscape of the desert, the structure of the metal sculptures is drawn from tangled ranching wire found on the artist’s property in Marfa, Texas. The twisted and looping three-dimensional structures evidence Wool’s affinity for the line and continue his open-ended experimentation with form.  Christopher Wool (*1955, Chicago) lives and works in New York and Marfa, Texas. 
Cao Fei
Cao Fei
London - Kensington Gardens
until 17-05-2020

Cao Fei – Blueprints Cao Fei is a multi-media artist and filmmaker based in Beijing. Video, digital media, photography and objects all play a role in the artist's engagement with an age of rapid technological development. The Serpentine Galleries exhibition will bring together new and existing works in an immersive, site-specific installation, expanding the themes of automation, virtuality and technology that Cao Fei continuously draws upon.

Cao Fei – Blueprints Cao Fei is a multi-media artist and filmmaker based in Beijing. Video, digital media, photography and objects all play a role in the artist's engagement with an age of rapid technological development. The Serpentine Galleries exhibition will bring together new and existing works in an immersive, site-specific installation, expanding the themes of automation, virtuality and technology that Cao Fei continuously draws upon.
Hannah Black
Hannah Black
London - 14 Brewer Street, First Floor
until 22-04-2020

Hannah Black – Ruin/Rien Ruin/Rien links together a cluster of events associated with the French Revolution in the late 18th century and the concept of the autonomous artwork.

Hannah Black – Ruin/Rien Ruin/Rien links together a cluster of events associated with the French Revolution in the late 18th century and the concept of the autonomous artwork.
Isa Genzken
Isa Genzken
London - 23 Savile Row
until 02-05-2020

Isa Genzken – Window   ‘Window’ is an exhibition at our London gallery by Isa Genzken featuring a new and unseen body of work. Genzken’s immersive environment expands on the themes of travel, through elements of an aircraft cabin, and the window as a juncture between interior and exterior spaces. In this respect, it reveals the artist’s interest in architecture and light, a topic of enduring resonance in her work as seen in the landmark exhibition in Chicago in 1992, ‘Everybody Needs at Least One Window’. Isa Genzken has long been considered one of Germany’s most important and influential contemporary artists. Since the 1970s, Genzken’s multifaceted practice has encompassed sculpture, photography, found-object installation, film, drawing and painting. Her work borrows from the aesthetics of Minimalism, punk culture and assemblage art to confront the conditions of human experience in contemporary society and the uneasy social climate of capitalism. Throughout her fifty-year career, Genzken’s primary focus has always been sculpture, and although her style has remained varied, her work has maintained a striking common thread and internal truth to both her vision and to the works of art themselves.

Isa Genzken – Window   ‘Window’ is an exhibition at our London gallery by Isa Genzken featuring a new and unseen body of work. Genzken’s immersive environment expands on the themes of travel, through elements of an aircraft cabin, and the window as a juncture between interior and exterior spaces. In this respect, it reveals the artist’s interest in architecture and light, a topic of enduring resonance in her work as seen in the landmark exhibition in Chicago in 1992, ‘Everybody Needs at Least One Window’. Isa Genzken has long been considered one of Germany’s most important and influential contemporary artists. Since the 1970s, Genzken’s multifaceted practice has encompassed sculpture, photography, found-object installation, film, drawing and painting. Her work borrows from the aesthetics of Minimalism, punk culture and assemblage art to confront the conditions of human experience in contemporary society and the uneasy social climate of capitalism. Throughout her fifty-year career, Genzken’s primary focus has always been sculpture, and although her style has remained varied, her work has maintained a striking common thread and internal truth to both her vision and to the works of art themselves.
Peter Schuyff
Peter Schuyff
London - 12a Savile Row
until 24-04-2020

Peter Schuyff – Works on paper

Peter Schuyff – Works on paper
The sky is leaden in the south
The sky is leaden in the south
London - 1?2 Warner Yard
until 25-04-2020

The sky is leaden in the south: An evocation throug grey Andrea Büttner, Helen Cammock, Lubaina Himid, Ellen Lesperance, Liliana Moro, Ruth Proctor, Charlotte Prodger, Lis Rhodes  

The sky is leaden in the south: An evocation throug grey Andrea Büttner, Helen Cammock, Lubaina Himid, Ellen Lesperance, Liliana Moro, Ruth Proctor, Charlotte Prodger, Lis Rhodes  
Hugh Hayden
Hugh Hayden
London - 27 Bell Street
until 02-05-2020

Hugh Hayden – American Food Lisson Gallery is pleased to present Hugh Hayden’s first solo exhibition in the UK. It is also the first to directly engage with Hayden’s culinary installation practice, bringing together wooden picnic tables, cast-iron skillets, and a multimedia stove to reflect on the history and significance of cooking and dining together in America.  Influenced by his background as an architect – in particular designing concepts for new restaurants – Hayden is interested in African cultural inflections on food, art and music. Hayden considers Southern cooking the first uniquely American cuisine, having originated in kitchens run by the enslaved cooks, who infused recipes with African tastes, ingredients and techniques. For the artist, Texas-born and New York-based, the African origins and contributions in the creation of America’s cuisine are equally embedded in the country’s cultural and economic development and lasting infrastructure. More specifically, Hayden is “interested in celebrating the indebtedness to African origins in the cooking – as a form of creation of America, Western culture and Modern Art”.

Hugh Hayden – American Food Lisson Gallery is pleased to present Hugh Hayden’s first solo exhibition in the UK. It is also the first to directly engage with Hayden’s culinary installation practice, bringing together wooden picnic tables, cast-iron skillets, and a multimedia stove to reflect on the history and significance of cooking and dining together in America.  Influenced by his background as an architect – in particular designing concepts for new restaurants – Hayden is interested in African cultural inflections on food, art and music. Hayden considers Southern cooking the first uniquely American cuisine, having originated in kitchens run by the enslaved cooks, who infused recipes with African tastes, ingredients and techniques. For the artist, Texas-born and New York-based, the African origins and contributions in the creation of America’s cuisine are equally embedded in the country’s cultural and economic development and lasting infrastructure. More specifically, Hayden is “interested in celebrating the indebtedness to African origins in the cooking – as a form of creation of America, Western culture and Modern Art”.
Ella Kruglyanskaya
Ella Kruglyanskaya
London - 3 & 11 Duke Street St James's
until 23-05-2020

Ella Kruglyanskaya – This is a Robbery For her second London exhibition at Thomas Dane Gallery, Ella Kruglyanskaya displays her deeply original streak—part-rebellious, part-classicist—and continues her focus on the gendered and expressionistic histories of painting albeit with a more personal and introspective drive. The exhibition takes the form of a continuous collage in two parts across both gallery spaces. Each includes a profusion of works on canvas, egg tempera panels and works on paper, unpacking the traditions of portraiture, still-life, trompe l’oeil and the memento mori, scrutinising her own artistic output throughout. 

Ella Kruglyanskaya – This is a Robbery For her second London exhibition at Thomas Dane Gallery, Ella Kruglyanskaya displays her deeply original streak—part-rebellious, part-classicist—and continues her focus on the gendered and expressionistic histories of painting albeit with a more personal and introspective drive. The exhibition takes the form of a continuous collage in two parts across both gallery spaces. Each includes a profusion of works on canvas, egg tempera panels and works on paper, unpacking the traditions of portraiture, still-life, trompe l’oeil and the memento mori, scrutinising her own artistic output throughout. 
Marc Brandenburg
Marc Brandenburg
London - Ely House, 37 Dover Street
until 04-04-2020

Marc Brandenburg – Snowflake Marc Brandenburg's first UK solo show will bring together monumental drawings that show scenes from a protest march, alongside a number of smaller works on paper. Depicting various moments of lived uncertainty, Brandenburg's drawings explore the fragility and commonalities found at the fringes of society.

Marc Brandenburg – Snowflake Marc Brandenburg's first UK solo show will bring together monumental drawings that show scenes from a protest march, alongside a number of smaller works on paper. Depicting various moments of lived uncertainty, Brandenburg's drawings explore the fragility and commonalities found at the fringes of society.
Vivian Suter
Vivian Suter
London - Arkwright Road
until 05-04-2020

Vivian Suter – Tin Tin's Sofa

Vivian Suter – Tin Tin's Sofa
Lara Favaretto
Lara Favaretto
Miami - 2100 Collins Avenue
until 19-04-2020

Lara Favaretto – Blind Spot  Incorporating paintings, sculpture and interactive installations, Lara Favaretto: Blind Spot presents an arrangement of new and recent works alongside ongoing series from the artist’s practice. The exhibition also features a new, site-specific work commissioned for the museum’s permanent collection. Favaretto embraces the idea of constant change, creating works of art and situations that are in flux. Though often humorous and playful, her works address more serious matters such as decay, consumption and loss. Using elements like obsolete technologies to subtly refer to the passing of time, Favaretto incorporates found materials that are repurposed in her work. These upcycled materials – such as found paintings, discarded books and weathered construction materials – serve as commentary on the lifecycle of material detritus. Favaretto’s oeuvre highlights her interest in exploring ideas of the survival of certain objects over others, while contemplating their legitimacy in relation to the forgotten and exposing their inevitable destiny of wear, corrosion, erosion and breakage.

Lara Favaretto – Blind Spot  Incorporating paintings, sculpture and interactive installations, Lara Favaretto: Blind Spot presents an arrangement of new and recent works alongside ongoing series from the artist’s practice. The exhibition also features a new, site-specific work commissioned for the museum’s permanent collection. Favaretto embraces the idea of constant change, creating works of art and situations that are in flux. Though often humorous and playful, her works address more serious matters such as decay, consumption and loss. Using elements like obsolete technologies to subtly refer to the passing of time, Favaretto incorporates found materials that are repurposed in her work. These upcycled materials – such as found paintings, discarded books and weathered construction materials – serve as commentary on the lifecycle of material detritus. Favaretto’s oeuvre highlights her interest in exploring ideas of the survival of certain objects over others, while contemplating their legitimacy in relation to the forgotten and exposing their inevitable destiny of wear, corrosion, erosion and breakage.
Wong Ping
Wong Ping
Miami - 61 NE 41st Street
until 26-04-2020

Wong Ping  With a signature style that is both psychedelic and provocative, and narratives that are richly symbolic, engaging and absurd, Wong Ping creates episodic cinematic tales that are profoundly universal, while often deeply psychological and personal. Wong’s animated videos and installations humorously allegorize contemporary issues of sexuality, culture, politics, and power. Often alluding to fable and fiction, adopting narrative forms such as the detective novel and creating anthropomorphic characters, Wong’s visual language exposes crude realities while offering a space for reflection through fantasy, humor and shared experience.

Wong Ping  With a signature style that is both psychedelic and provocative, and narratives that are richly symbolic, engaging and absurd, Wong Ping creates episodic cinematic tales that are profoundly universal, while often deeply psychological and personal. Wong’s animated videos and installations humorously allegorize contemporary issues of sexuality, culture, politics, and power. Often alluding to fable and fiction, adopting narrative forms such as the detective novel and creating anthropomorphic characters, Wong’s visual language exposes crude realities while offering a space for reflection through fantasy, humor and shared experience.
Mickalene Thomas
Mickalene Thomas
Miami - 2100 Collins Avenue
until 27-09-2020

Mickalene Thomas – Better Nights Inspired by the local New Jersey play ‘Put a Little Sugar in my Bowl’ organized and performed by the artists’ mother, friends, and family as well as the parties hosted by the artist’s mother in the late 1970s, Mickalene Thomas: Better Nights is an installation that will transform the galleries into an immersive art experience for the duration of the exhibition. The installation embodies an apartment environment, conceptually reconstructed according to the domestic aesthetic of the period, including faux wood paneling, wallpaper and custom seating reupholstered with the artist’s signature textiles. An extension of Thomas’ artistic universe, the installation incorporates both work by the artist and a curated selection by Thomas featuring work by emerging and prominent artists of color, with the prop-like tableau echoing the collage-like compositional style of Thomas’ paintings.

Mickalene Thomas – Better Nights Inspired by the local New Jersey play ‘Put a Little Sugar in my Bowl’ organized and performed by the artists’ mother, friends, and family as well as the parties hosted by the artist’s mother in the late 1970s, Mickalene Thomas: Better Nights is an installation that will transform the galleries into an immersive art experience for the duration of the exhibition. The installation embodies an apartment environment, conceptually reconstructed according to the domestic aesthetic of the period, including faux wood paneling, wallpaper and custom seating reupholstered with the artist’s signature textiles. An extension of Thomas’ artistic universe, the installation incorporates both work by the artist and a curated selection by Thomas featuring work by emerging and prominent artists of color, with the prop-like tableau echoing the collage-like compositional style of Thomas’ paintings.
Louise Nevelson
Louise Nevelson
Miami - 61 NE 41st Street
until 19-04-2020

Louise Nevelson The works of Louise Nevelson (b. 1899, Kiev; d. 1988, New York) radically explore space through sculpture. Building on the legacies of Cubism, Constructivism, and Abstract Expressionism, the artist’s famed wooden constructions translate found objects into personal yet abstract portals. After working in painting, clay, and carved wood, Nevelson embarked upon her signature monochromatic assemblages made of found wood in the 1950s painted black, white, and even gold to harmonize the divergent surfaces of her materials. A pioneering female sculptor, Nevelson is among the most significant American sculptors of the twentieth century.

