Art feed

Curated by Exhibitionary

Elizabeth Peyton
Elizabeth Peyton
London - 1 Davies St
until 15-06-2019

Elizabeth Peyton   

Elizabeth Peyton   
Bendt Eyckermans
Bendt Eyckermans
London - 88 Mile End Road, Unit 4
until 01-06-2019

Bendt Eyckermans – Yellow Leaves  

Bendt Eyckermans – Yellow Leaves  
Kathy Acker
Kathy Acker
London - The Mall
until 04-08-2019

Kathy Acker  Kathy Acker is the first UK exhibition dedicated to the American writer Kathy Acker and her written, spoken and performed work. This polyvocal and expansive project combines an exhibition with a programme of performances, screenings and talks. The exhibition is structured around fragments of Acker’s writing, which serve as catalysts for a network of interconnected materials presented around them, including works by other artists and writers, video and audio documentation of Acker’s performative appearances in various cultural and media contexts, and documents and books from her personal archive.  With works and contributions by: Reza Abdoh, Sophie Bassouls, Kathy Brew, Paul Buck, Ellen Cantor, Barbara Caspar, Julien Ceccaldi, Jamie Crewe, Jimmy DeSana, Coleen Fitzgibbon, Carl Gent, Leslie Asako Gladsjø, Bette Gordon, Penny Goring, Sidsel Meineche Hansen, N. Katherine Hayles, Johanna Hedva, Caspar Heinemann, Every Ocean Hughes, Bhanu Kapil, Ghislaine Leung, Sophie Lewis, Candice Lin, Stephen Littman, Rosanna McNamara, Reba Maybury, The Mekons, D. Mortimer, Precious Okoyomon, Genesis P-Orridge, Raúl Ruiz, Sarah Schulman, Nancy Spero, Alan Sondheim, Patrick Staff, Linda Stupart, Atalia ten Brink, Kate Valk, VNS Matrix, Isabel Waidner, Robin Winters, David Wojnarowicz, X&Y (Coleen Fitzgibbon and Robin Winters), and others to be announced.

Kathy Acker  Kathy Acker is the first UK exhibition dedicated to the American writer Kathy Acker and her written, spoken and performed work. This polyvocal and expansive project combines an exhibition with a programme of performances, screenings and talks. The exhibition is structured around fragments of Acker’s writing, which serve as catalysts for a network of interconnected materials presented around them, including works by other artists and writers, video and audio documentation of Acker’s performative appearances in various cultural and media contexts, and documents and books from her personal archive.  With works and contributions by: Reza Abdoh, Sophie Bassouls, Kathy Brew, Paul Buck, Ellen Cantor, Barbara Caspar, Julien Ceccaldi, Jamie Crewe, Jimmy DeSana, Coleen Fitzgibbon, Carl Gent, Leslie Asako Gladsjø, Bette Gordon, Penny Goring, Sidsel Meineche Hansen, N. Katherine Hayles, Johanna Hedva, Caspar Heinemann, Every Ocean Hughes, Bhanu Kapil, Ghislaine Leung, Sophie Lewis, Candice Lin, Stephen Littman, Rosanna McNamara, Reba Maybury, The Mekons, D. Mortimer, Precious Okoyomon, Genesis P-Orridge, Raúl Ruiz, Sarah Schulman, Nancy Spero, Alan Sondheim, Patrick Staff, Linda Stupart, Atalia ten Brink, Kate Valk, VNS Matrix, Isabel Waidner, Robin Winters, David Wojnarowicz, X&Y (Coleen Fitzgibbon and Robin Winters), and others to be announced.
Sarah Morris
Sarah Morris
London - 144-152 Bermondsey Street
until 30-06-2019

Sarah Morris White Cube Bermondsey presents Sarah Morris’s first solo show in the UK in six years. Featuring paintings, films, a site-specific wall painting as well as the artist’s first sculptural work, the exhibition reflects Morris's interest in networks, typologies, architecture and the city, articulated through colour and geometric abstraction.  

Sarah Morris White Cube Bermondsey presents Sarah Morris’s first solo show in the UK in six years. Featuring paintings, films, a site-specific wall painting as well as the artist’s first sculptural work, the exhibition reflects Morris's interest in networks, typologies, architecture and the city, articulated through colour and geometric abstraction.  
Mike Nelson
Mike Nelson
London - Millbank
until 06-10-2019

Tate Britain Commission: Mike Nelson – The Asset Strippers Mike Nelson has transformed the grand spaces of the Duveen Galleries into something between a sculpture court and an asset strippers’ warehouse. He has carefully selected objects from the post-war Britain that framed his childhood – including enormous knitting machines, woodwork stripped from a former army barracks, graffitied steel awnings and doors from an NHS hospital. Nelson’s project has been informed by the Duveen Galleries’ origins as the first purpose-built sculpture galleries in England, intended to rival the sculpture court at the British Museum and the V&A’s Cast Courts. It turns the neo-classical galleries into a warehouse of monuments to a lost era and the vision of society it represented.  

Tate Britain Commission: Mike Nelson – The Asset Strippers Mike Nelson has transformed the grand spaces of the Duveen Galleries into something between a sculpture court and an asset strippers’ warehouse. He has carefully selected objects from the post-war Britain that framed his childhood – including enormous knitting machines, woodwork stripped from a former army barracks, graffitied steel awnings and doors from an NHS hospital. Nelson’s project has been informed by the Duveen Galleries’ origins as the first purpose-built sculpture galleries in England, intended to rival the sculpture court at the British Museum and the V&A’s Cast Courts. It turns the neo-classical galleries into a warehouse of monuments to a lost era and the vision of society it represented.  
Robert Reed
Robert Reed
London - 54 Eastcastle Street
until 29-05-2019

Robert Reed – San Romano Series Pilar Corrias is pleased to present the first solo exhibition in London of American artist Robert Reed (1938 – 2014) focussing on the San Romano Series executed between 1979 and 1984. This body of work consists of ten large paintings that combine colourful abstract forms with a sense of geometric composition and perspective derived from the Italian Renaissance. These works were a direct response to Paolo Ucello’s The Battle of San Romano (c. 1438 – 40) which Reed saw at the National Gallery in London in 1979. Uccello’s mid-fifteenth century masterpiece resonated with the formal questions Reed was engaged with in his abstract compositions. “The activity, the clash, the pomp, and circumstance… the organized confusion was something that I identify with very much,” he said in 1986. “I began to develop a vocabulary which became the vocabulary through which I speak now, but it came directly from those paint-ings.” The exhibition will include five of these monumental paintings alongside charcoal drawings and collages which have never before been shown outside of the United States.

Robert Reed – San Romano Series Pilar Corrias is pleased to present the first solo exhibition in London of American artist Robert Reed (1938 – 2014) focussing on the San Romano Series executed between 1979 and 1984. This body of work consists of ten large paintings that combine colourful abstract forms with a sense of geometric composition and perspective derived from the Italian Renaissance. These works were a direct response to Paolo Ucello’s The Battle of San Romano (c. 1438 – 40) which Reed saw at the National Gallery in London in 1979. Uccello’s mid-fifteenth century masterpiece resonated with the formal questions Reed was engaged with in his abstract compositions. “The activity, the clash, the pomp, and circumstance… the organized confusion was something that I identify with very much,” he said in 1986. “I began to develop a vocabulary which became the vocabulary through which I speak now, but it came directly from those paint-ings.” The exhibition will include five of these monumental paintings alongside charcoal drawings and collages which have never before been shown outside of the United States.
World Receivers
World Receivers
London - 176 Prince of Wales Road
until 07-07-2019

World Receivers Kevin Beasley, Hayden Dunham, Lizzie Fitch, Lizzie Fitch/Ryan Trecartin, Aaron Fowler, Isa Genzken, Tau Lewis, Athena Papadopoulos, Signe Pierce, Puppies Puppies, Cindy Sherman, Anj Smith, Jasper Spicero, Ryan Trecartin, Anna Uddenberg, Chloe Wise, Issy Wood Curated by Tiffany Zabludowicz World Receivers focuses on the overlaps of identity, materiality and politics. The exhibition continues the Zabludowicz Collection’s commitment to promoting and contextualizing new perspectives in contemporary art and in particular, an engagement with issues of individuality.   

World Receivers Kevin Beasley, Hayden Dunham, Lizzie Fitch, Lizzie Fitch/Ryan Trecartin, Aaron Fowler, Isa Genzken, Tau Lewis, Athena Papadopoulos, Signe Pierce, Puppies Puppies, Cindy Sherman, Anj Smith, Jasper Spicero, Ryan Trecartin, Anna Uddenberg, Chloe Wise, Issy Wood Curated by Tiffany Zabludowicz World Receivers focuses on the overlaps of identity, materiality and politics. The exhibition continues the Zabludowicz Collection’s commitment to promoting and contextualizing new perspectives in contemporary art and in particular, an engagement with issues of individuality.   
Ettore Sottsass
Ettore Sottsass
Miami - 61 NE 41st Street
until 06-10-2019

Ettore Sottsass and the Social Factory Ettore Sottsass and the Social Factory surveys the work of Italian architect and designer Ettore Sottsass (b. 1917, Innsbruck, Austria; d. 2007, Milan), focusing on four decades of his monumental furniture and ceramics, conceptual photography, and speculative drawings. A seminal figure of the postwar period, Sottsass reimagined modern life through design, profoundly influencing his peers and generations of cultural producers. While Sottsass has been frequently touted for his contributions to design and architecture, Ettore Sottsass and the Social Factory investigates his polymathic work through its social and economic contexts, from Italy’s postwar prosperity to the utopianism and social upheaval of the 1960s and ’70s to the conservative turn of the 1980s and the renewed progressive currents of the turn of the millennium. Encompassing more than 50 works organized in four chronological sections, the exhibition presents significant objects that convey the designer’s evolving visions of society. Included in the exhibition are Sottsass’s “Superboxes,” functional cabinets that challenge the traditional scale and role of furniture in order to defy consumerist trends. Ceramic totems of the late 1960s combine sacred architectural forms and pop culture artifacts, while utopian drawings and photographs imagine a world free from tedious work. The exhibition also highlights outstanding examples of Sottsass’s objects for the famed Memphis group he founded in the 1980s, and the baroque and monumental furniture he produced until his passing.  

Ettore Sottsass and the Social Factory Ettore Sottsass and the Social Factory surveys the work of Italian architect and designer Ettore Sottsass (b. 1917, Innsbruck, Austria; d. 2007, Milan), focusing on four decades of his monumental furniture and ceramics, conceptual photography, and speculative drawings. A seminal figure of the postwar period, Sottsass reimagined modern life through design, profoundly influencing his peers and generations of cultural producers. While Sottsass has been frequently touted for his contributions to design and architecture, Ettore Sottsass and the Social Factory investigates his polymathic work through its social and economic contexts, from Italy’s postwar prosperity to the utopianism and social upheaval of the 1960s and ’70s to the conservative turn of the 1980s and the renewed progressive currents of the turn of the millennium. Encompassing more than 50 works organized in four chronological sections, the exhibition presents significant objects that convey the designer’s evolving visions of society. Included in the exhibition are Sottsass’s “Superboxes,” functional cabinets that challenge the traditional scale and role of furniture in order to defy consumerist trends. Ceramic totems of the late 1960s combine sacred architectural forms and pop culture artifacts, while utopian drawings and photographs imagine a world free from tedious work. The exhibition also highlights outstanding examples of Sottsass’s objects for the famed Memphis group he founded in the 1980s, and the baroque and monumental furniture he produced until his passing.  
Purvis Young & New Acquisitions
Purvis Young & New Acquisitions
Miami - 95 NW 29th Street
until 29-06-2019

Purvis Young Purvis Young is a large-scale exhibition, encompassing the foundation's entire first floor, featuring over 100 paintings from this artist who spent the entirety of his life (1943—2010) working in Miami. Numerous universal themes within his paintings will be highlighted and presented in depth. A comprehensive catalog with an interview by Hans Ulrich Obrist and writings by Rashid Johnson, Gean Moreno, Franklin Sirmans, César Trasobares, and Barbara N. Young, will accompany the exhibition. New Acquisitions New Acquisitions presents paintings and sculptures acquired within the last two years. Each of the 20 artists will be represented by multiple works in their own room. The exhibition will include new large-scale paintings created by Jonathan Lyndon Chase during his 2018 off-site residency. Other artists includes Janiva Ellis, Tomm El-Saieh, Martha Jungwirth, Rudolf Polanszky and Tschabalala Self.