Louise Nevelson The works of Louise Nevelson (b. 1899, Kiev; d. 1988, New York) radically explore space through sculpture. Building on the legacies of Cubism, Constructivism, and Abstract Expressionism, the artist’s famed wooden constructions translate found objects into personal yet abstract portals. After working in painting, clay, and carved wood, Nevelson embarked upon her signature monochromatic assemblages made of found wood in the 1950s painted black, white, and even gold to harmonize the divergent surfaces of her materials. A pioneering female sculptor, Nevelson is among the most significant American sculptors of the twentieth century.
Can It Really Be 20 Years Already?
Can It Really Be 20 Years Already?
Miami - 591 NW 27th Street
until 25-04-2020

Can It Really Be 20 Years Already? Art in Our Times, Contemporary Masters, and Philanthropy Magdalena Abakanowicz, Radcliffe Bailey, Eric Bainbridge, Domenico Bianchi, Gilles Barbier, Florian Baudrexel, William Beckman, John Beech, Jeff Brouws, Peter Buggenhout, Lawrence Carroll, John Chamberlain, Olafur Eliasson, Willem de Kooning, Donna Dennis, Nathalie Djurberg, Mark di Suvero, William Eggleston, Leandro Erlich, Kota Ezawa, Michael Heizer, Thomas Hirschhorn, Pieter Hugo, Anselm Kiefer, Justine Kurland, Sol LeWitt, Donald Lokuta, Emil Lukas, Danny Lyon, Chema Madoz, Ibrahim Mahama, Mark Manders, Barry McGee, Dave Muller, Wilhelm Mundt, Jackie Nickerson, Isamu Noguchi, Tony Oursler, Maurizio Pellegrin, Michelangelo Pistoletto, Pedro Cabrita Reis, Jason Rhoades, Nancy Rubins, George Segal, Richard Serra, Cindy Sherman, Shinique Smith, Kenneth Snelson, Jennifer Steinkamp, Frank Stella, Joel Sternfeld, Kishio Suga, William Tucker, Paolo Ventura, Eudora Welty, Franz West, Lois Weinberger The Margulies Collection at the Warehouse, a pioneering force in contemporary art in Miami, presents its 20th Year Anniversary of public exhibitions. Since it’s inauguration in 1999 the Warehouse has welcomed visitors from South Florida and all over the world. The Warehouse exhibitions showcase art of our times featuring 20th & 21st century sculpture, photography, video, painting and large-scale installations by international artists culled from the renowned collection of Martin Z. Margulies. With a stated mission of arts education, the Warehouse has produced hundreds of programs for the community including guest speakers, seminars, publications, internships and guided tours.

Can It Really Be 20 Years Already? Art in Our Times, Contemporary Masters, and Philanthropy Magdalena Abakanowicz, Radcliffe Bailey, Eric Bainbridge, Domenico Bianchi, Gilles Barbier, Florian Baudrexel, William Beckman, John Beech, Jeff Brouws, Peter Buggenhout, Lawrence Carroll, John Chamberlain, Olafur Eliasson, Willem de Kooning, Donna Dennis, Nathalie Djurberg, Mark di Suvero, William Eggleston, Leandro Erlich, Kota Ezawa, Michael Heizer, Thomas Hirschhorn, Pieter Hugo, Anselm Kiefer, Justine Kurland, Sol LeWitt, Donald Lokuta, Emil Lukas, Danny Lyon, Chema Madoz, Ibrahim Mahama, Mark Manders, Barry McGee, Dave Muller, Wilhelm Mundt, Jackie Nickerson, Isamu Noguchi, Tony Oursler, Maurizio Pellegrin, Michelangelo Pistoletto, Pedro Cabrita Reis, Jason Rhoades, Nancy Rubins, George Segal, Richard Serra, Cindy Sherman, Shinique Smith, Kenneth Snelson, Jennifer Steinkamp, Frank Stella, Joel Sternfeld, Kishio Suga, William Tucker, Paolo Ventura, Eudora Welty, Franz West, Lois Weinberger The Margulies Collection at the Warehouse, a pioneering force in contemporary art in Miami, presents its 20th Year Anniversary of public exhibitions. Since it’s inauguration in 1999 the Warehouse has welcomed visitors from South Florida and all over the world. The Warehouse exhibitions showcase art of our times featuring 20th & 21st century sculpture, photography, video, painting and large-scale installations by international artists culled from the renowned collection of Martin Z. Margulies. With a stated mission of arts education, the Warehouse has produced hundreds of programs for the community including guest speakers, seminars, publications, internships and guided tours.
Sarah Lucas
Sarah Lucas
New York - 130 East 64th Street
until 25-04-2020

Sarah Lucas – HONEY PIE Gladstone Gallery is pleased to present an exhibition of new soft sculptures and bronzes by Sarah Lucas from her ongoing body of Bunnies, which she began making in 1997. Expanding her unique visual language of pantyhose, stuffing, and chairs, to include concrete, bronze, and steel, that Lucas has employed since her rise to international prominence in the mid-nineties, the works in this show demonstrate the artist’s powerful ability to transform utilitarian materials into conceptually complex objects that pose urgent questions about gender, sexuality, and identity. 

Sarah Lucas – HONEY PIE Gladstone Gallery is pleased to present an exhibition of new soft sculptures and bronzes by Sarah Lucas from her ongoing body of Bunnies, which she began making in 1997. Expanding her unique visual language of pantyhose, stuffing, and chairs, to include concrete, bronze, and steel, that Lucas has employed since her rise to international prominence in the mid-nineties, the works in this show demonstrate the artist’s powerful ability to transform utilitarian materials into conceptually complex objects that pose urgent questions about gender, sexuality, and identity. 
Overwrite
Overwrite
New York - 508 West 26 Street ? Ground Floor & 8th Floor
until 08-04-2020

Overwrite Cory Arcangel, Julie Becker, Tony Conrad, Guyton\Walker, Jacqueline Humphries   In our age of automation and digitization, a seemingly infinite number of objects and data points inform daily life. Meanwhile, human capacity for interpretation, retention, and connection remains unchanged, despite perpetual promises to improve bandwidth. Placing works by Cory Arcangel, Julie Becker, Tony Conrad, Guyton\Walker, and Jacqueline Humphries in dialogue, Overwrite examines artistic intervention within the lifecycle of technology and memory. Surveying these visual tropes in new media, painting and sculpture, the works on view implicate themselves in various social and industrial systems. Overwrite illuminates pause and present-mindedness in a moment when neither is easy to find.

Overwrite Cory Arcangel, Julie Becker, Tony Conrad, Guyton\Walker, Jacqueline Humphries   In our age of automation and digitization, a seemingly infinite number of objects and data points inform daily life. Meanwhile, human capacity for interpretation, retention, and connection remains unchanged, despite perpetual promises to improve bandwidth. Placing works by Cory Arcangel, Julie Becker, Tony Conrad, Guyton\Walker, and Jacqueline Humphries in dialogue, Overwrite examines artistic intervention within the lifecycle of technology and memory. Surveying these visual tropes in new media, painting and sculpture, the works on view implicate themselves in various social and industrial systems. Overwrite illuminates pause and present-mindedness in a moment when neither is easy to find.
Daniel Buren & Pierre Huyghe
Daniel Buren & Pierre Huyghe
New York - 980 Madison Avenue, Third Floor
until 04-04-2020

Daniel Buren & Pierre Huyghe An exhibition that foregrounds the conceptual affinities between French artists Daniel Buren (b. 1938) and Pierre Huyghe (b. 1962). Presenting a selection of Buren’s vanguard striped paintings from 1966 in dialogue with one of Huyghe’s dynamic aquarium ecosystems from 2013, the show unites two bodies of works that dismantle the conventional relationship between authorship and presentation.

Daniel Buren & Pierre Huyghe An exhibition that foregrounds the conceptual affinities between French artists Daniel Buren (b. 1938) and Pierre Huyghe (b. 1962). Presenting a selection of Buren’s vanguard striped paintings from 1966 in dialogue with one of Huyghe’s dynamic aquarium ecosystems from 2013, the show unites two bodies of works that dismantle the conventional relationship between authorship and presentation.
Donald Judd
Donald Judd
New York - 11 West 53 Street
until 11-07-2020

Donald Judd “I had always considered my work another activity of some kind,” remarked artist Donald Judd. “I certainly didn’t think I was making sculpture.” One of the foremost sculptors of our time, Judd refused this designation and other attempts to label his art: his revolutionary approach to form, materials, working methods, and display went beyond the set of existing terms in mid-century New York. His work, in turn, changed the language of modern sculpture. Bringing together sculpture, painting, drawing, and rarely seen works from throughout Judd’s career, Judd is the first US retrospective in over 30 years to explore this artist’s remarkable vision. Judd (1928–1994) began his professional career working as a painter while studying art history and writing art criticism. Among a new generation of artists who sought to move past the breakthroughs of Abstract Expressionism, Judd shifted from two to three dimensions, into what he called “real space,” relinquishing a focus on the artist’s gesture. In his constructed reliefs and wooden floor pieces from this time, he established a new type of object-making that rejected illusion, narrative, and metaphorical content. By the mid-1960s, Judd commenced his lifelong practice of using industrial materials, such as aluminum, steel, and Plexiglas, and delegating production of his work to local metal shops. With the help of these specialized fabricators, he developed a signature vocabulary of hollow, rectilinear volumes, often arranged in series. In the following years, “boxes,” “stacks,” and “progressions” continued as Judd’s principal framework to introduce different combinations of color and surface. Judd surveys the complete evolution of the artist’s career, culminating in the last decade of his life, when Judd intensified his work with color and continued to lay new ground for what ensuing generations would come to define as sculpture.

Donald Judd “I had always considered my work another activity of some kind,” remarked artist Donald Judd. “I certainly didn’t think I was making sculpture.” One of the foremost sculptors of our time, Judd refused this designation and other attempts to label his art: his revolutionary approach to form, materials, working methods, and display went beyond the set of existing terms in mid-century New York. His work, in turn, changed the language of modern sculpture. Bringing together sculpture, painting, drawing, and rarely seen works from throughout Judd’s career, Judd is the first US retrospective in over 30 years to explore this artist’s remarkable vision. Judd (1928–1994) began his professional career working as a painter while studying art history and writing art criticism. Among a new generation of artists who sought to move past the breakthroughs of Abstract Expressionism, Judd shifted from two to three dimensions, into what he called “real space,” relinquishing a focus on the artist’s gesture. In his constructed reliefs and wooden floor pieces from this time, he established a new type of object-making that rejected illusion, narrative, and metaphorical content. By the mid-1960s, Judd commenced his lifelong practice of using industrial materials, such as aluminum, steel, and Plexiglas, and delegating production of his work to local metal shops. With the help of these specialized fabricators, he developed a signature vocabulary of hollow, rectilinear volumes, often arranged in series. In the following years, “boxes,” “stacks,” and “progressions” continued as Judd’s principal framework to introduce different combinations of color and surface. Judd surveys the complete evolution of the artist’s career, culminating in the last decade of his life, when Judd intensified his work with color and continued to lay new ground for what ensuing generations would come to define as sculpture.
Bernhard Buhmann
Bernhard Buhmann
New York - 1 Oliver Street
until 05-04-2020

Bernhard Buhmann – ?Unrast Marinaro is pleased to present Bernhard Buhmann’s second solo show with the gallery, Unrast, an exhibition of new paintings. In this body of work, Buhmann continues his exploration of the social consequences from the introduction of new technologies and their impact on the individual. In this context, the classical medium of painting serves as a level of reflection in order to be able to think about technological processes and their effects in a world that is flooded daily with digital content. The paintings become abstracted portraits, protagonists in a contemporary digital society. Buhmann examines our world that is interlinked with digital communication, which tends to lead to communication without community. Only parts of an individual are revealed through digital communication and the true self can be hidden to show to only what the author wants the outside world to know. This new reality of the self is portrayed in Buhmann’s canvases, abstracting and obscuring the true identities of his subjects. Built up over several layers and characterized by compositional tension elements that lead across the line to the surface and to large-scale color gradients, these works develop their individuality, by details and the specific color scheme. An abstracted fist wraps around the edge of a geometric form, a shoe peaks out from the bottom of the composition, a hat adorns the top or a pipe is wedged between two shapes—clues that are revealed to distinguish each portrait from the next. Small inaccuracies, distortions and traces of the painting process counteract the graphic impression of the pictures. They are digital-looking characters on the analog screen. 

Bernhard Buhmann – ?Unrast Marinaro is pleased to present Bernhard Buhmann’s second solo show with the gallery, Unrast, an exhibition of new paintings. In this body of work, Buhmann continues his exploration of the social consequences from the introduction of new technologies and their impact on the individual. In this context, the classical medium of painting serves as a level of reflection in order to be able to think about technological processes and their effects in a world that is flooded daily with digital content. The paintings become abstracted portraits, protagonists in a contemporary digital society. Buhmann examines our world that is interlinked with digital communication, which tends to lead to communication without community. Only parts of an individual are revealed through digital communication and the true self can be hidden to show to only what the author wants the outside world to know. This new reality of the self is portrayed in Buhmann’s canvases, abstracting and obscuring the true identities of his subjects. Built up over several layers and characterized by compositional tension elements that lead across the line to the surface and to large-scale color gradients, these works develop their individuality, by details and the specific color scheme. An abstracted fist wraps around the edge of a geometric form, a shoe peaks out from the bottom of the composition, a hat adorns the top or a pipe is wedged between two shapes—clues that are revealed to distinguish each portrait from the next. Small inaccuracies, distortions and traces of the painting process counteract the graphic impression of the pictures. They are digital-looking characters on the analog screen. 
Liam Gillick
Liam Gillick
New York - 121 W 27th Street
until 18-04-2020

Liam Gillick – Redaction Casey Kaplan is pleased to announce Liam Gillick: Redaction, the artist’s ninth solo exhibition with the gallery over a two-decade collaboration. The show brings together a selection of key texts, abstract structures and installations, spanning the early 90s to the late 2000s, and will coincide with the gallery’s 25th anniversary. Since the late 1980s, Gillick has employed a variety of methodologies to explore the semiotics of the built world. Writing has maintained a crucial role in his practice, culminating in an eclectic collection of fictional texts that resist linear narrative in favor of fragmented dialogue, stream of consciousness, and abrupt slips in time. In addition to these narrative devices, Gillick often uses historical revisioning as an exercise through which to imagine alternative parallel futures. Continually referenced, decontextualized, and reworked, the texts remain in a permanent state of development and transformation in order to examine shifting modes of production and the psychosocial implications of late capitalism. A selection of Gillick’s earliest writings provide a conceptual framework for this exhibition, including: McNamara (1992-1995), Erasmus is Late (1995), Ibuka! (1995), and Discussion Island/Big Conference Centre (1997). Many of the artworks were produced in relation to specific ideas contained within the texts, encompassing ergonomics, conditions of production, the influence of secondary characters, the aesthetics of both secondary and tertiary sectors, and the disillusionment of utopian projections of the future. Formal abstractions and instructional installations exist as potential props or mis-en-scenes, in loose correlation to the narratives. Rejecting a cause-and-effect logic, the works instead propose a variety of potential scenarios to reflect the nuanced contexts in which abstract ideas are realized. A series of Plexiglas and powder-coated aluminum structures resume the language of renovation and development utilized in the texts. The materials are specifically chosen for these connotations and often embody the formal qualities of secondary architecture. Canopies suspended from the ceiling incite the unconscious congregation of bodies; a free-standing screen provides access visually while blocking physical entry, and ill-placed handrails create arbitrary divisions, but deny stability. Within this non-functional “middle space,” the artworks maintain an elusive and open-ended quality, persistently asking “What If?” while refuting a definitive answer. Acutely self-aware, but without irony or cynicism, the work parodies the perpetual speculation of corporate culture and the desire to preserve an illusion of progress. In face of the increasingly rapid rate at which models of collectivity and resistance are outmaneuvered, co-opted and rebranded within neoliberal societies, Gillick’s work has continued to encourage discourse and collective exchange over three decades of artistic production. Liam Gillick lives in New York. His work has been the subject of numerous solo exhibitions internationally, at institutions such as: Madre Museum, Naples; Kunsthalle Wien, Vienna; Contemporary Art Centre, Vilnius; Serralves Museum of Contemporary Art, Porto; Le Magasin, Grenoble; Hessel Museum of Art, Bard College, New York; Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago; the Guggenheim Museum, New York and Bilbao; Museum of Modern Art, New York; and Tate, London, among many others. Gillick has participated in documenta, and the Venice, Berlin and Istanbul Biennales - representing Germany in 2009 in Venice. A prolific writer and critic of contemporary art over the last twenty-five years, Gillick has contributed to publications such as Artforum, October, Frieze and e-flux Journal. He is the author of a number of books, including a volume of his selected critical writing and the recently-published Industry and Intelligence: Contemporary Art Since 1820 (Columbia University Press, March 2016). Additionally, Gillick has produced a number of short films since the late 2000s, which address the construction of the creative persona in light of the enduring mutability of the contemporary artist as a cultural figure. High-profile public works include the British Government Home Office (Interior Ministry) building in London and the Lufthansa Headquarters in Frankfurt. His work can be found in institutional collections such as Centre Pompidou, Paris; Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York and Bilbao; Museum of Modern Art, New York; Tate, London; and Serralves Museum of Contemporary Art, Porto.  [1] Liam Gillick, Big Conference Centre, 1997  

Liam Gillick – Redaction Casey Kaplan is pleased to announce Liam Gillick: Redaction, the artist’s ninth solo exhibition with the gallery over a two-decade collaboration. The show brings together a selection of key texts, abstract structures and installations, spanning the early 90s to the late 2000s, and will coincide with the gallery’s 25th anniversary. Since the late 1980s, Gillick has employed a variety of methodologies to explore the semiotics of the built world. Writing has maintained a crucial role in his practice, culminating in an eclectic collection of fictional texts that resist linear narrative in favor of fragmented dialogue, stream of consciousness, and abrupt slips in time. In addition to these narrative devices, Gillick often uses historical revisioning as an exercise through which to imagine alternative parallel futures. Continually referenced, decontextualized, and reworked, the texts remain in a permanent state of development and transformation in order to examine shifting modes of production and the psychosocial implications of late capitalism. A selection of Gillick’s earliest writings provide a conceptual framework for this exhibition, including: McNamara (1992-1995), Erasmus is Late (1995), Ibuka! (1995), and Discussion Island/Big Conference Centre (1997). Many of the artworks were produced in relation to specific ideas contained within the texts, encompassing ergonomics, conditions of production, the influence of secondary characters, the aesthetics of both secondary and tertiary sectors, and the disillusionment of utopian projections of the future. Formal abstractions and instructional installations exist as potential props or mis-en-scenes, in loose correlation to the narratives. Rejecting a cause-and-effect logic, the works instead propose a variety of potential scenarios to reflect the nuanced contexts in which abstract ideas are realized. A series of Plexiglas and powder-coated aluminum structures resume the language of renovation and development utilized in the texts. The materials are specifically chosen for these connotations and often embody the formal qualities of secondary architecture. Canopies suspended from the ceiling incite the unconscious congregation of bodies; a free-standing screen provides access visually while blocking physical entry, and ill-placed handrails create arbitrary divisions, but deny stability. Within this non-functional “middle space,” the artworks maintain an elusive and open-ended quality, persistently asking “What If?” while refuting a definitive answer. Acutely self-aware, but without irony or cynicism, the work parodies the perpetual speculation of corporate culture and the desire to preserve an illusion of progress. In face of the increasingly rapid rate at which models of collectivity and resistance are outmaneuvered, co-opted and rebranded within neoliberal societies, Gillick’s work has continued to encourage discourse and collective exchange over three decades of artistic production. Liam Gillick lives in New York. His work has been the subject of numerous solo exhibitions internationally, at institutions such as: Madre Museum, Naples; Kunsthalle Wien, Vienna; Contemporary Art Centre, Vilnius; Serralves Museum of Contemporary Art, Porto; Le Magasin, Grenoble; Hessel Museum of Art, Bard College, New York; Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago; the Guggenheim Museum, New York and Bilbao; Museum of Modern Art, New York; and Tate, London, among many others. Gillick has participated in documenta, and the Venice, Berlin and Istanbul Biennales - representing Germany in 2009 in Venice. A prolific writer and critic of contemporary art over the last twenty-five years, Gillick has contributed to publications such as Artforum, October, Frieze and e-flux Journal. He is the author of a number of books, including a volume of his selected critical writing and the recently-published Industry and Intelligence: Contemporary Art Since 1820 (Columbia University Press, March 2016). Additionally, Gillick has produced a number of short films since the late 2000s, which address the construction of the creative persona in light of the enduring mutability of the contemporary artist as a cultural figure. High-profile public works include the British Government Home Office (Interior Ministry) building in London and the Lufthansa Headquarters in Frankfurt. His work can be found in institutional collections such as Centre Pompidou, Paris; Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York and Bilbao; Museum of Modern Art, New York; Tate, London; and Serralves Museum of Contemporary Art, Porto.  [1] Liam Gillick, Big Conference Centre, 1997  
Roe Ethridge
Roe Ethridge
New York - 976 Madison Avenue
until 18-04-2020

Roe Ethridge – Old Fruit  

Roe Ethridge – Old Fruit  
Larry Bell
Larry Bell
New York - 548 West 22nd Street
until 11-04-2020

Larry Bell – Still Standing One of the most renowned and influential artists to emerge from the Los Angeles art scene of the 1960s, Larry Bell is known foremost for his refined surface treatment of glass and his explorations of light, reflection, and shadow. In search of solitude, Bell traveled from New York through the American Midwest, moving to Taos, New Mexico in 1973. His experimentations with commercial industrial processes with high-vacuum coating systems and his interests in the optical qualities of glass led him to make work that investigates multiple ways of using light as a material.

Larry Bell – Still Standing One of the most renowned and influential artists to emerge from the Los Angeles art scene of the 1960s, Larry Bell is known foremost for his refined surface treatment of glass and his explorations of light, reflection, and shadow. In search of solitude, Bell traveled from New York through the American Midwest, moving to Taos, New Mexico in 1973. His experimentations with commercial industrial processes with high-vacuum coating systems and his interests in the optical qualities of glass led him to make work that investigates multiple ways of using light as a material.
Gerhard Richter
Gerhard Richter
New York - 945 Madison Avenue
until 05-07-2020

Gerhard Richter – Painting After All Devoted to one of the greatest artists of our time, Gerhard Richter: Painting After All will consider Richter's six-decade-long preoccupation with the dual means of representation and abstraction to explore the material, conceptual and historical implications of painting. Spanning the entirety of Richter's prolific and innovative career, the exhibition will present over one hundred works that focus on his specific commitment to the medium, as well as his related interests in photography, digital reproduction, and sculpture.  

Gerhard Richter – Painting After All Devoted to one of the greatest artists of our time, Gerhard Richter: Painting After All will consider Richter's six-decade-long preoccupation with the dual means of representation and abstraction to explore the material, conceptual and historical implications of painting. Spanning the entirety of Richter's prolific and innovative career, the exhibition will present over one hundred works that focus on his specific commitment to the medium, as well as his related interests in photography, digital reproduction, and sculpture.  
Jordan Casteel
Jordan Casteel
New York - 235 Bowery
until 24-05-2020

Jordan Casteel – Within Reach The first solo museum exhibition in New York of Jordan Casteel, “Within Reach” will feature works from Casteel’s celebrated series Visible Man (2013–14) and Nights in Harlem (2017), along with recent portraits of her students at Rutgers University-Newark.

Jordan Casteel – Within Reach The first solo museum exhibition in New York of Jordan Casteel, “Within Reach” will feature works from Casteel’s celebrated series Visible Man (2013–14) and Nights in Harlem (2017), along with recent portraits of her students at Rutgers University-Newark.
Albert Mertz
Albert Mertz
Vienna - Parkring 4
until 18-04-2020

Albert Mertz We are pleased to present a selection of works by Albert Mertz (1920 – 1990) on the occasion of his 100th birthday. Part of the exhibition features works created during the time Mertz resided in Savigny-sur-Orge, a Parisian suburb, from the early 1960ies until 1976. The walls of his flat were brown from the smoke of innumerable Gauloises, and when Lone Mertz first visited in 1975, she was overwhelmed by the largest wall of the living room, filled from floor to ceiling with an enormous collage: There sat Marcel Duchamp, side by side with Mondrian and Andy Warhol, Brigitte Bardot and Marilyn Monroe, Mickey Mouse and Donald Duck, all the heroes and heroines separated by glossy paper, gold and strident daubs of Allak (poster paint). The wall changed constantly; whenever a new and attractive picture turned up in “Life“ or “Elle“ or “Nouvel Observateur“, or in any of the other periodicals that landed in a steady stream on the reading piles, Albert would find the glue pot and slap on the glue with a graceful gesture – and, hey presto! – the new picture was on the wall. I grew to love that flat. The first large red-blue rectangles were painted in situ above the service hatch to the kitchen and around them hung the first attempts in red and blue, executed on large pieces of brown hardboard in different types of paint. Points of stillness placed in the world: above the television, besides the old-fashioned telephone with its old-fashioned dial, high and low, and then they were even reversible.1 The five works from the series r/b on board (1970ies) stem from this period and are all painted on the back board of used drawing blocks. Some of them are reversible. Mertz would use whatever came at hand as the basis of his compositions: even his Gauloises cigarette wrappers were painted red and blue. When using more traditional image carriers, these would often become the very subject of Mertz’ structural investigations: Untitled (1974) features six small canvases in red and blue, partially or completely deconstructed: here a corner is missing, there the whole surface (canvas) has been cut out and the paint transferred directly to the strecher bars. The exhibition also includes one of the print sheets for Mertz’ La Maison Rouge + Bleu: a book printed at Atelier Clot in Paris in 1973. The house remained one of Mertz’ favourite motives and can also be found in several works from the 1980ies such as Untitled (four houses falling) or Untitled (windows) (both 1984). Albert Mertz (1920 – 1990) had his exhibition debut only thirteen years old in 1933 and started at the Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts in 1936. Several years later he became a teaching professor at the same institution from 1979 until his death in 1990. Mertz is recognized for his art critics, his experimental films and in his work as a painter. He was co-founder of the Linien II in 1947 and represented Denmark posthumously at the 21st Sao Paulo Biennale, Brazil in 1991. Albert Mertz is represented in all major Danish art museums, in Moderna Museet, Stockholm, Sweden, The National Gallery, Oslo Norway and in major collections such as Daimler Art Collection in Berlin. 1. Lone Mertz, ‘Albert’, in Albert Mertz, Nikolai Copnehagen Contemporary Art Center, 1999

Albert Mertz We are pleased to present a selection of works by Albert Mertz (1920 – 1990) on the occasion of his 100th birthday. Part of the exhibition features works created during the time Mertz resided in Savigny-sur-Orge, a Parisian suburb, from the early 1960ies until 1976. The walls of his flat were brown from the smoke of innumerable Gauloises, and when Lone Mertz first visited in 1975, she was overwhelmed by the largest wall of the living room, filled from floor to ceiling with an enormous collage: There sat Marcel Duchamp, side by side with Mondrian and Andy Warhol, Brigitte Bardot and Marilyn Monroe, Mickey Mouse and Donald Duck, all the heroes and heroines separated by glossy paper, gold and strident daubs of Allak (poster paint). The wall changed constantly; whenever a new and attractive picture turned up in “Life“ or “Elle“ or “Nouvel Observateur“, or in any of the other periodicals that landed in a steady stream on the reading piles, Albert would find the glue pot and slap on the glue with a graceful gesture – and, hey presto! – the new picture was on the wall. I grew to love that flat. The first large red-blue rectangles were painted in situ above the service hatch to the kitchen and around them hung the first attempts in red and blue, executed on large pieces of brown hardboard in different types of paint. Points of stillness placed in the world: above the television, besides the old-fashioned telephone with its old-fashioned dial, high and low, and then they were even reversible.1 The five works from the series r/b on board (1970ies) stem from this period and are all painted on the back board of used drawing blocks. Some of them are reversible. Mertz would use whatever came at hand as the basis of his compositions: even his Gauloises cigarette wrappers were painted red and blue. When using more traditional image carriers, these would often become the very subject of Mertz’ structural investigations: Untitled (1974) features six small canvases in red and blue, partially or completely deconstructed: here a corner is missing, there the whole surface (canvas) has been cut out and the paint transferred directly to the strecher bars. The exhibition also includes one of the print sheets for Mertz’ La Maison Rouge + Bleu: a book printed at Atelier Clot in Paris in 1973. The house remained one of Mertz’ favourite motives and can also be found in several works from the 1980ies such as Untitled (four houses falling) or Untitled (windows) (both 1984). Albert Mertz (1920 – 1990) had his exhibition debut only thirteen years old in 1933 and started at the Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts in 1936. Several years later he became a teaching professor at the same institution from 1979 until his death in 1990. Mertz is recognized for his art critics, his experimental films and in his work as a painter. He was co-founder of the Linien II in 1947 and represented Denmark posthumously at the 21st Sao Paulo Biennale, Brazil in 1991. Albert Mertz is represented in all major Danish art museums, in Moderna Museet, Stockholm, Sweden, The National Gallery, Oslo Norway and in major collections such as Daimler Art Collection in Berlin. 1. Lone Mertz, ‘Albert’, in Albert Mertz, Nikolai Copnehagen Contemporary Art Center, 1999
Renate Bertlmann
Renate Bertlmann
Vienna - Prinz Eugen-Straße 27
until 30-08-2020

Renate Bertlmann – Carlone Contemporary  For the exhibition starting in February 2020 at the Upper Belvedere, the Austrian artist developed a new version of her contribution to the Biennale. Red Murano glass roses, rigorously arranged in a grid pattern, will adorn the lavishly frescoed Carlone Hall of the palace. This juxtaposition of fragility and aggression mirrors the duality found in the Baroque frescoes. The ostensibly fragile blossoms are not without protection as they are armed with blades protruding from each one of their flower heads; in fact, they themselves pose a threat. The contradiction proclaimed in the work's title of Discordo Ergo Sum [I dissent, therefore I am], thus becomes physically materialized in the space. 