Purvis Young Purvis Young is a large-scale exhibition, encompassing the foundation's entire first floor, featuring over 100 paintings from this artist who spent the entirety of his life (1943—2010) working in Miami. Numerous universal themes within his paintings will be highlighted and presented in depth. A comprehensive catalog with an interview by Hans Ulrich Obrist and writings by Rashid Johnson, Gean Moreno, Franklin Sirmans, César Trasobares, and Barbara N. Young, will accompany the exhibition. New Acquisitions New Acquisitions presents paintings and sculptures acquired within the last two years. Each of the 20 artists will be represented by multiple works in their own room. The exhibition will include new large-scale paintings created by Jonathan Lyndon Chase during his 2018 off-site residency. Other artists includes Janiva Ellis, Tomm El-Saieh, Martha Jungwirth, Rudolf Polanszky and Tschabalala Self.
Call–and-response
Call?and-response
Miami - 2100 Collins Avenue
until 27-07-2019

Call–and-response. Recent Acquisitions from the Collection Jennifer Allora & Guillermo Calzadilla, Sandford Biggers, Jeppe Hein, Mika Rottenberg, Lawrence Weiner Call–and-response exemplifies a vocal, often lyrical framework in which an initial statement is made, then responded to by another person or group. The format can be found across contexts, from athletic team chants and public demonstrations, to religious rituals and musical compositions. At its core, the term indicates a form of communication, an exchange of ideas between individuals, systems and institutions. This selection of newly acquired works interprets call–and-response visually to describe the creative process, in which artists produce work that creates dialogue with formal, social, political and environmental stimuli. The Bass, Miami Beach’s contemporary art museum, is committed to exhibiting and collecting work by international contemporary artists that define, explore and question our place and time. These artists’ projects take many forms, from major installations to public sculpture, that span generations and media. The following works on view reflect the artists’ diverse approaches to creative discourse, from manipulating language, appropriating pop culture and current events, to negotiating with form and public space.  

Call–and-response. Recent Acquisitions from the Collection Jennifer Allora & Guillermo Calzadilla, Sandford Biggers, Jeppe Hein, Mika Rottenberg, Lawrence Weiner Call–and-response exemplifies a vocal, often lyrical framework in which an initial statement is made, then responded to by another person or group. The format can be found across contexts, from athletic team chants and public demonstrations, to religious rituals and musical compositions. At its core, the term indicates a form of communication, an exchange of ideas between individuals, systems and institutions. This selection of newly acquired works interprets call–and-response visually to describe the creative process, in which artists produce work that creates dialogue with formal, social, political and environmental stimuli. The Bass, Miami Beach’s contemporary art museum, is committed to exhibiting and collecting work by international contemporary artists that define, explore and question our place and time. These artists’ projects take many forms, from major installations to public sculpture, that span generations and media. The following works on view reflect the artists’ diverse approaches to creative discourse, from manipulating language, appropriating pop culture and current events, to negotiating with form and public space.  
Beatriz González
Beatriz Gonzlez
Miami - 1103 Biscayne Blvd
until 01-09-2019

Beatriz González – A Retrospective Beatriz González: A Retrospective will be the first large-scale U.S. retrospective of the work of Bogotá-based artist Beatriz González (b. 1938, Bucaramanga, Colombia). At 81, González is not only an internationally celebrated Colombian artist but also one of the few extant representatives of the so-called “radical women” generation from Latin America. Despite the fact that it spans over six decades of intensive research, her groundbreaking production is, for the most part, unfamiliar to audiences in the United States. One of the most comprehensive displays of the artist’s work to date, this retrospective seeks to remedy this lag by presenting approximately 150 works, with examples from the early 1960s through the present, all of which embody the full scope of González’s oeuvre.

Beatriz González – A Retrospective Beatriz González: A Retrospective will be the first large-scale U.S. retrospective of the work of Bogotá-based artist Beatriz González (b. 1938, Bucaramanga, Colombia). At 81, González is not only an internationally celebrated Colombian artist but also one of the few extant representatives of the so-called “radical women” generation from Latin America. Despite the fact that it spans over six decades of intensive research, her groundbreaking production is, for the most part, unfamiliar to audiences in the United States. One of the most comprehensive displays of the artist’s work to date, this retrospective seeks to remedy this lag by presenting approximately 150 works, with examples from the early 1960s through the present, all of which embody the full scope of González’s oeuvre.
Angela Bulloch
Angela Bulloch
New York - 26 East 64th Street, Second Floor
until 15-06-2019

Angela Bulloch – “…then nothing turned itself inside-out and became something.” Simon Lee Gallery is pleased to present a solo exhibition by British Canadian artist Angela Bulloch at the New York space, for the very first time. The show is comprised of new Night Sky works, prints,sculptures and wall paintings. The Night Sky works are made from three dimensional maps of the universe, giving us views of well known constellations from ordinarily unreachable positions. The mathematical systems so often at the heart of the artist’s work, suggest that all is not as it seems. Alongside these works, the exhibition will include two sculptures, Heavy Metal Stack of Six:How Now?, a stack of six modular forms in polychrome steel that rise above the human form, pictured above, and Union Stack, a smaller indoor sculpture. theanyspacewhatever (2008) at the Solomon R. Guggenheim New York presented Firmamental Night Sky: Oculus.12 (2008), an architectural intervention which opened to a constant view of a spectacular Night Sky,suspended within the famous Frank Lloyd Wright rotunda. The arrangement of the points of light in each panel of a Night Sky, with pulsing stars and winking far away worlds, recreates a particular view of a planet or a constellation taken from a viewpoint deep into the universe, far from Earth. Night Skies re-imagine the familiar patterns of the stars which we see from earth, and in this reimagining, suggest our own ability to shift from the real to the virtual realm, to experience that which we can never really see. The totemic form of the outdoor sculpture, Heavy Metal Stack of Six: How Now?,which will be installed on the gallery terrace, suggests a similar oscillation between virtual and real space, from a digital origin, inside a 3D drawing application, to an analogue materiality. The colours of its facets create an illusionistic flatness which transports the viewer back into a virtual space.As in the Night Sky works, the generation of forms, from a digital geometric origin, creates a sense of displacement, a sense that the physical materiality of the work is a product of a geometric concept and could at any point evaporate back into the notional world of the artist’s imagination. 

Angela Bulloch – “…then nothing turned itself inside-out and became something.” Simon Lee Gallery is pleased to present a solo exhibition by British Canadian artist Angela Bulloch at the New York space, for the very first time. The show is comprised of new Night Sky works, prints,sculptures and wall paintings. The Night Sky works are made from three dimensional maps of the universe, giving us views of well known constellations from ordinarily unreachable positions. The mathematical systems so often at the heart of the artist’s work, suggest that all is not as it seems. Alongside these works, the exhibition will include two sculptures, Heavy Metal Stack of Six:How Now?, a stack of six modular forms in polychrome steel that rise above the human form, pictured above, and Union Stack, a smaller indoor sculpture. theanyspacewhatever (2008) at the Solomon R. Guggenheim New York presented Firmamental Night Sky: Oculus.12 (2008), an architectural intervention which opened to a constant view of a spectacular Night Sky,suspended within the famous Frank Lloyd Wright rotunda. The arrangement of the points of light in each panel of a Night Sky, with pulsing stars and winking far away worlds, recreates a particular view of a planet or a constellation taken from a viewpoint deep into the universe, far from Earth. Night Skies re-imagine the familiar patterns of the stars which we see from earth, and in this reimagining, suggest our own ability to shift from the real to the virtual realm, to experience that which we can never really see. The totemic form of the outdoor sculpture, Heavy Metal Stack of Six: How Now?,which will be installed on the gallery terrace, suggests a similar oscillation between virtual and real space, from a digital origin, inside a 3D drawing application, to an analogue materiality. The colours of its facets create an illusionistic flatness which transports the viewer back into a virtual space.As in the Night Sky works, the generation of forms, from a digital geometric origin, creates a sense of displacement, a sense that the physical materiality of the work is a product of a geometric concept and could at any point evaporate back into the notional world of the artist’s imagination. 
David Shrigley
David Shrigley
New York - 16 East 55th Street
until 15-06-2019

David Shrigley – Fluff War In his seventh solo exhibition at Anton Kern Gallery, entitled FLUFF WAR, British artist David Shrigley presents a large-scale kinetic sculpture, two neon sculptures, and 100 new drawings.  

David Shrigley – Fluff War In his seventh solo exhibition at Anton Kern Gallery, entitled FLUFF WAR, British artist David Shrigley presents a large-scale kinetic sculpture, two neon sculptures, and 100 new drawings.  
Jeff Wall
Jeff Wall
New York - 522 West 21st Street
until 22-06-2019

Jeff Wall

Jeff Wall
Alex Katz
Alex Katz
New York - 439 W 127 Street
until 03-08-2019

Alex Katz This exhibition tells the story of a year in Alex Katz’s painted-life. A life where landscapes are observed from the edge of his home in Maine. For more than half a century, Katz painted this land with a virtuosity yoked to a consistent elegance. Today, while the elegance remains, something else has beckoned. Katz finds himself in the middle of the tempest. The paintings are sublime scenes still, but scenes without respite. The sun breaks orange against spruce; day falls out of a thicket of trees; and a nocturnal sky emerges from nothing but irrepressible moves of black and gray, wet into wet, as painters say. A brash spirit emerges—his own hands can even be seen pressed into the black, putting the brush on notice, as if to impose himself directly on the image, charging it with cryptic emotions. This hand brings to mind the conclusion of W. B. Yeats’ “Among School Children”: "O body swayed to music, O brightening glance, / How can we know the dancer from the dance?” In these new works, Katz’s hand is bluntly material and inextricably sublime. He has fit his vision to the encroaching dark, engaging with mysteries he can almost summon in the paint. The life of a painting can be truly mysterious, especially to the painter. These paintings exist metaphorically where life edges into death, and perhaps have something uncanny to tell us. There are really two kinds of life in these paintings: the one the paintings embody, the one we believe we are observing, and then there is the other. It is this other which causes the trouble, this other we long to see.

Alex Katz This exhibition tells the story of a year in Alex Katz’s painted-life. A life where landscapes are observed from the edge of his home in Maine. For more than half a century, Katz painted this land with a virtuosity yoked to a consistent elegance. Today, while the elegance remains, something else has beckoned. Katz finds himself in the middle of the tempest. The paintings are sublime scenes still, but scenes without respite. The sun breaks orange against spruce; day falls out of a thicket of trees; and a nocturnal sky emerges from nothing but irrepressible moves of black and gray, wet into wet, as painters say. A brash spirit emerges—his own hands can even be seen pressed into the black, putting the brush on notice, as if to impose himself directly on the image, charging it with cryptic emotions. This hand brings to mind the conclusion of W. B. Yeats’ “Among School Children”: "O body swayed to music, O brightening glance, / How can we know the dancer from the dance?” In these new works, Katz’s hand is bluntly material and inextricably sublime. He has fit his vision to the encroaching dark, engaging with mysteries he can almost summon in the paint. The life of a painting can be truly mysterious, especially to the painter. These paintings exist metaphorically where life edges into death, and perhaps have something uncanny to tell us. There are really two kinds of life in these paintings: the one the paintings embody, the one we believe we are observing, and then there is the other. It is this other which causes the trouble, this other we long to see.
Virginia Overton
Virginia Overton
New York - 39 Walker Street
until 15-06-2019

Virginia Overton – Àgua Viva  

Virginia Overton – Àgua Viva  
Alex Israel
Alex Israel
New York - 508 West 26 Street ? Ground Floor & 8th Floor
until 15-06-2019

Alex Israel – As it Lays 2

Alex Israel – As it Lays 2
Mark Manders
Mark Manders
New York - 521 West 21st Street
until 24-05-2019

Mark Manders – Writing Yellow Throughout his influential practice, Manders has written a continuous sculptural autobiography through objects and architecture. Over the past three decades the artist has developed a cohesive body of work that exists in its own realm, independent of a clear narrative or chronology. Language plays a defining role in Manders’ practice; in a recent interview he explained, “I wanted to be a writer, but I became more fascinated with objects—how they relate to language and thinking. Instead of writing with words, I started to write with objects. I wanted to create a language out of them…” Writing Yellow sees Manders continue his original ambition to be a writer and aims towards a broader premise in which his works engage in a continuous dialogue with one another. In Writing Yellow, the artist’s latest literary and sculptural undertaking is filtered through the use of a single color: yellow.