Renate Bertlmann – Carlone Contemporary  For the exhibition starting in February 2020 at the Upper Belvedere, the Austrian artist developed a new version of her contribution to the Biennale. Red Murano glass roses, rigorously arranged in a grid pattern, will adorn the lavishly frescoed Carlone Hall of the palace. This juxtaposition of fragility and aggression mirrors the duality found in the Baroque frescoes. The ostensibly fragile blossoms are not without protection as they are armed with blades protruding from each one of their flower heads; in fact, they themselves pose a threat. The contradiction proclaimed in the work's title of Discordo Ergo Sum [I dissent, therefore I am], thus becomes physically materialized in the space. 
Kinke Kooi & Tenant of Culture
Kinke Kooi & Tenant of Culture
Vienna - Elisabethstrasse 24
until 18-04-2020

Kinke Kooi & Tenant of Culture – Fittings  

Kinke Kooi & Tenant of Culture – Fittings  
The Cindy Sherman Effect
The Cindy Sherman Effect
Vienna - Freyung 8
until 21-06-2020

The Cindy Sherman Effect. Identity and Transformation in Contemporary Art The exhibition addresses one of the key issues in art: the preoccupation with themes of identity, its construction, forms of transformation and fiction are hot topics in the face of a world that is in constant flux through increasing globalisation. At the same time, new technologies such as the Internet, gene manipulation and cloning give cause for us to consider the concept of identity in terms of subject generation and definition. Cindy Sherman’s work is counted among the classics of performance photography and artistic role play; starting out from this base, the exhibition will cast light on these relevant questions pertaining to the theme of Identity. Sherman’s photographic works – developed out of 1970s performance art and her specific interest in ever-changing identities – has never ceased to be a formative stylistic influence down to the immediate present.

The Cindy Sherman Effect. Identity and Transformation in Contemporary Art The exhibition addresses one of the key issues in art: the preoccupation with themes of identity, its construction, forms of transformation and fiction are hot topics in the face of a world that is in constant flux through increasing globalisation. At the same time, new technologies such as the Internet, gene manipulation and cloning give cause for us to consider the concept of identity in terms of subject generation and definition. Cindy Sherman’s work is counted among the classics of performance photography and artistic role play; starting out from this base, the exhibition will cast light on these relevant questions pertaining to the theme of Identity. Sherman’s photographic works – developed out of 1970s performance art and her specific interest in ever-changing identities – has never ceased to be a formative stylistic influence down to the immediate present.
Objects Recognized in Flashes
Objects Recognized in Flashes
Vienna - Museumsplatz 1
until 13-04-2020

Objects Recognized in Flashes Michele Abeles, Annette Kelm, Josephine Pryde, Eileen Quinlan Curated by Matthias Michalka Objects Recognized in Flashes is the title of a group exhibition focusing on surfaces of photographs, products, and bodies. The exhibition was developed by the curator in consultation with the artists Michele Abeles, Annette Kelm, Josephine Pryde, and Eileen Quinlan. It asks how our largely mediatized society deals with and relates analogue and digital images. How are relations between material and immateriality, body, screen and photographic surface constituted? In our contemporary consumer culture, products and questions of commodity aesthetics are becoming more and more significant. This is not without consequences for our use of photographic images. Ubiquitous advertising, marketing, and product presentation create imaginary visual standards that have now become a firm fixture of our self representations in photos on social media platforms. The works by the four artists in the exhibition respond both in respect to each other, and to this changing context.  

Objects Recognized in Flashes Michele Abeles, Annette Kelm, Josephine Pryde, Eileen Quinlan Curated by Matthias Michalka Objects Recognized in Flashes is the title of a group exhibition focusing on surfaces of photographs, products, and bodies. The exhibition was developed by the curator in consultation with the artists Michele Abeles, Annette Kelm, Josephine Pryde, and Eileen Quinlan. It asks how our largely mediatized society deals with and relates analogue and digital images. How are relations between material and immateriality, body, screen and photographic surface constituted? In our contemporary consumer culture, products and questions of commodity aesthetics are becoming more and more significant. This is not without consequences for our use of photographic images. Ubiquitous advertising, marketing, and product presentation create imaginary visual standards that have now become a firm fixture of our self representations in photos on social media platforms. The works by the four artists in the exhibition respond both in respect to each other, and to this changing context.  
Ulla Wiggen
Ulla Wiggen
Cologne - Neven-Du Mont-Strasse 17
until 04-04-2020

Ulla Wiggen – Visualities The art gallery as a laboratory of visualities: the eye that looks, being looked at by the artwork. Ulla Wiggen started her career in the 60s, painting in a highly matter of fact technique the new world of electronic components inside digital equipments – at once objective and enigmatic (in a mode reminding of her later series of portraits). In 1966 she took part in the legendary Experiments in Art and Technology in New York as an assistant to Öyvind Fahlström, whose radical approach to art was a decisive inspiration in her artistic development. In Ulla Wiggen’s new works she has shifted focus from the inside of computers to the inside of the human brain. Her paintings in Visualities are a series of variations on the theme of the human iris, the kernel of vision, painting and epistemology. Her meticulous studies of the eye move between strict objectivity and mystery, in an imaginative spectrum from irises to vibrant flowers and cosmological drama. Peter Cornell

Ulla Wiggen – Visualities The art gallery as a laboratory of visualities: the eye that looks, being looked at by the artwork. Ulla Wiggen started her career in the 60s, painting in a highly matter of fact technique the new world of electronic components inside digital equipments – at once objective and enigmatic (in a mode reminding of her later series of portraits). In 1966 she took part in the legendary Experiments in Art and Technology in New York as an assistant to Öyvind Fahlström, whose radical approach to art was a decisive inspiration in her artistic development. In Ulla Wiggen’s new works she has shifted focus from the inside of computers to the inside of the human brain. Her paintings in Visualities are a series of variations on the theme of the human iris, the kernel of vision, painting and epistemology. Her meticulous studies of the eye move between strict objectivity and mystery, in an imaginative spectrum from irises to vibrant flowers and cosmological drama. Peter Cornell
Maria Brunner
Maria Brunner
Cologne - St. Apern Strasse 26
until 08-04-2020

Maria Brunner – KATHEDRaLe   In the exhibition KATHEDRaLe, Maria Brunner shows ten large-format photographs of views of the Cologne Cathedral printed on transparent PVC lamella curtains.  

Maria Brunner – KATHEDRaLe   In the exhibition KATHEDRaLe, Maria Brunner shows ten large-format photographs of views of the Cologne Cathedral printed on transparent PVC lamella curtains.  
Whitney Claflin
Whitney Claflin
Cologne - Jülicher Strasse 14
until 04-04-2020

Whitney Claflin – By all means, you can have two halloweens

Whitney Claflin – By all means, you can have two halloweens
Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
Cologne - Hahnenstrasse 6
until 03-05-2020

Tony Conrad  The experimental artist, whose career spans over six decades, counts as a central figure of the avant-garde and media art. As a violinist and pioneer of Minimal Music, his musical work—in composition, performance, and self-made musical instruments—is inevitably linked to his work as a visual artist. Conrad was a master of "crossover", of bridging and connecting different disciplines, so that it seems impossible to imagine the interdependence between fine art, film, music, and performance in contemporary art without him.

Tony Conrad  The experimental artist, whose career spans over six decades, counts as a central figure of the avant-garde and media art. As a violinist and pioneer of Minimal Music, his musical work—in composition, performance, and self-made musical instruments—is inevitably linked to his work as a visual artist. Conrad was a master of "crossover", of bridging and connecting different disciplines, so that it seems impossible to imagine the interdependence between fine art, film, music, and performance in contemporary art without him.
Blinky Palermo
Blinky Palermo
Cologne - Hein­rich-Böll-Platz
until 03-05-2020

Blinky Palermo – The Com­plete Edi­tions Peter Heis­terkamp, whose artist’s name was tak­en from the ma­fio­so Frank “Blinky” Paler­mo, is known for his large fab­ric and me­t­al pic­tures as well as his ob­jects and in­s­tal­la­tions.

Blinky Palermo – The Com­plete Edi­tions Peter Heis­terkamp, whose artist’s name was tak­en from the ma­fio­so Frank “Blinky” Paler­mo, is known for his large fab­ric and me­t­al pic­tures as well as his ob­jects and in­s­tal­la­tions.
Lothar Hempel
Lothar Hempel
Berlin - Fasanenstrasse 61
until 18-04-2020

Lothar Hempel – Freitag der 13.  

Lothar Hempel – Freitag der 13.  
William Tucker
William Tucker
Berlin - Charlottenstrasse 13
until 11-04-2020

William Tucker – Figure Advancing William Tucker (*1935 in Cairo, lives in Williamsburg, MA) belonged to the influential circle of young British sculptors such as Philip King and Tim Scott in the 1970s. They were introduced as the 'New Generation' in the exhibition of the same name at the Whitechapel Art Gallery London in 1965 and provided decisive impulses for the development of abstract sculpture and the expansion of the concept of sculpture. During this time he also became known as a theoretician, critic and exhibition organizer. Tucker published the standard work on the history of the modern sculpture The Language of Sculpture in 1972 and published numerous reviews and essays in Studio International, the English counterpart of ARTFORUM.  In his fourth solo exhibition at the Buchmann Gallery, William Tucker realizes for the first time two monumental wall works, called Mural Engravings by the artist. The wall works are contrasted by three large-format bronzes, such as the work Figure Advancing, which was created in 2018 and is exhibited here for the first time. The wall works, Cat's Cradle IV, 2019, and Porte VI, 2019, consist of 6 cm deep and 6 cm wide incisions in the wall, which, painted black, form a negative relief. The Mural Engravings refer to three series of abstract sculptures from the early 1970s, the groups Shuttler, 1970, Cat's Cradle, 1971, and Porte from 1973, which, composed of linear elements, derive their power from the play of spatial illusions and analytically describe space. The Mural Engravings translate essential aspects of these historical works into two-dimensionality, thus updating their relevance. The oscillation between two- and three-dimensionality in the Mural Engravings also breaks the viewer's expectations: from a distance, the works are perceived as wall drawings or wall paintings and seem to be flat. The real three-dimensionality and depth of the work only becomes apparent on closer inspection. The negative space of the works, the 6 cm deep "engraving" of the wall, creates remarkable plasticity and also supports the three-dimensionality of the drawing on the wall, which the viewer concedes an illusionistic space. As reduced drawings that create their plasticity and create a virtual negative space, the two Mural Engravings form the antithesis to the large fully-plastic bronzes in the exhibition Figure Advancing, 2018, Cave, 2005, and Secret, 2010. These bronzes, which have been continuously advanced since the mid-1980s, oscillate between figure and pure form, preserving within themselves the delicate moment of transition from the inert, amorphous mass from which they are created, and moving towards the readable figure. The title-giving sculpture Figure Advancing from 2018 is one of the artist's most recent large-format works and is, in turn, more autonomously designed than the previous works, moving towards greater abstraction. The development of William Tucker's bronzes since the 1980s was preceded by a fundamental break with William Tucker's constructivist and minimalist practice, which secured the artist a place among radical and avant-garde artists from the early 1960s onwards. The exhibition now confidently unites his two fields of work and shows that the constructivist minimalist and anthropomorphic-figurative phases in William Tucker's extensive oeuvre were never mutually exclusive, but rather mutually dependent. Looking back on a rich body of work, the exhibition uses the new wall works to bridge the gap between the analytical approach of the artist's first phase of work, based on line, space, and body, and the current work, which takes on a new form in Figure Advancing.  

William Tucker – Figure Advancing William Tucker (*1935 in Cairo, lives in Williamsburg, MA) belonged to the influential circle of young British sculptors such as Philip King and Tim Scott in the 1970s. They were introduced as the 'New Generation' in the exhibition of the same name at the Whitechapel Art Gallery London in 1965 and provided decisive impulses for the development of abstract sculpture and the expansion of the concept of sculpture. During this time he also became known as a theoretician, critic and exhibition organizer. Tucker published the standard work on the history of the modern sculpture The Language of Sculpture in 1972 and published numerous reviews and essays in Studio International, the English counterpart of ARTFORUM.  In his fourth solo exhibition at the Buchmann Gallery, William Tucker realizes for the first time two monumental wall works, called Mural Engravings by the artist. The wall works are contrasted by three large-format bronzes, such as the work Figure Advancing, which was created in 2018 and is exhibited here for the first time. The wall works, Cat's Cradle IV, 2019, and Porte VI, 2019, consist of 6 cm deep and 6 cm wide incisions in the wall, which, painted black, form a negative relief. The Mural Engravings refer to three series of abstract sculptures from the early 1970s, the groups Shuttler, 1970, Cat's Cradle, 1971, and Porte from 1973, which, composed of linear elements, derive their power from the play of spatial illusions and analytically describe space. The Mural Engravings translate essential aspects of these historical works into two-dimensionality, thus updating their relevance. The oscillation between two- and three-dimensionality in the Mural Engravings also breaks the viewer's expectations: from a distance, the works are perceived as wall drawings or wall paintings and seem to be flat. The real three-dimensionality and depth of the work only becomes apparent on closer inspection. The negative space of the works, the 6 cm deep "engraving" of the wall, creates remarkable plasticity and also supports the three-dimensionality of the drawing on the wall, which the viewer concedes an illusionistic space. As reduced drawings that create their plasticity and create a virtual negative space, the two Mural Engravings form the antithesis to the large fully-plastic bronzes in the exhibition Figure Advancing, 2018, Cave, 2005, and Secret, 2010. These bronzes, which have been continuously advanced since the mid-1980s, oscillate between figure and pure form, preserving within themselves the delicate moment of transition from the inert, amorphous mass from which they are created, and moving towards the readable figure. The title-giving sculpture Figure Advancing from 2018 is one of the artist's most recent large-format works and is, in turn, more autonomously designed than the previous works, moving towards greater abstraction. The development of William Tucker's bronzes since the 1980s was preceded by a fundamental break with William Tucker's constructivist and minimalist practice, which secured the artist a place among radical and avant-garde artists from the early 1960s onwards. The exhibition now confidently unites his two fields of work and shows that the constructivist minimalist and anthropomorphic-figurative phases in William Tucker's extensive oeuvre were never mutually exclusive, but rather mutually dependent. Looking back on a rich body of work, the exhibition uses the new wall works to bridge the gap between the analytical approach of the artist's first phase of work, based on line, space, and body, and the current work, which takes on a new form in Figure Advancing.  
Gregor Hildebrandt
Gregor Hildebrandt
Berlin - Knesebeckstrasse 95
until 22-04-2020

Gregor Hildebrandt – Fliegen weit vom Ufer fort Fliegen weit vom Ufer fort, the title of Gregor Hildebrandt’s eighth solo show at Wentrup, is a line from the rather moving sailor’s song Die großen weißen Vögel that Ingrid Carven sang in 1979. The celebrated German actress, chanson singer, diseuse, and diva sings in her distinctive voice with its deep melancholy about seagulls carrying the souls of sailors on their wings.  Like Gregor Hildebrandt (born in 1974), Ingrid Carven was born in Saarland, where both also grew up. Hildebrandt’s grandmother Oma Gisela’s house is in Sulzbach. There, next to the entrance, on an artistically designed window, three of the white birds from the song seem to take off on their flight into the distance. As a child, Hildebrandt admired how the seagulls fly out of the door on this light-flooded mosaic made of glass blocks.  The central work, Ein Lied von Wiederkehr, pays in this respect homage to the Hungarian-German artist and architect György Lehoczky (1901-1979), who, despite his spectacular local commissions, is today largely forgotten. In Saarland, Lehoczky left traces everywhere, because between 1949 and 1966 he designed and outfitted numerous buildings there, including train stations, churches, schools, and indeed residential buildings, like Oma Gisela’s. Not least with this blue custom-made, unique window, he made a name for himself as a glass designer. Hildebrandt revives this blue window by imitating the stones with cut-out vinyl records. For the current exhibition, Hildebrandt turned the motif in such a way that this time, the seagulls can fly out into the world through the gallery’s glass door.  The title, also taken from the above-mentioned song by Carven, underlines the autobiographical reference to Saarland: The song title of the Munich band Anne, whose producer is Hildebrandt and was established by the artist’s friends from his youth in Saarland and a student in his class (Hildebrandt is a professor at the Munich academy). Even though the voices of the different pieces of music are not audible, Gregor Hildebrandt succeeds with the help of their stories to directly condense different dimensions into a personal mesh.  Back to Carven’s Fliegen weit vom Ufer fort, which since 2007 has always been played after the encores at concerts of the band Tocotronic (Hildebrandt is a fan) and is thus linked to the installaton Ich habe Stimmen gehört. “It was a long way,” the song goes, “I was like driftwood of time.”  Wood was also the motif of a work in the past exhibition at Wentrup, In den Adern des Holzes sehe ich Gesichter, a framed panel where slices of wound magnetic tape are arranged in the form of a end-grain parquet floor. The massive varnished wooden beams placed next to each other seem to be covered by a strongly reflective, brownish-black grain, and appear like dark rosewood or palisander. A dream-like game where the dimensions of perception overlay one another. The appearance is deceptive—the tree trunk in fact consists of magnetic tape wound around a little wheel—and yet at the same time it isn’t. Both objects stand both for themselves and as a representation of a wooden plane; they are simultaneously raw materials, sculpture and image.  There are numerous references to the material wood in Hildebrandt’s work. It contains references to artists in the borderland between pop art and minimal art like Richard Artschwager, and at the time it also harks back to an early work from 2003. In one of his very first works, Hildebrandt declared disks of spruce wood to be records, and instead of grooves in vinyl, here the tree rings stand for the sound.  Outside in front of the gallery’s window front and under his black flag, woven from cassette tapes, we see (almost at eye level) another recurrent motif of the oeuvre: the pawn of a chess game. Personified into a person by its sheer size, the black bronze figure stands proudly guard. It is no accident that the shape of this sculpture reminds us of the contours of a well-known girl with a similarly wide skirt: the Infanta Margarete Theresa from Diego Velázques’ painting Las Meninas. Apart from the world of music and other transmitters of sounds—records, tapes, and videocassettes—the game of chess is another large treasure chamber from which Hildebrandt constantly draws ideas and forms. With this concept, Hildebrandt grasps anew the hidden beauty and romanticism of everyday objects that often seem almost obsolete. The exhibition fans out into the gallery’s backspace. There, Hildebrandt shows for the first time in a film loop his virtual collection of chessboards; he photographs their patterns tirelessly whenever he discovers one. And that is just the beginning. 

Gregor Hildebrandt – Fliegen weit vom Ufer fort Fliegen weit vom Ufer fort, the title of Gregor Hildebrandt’s eighth solo show at Wentrup, is a line from the rather moving sailor’s song Die großen weißen Vögel that Ingrid Carven sang in 1979. The celebrated German actress, chanson singer, diseuse, and diva sings in her distinctive voice with its deep melancholy about seagulls carrying the souls of sailors on their wings.  Like Gregor Hildebrandt (born in 1974), Ingrid Carven was born in Saarland, where both also grew up. Hildebrandt’s grandmother Oma Gisela’s house is in Sulzbach. There, next to the entrance, on an artistically designed window, three of the white birds from the song seem to take off on their flight into the distance. As a child, Hildebrandt admired how the seagulls fly out of the door on this light-flooded mosaic made of glass blocks.  The central work, Ein Lied von Wiederkehr, pays in this respect homage to the Hungarian-German artist and architect György Lehoczky (1901-1979), who, despite his spectacular local commissions, is today largely forgotten. In Saarland, Lehoczky left traces everywhere, because between 1949 and 1966 he designed and outfitted numerous buildings there, including train stations, churches, schools, and indeed residential buildings, like Oma Gisela’s. Not least with this blue custom-made, unique window, he made a name for himself as a glass designer. Hildebrandt revives this blue window by imitating the stones with cut-out vinyl records. For the current exhibition, Hildebrandt turned the motif in such a way that this time, the seagulls can fly out into the world through the gallery’s glass door.  The title, also taken from the above-mentioned song by Carven, underlines the autobiographical reference to Saarland: The song title of the Munich band Anne, whose producer is Hildebrandt and was established by the artist’s friends from his youth in Saarland and a student in his class (Hildebrandt is a professor at the Munich academy). Even though the voices of the different pieces of music are not audible, Gregor Hildebrandt succeeds with the help of their stories to directly condense different dimensions into a personal mesh.  Back to Carven’s Fliegen weit vom Ufer fort, which since 2007 has always been played after the encores at concerts of the band Tocotronic (Hildebrandt is a fan) and is thus linked to the installaton Ich habe Stimmen gehört. “It was a long way,” the song goes, “I was like driftwood of time.”  Wood was also the motif of a work in the past exhibition at Wentrup, In den Adern des Holzes sehe ich Gesichter, a framed panel where slices of wound magnetic tape are arranged in the form of a end-grain parquet floor. The massive varnished wooden beams placed next to each other seem to be covered by a strongly reflective, brownish-black grain, and appear like dark rosewood or palisander. A dream-like game where the dimensions of perception overlay one another. The appearance is deceptive—the tree trunk in fact consists of magnetic tape wound around a little wheel—and yet at the same time it isn’t. Both objects stand both for themselves and as a representation of a wooden plane; they are simultaneously raw materials, sculpture and image.  There are numerous references to the material wood in Hildebrandt’s work. It contains references to artists in the borderland between pop art and minimal art like Richard Artschwager, and at the time it also harks back to an early work from 2003. In one of his very first works, Hildebrandt declared disks of spruce wood to be records, and instead of grooves in vinyl, here the tree rings stand for the sound.  Outside in front of the gallery’s window front and under his black flag, woven from cassette tapes, we see (almost at eye level) another recurrent motif of the oeuvre: the pawn of a chess game. Personified into a person by its sheer size, the black bronze figure stands proudly guard. It is no accident that the shape of this sculpture reminds us of the contours of a well-known girl with a similarly wide skirt: the Infanta Margarete Theresa from Diego Velázques’ painting Las Meninas. Apart from the world of music and other transmitters of sounds—records, tapes, and videocassettes—the game of chess is another large treasure chamber from which Hildebrandt constantly draws ideas and forms. With this concept, Hildebrandt grasps anew the hidden beauty and romanticism of everyday objects that often seem almost obsolete. The exhibition fans out into the gallery’s backspace. There, Hildebrandt shows for the first time in a film loop his virtual collection of chessboards; he photographs their patterns tirelessly whenever he discovers one. And that is just the beginning. 
Andreas Eriksson
Andreas Eriksson
Berlin - Linienstrasse 155
until 04-04-2020

Andreas Eriksson – Nite Flights neugerriemschneider is pleased to present its second solo exhibition with Andreas Eriksson at the gallery. Dedicated to his new series of paintings entitled Nite Flights (2019), the eponymous exhibition also features a selection of screen prints, monotypes and bronze sculptures by the artist, each of which plays off and gradually reveals his painterly vocabulary. Nite Flights unfolds like a journey through the night, delicately fusing notions of isolation and geographies with the natural and built worlds, shaping a context that is at once familiar and enigmatic. Engaging with painting as a source of metaphorical reference that expands its formal aspects, Andreas Eriksson derives the patterns, hues, textures and motifs that he employs from his immediate natural environment, with day- night cycles and the seasonally shifting color schemes of the Swedish landscape recurring in his work. As their titles suggest, the Nite Flights paintings capture moments just before dawn as seen through an airplane’s window. They emerge as presentations of abstract, unidentified and often dreamlike locations in which the permanent is confronted by the ephemeral, the static by the dynamic, the heavy by the weightless and the deliberate by the unconscious. Eriksson characterizes night, with its ability to nearly suspend time and trap light, as simultaneously unsettling and captivating. Formally, the paintings are distinguished by fields of color arranged in geographical patterns as discerned through the night, featuring a nuanced constellation of deep blacks, dark browns and nocturnal blues set against dusky highlights. Thin coats of acrylic are covered in thick strokes of oil paint to create a sense of luminescence emanating from the surface’s darkness reminiscent of the light cast by harvest, strawberry, blue and snow moons. The paintings, viewed in the context of Eriksson’s oeuvre, act as contrasting counterparts to his linen wall weavings, which are rendered in light, variegated yellow, beige and brown earth tones, visually drawing upon the landscape of the artist’s native Sweden. Acting as points of reference for the wall weavings are the three black-on- white screen prints on view: Subrosa, Sketch for unfinished painting, and Arsenura (all 2017). With their pared down compositions, they mirror the reduced nature of the black-and-white tapestry-making templates used by Eriksson and his team of weavers, and function as negative impressions of Andreas Eriksson’s nocturnal topographies. Framing the landscapes that surround Lake Va?nern, Eriksson’s studio windows mark a threshold between inside and outside, creating a dialogue between them. The monotypes The Moon, Window First Snow, and Window 11 (all 2019) draw the viewer into a darkened winter landscape. Their compositions of night-like tones create depth through reflection, with the mark-making and layering characteristic of monotypes allowing for unpredictable, organic structures. The window reappears as the conceptual framework for Eriksson’s series Content is a Glimpse (2014 - ongoing) comprising bronze casts of birds that met their untimely end after colliding with Eriksson’s studio window. Reflections in windows create the illusion of landscape, ultimately misdirecting and deceiving. In a poetic attempt to suspend the birds’ decay, Eriksson immortalized them in bronze, furthering his fascination with capturing nature’s ephemera. Andreas Eriksson’s work is an exercise in remapping and reconsidering once familiar terrain. An exploration of an increasingly globalized, interconnected world, Nite Flights expands this line of inquiry to the celestial realm and creates a space for questions about our existence within time and space. Andreas Eriksson was born in 1975 in Bjo?rsa?ter, Sweden. Selected solo exhibitions include Cutouts, Mistakes and Threads, Braunsfelder, Cologne (2019), Work in Progress, Skissernas Museum, Lund (2017); Erosion, Kunstforum Baloise, Basel (2015); Roundabouts, Bonniers Konsthall, Stockholm (2014), Trondheim Kunstmuseum, Trondheim; Centre PasquArt, Biel; Reykjavik Art Museum, Reykjavik; The Nordic Pavilion, La Biennale di Venezia, Venice (2011); Walking the Dog, Lying on the Sofa, mumok Museum moderner Kunst Stiftung Ludwig, Vienna (2008). Group exhibitions include New Materialism, Bonniers Konsthall, Stockholm (2018); Monkey and Waterfall - Pictures of our Climate, Sara Hilde?n Art Museum, Tampere (2018); Making and Unmaking, Camden Arts Centre, London (2016); The Imminence of Poetics Sa?o Paulo Biennial, Sa?o Paulo (2012); Pink Caviar, Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, Humblebaek (2012) and Modernautsta?llningen 2010 at the Moderna Museet, Stockholm in 2010. Andreas Eriksson lives and works in Kinnekulle, Sweden. For further press information and imagery, please contact Alexia Timmermans at neugerriemschneider: +49 30 288 77277 or [email protected]