Mark Manders – Writing Yellow Throughout his influential practice, Manders has written a continuous sculptural autobiography through objects and architecture. Over the past three decades the artist has developed a cohesive body of work that exists in its own realm, independent of a clear narrative or chronology. Language plays a defining role in Manders’ practice; in a recent interview he explained, “I wanted to be a writer, but I became more fascinated with objects—how they relate to language and thinking. Instead of writing with words, I started to write with objects. I wanted to create a language out of them…” Writing Yellow sees Manders continue his original ambition to be a writer and aims towards a broader premise in which his works engage in a continuous dialogue with one another. In Writing Yellow, the artist’s latest literary and sculptural undertaking is filtered through the use of a single color: yellow.
En Plein Air
En Plein Air
New York - Tenth Avenue Square
until 31-03-2020

En Plein Air? Ei Arakawa, Firelei Báez, Daniel Buren, Sam Falls, Lubaina Himid, Lara Schnitger, Ryan Sullivan, Vivian Suter En Plein Air is a group exhibition that broadens and challenges historical ideas of outdoor painting. Along the length of the park, the exhibition features newly commissioned artworks . En Plein Air, inspired by the unique site of the High Line, examines and expands the tradition of outdoor painting. The title refers to the mid-19th-century practice of en plein air painting (French for “in the open air”). When pre-mixed paints became readily available in tubes, and thus could be easily transported along with canvases and easels, artists brought their studios outside. The act of painting outdoors became associated with the Impressionist movement, which emphasized capturing nature and the fleeting qualities of light while depicting new perceptual and social experiences accelerated by the Industrial Revolution. The inclination to paint outside was one reaction to the overwhelming transformations of life in urban centers, as nature and cities redefined each other under the pressure of modernization—a history that connects to that of the High Line, a remnant of the industrial era of the neighborhood. The artists in the exhibition expand well beyond the historical plein air lineage. They not only bring painting outside but imagine nature as context, subject, and collaborator. The eight featured artists approach the history, methodologies, and content of outdoor painting from a variety of perspectives. Some of the artists make work exclusively to be shown outside, while others turn nature into both the subject and the medium used to create their paintings. Still others challenge elementary distinctions between nature and the artificial. The High Line is an apt site for the consideration of the importance of landscape painting in our time, as the natural features of the park juxtapose with the artificial scenery of the surrounding billboards, building facades and walls, and variety of advertisements. Through the participation of an international group of artists, En Plein Air challenges the kinds of work traditionally associated with public art—sculptures and murals—by presenting freestanding, outdoor paintings that can be viewed in the round and in dialogue with the surrounding landscapes.  

En Plein Air? Ei Arakawa, Firelei Báez, Daniel Buren, Sam Falls, Lubaina Himid, Lara Schnitger, Ryan Sullivan, Vivian Suter En Plein Air is a group exhibition that broadens and challenges historical ideas of outdoor painting. Along the length of the park, the exhibition features newly commissioned artworks . En Plein Air, inspired by the unique site of the High Line, examines and expands the tradition of outdoor painting. The title refers to the mid-19th-century practice of en plein air painting (French for “in the open air”). When pre-mixed paints became readily available in tubes, and thus could be easily transported along with canvases and easels, artists brought their studios outside. The act of painting outdoors became associated with the Impressionist movement, which emphasized capturing nature and the fleeting qualities of light while depicting new perceptual and social experiences accelerated by the Industrial Revolution. The inclination to paint outside was one reaction to the overwhelming transformations of life in urban centers, as nature and cities redefined each other under the pressure of modernization—a history that connects to that of the High Line, a remnant of the industrial era of the neighborhood. The artists in the exhibition expand well beyond the historical plein air lineage. They not only bring painting outside but imagine nature as context, subject, and collaborator. The eight featured artists approach the history, methodologies, and content of outdoor painting from a variety of perspectives. Some of the artists make work exclusively to be shown outside, while others turn nature into both the subject and the medium used to create their paintings. Still others challenge elementary distinctions between nature and the artificial. The High Line is an apt site for the consideration of the importance of landscape painting in our time, as the natural features of the park juxtapose with the artificial scenery of the surrounding billboards, building facades and walls, and variety of advertisements. Through the participation of an international group of artists, En Plein Air challenges the kinds of work traditionally associated with public art—sculptures and murals—by presenting freestanding, outdoor paintings that can be viewed in the round and in dialogue with the surrounding landscapes.  
Alicja Kwade
Alicja Kwade
New York - 1000 Fifth Avenue
until 27-10-2019

The Roof Garden Commission?: Alicja Kwade – ParaPivot Berlin-based artist Alicja Kwade's (born 1979, Poland) work is elegant, rigorous, and highly experiential. Using a wide range of media, Kwade creates sculptures and installations that reflect on time, perception, and scientific inquiry. With equal parts poetry and critical acumen, she calls into question the systems designed to banish doubt from the world and make sense of an otherwise unfathomable universe. Ultimately, Kwade seeks to heighten both the mystery and the absurdity of the human condition in order to enhance our powers of self-reflection. For The Met, Kwade has created two sculptures using steel and stone to evoke a miniature solar system, a piece of space that will settle temporarily on the Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Roof Garden. This will be Kwade's first solo exhibition at a museum in the United States.

The Roof Garden Commission?: Alicja Kwade – ParaPivot Berlin-based artist Alicja Kwade's (born 1979, Poland) work is elegant, rigorous, and highly experiential. Using a wide range of media, Kwade creates sculptures and installations that reflect on time, perception, and scientific inquiry. With equal parts poetry and critical acumen, she calls into question the systems designed to banish doubt from the world and make sense of an otherwise unfathomable universe. Ultimately, Kwade seeks to heighten both the mystery and the absurdity of the human condition in order to enhance our powers of self-reflection. For The Met, Kwade has created two sculptures using steel and stone to evoke a miniature solar system, a piece of space that will settle temporarily on the Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Roof Garden. This will be Kwade's first solo exhibition at a museum in the United States.
Firelei Báez
Firelei Bez
New York - 291 Grand Street
until 16-06-2019

Firelei Báez – Je bâtis a roches mon langage Dominican-born, New York-based artist Firelei Báez reconfigures visual references drawn from the past to explore new possibilities for the future. Incorporating subject matter from a breadth of diasporic narratives, the artist’s intricate works on paper and canvas, large-scale sculptures, and installations explore the ways in which personal and collective identities are shaped by inherited histories. Báez incorporates the visual languages of regionally-specific mythology and ritual alongside those of science fiction and fantasy, to envision identities as unfixed, and inherited stories as perpetually-evolving. By rendering spectacular bodies that exist on opposite sides of intersecting boundaries, Báez carries portraiture into an in-between space where subjectivity is rooted in historical narratives as much as it can likewise become untethered by them.

Firelei Báez – Je bâtis a roches mon langage Dominican-born, New York-based artist Firelei Báez reconfigures visual references drawn from the past to explore new possibilities for the future. Incorporating subject matter from a breadth of diasporic narratives, the artist’s intricate works on paper and canvas, large-scale sculptures, and installations explore the ways in which personal and collective identities are shaped by inherited histories. Báez incorporates the visual languages of regionally-specific mythology and ritual alongside those of science fiction and fantasy, to envision identities as unfixed, and inherited stories as perpetually-evolving. By rendering spectacular bodies that exist on opposite sides of intersecting boundaries, Báez carries portraiture into an in-between space where subjectivity is rooted in historical narratives as much as it can likewise become untethered by them.
Dan Graham
Dan Graham
Vienna - Eschenbachgasse 9
until 08-06-2019

Dan Graham  

Dan Graham  
Michael Riedel
Michael Riedel
Vienna - Schleifmhlgasse 1A
until 22-06-2019

Michael Riedel  

Michael Riedel  
Mark Rothko
Mark Rothko
Vienna - Maria-Theresien-Platz
until 30-06-2019

Mark Rothko Presenting a survey of his artistic career for the first time in Austria, the exhibition traces the radical development of Rothko’s work across more than four decades, from his early figurative paintings of the 1930s, through the transitional years of the 1940s to the groundbreaking mature works of the 1950s and 1960s. The artist’s children Kate and Christopher have been closely involved in the project from its very beginning, and have themselves kindly loaned a number of paintings from the family collection.  

Mark Rothko Presenting a survey of his artistic career for the first time in Austria, the exhibition traces the radical development of Rothko’s work across more than four decades, from his early figurative paintings of the 1930s, through the transitional years of the 1940s to the groundbreaking mature works of the 1950s and 1960s. The artist’s children Kate and Christopher have been closely involved in the project from its very beginning, and have themselves kindly loaned a number of paintings from the family collection.  
Agnieszka Polska
Agnieszka Polska
Vienna - Schleifmhlgasse 5
until 15-06-2019

Georg Kargl Box: Agnieszka Polska – Voices, Birds, Stone Tools.  

Georg Kargl Box: Agnieszka Polska – Voices, Birds, Stone Tools.  
Jay Chung & Q Takeki Maeda
Jay Chung & Q Takeki Maeda
Cologne - Hahnenstrasse 6
until 23-06-2019

Jay Chung & Q Takeki Maeda – The Auratic Narrative When organizing an exhibition surveying an artist’s body of work, the convention is to frame it as a story. Usually this story includes the artist’s birth (“Born in rural Romania”), a pivotal moment in their career (“She then moved to Paris, where she continued her philosophical pursuits at the Sorbonne”), and a period of time striving towards artistic, cultural or political achievements (“these identities have informed his work for more than 30 years”i). These accounts of individual development, despite being factually accurate, are constructed, which is to say generated and maintained, by arts professionals. In an interview about the societal effects of quantitative metrics, sociologist Steffen Mau alludes to this practice, stating that “fictional expectations” for an artist are established “by means of a story, in the style of an auratic success story that will be realized in the future.”

Jay Chung & Q Takeki Maeda – The Auratic Narrative When organizing an exhibition surveying an artist’s body of work, the convention is to frame it as a story. Usually this story includes the artist’s birth (“Born in rural Romania”), a pivotal moment in their career (“She then moved to Paris, where she continued her philosophical pursuits at the Sorbonne”), and a period of time striving towards artistic, cultural or political achievements (“these identities have informed his work for more than 30 years”i). These accounts of individual development, despite being factually accurate, are constructed, which is to say generated and maintained, by arts professionals. In an interview about the societal effects of quantitative metrics, sociologist Steffen Mau alludes to this practice, stating that “fictional expectations” for an artist are established “by means of a story, in the style of an auratic success story that will be realized in the future.”
Jac Leirner
Jac Leirner
Cologne - Heinrich-Bll-Platz
until 21-07-2019

Jac Leirner 2019 Wolfgang Hahn Prize In 2019, the Gesellschaft fu?r Moderne Kunst am Museum Ludwig will honor Jac Leirner with the Wolf- gang Hahn Prize. For the first time, the Gesellschaft fu?r Moderne Kunst is honoring a South American artist. Jac Leirner, born in Sa?o Paulo in 1961, has been pursuing a subtle analysis of social and representational systems for many years. She creates installations, collages, and sculptures according to principles of collecting, accumulation, and classification. Found and often industrially manufactured everyday ob- jects play an important role in her work. The results are dense, often minimalist works that play with the aesthetic, representational, and socio-cultural levels of meaning of the objects. Honoring a South American artist for her internationally relevant oeuvre will broaden the Western per- spective toward global developments in contemporary art. Leirner’s work, located at the intersection of minimalism, conceptualism, and institutional critique, is an important addition to the collection of the Museum Ludwig. Thanks to the dedication of its members, the Gesellschaft fu?r Moderne Kunst is pre- senting the Wolfgang Hahn Prize for the twenty-fifth year in a row.