Andreas Eriksson – Nite Flights neugerriemschneider is pleased to present its second solo exhibition with Andreas Eriksson at the gallery. Dedicated to his new series of paintings entitled Nite Flights (2019), the eponymous exhibition also features a selection of screen prints, monotypes and bronze sculptures by the artist, each of which plays off and gradually reveals his painterly vocabulary. Nite Flights unfolds like a journey through the night, delicately fusing notions of isolation and geographies with the natural and built worlds, shaping a context that is at once familiar and enigmatic. Engaging with painting as a source of metaphorical reference that expands its formal aspects, Andreas Eriksson derives the patterns, hues, textures and motifs that he employs from his immediate natural environment, with day- night cycles and the seasonally shifting color schemes of the Swedish landscape recurring in his work. As their titles suggest, the Nite Flights paintings capture moments just before dawn as seen through an airplane’s window. They emerge as presentations of abstract, unidentified and often dreamlike locations in which the permanent is confronted by the ephemeral, the static by the dynamic, the heavy by the weightless and the deliberate by the unconscious. Eriksson characterizes night, with its ability to nearly suspend time and trap light, as simultaneously unsettling and captivating. Formally, the paintings are distinguished by fields of color arranged in geographical patterns as discerned through the night, featuring a nuanced constellation of deep blacks, dark browns and nocturnal blues set against dusky highlights. Thin coats of acrylic are covered in thick strokes of oil paint to create a sense of luminescence emanating from the surface’s darkness reminiscent of the light cast by harvest, strawberry, blue and snow moons. The paintings, viewed in the context of Eriksson’s oeuvre, act as contrasting counterparts to his linen wall weavings, which are rendered in light, variegated yellow, beige and brown earth tones, visually drawing upon the landscape of the artist’s native Sweden. Acting as points of reference for the wall weavings are the three black-on- white screen prints on view: Subrosa, Sketch for unfinished painting, and Arsenura (all 2017). With their pared down compositions, they mirror the reduced nature of the black-and-white tapestry-making templates used by Eriksson and his team of weavers, and function as negative impressions of Andreas Eriksson’s nocturnal topographies. Framing the landscapes that surround Lake Va?nern, Eriksson’s studio windows mark a threshold between inside and outside, creating a dialogue between them. The monotypes The Moon, Window First Snow, and Window 11 (all 2019) draw the viewer into a darkened winter landscape. Their compositions of night-like tones create depth through reflection, with the mark-making and layering characteristic of monotypes allowing for unpredictable, organic structures. The window reappears as the conceptual framework for Eriksson’s series Content is a Glimpse (2014 - ongoing) comprising bronze casts of birds that met their untimely end after colliding with Eriksson’s studio window. Reflections in windows create the illusion of landscape, ultimately misdirecting and deceiving. In a poetic attempt to suspend the birds’ decay, Eriksson immortalized them in bronze, furthering his fascination with capturing nature’s ephemera. Andreas Eriksson’s work is an exercise in remapping and reconsidering once familiar terrain. An exploration of an increasingly globalized, interconnected world, Nite Flights expands this line of inquiry to the celestial realm and creates a space for questions about our existence within time and space. Andreas Eriksson was born in 1975 in Bjo?rsa?ter, Sweden. Selected solo exhibitions include Cutouts, Mistakes and Threads, Braunsfelder, Cologne (2019), Work in Progress, Skissernas Museum, Lund (2017); Erosion, Kunstforum Baloise, Basel (2015); Roundabouts, Bonniers Konsthall, Stockholm (2014), Trondheim Kunstmuseum, Trondheim; Centre PasquArt, Biel; Reykjavik Art Museum, Reykjavik; The Nordic Pavilion, La Biennale di Venezia, Venice (2011); Walking the Dog, Lying on the Sofa, mumok Museum moderner Kunst Stiftung Ludwig, Vienna (2008). Group exhibitions include New Materialism, Bonniers Konsthall, Stockholm (2018); Monkey and Waterfall - Pictures of our Climate, Sara Hilde?n Art Museum, Tampere (2018); Making and Unmaking, Camden Arts Centre, London (2016); The Imminence of Poetics Sa?o Paulo Biennial, Sa?o Paulo (2012); Pink Caviar, Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, Humblebaek (2012) and Modernautsta?llningen 2010 at the Moderna Museet, Stockholm in 2010. Andreas Eriksson lives and works in Kinnekulle, Sweden. For further press information and imagery, please contact Alexia Timmermans at neugerriemschneider: +49 30 288 77277 or [email protected]
Ronny Bulik & Markus Dreßen
Ronny Bulik & Markus Dreßen
Berlin - Blumenthalstrasse 7
until 18-04-2020

Ronny Bulik & Markus Dreßen – Mirrrror  

Ronny Bulik & Markus Dreßen – Mirrrror  
A Year Without the Southern Sun
A Year Without the Southern Sun
Berlin - Potsdamer Strasse 81B
until 04-04-2020

A Year Without the Southern Sun Agnes Denes, Gordon Matta-Clark, Kevin Blinderman, Mathieu Kleyebe Abonnenc, Nadia Kaabi-Linke, Neda Saeedi, Rafael Domenech, Trevor Paglen, Yalda Afsah Curated by Justin Polera “A Year Without the Southern Sun” has gathered 9 artists to investigate the relationship between decolonization and climate change. At the core of the exhibition is the ambivalence that surrounds the Anthropocene – the confrontation of nature and human-made creations, which can be both violent and beautiful. The title is based on the climate catastrophe in 1816, when an eruption in the Dutch East Indies (now Indonesia) caused a volcanic winter across the globe. Volcanic dust and fallout caused atmospheric opacity that blocked out the sun. Although the crisis was an agricultural disaster in Western Europe, it still led to the creation of several masterpieces in art and literature including the sunsets in J. M. W. Turner paintings and writings of Mary Shelley, Percy Bysshe Shelley, Lord Byron. However, art history has largely neglected artworks made in the Global South during this year. “A Year Without the Southern Sun” brings together a multitude of post-war and contemporary art works that reflect the diversity of artists from around the world. The works are subtle and enigmatic propositions, never simply addressing the past or present but often shedding light on possible futures. Many of the artists, such as Nadia Kaabi-Linke, Mathieu Kleyebe Abonnenc, Neda Saeedi and Rafael Domenech, look at their family histories and relationship to colonization and neo-colonization. Others, such as Trevor Paglen and Kevin Blinderman, seek to use the very technologies of the state to unveil the current military-industrial complex and security systems that surround us. An emblematic work in relation to social crises is Gordon Matta-Clark’s film Day’s End (1974). It follows the artist as he cuts an elliptical hole in the river-facing wall of Manhattan’s derelict Pier 52. In part a performance, his actions are also a form of recycling and space intervention. Meanwhile, Agnes Denes presents photographic documents in her seminal 1982 work Wheatfield: A Confrontation. Denes planted and harvested a wheat field in a landfill in Lower Manhattan’s Battery Park by hand. The wheat field was consciously grown at the foot of the World Trade Center – an early eco-feminist commentary that poignantly connects immigration, world hunger and waste with economic mismanagement and international trade.  “A Year Without the Southern Sun” presents artistic reflections on the exploitation of natural resources and the impending global consequences it causes. Through both reconstruction and destruction, the works in this exhibition mold the material of social reality into new forms.

A Year Without the Southern Sun Agnes Denes, Gordon Matta-Clark, Kevin Blinderman, Mathieu Kleyebe Abonnenc, Nadia Kaabi-Linke, Neda Saeedi, Rafael Domenech, Trevor Paglen, Yalda Afsah Curated by Justin Polera “A Year Without the Southern Sun” has gathered 9 artists to investigate the relationship between decolonization and climate change. At the core of the exhibition is the ambivalence that surrounds the Anthropocene – the confrontation of nature and human-made creations, which can be both violent and beautiful. The title is based on the climate catastrophe in 1816, when an eruption in the Dutch East Indies (now Indonesia) caused a volcanic winter across the globe. Volcanic dust and fallout caused atmospheric opacity that blocked out the sun. Although the crisis was an agricultural disaster in Western Europe, it still led to the creation of several masterpieces in art and literature including the sunsets in J. M. W. Turner paintings and writings of Mary Shelley, Percy Bysshe Shelley, Lord Byron. However, art history has largely neglected artworks made in the Global South during this year. “A Year Without the Southern Sun” brings together a multitude of post-war and contemporary art works that reflect the diversity of artists from around the world. The works are subtle and enigmatic propositions, never simply addressing the past or present but often shedding light on possible futures. Many of the artists, such as Nadia Kaabi-Linke, Mathieu Kleyebe Abonnenc, Neda Saeedi and Rafael Domenech, look at their family histories and relationship to colonization and neo-colonization. Others, such as Trevor Paglen and Kevin Blinderman, seek to use the very technologies of the state to unveil the current military-industrial complex and security systems that surround us. An emblematic work in relation to social crises is Gordon Matta-Clark’s film Day’s End (1974). It follows the artist as he cuts an elliptical hole in the river-facing wall of Manhattan’s derelict Pier 52. In part a performance, his actions are also a form of recycling and space intervention. Meanwhile, Agnes Denes presents photographic documents in her seminal 1982 work Wheatfield: A Confrontation. Denes planted and harvested a wheat field in a landfill in Lower Manhattan’s Battery Park by hand. The wheat field was consciously grown at the foot of the World Trade Center – an early eco-feminist commentary that poignantly connects immigration, world hunger and waste with economic mismanagement and international trade.  “A Year Without the Southern Sun” presents artistic reflections on the exploitation of natural resources and the impending global consequences it causes. Through both reconstruction and destruction, the works in this exhibition mold the material of social reality into new forms.
Daniel Steegman Mangrané
Daniel Steegman Mangrané
Berlin - Potsdamer Strasse 81E
until 09-04-2020

Daniel Steegman Mangrané – Fog Dog Esther Schipper is pleased to announce Daniel Steegmann Mangrané’s second solo exhibition with the gallery. Entitled Fog Dog, the exhibition includes architectural light interventions, a sound installation and a new film.    A two-part light intervention greets the visitor upon entering the exhibition. Lit entirely by natural light, angled dividing walls transform the space into a series of connecting rooms. A large triangular opening in the ceiling and a head-high funnel-shaped construction narrowing toward an aperture fundamentally alter the experience of the space, controlling and shaping the entering light. The works evoke a long tradition of encounters with natural light, drawing attention to the subjectivity of perception and its metaphorical associations.   A second rectangular construction in the back of the gallery opens into an adjoining room, funnelling the light to create a diffuse brightness, apparition-like. While the rectangular openings recall the windows found in ecclesiastic architecture and its tradition of controlling light (e.g. as marker of the divine), yet also obliquely refer to the work of 20th century light & space artists constructing environments to shape light.   The visual experience—perhaps synaesthetically felt as tactility of light as well—is augmented by the artist’s introduction of a sound-based work: the floor of the exhibition space is covered with fine gravel, giving an unexpected feeling and sound to the visitor’s gait, as a series of human and animal steps can be heard moving closer and further away again in irregular intervals. For the visitor these disembodied sounds may take on a ghostly quality—suggesting the presence of others, no longer or not yet visible.     In the largest semi-enclosed room created by the divisions of the space, Steegmann Mangrané’s new film, Fog Dog, will be screened. Premiered in early February at the Dhaka Art Summit 2020, Fog Dog is the artist’s first foray into cinematic storytelling. It takes as point of departure the curious interaction of human and non-human inhabitants of the Institute of Fine Arts of Dhaka, documenting the daily life of the school and and the numerous stray dogs that live there and seem to lead a parallel existence.   Designed by architect and pioneer of Bangladeshi modernism Muzharul Islam (1923-2012) and characterized by an open structure—open colonnades, free-standing staircases, ceramic jalousies, and wooden screens allow for an interweaving of interior and exterior—the building is both stage and protagonist of the film. Boundaries between inside and outside, building and surrounding gardens, institutional and public spaces seem fluid. The ambient noises of the tropical landscape and the urban environment mingle, creating a richly evocative sonic landscape.    Drawing on the inextricable entanglement of traces of the past and prospects of the future in today’s realities, conversations about the lasting consequences of the colonial past and a TV report on the effects of climate change are woven into the daily lives we encounter, as the film settles in on the routine of the school’s nightwatchman. During the night the building is visited by a ghostly presence—a phantom that will not seem out of place and continues to haunt its guardian even after daybreak.    Both the film Fog Dog, with its ample portrait of a world beyond human modes of existence, and the exhibition as a whole with its heightened awareness of light, sound, and tactility, created through the architectural interventions and sound installation, seek to address how human perception makes sense of the world, questioning a traditional model of Western dichotomy between subject and object, and proposing a more nuanced, less hierarchical, and richer paradigm. The creation of the subject through experience and its relation to others is posited in a continuum, not one that is characterized by linear progression but by simultaneity. Subjectivity is understood not as an individuation process but as a “cosmic ecology of selves,” as the anthropologist Eduardo Kohn puts it.   The doubling of concrete and ephemeral phenomena is reinforced by the exhibition’s title, Fog Dog, which can refer to a faint beam of light sometimes seen in a breaking fog bank but also refers to the metaphorical trope of a fog’s fleeting, ambulant and thus “dog-like” quality.     Daniel Steegmann Mangrané was born in 1977 in Barcelona, Spain. He studied at the Escola de disseny I art, and the Gris ART School of Photography, both in Barcelona. The artist lives and works in Rio de Janeiro. Steegmann Mangrané was nominated for the prestigious PIPA Prize for Latin American artists in 2012, 2013 and 2014.

Daniel Steegman Mangrané – Fog Dog Esther Schipper is pleased to announce Daniel Steegmann Mangrané’s second solo exhibition with the gallery. Entitled Fog Dog, the exhibition includes architectural light interventions, a sound installation and a new film.    A two-part light intervention greets the visitor upon entering the exhibition. Lit entirely by natural light, angled dividing walls transform the space into a series of connecting rooms. A large triangular opening in the ceiling and a head-high funnel-shaped construction narrowing toward an aperture fundamentally alter the experience of the space, controlling and shaping the entering light. The works evoke a long tradition of encounters with natural light, drawing attention to the subjectivity of perception and its metaphorical associations.   A second rectangular construction in the back of the gallery opens into an adjoining room, funnelling the light to create a diffuse brightness, apparition-like. While the rectangular openings recall the windows found in ecclesiastic architecture and its tradition of controlling light (e.g. as marker of the divine), yet also obliquely refer to the work of 20th century light & space artists constructing environments to shape light.   The visual experience—perhaps synaesthetically felt as tactility of light as well—is augmented by the artist’s introduction of a sound-based work: the floor of the exhibition space is covered with fine gravel, giving an unexpected feeling and sound to the visitor’s gait, as a series of human and animal steps can be heard moving closer and further away again in irregular intervals. For the visitor these disembodied sounds may take on a ghostly quality—suggesting the presence of others, no longer or not yet visible.     In the largest semi-enclosed room created by the divisions of the space, Steegmann Mangrané’s new film, Fog Dog, will be screened. Premiered in early February at the Dhaka Art Summit 2020, Fog Dog is the artist’s first foray into cinematic storytelling. It takes as point of departure the curious interaction of human and non-human inhabitants of the Institute of Fine Arts of Dhaka, documenting the daily life of the school and and the numerous stray dogs that live there and seem to lead a parallel existence.   Designed by architect and pioneer of Bangladeshi modernism Muzharul Islam (1923-2012) and characterized by an open structure—open colonnades, free-standing staircases, ceramic jalousies, and wooden screens allow for an interweaving of interior and exterior—the building is both stage and protagonist of the film. Boundaries between inside and outside, building and surrounding gardens, institutional and public spaces seem fluid. The ambient noises of the tropical landscape and the urban environment mingle, creating a richly evocative sonic landscape.    Drawing on the inextricable entanglement of traces of the past and prospects of the future in today’s realities, conversations about the lasting consequences of the colonial past and a TV report on the effects of climate change are woven into the daily lives we encounter, as the film settles in on the routine of the school’s nightwatchman. During the night the building is visited by a ghostly presence—a phantom that will not seem out of place and continues to haunt its guardian even after daybreak.    Both the film Fog Dog, with its ample portrait of a world beyond human modes of existence, and the exhibition as a whole with its heightened awareness of light, sound, and tactility, created through the architectural interventions and sound installation, seek to address how human perception makes sense of the world, questioning a traditional model of Western dichotomy between subject and object, and proposing a more nuanced, less hierarchical, and richer paradigm. The creation of the subject through experience and its relation to others is posited in a continuum, not one that is characterized by linear progression but by simultaneity. Subjectivity is understood not as an individuation process but as a “cosmic ecology of selves,” as the anthropologist Eduardo Kohn puts it.   The doubling of concrete and ephemeral phenomena is reinforced by the exhibition’s title, Fog Dog, which can refer to a faint beam of light sometimes seen in a breaking fog bank but also refers to the metaphorical trope of a fog’s fleeting, ambulant and thus “dog-like” quality.     Daniel Steegmann Mangrané was born in 1977 in Barcelona, Spain. He studied at the Escola de disseny I art, and the Gris ART School of Photography, both in Barcelona. The artist lives and works in Rio de Janeiro. Steegmann Mangrané was nominated for the prestigious PIPA Prize for Latin American artists in 2012, 2013 and 2014.
To Whom It May Concern
To Whom It May Concern
Berlin - Invalidenstrasse 50/51
until 03-05-2020

To Whom It May Concern. Gifts of Paul Maenz Paul Maenz is giving three important works of contemporary art to the Nationalgalerie. In an exhibition at Hamburger Bahnhof titled To Whom It May Concern, following on the heels of his 80th birthday, these works are on view for the first time, together with the Berlin collector’s earlier gifts. Since 2006 Maenz has given numerous works of art to the Nationalgalerie and the Kupferstichkabinett (Prints and Drawings Collection), Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, as well as to the Stiftung des Vereins der Freunde der Nationalgalerie für zeitgenössische Kunst (Foundation for Contemporary Art, Friends of the Nationalgalerie). The exhibition brings together various approaches in conceptual art ranging from subjective and expressive painting to photographic installations by Walter Dahn and Ji?í Georg Dokoupil, Hans-Peter Feldmann, Joseph Kosuth and Sturtevant. Strategies of appropriation and questions about authorship and representation are features the works have in common. Joseph Kosuth’s One and Three Chairs (1965) is an iconic work of conceptual art. Sturtevant’s large-scale painting Warhol Flowers (1990) reflects the American artist’s reassessment of the Pop Art celebrity over a period of many years. The 22-part painting series Die Ricki-Bilder (1982–83) by Walter Dahn and Ji?í Georg Dokoupil is a sardonically humorous reaction to the Berlin painter Rainer Fetting. Two major works by Hans-Peter Feldmann are shown in the exhibition: the installation Rotes Abendkleid (2002) and the room-sized photo installation 100 Jahre (1998–2000). The latter work, in addition to Sturtevant’s painting and the Ricki-Bilder, is part of Maenz’s current gift. This gift to the Nationalgalerie also includes Paul Maenz and Gerd de Vries’ reference library, comprising some 2,500 publication titles on contemporary art reaching back to 1960. Maenz was a formative figure in the West German contemporary art scene. With Gerd de Vries, he ran an influential gallery in Cologne from 1970 to 1990 for art of the international avant-garde. Maenz moved to Berlin in 1993.

To Whom It May Concern. Gifts of Paul Maenz Paul Maenz is giving three important works of contemporary art to the Nationalgalerie. In an exhibition at Hamburger Bahnhof titled To Whom It May Concern, following on the heels of his 80th birthday, these works are on view for the first time, together with the Berlin collector’s earlier gifts. Since 2006 Maenz has given numerous works of art to the Nationalgalerie and the Kupferstichkabinett (Prints and Drawings Collection), Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, as well as to the Stiftung des Vereins der Freunde der Nationalgalerie für zeitgenössische Kunst (Foundation for Contemporary Art, Friends of the Nationalgalerie). The exhibition brings together various approaches in conceptual art ranging from subjective and expressive painting to photographic installations by Walter Dahn and Ji?í Georg Dokoupil, Hans-Peter Feldmann, Joseph Kosuth and Sturtevant. Strategies of appropriation and questions about authorship and representation are features the works have in common. Joseph Kosuth’s One and Three Chairs (1965) is an iconic work of conceptual art. Sturtevant’s large-scale painting Warhol Flowers (1990) reflects the American artist’s reassessment of the Pop Art celebrity over a period of many years. The 22-part painting series Die Ricki-Bilder (1982–83) by Walter Dahn and Ji?í Georg Dokoupil is a sardonically humorous reaction to the Berlin painter Rainer Fetting. Two major works by Hans-Peter Feldmann are shown in the exhibition: the installation Rotes Abendkleid (2002) and the room-sized photo installation 100 Jahre (1998–2000). The latter work, in addition to Sturtevant’s painting and the Ricki-Bilder, is part of Maenz’s current gift. This gift to the Nationalgalerie also includes Paul Maenz and Gerd de Vries’ reference library, comprising some 2,500 publication titles on contemporary art reaching back to 1960. Maenz was a formative figure in the West German contemporary art scene. With Gerd de Vries, he ran an influential gallery in Cologne from 1970 to 1990 for art of the international avant-garde. Maenz moved to Berlin in 1993.
Anna Witt
Anna Witt
Berlin - Pohlstrasse 64
until 15-04-2020

Anna Witt – Unboxing the Future  In her three-channel video Unboxing the future, Anna Witt prompts a framework of discussion around automation, artificial intelligence and possible post-work utopian ideals with a group of workers in the Japanese city of Toyota in Aichi Prefecture, both assembly-line workers and engineers and developers.  

Anna Witt – Unboxing the Future  In her three-channel video Unboxing the future, Anna Witt prompts a framework of discussion around automation, artificial intelligence and possible post-work utopian ideals with a group of workers in the Japanese city of Toyota in Aichi Prefecture, both assembly-line workers and engineers and developers.  
Katja Strunz
Katja Strunz
Berlin - Grolmannstrasse 32/33
until 18-04-2020

Katja Strunz – Space Lips

Katja Strunz – Space Lips
Rirkrit Tiravanija
Rirkrit Tiravanija
Basel - Drahtzugstrasse 67
until 31-05-2020

Rirkrit Tiravanija – The Odious Smell of Truth This is the second work of a ten-year programme of public installations produced by Beat Raeber, Galerie at Drahtzugstrasse 67 in Basel. Rirkrit Tiravanija's work is characterised by great versatility and a constant involvement of the viewer – exchange and freedom of interpretation are essential components of his practice. Since the late 1980s, he has been experimenting with open, sometimes surprising formats that question how the classical conceptions of art can be extended, how the boundaries of an exhibition space broadened, and its limiting barriers circumvented. Creating spaces for relationships, encounters and reactions forms the basis of his works. He works with different cultural contexts, linking them and using them as references. As a modern nomad – the Thai artist was born in Buenos Aires and lives between New York, Berlin and Chiang Mai – he uses the distinctive and connecting aspects of Western and Eastern ways of life and philosophies and integrates them into his work. Further influences come from literature, pop and news culture. Exploiting the mechanisms of propaganda or advertising, utilising their effect patterns, such as the oscillation between promises, deception, and applied truths, are key part of his work.  

Rirkrit Tiravanija – The Odious Smell of Truth This is the second work of a ten-year programme of public installations produced by Beat Raeber, Galerie at Drahtzugstrasse 67 in Basel. Rirkrit Tiravanija's work is characterised by great versatility and a constant involvement of the viewer – exchange and freedom of interpretation are essential components of his practice. Since the late 1980s, he has been experimenting with open, sometimes surprising formats that question how the classical conceptions of art can be extended, how the boundaries of an exhibition space broadened, and its limiting barriers circumvented. Creating spaces for relationships, encounters and reactions forms the basis of his works. He works with different cultural contexts, linking them and using them as references. As a modern nomad – the Thai artist was born in Buenos Aires and lives between New York, Berlin and Chiang Mai – he uses the distinctive and connecting aspects of Western and Eastern ways of life and philosophies and integrates them into his work. Further influences come from literature, pop and news culture. Exploiting the mechanisms of propaganda or advertising, utilising their effect patterns, such as the oscillation between promises, deception, and applied truths, are key part of his work.  
Siren Eun Young Jung
Siren Eun Young Jung
Düsseldorf - Grabbeplatz 4
until 05-04-2020

Siren Eun Young Jung – Deferral Theatre Kunstverein für die Rheinlande und Westfalen, Düsseldorf is pleased to present Deferral Theatre, the first comprehensive solo exhibition of siren eun young jung in Europe. Informed by historical acts of resistance, the research-driven practice of the Seoul-based artist engages across a wide rage of media to critically deconstruct oppressive conventions around gender, tradition, and history. The starting point of the Düsseldorf exhibition is the Yeoseong Gukgeuk Project, her long-term research project on the so called Yeoseong Gukgeuk theatre: an art form similar to the Korean traditional opera, in which all characters – male or female – are played solely by women. After it peaked during the 1950s and 1960s its popularity swiftly declined, not least because of deviant ‘modernization ideologies’ of the military government of president Park Chung-hee. With this reinvention of traditional Korean female theatre, the Yeoseong Gukgeuk performer brought gender shifts into the limelight and undermined prevalent norms and binaries.

Siren Eun Young Jung – Deferral Theatre Kunstverein für die Rheinlande und Westfalen, Düsseldorf is pleased to present Deferral Theatre, the first comprehensive solo exhibition of siren eun young jung in Europe. Informed by historical acts of resistance, the research-driven practice of the Seoul-based artist engages across a wide rage of media to critically deconstruct oppressive conventions around gender, tradition, and history. The starting point of the Düsseldorf exhibition is the Yeoseong Gukgeuk Project, her long-term research project on the so called Yeoseong Gukgeuk theatre: an art form similar to the Korean traditional opera, in which all characters – male or female – are played solely by women. After it peaked during the 1950s and 1960s its popularity swiftly declined, not least because of deviant ‘modernization ideologies’ of the military government of president Park Chung-hee. With this reinvention of traditional Korean female theatre, the Yeoseong Gukgeuk performer brought gender shifts into the limelight and undermined prevalent norms and binaries.
I'm not a nice girl!
I'm not a nice girl!
Düsseldorf - Ständehausstrasse 1
until 17-05-2020

I'm not a nice girl! Eleanor Antin, Lee Lozano, Adrian Piper, Mierle Laderman Ukeles The exhibition at K21 presents works by four first-generation American conceptual artists: Eleanor Antin (b. 1935), Lee Lozano (1930–1999), Adrian Piper (b. 1948), and Mierle Laderman Ukeles (b. 1939). To this day, their work deals with relevant sociopolitical and feminist themes, such as institutional critique, racism, identity and gender politics, as well as ecological issues.