Jac Leirner 2019 Wolfgang Hahn Prize In 2019, the Gesellschaft fu?r Moderne Kunst am Museum Ludwig will honor Jac Leirner with the Wolf- gang Hahn Prize. For the first time, the Gesellschaft fu?r Moderne Kunst is honoring a South American artist. Jac Leirner, born in Sa?o Paulo in 1961, has been pursuing a subtle analysis of social and representational systems for many years. She creates installations, collages, and sculptures according to principles of collecting, accumulation, and classification. Found and often industrially manufactured everyday ob- jects play an important role in her work. The results are dense, often minimalist works that play with the aesthetic, representational, and socio-cultural levels of meaning of the objects. Honoring a South American artist for her internationally relevant oeuvre will broaden the Western per- spective toward global developments in contemporary art. Leirner’s work, located at the intersection of minimalism, conceptualism, and institutional critique, is an important addition to the collection of the Museum Ludwig. Thanks to the dedication of its members, the Gesellschaft fu?r Moderne Kunst is pre- senting the Wolfgang Hahn Prize for the twenty-fifth year in a row.
Cédric Eisenring
Cdric Eisenring
Cologne - Arndtstrasse 4
until 08-06-2019

Cédric Eisenring – Signal to Noise Signal to Noise (2019) is a sequential series of photographs of public, photo-realistic bronze sculptures. Edited directly in the lab, the final prints are intertwined with quotes appropriated from graphic novels of the 1990s, amalgamating the documentary and the fictional and following the artist’s engagement with narrative both pictorial and text based. In his second solo exhibition with the gallery, Eisenring undertakes a reflection about the photographic medium as well as on communication and distribution strategies in both the digital and public realm.  

Cédric Eisenring – Signal to Noise Signal to Noise (2019) is a sequential series of photographs of public, photo-realistic bronze sculptures. Edited directly in the lab, the final prints are intertwined with quotes appropriated from graphic novels of the 1990s, amalgamating the documentary and the fictional and following the artist’s engagement with narrative both pictorial and text based. In his second solo exhibition with the gallery, Eisenring undertakes a reflection about the photographic medium as well as on communication and distribution strategies in both the digital and public realm.  
Russian Morning
Russian Morning
Cologne - Marsilstein 21?23
until 31-05-2019

Russian Morning Magnus Frederik Clausen, Thea Djordjadze, Lito Kattou, Petros Moris, Oliver Osborne, David Ostrowski, Michail Pirgelis, Max Ruf, Gerda Scheepers

Russian Morning Magnus Frederik Clausen, Thea Djordjadze, Lito Kattou, Petros Moris, Oliver Osborne, David Ostrowski, Michail Pirgelis, Max Ruf, Gerda Scheepers
Kaspar Müller
Kaspar Mller
Berlin - Genthiner Strasse 36
until 15-06-2019

Kaspar Müller – Why always me? The genres within photography have fragmented into tiny shards, of which we are acutely aware even if we don’t name them. We have developed a nuanced ability to read images, one that runs parallel to aesthetics. It considers what an image is trying to communicate, through what strategies, and assesses its overall success in situ. The photograph has made itself too available to us. We take them for granted and are entirely dependent on them. At the same time, we have let ourselves become so immersed in this sea of images that we begin to mistake them – their volume in particular – for a means of understanding.  In an earlier text on Müller’s work I wrote that he “undermines the conventions of the reception of art as it has come to be today: a hydra of communication, promotion, advertising and social posturing. He still exists within this system – it’s more or less inescapable – but many of his actions as an artist try to peel the curtains back a bit.” The photographs shown here, taken over the past decade, offer up an illustration of the system as it has become intertwined with an individual’s life. They open a window into Müller’s travels (many of which were sponsored by those supporting his work as an artist), his experimentations in the studio, his exhibitions and participation in art fairs, and his personal life – including portraits of his son and his family’s cat. From the description, one could just as easily be talking about his Instagram account. Their collective title – “Why Always Me?” – is like a twinned admission of the self-involvement of being an artist and an attempt at absolution.   

Kaspar Müller – Why always me? The genres within photography have fragmented into tiny shards, of which we are acutely aware even if we don’t name them. We have developed a nuanced ability to read images, one that runs parallel to aesthetics. It considers what an image is trying to communicate, through what strategies, and assesses its overall success in situ. The photograph has made itself too available to us. We take them for granted and are entirely dependent on them. At the same time, we have let ourselves become so immersed in this sea of images that we begin to mistake them – their volume in particular – for a means of understanding.  In an earlier text on Müller’s work I wrote that he “undermines the conventions of the reception of art as it has come to be today: a hydra of communication, promotion, advertising and social posturing. He still exists within this system – it’s more or less inescapable – but many of his actions as an artist try to peel the curtains back a bit.” The photographs shown here, taken over the past decade, offer up an illustration of the system as it has become intertwined with an individual’s life. They open a window into Müller’s travels (many of which were sponsored by those supporting his work as an artist), his experimentations in the studio, his exhibitions and participation in art fairs, and his personal life – including portraits of his son and his family’s cat. From the description, one could just as easily be talking about his Instagram account. Their collective title – “Why Always Me?” – is like a twinned admission of the self-involvement of being an artist and an attempt at absolution.   
Richard Long
Richard Long
Berlin - Neue Grnstrasse 12
until 27-07-2019

Richard Long  

Richard Long  
Ryan Gander
Ryan Gander
Berlin - Potsdamer Strasse 81E
until 08-06-2019

Ryan Gander – Some Other Life On the occasion of Gallery Weekend 2019, Esther Schipper is pleased to present Ryan Gander’s second solo exhibition with the gallery.    Some Other Life will feature new works—sculptures, installations, and a video—all articulated around the notion of illumination and enlightenment, both physical and metaphorical, notably through the use of neutral or middle grey, a tone that is perceptually about halfway between black and white on a lightness scale. Many of the exhibited works incorporate the use of rechargeable batteries for the storage of electricity that allow the works to function. In the artist’s own words: “Not only are many of the works conceptual timepieces unto themselves, but like our individual life cycles, they are quite simply running out. This relates to the mortality of the human condition and our anxiety around the influence we play in the world during our time here.”   Upon entering the exhibition space, visitors encounter two rolls of pure white carpet, partially unrolled and positioned side by side on the floor, show wheel tracks and footprints left by two vehicles and their drivers in what could be a snow-covered landscape. The work, titled Diagram for Common Ground, 2019, suggests a vague narrative where two characters have met and then departed from one another. The marks appear partially obscured by a subsequent flurry of snow, adding on to the poetic yet mysterious scene that may have happened there. Twenty-four grey numbered cubes are scattered across the white carpets; each cube emits a low volume ticking sound, at a tempo unique to the others.   Positioned nearby, Evidence of absence, 2019, is comprised of two grey Peli cases containing glowing acrylic cubes numbered 1–24. Nine of them are dispatched across the exhibition marking the position of each artwork, while the remaining cubes are displayed within the open cases.   Featuring a full-sizesculptural rendition of Vincent van Gogh’s painting Gauguin’s Chair, 1888 (Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam), Monkey See, Monkey Do, 2019, continues Gander’s investigation of the notion of artist. The dark-toned canvas by Van Gogh depicts, through the means of a burning candle and a couple of books left on the armchair’s seat, a portrait in absentiaof the French painter, and Van Gogh’s close friend, Paul Gauguin. Not only did Gander reproduce the chair and objects with faithful details—an artificial candle is burning and then mysteriously blown out before re-igniting again in an endless loop—but he also rendered the painting’s distorted perspective of the chair’s structure, mimicking Van Gogh’s style in a three-dimensional space.   The candle is also the central motif of Gander’s Embrace Your Mistakes... Your Mistakes Are the Markers of Your Time, 2019. In this series of 365 ink drawings, one for each day of the year, the artist tries in vain to draw a candle that goes out. Each sketch is then crumpled and discarded into a waste paper bin, only to be recovered and smoothed out—while preserving each fold and crease—and framed in a neutral grey frame that echoes the color of Gauguin’s chair.   Furthermore, Gander presents a new iteration of his recent animatronic mice. In I... I... I…, a white mouse looks through a hole broken in the gallery wall, close to the floor. The robotic animal attempts to deliver a speech using the voice of the artist’s 9-year-old daughter who struggles and stutters with her words, not quite knowing how to begin or what exactly to say.   In So I see (So I see, the light is changing constantly, as is your perspective), 2019, a short flight of three steps set alongside a low wall, made from internally illuminated acrylic emitting a bright glow of white light, echoes the number markers dispatched in the exhibition.   A new film entitled Foreseeable future, or When the shadows go the wrong way, 2019, virtually renders a high-speed time lapse of the artist’s studio complex being covered by overgrowth, as time continually simulates its passing at an alarming rate. The inexorable degradation of the building is only visible through the image of its shadow being outlined as foliage covers it.   The material, formal and stylistic variety of Ryan Gander’s practice is unified both by his conceptual vision and by recurring themes concerning creativity, the nature of art and the life of the artist. In And for my next show, 2019, grey miniature maquettes of sculptural artworks—all from existing series by the artist—are displayed in a vitrine recessed into the wall, only 80 centimeters from the floor as if exhibited for a children audience.   Gander’s oeuvre evokes fictional spaces, referring to absent objects, artworks or persons, both real and imaginary. The artist often focuses his attention on the playfulness and imagination of children, who are less burdened by facts and appearances than adults.   Ryan Gander was born in 1976 in Chester, England. The artist lives and works between Suffolk and London. 

Ryan Gander – Some Other Life On the occasion of Gallery Weekend 2019, Esther Schipper is pleased to present Ryan Gander’s second solo exhibition with the gallery.    Some Other Life will feature new works—sculptures, installations, and a video—all articulated around the notion of illumination and enlightenment, both physical and metaphorical, notably through the use of neutral or middle grey, a tone that is perceptually about halfway between black and white on a lightness scale. Many of the exhibited works incorporate the use of rechargeable batteries for the storage of electricity that allow the works to function. In the artist’s own words: “Not only are many of the works conceptual timepieces unto themselves, but like our individual life cycles, they are quite simply running out. This relates to the mortality of the human condition and our anxiety around the influence we play in the world during our time here.”   Upon entering the exhibition space, visitors encounter two rolls of pure white carpet, partially unrolled and positioned side by side on the floor, show wheel tracks and footprints left by two vehicles and their drivers in what could be a snow-covered landscape. The work, titled Diagram for Common Ground, 2019, suggests a vague narrative where two characters have met and then departed from one another. The marks appear partially obscured by a subsequent flurry of snow, adding on to the poetic yet mysterious scene that may have happened there. Twenty-four grey numbered cubes are scattered across the white carpets; each cube emits a low volume ticking sound, at a tempo unique to the others.   Positioned nearby, Evidence of absence, 2019, is comprised of two grey Peli cases containing glowing acrylic cubes numbered 1–24. Nine of them are dispatched across the exhibition marking the position of each artwork, while the remaining cubes are displayed within the open cases.   Featuring a full-sizesculptural rendition of Vincent van Gogh’s painting Gauguin’s Chair, 1888 (Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam), Monkey See, Monkey Do, 2019, continues Gander’s investigation of the notion of artist. The dark-toned canvas by Van Gogh depicts, through the means of a burning candle and a couple of books left on the armchair’s seat, a portrait in absentiaof the French painter, and Van Gogh’s close friend, Paul Gauguin. Not only did Gander reproduce the chair and objects with faithful details—an artificial candle is burning and then mysteriously blown out before re-igniting again in an endless loop—but he also rendered the painting’s distorted perspective of the chair’s structure, mimicking Van Gogh’s style in a three-dimensional space.   The candle is also the central motif of Gander’s Embrace Your Mistakes... Your Mistakes Are the Markers of Your Time, 2019. In this series of 365 ink drawings, one for each day of the year, the artist tries in vain to draw a candle that goes out. Each sketch is then crumpled and discarded into a waste paper bin, only to be recovered and smoothed out—while preserving each fold and crease—and framed in a neutral grey frame that echoes the color of Gauguin’s chair.   Furthermore, Gander presents a new iteration of his recent animatronic mice. In I... I... I…, a white mouse looks through a hole broken in the gallery wall, close to the floor. The robotic animal attempts to deliver a speech using the voice of the artist’s 9-year-old daughter who struggles and stutters with her words, not quite knowing how to begin or what exactly to say.   In So I see (So I see, the light is changing constantly, as is your perspective), 2019, a short flight of three steps set alongside a low wall, made from internally illuminated acrylic emitting a bright glow of white light, echoes the number markers dispatched in the exhibition.   A new film entitled Foreseeable future, or When the shadows go the wrong way, 2019, virtually renders a high-speed time lapse of the artist’s studio complex being covered by overgrowth, as time continually simulates its passing at an alarming rate. The inexorable degradation of the building is only visible through the image of its shadow being outlined as foliage covers it.   The material, formal and stylistic variety of Ryan Gander’s practice is unified both by his conceptual vision and by recurring themes concerning creativity, the nature of art and the life of the artist. In And for my next show, 2019, grey miniature maquettes of sculptural artworks—all from existing series by the artist—are displayed in a vitrine recessed into the wall, only 80 centimeters from the floor as if exhibited for a children audience.   Gander’s oeuvre evokes fictional spaces, referring to absent objects, artworks or persons, both real and imaginary. The artist often focuses his attention on the playfulness and imagination of children, who are less burdened by facts and appearances than adults.   Ryan Gander was born in 1976 in Chester, England. The artist lives and works between Suffolk and London. 
Sol Calero
Sol Calero
Berlin - Ritterstrae 2a
until 15-06-2019

Sol Calero – Archivos Olvidados For her first exhibition at ChertLüdde, Sol Calero presents a project in tribute to her late grandmother Luisa Hernandez. A pillar of the family, Hernandez (known familially as “Abuli”) lived between her home in Caracas and her farm in Los Llanos, the flatlands of Venezuela, where she became an important member of the community, opening up her house for the local children to learn in classes, decorate the house and participate in social meetings. After raising her six children alone as a widow, she enrolled at the Escuela de Artes Cristóbal Rojas in Caracas and began to study fine art. Calero spent a large part of her childhood taking part in the organic learning process of her grandmother where art and craftsmanship became indivisible from a familial and social structure that allowed for and celebrated the collective aspect of art-making and understanding. The central subject matter of the exhibition is the most recent archive of her grandmother, who collected images from magazines as references for her paintings. These last clippings represent a body of work left unfinished upon Hernandez’s death, picked up and elaborated upon by Calero. The gallery space presents itself as a trajectory of Calero’s process of approaching the archive, beginning with an intimate room of child-size proportions, where the original images that Abuli used as references for her paintings are displayed. In the same room, Calero has undertaken a drawing exercise taught to her by her grandmother: draw a line, then another one to close it into a shape, and fill the space with color. Covering the entire space with the gestural freedom that children naturally possess, Calero repeats the ritual of her childhood spent drawing with her grandmother. On the paintings in this room, Calero leaves chalk marks on the blackboard canvases as visible remnants of her attempts to draw horses for the first time. 

Sol Calero – Archivos Olvidados For her first exhibition at ChertLüdde, Sol Calero presents a project in tribute to her late grandmother Luisa Hernandez. A pillar of the family, Hernandez (known familially as “Abuli”) lived between her home in Caracas and her farm in Los Llanos, the flatlands of Venezuela, where she became an important member of the community, opening up her house for the local children to learn in classes, decorate the house and participate in social meetings. After raising her six children alone as a widow, she enrolled at the Escuela de Artes Cristóbal Rojas in Caracas and began to study fine art. Calero spent a large part of her childhood taking part in the organic learning process of her grandmother where art and craftsmanship became indivisible from a familial and social structure that allowed for and celebrated the collective aspect of art-making and understanding. The central subject matter of the exhibition is the most recent archive of her grandmother, who collected images from magazines as references for her paintings. These last clippings represent a body of work left unfinished upon Hernandez’s death, picked up and elaborated upon by Calero. The gallery space presents itself as a trajectory of Calero’s process of approaching the archive, beginning with an intimate room of child-size proportions, where the original images that Abuli used as references for her paintings are displayed. In the same room, Calero has undertaken a drawing exercise taught to her by her grandmother: draw a line, then another one to close it into a shape, and fill the space with color. Covering the entire space with the gestural freedom that children naturally possess, Calero repeats the ritual of her childhood spent drawing with her grandmother. On the paintings in this room, Calero leaves chalk marks on the blackboard canvases as visible remnants of her attempts to draw horses for the first time. 
Guido van der Werve
Guido van der Werve
Berlin - Clayallee 174
until 22-06-2019

Guido van der Werve On the occasion of the Gallery Weekend Berlin 2019, Fluentum is pleased to inaugurate its collection publicly with a solo exhibition by Dutch artist Guido van der Werve (born 1977).   Fluentum is a platform for the production, collection and presentation of contemporary art with a strong focus on time-based media such as film and video. It supports artists* in their new productions, buys works for the collection and organizes exhibitions in its own rooms. As a private initiative, Fluentum is independent of institutions and galleries.  Fluentum will present six works by the Dutch artist in his first major solo exhibition in Germany. Walking on frozen waters in front of an icebreaker, undertaking a 1,000-mile triathlon from Warsaw to Paris, or standing on the North Pole for a full twenty-four hours—the films of Guido van der Werve are often driven by sheer physical stamina. Yet at the same time—and not without a good portion of dry wit—they convey striking and clear images for existential and universal feelings: longing, melancholy, isolation, the precarity of life. Van der Werve, a classically trained musician as well as a passionate athlete, always stars as the lead actor of his intricately composed films and often writes his own musical scores. This inaugural exhibition at Fluentum showcases the artist’s oeuvre through a selection of six works from his Numbers series.   Parallel to the exhibition, Fluentum also supports the production of van der Werve’s new work Number eighteen —a poetic self-examination on how the artist’s inferiority complex and fear of death saved his life. In 2016, the artist had an accident while cycling through Berlin. He spent two months in a Berlin hospital fighting for his life. A development in a fast-forward followed. He could no longer do it alone, he had to rely on help from others. Number eighteen is a personal and radically concrete attempt to deal with mankind’s eternal wish to escape death, furthering van der Werve’s earlier works shown in this exhibition. Fluentum is a platform for the production, collection and presentation of contemporary art with a strong focus on time-based media such as film and video. It was founded in 2010 by Berlin software entrepreneur Markus Hannebauer (born 1976). Currently, the collection includes works by Omer Fast, Hito Steyerl, William Kentridge, Douglas Gordon, Katarina Zdjelar, Hiwa K, and others. Fluentum is located in the former main building of a military facility built in 1936-38 for the Luftwaffe, which served as the headquarters of the U.S. Army from 1945 to 1994. The Berlin Airlift was organized here. Over the past three years, the historic building on Clayallee has been extensively redesigned by the Berlin architects Sauerbruch Hutton for use as an exhibition and private space, so that seven areas spanning over 600 square meters can be used to exhibit art and host discussions with artists.  

Guido van der Werve On the occasion of the Gallery Weekend Berlin 2019, Fluentum is pleased to inaugurate its collection publicly with a solo exhibition by Dutch artist Guido van der Werve (born 1977).   Fluentum is a platform for the production, collection and presentation of contemporary art with a strong focus on time-based media such as film and video. It supports artists* in their new productions, buys works for the collection and organizes exhibitions in its own rooms. As a private initiative, Fluentum is independent of institutions and galleries.  Fluentum will present six works by the Dutch artist in his first major solo exhibition in Germany. Walking on frozen waters in front of an icebreaker, undertaking a 1,000-mile triathlon from Warsaw to Paris, or standing on the North Pole for a full twenty-four hours—the films of Guido van der Werve are often driven by sheer physical stamina. Yet at the same time—and not without a good portion of dry wit—they convey striking and clear images for existential and universal feelings: longing, melancholy, isolation, the precarity of life. Van der Werve, a classically trained musician as well as a passionate athlete, always stars as the lead actor of his intricately composed films and often writes his own musical scores. This inaugural exhibition at Fluentum showcases the artist’s oeuvre through a selection of six works from his Numbers series.   Parallel to the exhibition, Fluentum also supports the production of van der Werve’s new work Number eighteen —a poetic self-examination on how the artist’s inferiority complex and fear of death saved his life. In 2016, the artist had an accident while cycling through Berlin. He spent two months in a Berlin hospital fighting for his life. A development in a fast-forward followed. He could no longer do it alone, he had to rely on help from others. Number eighteen is a personal and radically concrete attempt to deal with mankind’s eternal wish to escape death, furthering van der Werve’s earlier works shown in this exhibition. Fluentum is a platform for the production, collection and presentation of contemporary art with a strong focus on time-based media such as film and video. It was founded in 2010 by Berlin software entrepreneur Markus Hannebauer (born 1976). Currently, the collection includes works by Omer Fast, Hito Steyerl, William Kentridge, Douglas Gordon, Katarina Zdjelar, Hiwa K, and others. Fluentum is located in the former main building of a military facility built in 1936-38 for the Luftwaffe, which served as the headquarters of the U.S. Army from 1945 to 1994. The Berlin Airlift was organized here. Over the past three years, the historic building on Clayallee has been extensively redesigned by the Berlin architects Sauerbruch Hutton for use as an exhibition and private space, so that seven areas spanning over 600 square meters can be used to exhibit art and host discussions with artists.  
Raphaela Vogel
Raphaela Vogel
Berlin - Weydingerstrasse 10
until 06-07-2019

Raphaela Vogel  

Raphaela Vogel  
Rirkrit Tiravanija
Rirkrit Tiravanija
Berlin - Linienstrasse 155
until 10-08-2019

Rirkrit Tiravanija – untitled 2019 (beauté esthétique with no shampoo) We are pleased to announce the presentation of untitled 2019 (beaute? esthe?tique with no shampoo), a new work by Rirkrit Tiravanija at neugerriemschneider. Showcasing Tiravanija’s most recent engagement with the medium of ceramic, the work also continues his longstanding exploration of participatory stages and social relations. untitled 2019 (beaute? esthe?tique with no shampoo) creates a space for exchange and contemplation. Over 100 diverse ceramic objects, each handmade by Tiravanija, are placed in an environment of mid-20th century furniture. Visitors are invited to rest on a cushioned bench and daybed and help themselves to cooled green tea from one of the artist’s ceramic creations. Encircling the room are silkscreened images depicting scenes of protest. Each source image was hand-drawn from a newspaper photograph of a demonstration and continues a body of work entitled demonstration drawings, which Tiravanija began at the turn of the 21st century to document political upheaval, protest and public dissonance happening around the globe. The ochre pigment that colors the silkscreen gains its tone from clay used to create pottery, drawing out the material connection between the wall work and the ceramic objects and between our sense of sight, of touch and of taste. In its totality the work offers a multisensory experience, and one that invites both contemplation, and serves as a focused reminder of social unrest. Rirkrit Tiravanija’s work is focused on immaterial projects, relational artwork and performance. His physical pieces are conceptual, imbued with his interests in propaganda, literature and the juxtaposition of multiple cultural contexts and he often makes use of humble materials. Born in Buenos Aires in 1961, Tiravanija grew up in Thailand, Ethiopia, Japan and Canada amongst other countries. Tiravanija has exhibited widely over the past 20 years. Selected solo exhibitions include at the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington D.C. (2019); Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam (2016); the Garage Museum of Contemporary Art, Moscow (2015); the Kunsthalle Bielefeld (2010); the Kunsthalle Fridericianum, Kassel (2009); the Muse?e d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris; the Guggenheim Museum, New York; the Serpentine Gallery in London (all 2005); as well as at the Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen in Rotterdam (2004). The artist’s work was part of several biennials such as the Biennale di Venezia (2015, 2003, 1999, 1993); the Sharjah Biennial (2015, 2007); the Gwangju Biennial (2012); the Yokohama Triennale (2008, 2001); the Biennale d’art contemporain de Lyon (2007, 2005, 1995); the Sa?o Paulo Biennial (2006); the Istanbul Biennial (2001); the Sydney Biennial (1998); the Berlin Biennale (1998); and the Manifesta in Rotterdam (1996). Tiravanija teaches at the School of the Arts at Columbia University in New York. He is co-curator of the interdisciplinary platform for discourse and performance Utopia Station and a founding member of the environmental project The Land Foundation in Chiang Mai, Thailand. Rirkrit Tiravanija lives and works in Chiang Mai, Berlin and New York. For further press information and imagery, please contact Sophie Furse at neugerriemschneider: +49 30 288 77277 or [email protected]