I'm not a nice girl! Eleanor Antin, Lee Lozano, Adrian Piper, Mierle Laderman Ukeles The exhibition at K21 presents works by four first-generation American conceptual artists: Eleanor Antin (b. 1935), Lee Lozano (1930–1999), Adrian Piper (b. 1948), and Mierle Laderman Ukeles (b. 1939). To this day, their work deals with relevant sociopolitical and feminist themes, such as institutional critique, racism, identity and gender politics, as well as ecological issues.
Something Between Us
Something Between Us
Düsseldorf - Kaistrasse 10
until 31-05-2020

Something Between Us Kirstin Burckhardt, Miriam Cahn, Teboho Edkins, Vivian Greven, Luzia Hürzeler, Alice Musiol, Warren Neidich, Sibylle Springer, Thomas Taube, Andrea Winkler The international group exhibition Something Between Us addresses the topic of the human being as a social animal, as “zoon politikon”. It investigates the anthropological constants of interpersonal relationships, such as love, empathy, emotional security, caring and safety, on the one hand, and yet, on the other hand, there is hate, fixation on roles, dependency, reprimand and discrimination.

Something Between Us Kirstin Burckhardt, Miriam Cahn, Teboho Edkins, Vivian Greven, Luzia Hürzeler, Alice Musiol, Warren Neidich, Sibylle Springer, Thomas Taube, Andrea Winkler The international group exhibition Something Between Us addresses the topic of the human being as a social animal, as “zoon politikon”. It investigates the anthropological constants of interpersonal relationships, such as love, empathy, emotional security, caring and safety, on the one hand, and yet, on the other hand, there is hate, fixation on roles, dependency, reprimand and discrimination.
Deutschland
Deutschland
Düsseldorf - Ackerstrasse 99
until 30-04-2020

Deutschland Peggy Buth, Asta Gröting, Sven Johne, Annette Kelm, Barbara Klemm, Reinhard Mucha, Andreas Mühe, Henrike Naumann, Wilhelm Schürmann, Katharina Sieverding, Klaus Staeck The exhibition "Deutschland" shows cross-generational positions of German artists, some of whom directly or indirectly face the history and present of the Federal Republic, and whose works open up resistant and ambivalent spaces that make it clear that there can be no one-to-one definition of "German art" at all.

Deutschland Peggy Buth, Asta Gröting, Sven Johne, Annette Kelm, Barbara Klemm, Reinhard Mucha, Andreas Mühe, Henrike Naumann, Wilhelm Schürmann, Katharina Sieverding, Klaus Staeck The exhibition "Deutschland" shows cross-generational positions of German artists, some of whom directly or indirectly face the history and present of the Federal Republic, and whose works open up resistant and ambivalent spaces that make it clear that there can be no one-to-one definition of "German art" at all.
Elin Gonzalez + Sami Schlichting
Elin Gonzalez + Sami Schlichting
Düsseldorf - Birkenstrasse 92
until 25-04-2020

Elin Gonzalez + Sami Schlichting – Dungeons and Dasein Dungeons: A dungeon is a room or cell in which prisoners are held, especially underground. The word dungeon comes from French donjon (also spelled dongeon), which means "keep", the main tower of a castle. Though it is uncertain, both dungeon and donjon are thought to derive from the Middle Latin word dominio, meaning "lord" or „master“. Dasein: is a German word that means "being there" or "presence" (German: da "there"; sein "being"), and is often translated into English with the word "existence". It is a fundamental concept in the existential philosophy of Martin Heidegger, particularly in his magnum opus Being and Time. Heidegger uses the expression Dasein to refer to the experience of being that is peculiar to human beings. Thus it is a form of being that is aware of and must confront such issues as personhood, mortality and the dilemma or paradox of living in relationship with other humans while being ultimately alone with oneself.

Elin Gonzalez + Sami Schlichting – Dungeons and Dasein Dungeons: A dungeon is a room or cell in which prisoners are held, especially underground. The word dungeon comes from French donjon (also spelled dongeon), which means "keep", the main tower of a castle. Though it is uncertain, both dungeon and donjon are thought to derive from the Middle Latin word dominio, meaning "lord" or „master“. Dasein: is a German word that means "being there" or "presence" (German: da "there"; sein "being"), and is often translated into English with the word "existence". It is a fundamental concept in the existential philosophy of Martin Heidegger, particularly in his magnum opus Being and Time. Heidegger uses the expression Dasein to refer to the experience of being that is peculiar to human beings. Thus it is a form of being that is aware of and must confront such issues as personhood, mortality and the dilemma or paradox of living in relationship with other humans while being ultimately alone with oneself.
Christopher Wool
Christopher Wool
Los Angeles - 221 South Grand Avenue
until 31-12-2020

Christopher Wool In celebration of The Broad's fifth anniversary, the museum will dedicate its first and third floor galleries to a series of free exhibitions and in-depth, single-artist presentations in a unique, rolling sequence beginning February 8 until early 2021 that includes deep dives into the work of icons of American postwar art and 1960s pop, key artists of the 1980s New York and Los Angeles art scenes, and works by important figures of the 1990s to the present day. An in-depth installation featuring 16 works by Christopher Wool (13 of which are on view for the first time at The Broad).

Christopher Wool In celebration of The Broad's fifth anniversary, the museum will dedicate its first and third floor galleries to a series of free exhibitions and in-depth, single-artist presentations in a unique, rolling sequence beginning February 8 until early 2021 that includes deep dives into the work of icons of American postwar art and 1960s pop, key artists of the 1980s New York and Los Angeles art scenes, and works by important figures of the 1990s to the present day. An in-depth installation featuring 16 works by Christopher Wool (13 of which are on view for the first time at The Broad).
Katharina Fritsch
Katharina Fritsch
Los Angeles - 1062 North Orange Grove
until 02-05-2020

Katharina Fritsch Presenting three new sculptures, it is the artist’s first one-person exhibition in Los Angeles. At the center of the gallery, standing more than thirteen feet tall, is Hahn/Cock (all works 2019), a sculpture of a bright blue rooster atop a vivid green circular pedestal. Accompanying it, and painted the same bright blue, is Zwei Männer/Two Men. Fritsch has said, “Men have women as their models, so obviously I have men as my models. They are my muses.” Like the rooster, these two men are sculpted in exacting detail, from their shoes to the smartphones in their hands, yet they are anonymous enough to stand in for a gender and a type. Completing the installation is Stern/Star, an eight-foot painted-aluminum star mounted on the wall.

Katharina Fritsch Presenting three new sculptures, it is the artist’s first one-person exhibition in Los Angeles. At the center of the gallery, standing more than thirteen feet tall, is Hahn/Cock (all works 2019), a sculpture of a bright blue rooster atop a vivid green circular pedestal. Accompanying it, and painted the same bright blue, is Zwei Männer/Two Men. Fritsch has said, “Men have women as their models, so obviously I have men as my models. They are my muses.” Like the rooster, these two men are sculpted in exacting detail, from their shoes to the smartphones in their hands, yet they are anonymous enough to stand in for a gender and a type. Completing the installation is Stern/Star, an eight-foot painted-aluminum star mounted on the wall.
Parker Ito
Parker Ito
Los Angeles - 1206 Maple Avenue, Suite 1030
until 04-04-2020

Parker Ito – Longevity Buns  

Parker Ito – Longevity Buns  
Cyprien Gaillard
Cyprien Gaillard
Los Angeles - 5900 Wilshire Boulevard
until 19-04-2020

Cyprien Gaillard – Reefs to Rigs Reefs to Rigs is an exhibition of new sculptures and photographs by Cyprien Gaillard, as well as his most recent film, in a presentation that connects with the Los Angeles gallery’s particular site above a future LA Metro station and across from the La Brea Tar Pits. At this intersection of urban infrastructure and prehistoric matter, Gaillard’s works emphasize the cyclical, era-spanning interactions between nature and human industry, made visible and palpable through materials encountered across the world. On the ground floor of Sprüth Magers, Los Angeles, large wall-based sculptures circumscribe the gallery space, composed of impossibly thin limestone panels atop honeycomb aluminum structures. Swirling constellations of fossils are embedded within each panel, as is the cryptic logo of the New Jersey Transit commuter rail line (with its interlocking “N” and “J”) that connects the state’s cities and towns with the New York City metroplex. The works’ thick aluminum substrates, which protrude from the wall, lay bare the industrial, fabricated nature of each sculpture, as do inlaid screws, whose placement across one of the stone panels recreates—on a one-to-one scale—those found around the windows of a New York MTA subway car. This same arrangement is materialized in pink coral inlay in several other panels.

Cyprien Gaillard – Reefs to Rigs Reefs to Rigs is an exhibition of new sculptures and photographs by Cyprien Gaillard, as well as his most recent film, in a presentation that connects with the Los Angeles gallery’s particular site above a future LA Metro station and across from the La Brea Tar Pits. At this intersection of urban infrastructure and prehistoric matter, Gaillard’s works emphasize the cyclical, era-spanning interactions between nature and human industry, made visible and palpable through materials encountered across the world. On the ground floor of Sprüth Magers, Los Angeles, large wall-based sculptures circumscribe the gallery space, composed of impossibly thin limestone panels atop honeycomb aluminum structures. Swirling constellations of fossils are embedded within each panel, as is the cryptic logo of the New Jersey Transit commuter rail line (with its interlocking “N” and “J”) that connects the state’s cities and towns with the New York City metroplex. The works’ thick aluminum substrates, which protrude from the wall, lay bare the industrial, fabricated nature of each sculpture, as do inlaid screws, whose placement across one of the stone panels recreates—on a one-to-one scale—those found around the windows of a New York MTA subway car. This same arrangement is materialized in pink coral inlay in several other panels.
Catherine Opie
Catherine Opie
Los Angeles - 6750 Santa Monica Boulevard
until 04-04-2020

Catherine Opie – Rhetorical Landscapes Regen Projects is pleased to debut a new body of work by Los Angeles-based artist Catherine Opie. Titled Rhetorical Landscapes, the exhibition presents a series of animated political collages and landscape photographs. This marks the artist’s tenth solo exhibition at the gallery.   For over thirty years, Catherine Opie has captured often overlooked aspects of contemporary American life and culture. One of the most important photographers of her generation, her photographic subjects have included early seminal portraits of the LGBTQ+ community, the architecture of Los Angeles' freeway system, mansions in Beverly Hills, Midwestern icehouses, high school football players, California surfers, and abstract landscapes of National Parks, among others. 

Catherine Opie – Rhetorical Landscapes Regen Projects is pleased to debut a new body of work by Los Angeles-based artist Catherine Opie. Titled Rhetorical Landscapes, the exhibition presents a series of animated political collages and landscape photographs. This marks the artist’s tenth solo exhibition at the gallery.   For over thirty years, Catherine Opie has captured often overlooked aspects of contemporary American life and culture. One of the most important photographers of her generation, her photographic subjects have included early seminal portraits of the LGBTQ+ community, the architecture of Los Angeles' freeway system, mansions in Beverly Hills, Midwestern icehouses, high school football players, California surfers, and abstract landscapes of National Parks, among others. 
Forever Young
Forever Young
Munich - Türkenstrasse 19
until 26-04-2020

Forever Young: 10 Years Museum Brandhorst A lot has happened at the Museum Brandhorst since it opened in May 2009. Along with numerous exhibitions, the Brandhorst Collection has grown dramatically—from 700 to more than 1,200 artworks. It now ranks among the most important museum collections of contemporary art in Europe. The museum’s tenth birthday in May 2019 is the occasion for a large-scale exhibition drawn entirely from this expanded collection. Forever Young—10 Years Museum Brandhorst traces an arc ranging from the 1960s to the present day. Alongside renowned and popular highlights from the collection, a particular focus is placed on acquisitions from recent years—including major works by Charline von Heyl, Louise Lawler, Amy Sillman, Seth Price, Wolfgang Tillmans, Arthur Jafa, Alexandra Bircken, and Monika Baer, among others—many of which have never been shown in Munich. The exhibition includes some 250 works by 45 artists and has three main themes, each of which can stand alone and yet also make reference to one another. The first focuses on Andy Warhol and the ongoing legacy of Pop art, especially its often overlooked political and socio-critical dimensions. Unconventional lifestyles, the experience of marginalization due to skin color and sexual orientation, interventions in public space, and the intersection of art, fashion, and music all emerge as central concerns. The second strand concentrates on the controversial topic of subjectivity in contemporary society—and therefore also on the effects of late capitalism on identity formation. The third section presents a short history of painting since the 1960s, and specifically how this traditional artistic genre has expanded and adapted itself in recent decades through an engagement with emerging digital technologies and media dissemination, developments that have also been examined in a series of recent exhibitions at the museum, including Painting 2.0: Expression in the Information Age, Wade Guyton – The New York Studio, Kerstin Brätsch: Innovation and Jutta Koether – Tour de Madame.

Forever Young: 10 Years Museum Brandhorst A lot has happened at the Museum Brandhorst since it opened in May 2009. Along with numerous exhibitions, the Brandhorst Collection has grown dramatically—from 700 to more than 1,200 artworks. It now ranks among the most important museum collections of contemporary art in Europe. The museum’s tenth birthday in May 2019 is the occasion for a large-scale exhibition drawn entirely from this expanded collection. Forever Young—10 Years Museum Brandhorst traces an arc ranging from the 1960s to the present day. Alongside renowned and popular highlights from the collection, a particular focus is placed on acquisitions from recent years—including major works by Charline von Heyl, Louise Lawler, Amy Sillman, Seth Price, Wolfgang Tillmans, Arthur Jafa, Alexandra Bircken, and Monika Baer, among others—many of which have never been shown in Munich. The exhibition includes some 250 works by 45 artists and has three main themes, each of which can stand alone and yet also make reference to one another. The first focuses on Andy Warhol and the ongoing legacy of Pop art, especially its often overlooked political and socio-critical dimensions. Unconventional lifestyles, the experience of marginalization due to skin color and sexual orientation, interventions in public space, and the intersection of art, fashion, and music all emerge as central concerns. The second strand concentrates on the controversial topic of subjectivity in contemporary society—and therefore also on the effects of late capitalism on identity formation. The third section presents a short history of painting since the 1960s, and specifically how this traditional artistic genre has expanded and adapted itself in recent decades through an engagement with emerging digital technologies and media dissemination, developments that have also been examined in a series of recent exhibitions at the museum, including Painting 2.0: Expression in the Information Age, Wade Guyton – The New York Studio, Kerstin Brätsch: Innovation and Jutta Koether – Tour de Madame.