Rirkrit Tiravanija – untitled 2019 (beauté esthétique with no shampoo) We are pleased to announce the presentation of untitled 2019 (beaute? esthe?tique with no shampoo), a new work by Rirkrit Tiravanija at neugerriemschneider. Showcasing Tiravanija’s most recent engagement with the medium of ceramic, the work also continues his longstanding exploration of participatory stages and social relations. untitled 2019 (beaute? esthe?tique with no shampoo) creates a space for exchange and contemplation. Over 100 diverse ceramic objects, each handmade by Tiravanija, are placed in an environment of mid-20th century furniture. Visitors are invited to rest on a cushioned bench and daybed and help themselves to cooled green tea from one of the artist’s ceramic creations. Encircling the room are silkscreened images depicting scenes of protest. Each source image was hand-drawn from a newspaper photograph of a demonstration and continues a body of work entitled demonstration drawings, which Tiravanija began at the turn of the 21st century to document political upheaval, protest and public dissonance happening around the globe. The ochre pigment that colors the silkscreen gains its tone from clay used to create pottery, drawing out the material connection between the wall work and the ceramic objects and between our sense of sight, of touch and of taste. In its totality the work offers a multisensory experience, and one that invites both contemplation, and serves as a focused reminder of social unrest. Rirkrit Tiravanija’s work is focused on immaterial projects, relational artwork and performance. His physical pieces are conceptual, imbued with his interests in propaganda, literature and the juxtaposition of multiple cultural contexts and he often makes use of humble materials. Born in Buenos Aires in 1961, Tiravanija grew up in Thailand, Ethiopia, Japan and Canada amongst other countries. Tiravanija has exhibited widely over the past 20 years. Selected solo exhibitions include at the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington D.C. (2019); Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam (2016); the Garage Museum of Contemporary Art, Moscow (2015); the Kunsthalle Bielefeld (2010); the Kunsthalle Fridericianum, Kassel (2009); the Muse?e d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris; the Guggenheim Museum, New York; the Serpentine Gallery in London (all 2005); as well as at the Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen in Rotterdam (2004). The artist’s work was part of several biennials such as the Biennale di Venezia (2015, 2003, 1999, 1993); the Sharjah Biennial (2015, 2007); the Gwangju Biennial (2012); the Yokohama Triennale (2008, 2001); the Biennale d’art contemporain de Lyon (2007, 2005, 1995); the Sa?o Paulo Biennial (2006); the Istanbul Biennial (2001); the Sydney Biennial (1998); the Berlin Biennale (1998); and the Manifesta in Rotterdam (1996). Tiravanija teaches at the School of the Arts at Columbia University in New York. He is co-curator of the interdisciplinary platform for discourse and performance Utopia Station and a founding member of the environmental project The Land Foundation in Chiang Mai, Thailand. Rirkrit Tiravanija lives and works in Chiang Mai, Berlin and New York. For further press information and imagery, please contact Sophie Furse at neugerriemschneider: +49 30 288 77277 or [email protected]
Signe Pierce
Signe Pierce
Berlin - Torstrasse 220
until 15-06-2019

Signe Pierce – Reflexxxions American artist Signe Pierce (* 1988, USA) describes herself as a reality artist: “I am pop and I am art. I am digital and I am physical. I am virtual and I am real”. “What is real?” is the central question that hovers throughout Pierce’s installations, photographs, performances and writings. Throughout her work, Pierce has utilized her own life and body as a surface to be projected onto, both figuratively and literally. As a performer and self-described “reality artist”, Pierce presents a provocative, hyperreal version of herself, confronting expectations surrounding femininity, sexuality, and perception. Pierce is at the forefront of a young generation of artists that reflects the current digital age. Her artistic material is the social and political reality as well as the rapid development of digital media and technology. With Reflexxxions, her first solo exhibition in Germany at the EIGEN + ART Lab in Berlin, Signe Pierce debuts a new installation and body of work which fuses light, digital projections, and self portraiture with reflective surfaces and blank canvases. Sound, image, light and text will be condensed into an immersive landscape. The visitors become part of her reality. Curatored by Marie Gerbaulet and Anika Meier

Signe Pierce – Reflexxxions American artist Signe Pierce (* 1988, USA) describes herself as a reality artist: “I am pop and I am art. I am digital and I am physical. I am virtual and I am real”. “What is real?” is the central question that hovers throughout Pierce’s installations, photographs, performances and writings. Throughout her work, Pierce has utilized her own life and body as a surface to be projected onto, both figuratively and literally. As a performer and self-described “reality artist”, Pierce presents a provocative, hyperreal version of herself, confronting expectations surrounding femininity, sexuality, and perception. Pierce is at the forefront of a young generation of artists that reflects the current digital age. Her artistic material is the social and political reality as well as the rapid development of digital media and technology. With Reflexxxions, her first solo exhibition in Germany at the EIGEN + ART Lab in Berlin, Signe Pierce debuts a new installation and body of work which fuses light, digital projections, and self portraiture with reflective surfaces and blank canvases. Sound, image, light and text will be condensed into an immersive landscape. The visitors become part of her reality. Curatored by Marie Gerbaulet and Anika Meier
Straying from the Line
Straying from the Line
Berlin - Oberwallstrasse 1
until 28-07-2019

Straying from the Line Vito Acconci, Lynda Benglis, Dara Birnbaum, Jenna Bliss, Pauline Boudry & Renate Lorenz, Teresa Burga, Tom Burr, Claude Cahun, Ellen Cantor, Tony Cokes, Anna Dau?íková, Cosey Fanni Tutti, Nicole Eisenman, Ellen Gallagher, Jef Geys, Guerilla Girls, Barbara Hammer, Eva Hesse, Irma Hünerfauth, Mike Kuchar, Maria Lassnig, Leigh Ledare, Alice Lex-Nerlinger, Klara Lidén, Lee Lozano, Sarah Lucas, Ulrike Müller, Gabriele Münter, Anna Oppermann, Charlotte Posenenske, Tim Rollins & K.O.S., Aura Rosenberg & Mike Kelley, Betye Saar, Heji Shin, Jack Smith, Nancy Spero, Diamond Stingily, Elaine Sturtevant, Martine Syms, Rosemarie Trockel, Anna Uddenberg, Raphaela Vogel, Constantina Zavitzanos & Park McArthur 50 years ago, Lee Lozano articulated the relationship between artistic and social hierarchies, stating that “there can be no art revolution that is separate from a science revolution, a political revolution, an education revolution, a drug revolution, a sex revolution or a personal revolution." Understanding the personal as political became the driving force behind the central feminist movements of the time, bringing together a vibrant spectrum of activist, philosophical and artistic positions across political and social fields. Debates on personal experience and structural violence haven’t lost their relevance and only recently entered the spotlight of political and public interest through social movements such as #metoo and #notsurprised. Whether in politics, media, business, science, culture or our daily lives, experiences of sexism, racism, discrimination and other forms of violence and abuse are not only a personal problem, but a political and structural one as well.

Straying from the Line Vito Acconci, Lynda Benglis, Dara Birnbaum, Jenna Bliss, Pauline Boudry & Renate Lorenz, Teresa Burga, Tom Burr, Claude Cahun, Ellen Cantor, Tony Cokes, Anna Dau?íková, Cosey Fanni Tutti, Nicole Eisenman, Ellen Gallagher, Jef Geys, Guerilla Girls, Barbara Hammer, Eva Hesse, Irma Hünerfauth, Mike Kuchar, Maria Lassnig, Leigh Ledare, Alice Lex-Nerlinger, Klara Lidén, Lee Lozano, Sarah Lucas, Ulrike Müller, Gabriele Münter, Anna Oppermann, Charlotte Posenenske, Tim Rollins & K.O.S., Aura Rosenberg & Mike Kelley, Betye Saar, Heji Shin, Jack Smith, Nancy Spero, Diamond Stingily, Elaine Sturtevant, Martine Syms, Rosemarie Trockel, Anna Uddenberg, Raphaela Vogel, Constantina Zavitzanos & Park McArthur 50 years ago, Lee Lozano articulated the relationship between artistic and social hierarchies, stating that “there can be no art revolution that is separate from a science revolution, a political revolution, an education revolution, a drug revolution, a sex revolution or a personal revolution." Understanding the personal as political became the driving force behind the central feminist movements of the time, bringing together a vibrant spectrum of activist, philosophical and artistic positions across political and social fields. Debates on personal experience and structural violence haven’t lost their relevance and only recently entered the spotlight of political and public interest through social movements such as #metoo and #notsurprised. Whether in politics, media, business, science, culture or our daily lives, experiences of sexism, racism, discrimination and other forms of violence and abuse are not only a personal problem, but a political and structural one as well.
Math Bass
Math Bass
Berlin - Kurfrstenstrasse 156 & 24/25
until 22-06-2019

Math Bass – To Name A Few

Math Bass – To Name A Few
Civilization: The Way We Live Now
Civilization: The Way We Live Now
Beijing - Jiuxianqiao Road
until 15-09-2019

Civilization: The Way We Live Now Civilization: The Way We Live Now presents more than 250 works by over 120 of the world’s most renowned photographic artists, offering a complex and sprawling vision of contemporary life. The images gathered here, produced in the past 25 years, speak to the changes brought about by globalization, and draw attention both to the increasing amount of complexity and conflict, and to the unprecedented degree of interdependence, that characterize life today. They attest, as well, to the development of the medium of photography, and its ability to document these sweeping changes. Organized in collaboration between UCCA and the Foundation for the Exhibition of Photography, the Beijing presentation of Civilization is curated by William A. Ewing and Holly Roussell. In his 2011 book, Civilization, the historian Niall Ferguson notes: “These days most people around the world dress in much the same way: the same jeans, the same sneakers, the same T-shirts… It is one of the greatest paradoxes of modern history that a system designed to offer infinite choice to the individual has ended up homogenizing humanity.” This paradox lies at the core of “Civilization,” which strives to explain the “complex whole” that is modern society, in all its spiritual and material richness. The photographers in this exhibition depict, reveal, examine, criticize and otherwise reflect our hyper-modern and complex social terrain, from Edward Burtynsky’smassively transformed landscapesto Lauren Greenfield’s revealing urban portraits,from Toshio Shibata’s highly ordered tableaus to Xing Danwen’s electronic pollution. The exhibition is divided into eight sections. “Hive” explores the systems of cohabitation and collaboration that have developed in urban settings. “Alone Together” documents the solidarities and estrangements found within communities, as well as the effect of the internet on sociality. “Flow” testifies to the accelerated production and widening wealth gap in the post-industrial world. “Persuasion” explores the power of symbolic capital, from marketing strategies to consumption habits, from religious beliefs to personality cults. “Control” examines humanity’s ability to create order, resolve disputes, and organize political and social structures. “Rupture” focuses on the breakdown of this order, and the conflicts between individuals and collectives. “Escape” follows the ascent of recreational culture, where relaxation, entertainment, adventure, and thrill-seeking offer freedom from the given. Finally, “Next” presents visions of the future, questioning teleological narratives of development. Max Aguilera-Hellweg, Andreia Alves de Oliveira, Evan Baden,Murray Ballard,Olivo Barbieri, Mandy Barker, Olaf Otto Becker, Valérie Belin, Daniel Berehulak, Peter Bialobrzeski, Michele Borzoni, Priscilla Briggs, Paul Bulteel, Edward Burtynsky, Alejandro Cartagena , Philippe Chancel, Che Onejoon, Olivier Christinat, Lynne Cohen, Lois Conner, Gerco de Ruijter, Richard de Tscharner, Natan Dvir, Roger, Eberhard, Mitch Epstein, Adam Ferguson, Vincent Fournier, Andy Freeberg, Lee Friedlander, Matthieu Gafsou, Andreas Gefeller, George Georgiou, Christoph Gielen, Katy Grannan, Lauren Greenfield, Han Sungpil, Nick Hannes, Mishka Henner, Candida Höfer, Dan Holdsworth, Hong Hao, Pieter Hugo, Jo Choonman, Chris Jordan, Yeondoo Jung, Nadav Kander, KDK, Mike Kelley, Kim Taedong, Alfred Ko, Irene Kung, Benny Lam, An-My Lê, Michael Light,  Mauricio Lima, Pablo López Luz, Christian Lünig, Vera Lutter, Alex MacLean, David Maisel, Ann Mandelbaum, Edgar Martins, Jeffrey Milstein, Mintio, Richard Misrach, Andrew Moore,  David Moore, Richard Mosse, Michael Najjar, Walter Niedermayr, Jason Sangik Noh, Simon Norfolk, Hiroshi Okamoto, Neil Pardington, Trent Parke, Cara Phillips, Robert Polidori, Sergey Ponomarev, Cyril Porchet, Mark Power, Giles Price, Reiner Riedler, Simon Roberts, Andrew Rowat, Victoria Sambunaris, Sato Shintaro, Dona Schwartz, Paul Shambroom,  Sheng-Wen Lo, Toshio Shibata, Alec Soth, Henrik Spohler, Will Steacy, Thomas Struth, Larry Sultan, Shigeru Takato, Eric Thayer, Eason Tsang Ka Wai, Andreas Tschersich,  Amalia Ulman, Brian Ulrich, Penelope Umbrico, Carlo Valsecchi, Reginald Van de Velde, Cássio Vasconcellos, Massimo Vitali, Robert Walker, Richard Wallbank, Wang Qingsong, Patrick Weidmann, Thomas Weinberger, Damon Winter, Michael Wolf, Paolo Woods and Gabriele Galimberti, Raimond Wouda, Xing Danwen, Anne Zahalka, Luca Zanier,  Zhang Xiao, Robert Zhao Renhui, Francesco Zizola  

Civilization: The Way We Live Now Civilization: The Way We Live Now presents more than 250 works by over 120 of the world’s most renowned photographic artists, offering a complex and sprawling vision of contemporary life. The images gathered here, produced in the past 25 years, speak to the changes brought about by globalization, and draw attention both to the increasing amount of complexity and conflict, and to the unprecedented degree of interdependence, that characterize life today. They attest, as well, to the development of the medium of photography, and its ability to document these sweeping changes. Organized in collaboration between UCCA and the Foundation for the Exhibition of Photography, the Beijing presentation of Civilization is curated by William A. Ewing and Holly Roussell. In his 2011 book, Civilization, the historian Niall Ferguson notes: “These days most people around the world dress in much the same way: the same jeans, the same sneakers, the same T-shirts… It is one of the greatest paradoxes of modern history that a system designed to offer infinite choice to the individual has ended up homogenizing humanity.” This paradox lies at the core of “Civilization,” which strives to explain the “complex whole” that is modern society, in all its spiritual and material richness. The photographers in this exhibition depict, reveal, examine, criticize and otherwise reflect our hyper-modern and complex social terrain, from Edward Burtynsky’smassively transformed landscapesto Lauren Greenfield’s revealing urban portraits,from Toshio Shibata’s highly ordered tableaus to Xing Danwen’s electronic pollution. The exhibition is divided into eight sections. “Hive” explores the systems of cohabitation and collaboration that have developed in urban settings. “Alone Together” documents the solidarities and estrangements found within communities, as well as the effect of the internet on sociality. “Flow” testifies to the accelerated production and widening wealth gap in the post-industrial world. “Persuasion” explores the power of symbolic capital, from marketing strategies to consumption habits, from religious beliefs to personality cults. “Control” examines humanity’s ability to create order, resolve disputes, and organize political and social structures. “Rupture” focuses on the breakdown of this order, and the conflicts between individuals and collectives. “Escape” follows the ascent of recreational culture, where relaxation, entertainment, adventure, and thrill-seeking offer freedom from the given. Finally, “Next” presents visions of the future, questioning teleological narratives of development. Max Aguilera-Hellweg, Andreia Alves de Oliveira, Evan Baden,Murray Ballard,Olivo Barbieri, Mandy Barker, Olaf Otto Becker, Valérie Belin, Daniel Berehulak, Peter Bialobrzeski, Michele Borzoni, Priscilla Briggs, Paul Bulteel, Edward Burtynsky, Alejandro Cartagena , Philippe Chancel, Che Onejoon, Olivier Christinat, Lynne Cohen, Lois Conner, Gerco de Ruijter, Richard de Tscharner, Natan Dvir, Roger, Eberhard, Mitch Epstein, Adam Ferguson, Vincent Fournier, Andy Freeberg, Lee Friedlander, Matthieu Gafsou, Andreas Gefeller, George Georgiou, Christoph Gielen, Katy Grannan, Lauren Greenfield, Han Sungpil, Nick Hannes, Mishka Henner, Candida Höfer, Dan Holdsworth, Hong Hao, Pieter Hugo, Jo Choonman, Chris Jordan, Yeondoo Jung, Nadav Kander, KDK, Mike Kelley, Kim Taedong, Alfred Ko, Irene Kung, Benny Lam, An-My Lê, Michael Light,  Mauricio Lima, Pablo López Luz, Christian Lünig, Vera Lutter, Alex MacLean, David Maisel, Ann Mandelbaum, Edgar Martins, Jeffrey Milstein, Mintio, Richard Misrach, Andrew Moore,  David Moore, Richard Mosse, Michael Najjar, Walter Niedermayr, Jason Sangik Noh, Simon Norfolk, Hiroshi Okamoto, Neil Pardington, Trent Parke, Cara Phillips, Robert Polidori, Sergey Ponomarev, Cyril Porchet, Mark Power, Giles Price, Reiner Riedler, Simon Roberts, Andrew Rowat, Victoria Sambunaris, Sato Shintaro, Dona Schwartz, Paul Shambroom,  Sheng-Wen Lo, Toshio Shibata, Alec Soth, Henrik Spohler, Will Steacy, Thomas Struth, Larry Sultan, Shigeru Takato, Eric Thayer, Eason Tsang Ka Wai, Andreas Tschersich,  Amalia Ulman, Brian Ulrich, Penelope Umbrico, Carlo Valsecchi, Reginald Van de Velde, Cássio Vasconcellos, Massimo Vitali, Robert Walker, Richard Wallbank, Wang Qingsong, Patrick Weidmann, Thomas Weinberger, Damon Winter, Michael Wolf, Paolo Woods and Gabriele Galimberti, Raimond Wouda, Xing Danwen, Anne Zahalka, Luca Zanier,  Zhang Xiao, Robert Zhao Renhui, Francesco Zizola  
Richard Tuttle
Richard Tuttle
Beijing - Jiuxianqiao Road
until 16-06-2019

Richard Tuttle – Introduction to Practice  Curated by Victor Wang In spring 2019, M WOODS presents Richard Tuttle: Introduction to Practice, a survey spanning five decades of the artist’s prolific career and his first in China. Guest curated by Victor Wang ???, the exhibition details Tuttle’s pursuit of art for life through a practice and visual language concerned with reality and a strengthening of the spirit. The layout of the exhibition is organized by a symbol designed by the artist and includes nearly 100 of Tuttle’s most widely recognized works. His major series—Paper Octagonals, Rope Pieces, Wire Pieces and more—are clustered into “pods” of three, a highly innovative method of display and a first for the artist. Developed in close collaboration between the artist and curator, the show also includes a major sculptural commission and a special publication.

Richard Tuttle – Introduction to Practice  Curated by Victor Wang In spring 2019, M WOODS presents Richard Tuttle: Introduction to Practice, a survey spanning five decades of the artist’s prolific career and his first in China. Guest curated by Victor Wang ???, the exhibition details Tuttle’s pursuit of art for life through a practice and visual language concerned with reality and a strengthening of the spirit. The layout of the exhibition is organized by a symbol designed by the artist and includes nearly 100 of Tuttle’s most widely recognized works. His major series—Paper Octagonals, Rope Pieces, Wire Pieces and more—are clustered into “pods” of three, a highly innovative method of display and a first for the artist. Developed in close collaboration between the artist and curator, the show also includes a major sculptural commission and a special publication.
Doug Aitken
Doug Aitken
Beijing - 2 Jiuxuanquao Road
until 04-08-2019

Doug Aitken   Faurschou Foundation is pleased to present a solo exhibition of American artist, Doug Aitken, at Faurschou Beijing. It is the first solo exhibition of the artist in mainland China.   Aitken has developed a multimedia oeuvre that spans a wide array of mediums, integrating film, sound, photography, sculpture, performance, happenings, and site-specific installations. This exhibition features three installations including the video work NEW ERA.   Aitken’s body of artwork takes the viewer into a different world, which explores ideas and takes you places that language cannot fully articulate. Through image, forms, and sound, the artworks conceptualize the idea of a current world that is completely kinetic and synchronized, yet at other times a landscape that is vastly isolating.   Entering the first room of the gallery, NEW ERA creates a hexagonal space of alternating mirrors and projections, which take the 1973 invention of the very first cellular telephone by Martin Cooper as a starting idea. The narrative within this work disintegrates and abstracts, mirroring how the diametrically opposed notions of connectivity and freedom have been underlined in this paradigm-shifting moment in history.   In the second room, the viewer steps directly into 3 Modern Figures (don’t forget to breathe), an installation of three human figures resting on a raw wooden floor. These are not heroic figures but a candid snapshot of modern individuals frozen as if time had stopped. In the empty core of the sculptures, light emanates and pulses.    In the third darkened room stands a 12-foot rock and concrete sculpture with visual parallels to a brutalist monument, titled Crossing the Border. The slab of stone and concrete is cut in the shape of a silhouetted image of Gandhi. Echoing in the large room, we hear patterns of dripping water, the water appearing out of openings in the rock figure.   Connecting three works in the sequence of three rooms, this exhibition starts with the invention of the cellular phone, reflects the way humans are both in and out of sync in this age of technology and ends with Crossing the Border. The exhibition creates a fragmented narrative of today’s digital contemporary landscape. In this landscape, Aitken's works are signposts, making the viewer pause, stop and evaluate their surroundings.

Doug Aitken   Faurschou Foundation is pleased to present a solo exhibition of American artist, Doug Aitken, at Faurschou Beijing. It is the first solo exhibition of the artist in mainland China.   Aitken has developed a multimedia oeuvre that spans a wide array of mediums, integrating film, sound, photography, sculpture, performance, happenings, and site-specific installations. This exhibition features three installations including the video work NEW ERA.   Aitken’s body of artwork takes the viewer into a different world, which explores ideas and takes you places that language cannot fully articulate. Through image, forms, and sound, the artworks conceptualize the idea of a current world that is completely kinetic and synchronized, yet at other times a landscape that is vastly isolating.   Entering the first room of the gallery, NEW ERA creates a hexagonal space of alternating mirrors and projections, which take the 1973 invention of the very first cellular telephone by Martin Cooper as a starting idea. The narrative within this work disintegrates and abstracts, mirroring how the diametrically opposed notions of connectivity and freedom have been underlined in this paradigm-shifting moment in history.   In the second room, the viewer steps directly into 3 Modern Figures (don’t forget to breathe), an installation of three human figures resting on a raw wooden floor. These are not heroic figures but a candid snapshot of modern individuals frozen as if time had stopped. In the empty core of the sculptures, light emanates and pulses.    In the third darkened room stands a 12-foot rock and concrete sculpture with visual parallels to a brutalist monument, titled Crossing the Border. The slab of stone and concrete is cut in the shape of a silhouetted image of Gandhi. Echoing in the large room, we hear patterns of dripping water, the water appearing out of openings in the rock figure.   Connecting three works in the sequence of three rooms, this exhibition starts with the invention of the cellular phone, reflects the way humans are both in and out of sync in this age of technology and ends with Crossing the Border. The exhibition creates a fragmented narrative of today’s digital contemporary landscape. In this landscape, Aitken's works are signposts, making the viewer pause, stop and evaluate their surroundings.
Thomas Ruff
Thomas Ruff
Zrich - Rmistrasse 37
until 01-06-2019

Thomas Ruff – tripe & flower.s  Mai 36 Galerie is delighted to present works from two new series by Thomas Ruff (born 1958 in Zell am Harmersbach/Schwarzwald). Since the late 1970s, the artist has been exploring the structures and contiguities of the photographic medium. Ruff is interested not only in the various genres of photography, but also in the many different photographic techniques these involve. He analyses the visual significance and power of expression in different photographic genres -- including portraits, landscape, architecture, astronomy, reportage, nudes, abstraction – and makes use of all the photographic techniques and methods he knows. As a result, his oeuvre encompasses everything from his own analogue and digital photographs to computer-generated images as well as photographs from scientific and private archives, press photos and photos found on the internet. In his two new series tripe and flower.s, shown together here for the first time, Ruff brings analogue photographic techniques of the 19th and 20th centuries into the digital world of the 21st.

Thomas Ruff – tripe & flower.s  Mai 36 Galerie is delighted to present works from two new series by Thomas Ruff (born 1958 in Zell am Harmersbach/Schwarzwald). Since the late 1970s, the artist has been exploring the structures and contiguities of the photographic medium. Ruff is interested not only in the various genres of photography, but also in the many different photographic techniques these involve. He analyses the visual significance and power of expression in different photographic genres -- including portraits, landscape, architecture, astronomy, reportage, nudes, abstraction – and makes use of all the photographic techniques and methods he knows. As a result, his oeuvre encompasses everything from his own analogue and digital photographs to computer-generated images as well as photographs from scientific and private archives, press photos and photos found on the internet. In his two new series tripe and flower.s, shown together here for the first time, Ruff brings analogue photographic techniques of the 19th and 20th centuries into the digital world of the 21st.
Geumhyung Jeong
Geumhyung Jeong
Basel - Steinenberg 7
until 11-08-2019

Geumhyung Jeong – Homemade RC Toy For Homemade RC Toy, the South Korean artist and choreographer focuses her attention on the relationship between the human and the machine, creating an installation comprised of homemade robotic sculptures and documentation of the process of their making.

Geumhyung Jeong – Homemade RC Toy For Homemade RC Toy, the South Korean artist and choreographer focuses her attention on the relationship between the human and the machine, creating an installation comprised of homemade robotic sculptures and documentation of the process of their making.
Timothée Calame & Alan Schmalz
Timothe Calame & Alan Schmalz
Basel - Rebgasse 27
until 25-05-2019

Timothée Calame & Alan Schmalz – Affinities  

Timothée Calame & Alan Schmalz – Affinities  
Lake Verea
Lake Verea
Basel - Charles-Eames-Strasse 2
until 07-07-2019

Lake Verea: Paparazza Moderna Mexican artists Francisca Rivero-Lake and Carla Verea take paparazzi-like pictures of iconic buildings by modern architects. At the opening of their exhibition at the Vitra Design Museum Gallery, they will introduce their work and share experiences and anecdotes gathered on their quest for traces of Marcel Breuer, Walter Gropius, and other heroes of the modern era.  

Lake Verea: Paparazza Moderna Mexican artists Francisca Rivero-Lake and Carla Verea take paparazzi-like pictures of iconic buildings by modern architects. At the opening of their exhibition at the Vitra Design Museum Gallery, they will introduce their work and share experiences and anecdotes gathered on their quest for traces of Marcel Breuer, Walter Gropius, and other heroes of the modern era.  
The Young Picasso
The Young Picasso
Basel - Baselstrasse 101
until 26-05-2019

The Young Picasso – Blue and Rose Periods This exhibition, the most ambitious ever staged by the Fondation Beyeler, is devoted to the paintings and sculptures of the young Pablo Picasso from the so-called Blue and Rose periods, between 1901 and 1906. For the first time in Europe, the masterpieces of these crucial years, every one of them a milestone on Picasso’s path to preeminence as the twentieth century’s most famous artist, are presented together, in a concentration and quality that are unparalleled. Picasso’s pictures from this phase of creative ferment are some of the finest and most emotionally compelling examples of modern painting, and are counted among the most valuable and sought-after works in the entire history of art. It is unlikely that they will be seen again in such a selection in a single place. At the age of just twenty, the rising genius Picasso (1881–1973) embarked on a quest for new themes and forms of expression, which he immediately refined to a pitch of perfection. One artistic revolution followed another, in a rapid succession of changing styles and visual worlds. The focus of the exhibition is on the Blue and Rose periods, and thus on the six years in the life of the young Picasso that can be considered central to his entire oeuvre, paving the way for the epochal emergence of Cubism, which developed from Picasso’s previous work, in 1907. Here, the exhibition converges with the Fondation Beyeler’s permanent collection, whose earliest picture by Picasso is a study, dating from this pivotal year, for the Demoiselles d’Avignon.

The Young Picasso – Blue and Rose Periods This exhibition, the most ambitious ever staged by the Fondation Beyeler, is devoted to the paintings and sculptures of the young Pablo Picasso from the so-called Blue and Rose periods, between 1901 and 1906. For the first time in Europe, the masterpieces of these crucial years, every one of them a milestone on Picasso’s path to preeminence as the twentieth century’s most famous artist, are presented together, in a concentration and quality that are unparalleled. Picasso’s pictures from this phase of creative ferment are some of the finest and most emotionally compelling examples of modern painting, and are counted among the most valuable and sought-after works in the entire history of art. It is unlikely that they will be seen again in such a selection in a single place. At the age of just twenty, the rising genius Picasso (1881–1973) embarked on a quest for new themes and forms of expression, which he immediately refined to a pitch of perfection. One artistic revolution followed another, in a rapid succession of changing styles and visual worlds. The focus of the exhibition is on the Blue and Rose periods, and thus on the six years in the life of the young Picasso that can be considered central to his entire oeuvre, paving the way for the epochal emergence of Cubism, which developed from Picasso’s previous work, in 1907. Here, the exhibition converges with the Fondation Beyeler’s permanent collection, whose earliest picture by Picasso is a study, dating from this pivotal year, for the Demoiselles d’Avignon.
Lauriston Avery
Lauriston Avery
Dsseldorf - Gerresheimer Strasse 33
until 02-06-2019

Lauriston Avery – Deaf Bats Blind Sheperds Wildpalms proudly presents the first solo show in Germany of the American painter Lauriston Avery. For many years Avery, who lives and works in NY, has focused on producing an incredible body of work that is now coming to light. His extensive research with secular materials, such as soil, mirror, sticks, fur, and their applications have evolved into a depth of pictorial form that speaks with a uniquely sensual, rhythmic clarity. The works imply a process of mapping, the cellular body, aerial views of forgotten cities or mysterious constellations subjected to a manic ordering of addition and subtraction. Though reflective of some of the complex motivations behind Avery’s work, it is the primacy of the expressive form, the mystery of the aesthetic experience, that drives Avery’s investigations and practice.

Lauriston Avery – Deaf Bats Blind Sheperds Wildpalms proudly presents the first solo show in Germany of the American painter Lauriston Avery. For many years Avery, who lives and works in NY, has focused on producing an incredible body of work that is now coming to light. His extensive research with secular materials, such as soil, mirror, sticks, fur, and their applications have evolved into a depth of pictorial form that speaks with a uniquely sensual, rhythmic clarity. The works imply a process of mapping, the cellular body, aerial views of forgotten cities or mysterious constellations subjected to a manic ordering of addition and subtraction. Though reflective of some of the complex motivations behind Avery’s work, it is the primacy of the expressive form, the mystery of the aesthetic experience, that drives Avery’s investigations and practice.
Ed Atkins
Ed Atkins
Dsseldorf - Stndehausstrasse 1
until 16-06-2019

Ed Atkins – Ye Olde Food The British artist Ed Atkins (*1982, Oxford) is considered as a pioneer among a younger generation of artists whose members reflect upon the far-reaching transformations of everyday reality effected by the  rapid development of digital media. Atkins became known in particular for a series of computer-animated videos through which he interrogates the promise, potential, and ideologies of the technologies he employs. A crucial point of departure for his projects is the capacity of digital image production to reproduce the material world realistically in a radically dematerialized fashion. On the one hand, the motion capture animated protagonists of his videos manifest a total artificiality, while on the other suggesting a disconcerting degree of lifelikeness: they are brought to the point of tears, look into our eyes, or address us verbally. Atkins investigates the impact of virtual worlds on the physically palpable reality of the beholder, impelling us to ponder the status of emotionality and corporeality in an increasingly digitalized world, along with the possibilities and limits of language. In his solo exhibition at the K21, he presents current video and textual works which have been acquired for the collection, restaging them together with additional works in the spaces of the Bel Etage.

Ed Atkins – Ye Olde Food The British artist Ed Atkins (*1982, Oxford) is considered as a pioneer among a younger generation of artists whose members reflect upon the far-reaching transformations of everyday reality effected by the  rapid development of digital media. Atkins became known in particular for a series of computer-animated videos through which he interrogates the promise, potential, and ideologies of the technologies he employs. A crucial point of departure for his projects is the capacity of digital image production to reproduce the material world realistically in a radically dematerialized fashion. On the one hand, the motion capture animated protagonists of his videos manifest a total artificiality, while on the other suggesting a disconcerting degree of lifelikeness: they are brought to the point of tears, look into our eyes, or address us verbally. Atkins investigates the impact of virtual worlds on the physically palpable reality of the beholder, impelling us to ponder the status of emotionality and corporeality in an increasingly digitalized world, along with the possibilities and limits of language. In his solo exhibition at the K21, he presents current video and textual works which have been acquired for the collection, restaging them together with additional works in the spaces of the Bel Etage.
Matt Mullican
Matt Mullican
Dsseldorf - Berger Weg 16
until 11-08-2019

Matt Mullican – Banners Matt Mullican’s exhibition surrounds us with huge, colourful banners. We find ourselves immersed in a cornucopia of colours and signs that repeat themselves and cross- reference each other according to some law of their own in an abstract world that we are we are left to decipher. This Californian artist is fascinated by pictograms. He uses the poster as a form of expression aimed at the public. Pictograms representing music, theatre, film and painting reveal themselves to us immediately, while others are pure inventions. By placing his name alongside them on the posters, Mullican combines elements of reality with his own subjective world. Mullican recognised the banner as a particularly effective vehicle for bringing a message to the street. The visual syntax is pared down to the minimum and is instantly legible. What distinguishes his banners from the carriers of national symbols and battle insignia is that they serve to present his models of the world.  

Matt Mullican – Banners Matt Mullican’s exhibition surrounds us with huge, colourful banners. We find ourselves immersed in a cornucopia of colours and signs that repeat themselves and cross- reference each other according to some law of their own in an abstract world that we are we are left to decipher. This Californian artist is fascinated by pictograms. He uses the poster as a form of expression aimed at the public. Pictograms representing music, theatre, film and painting reveal themselves to us immediately, while others are pure inventions. By placing his name alongside them on the posters, Mullican combines elements of reality with his own subjective world. Mullican recognised the banner as a particularly effective vehicle for bringing a message to the street. The visual syntax is pared down to the minimum and is instantly legible. What distinguishes his banners from the carriers of national symbols and battle insignia is that they serve to present his models of the world.  
Rindon Johnson
Rindon Johnson
Dsseldorf - Schanzenstrasse 54
until 28-07-2019

Rindon Johnson – Circumscribe In CIRCUMSCRIBE, Rindon Johnson’s first institutional solo show in Europe, the artist examines material and conceptual forms of circulation and containment in relation to capital and consumption, privileging language, images, bodies, and technologies. Alongside existing paintings and sculptures, the exhibition features new videos and virtual reality works, a site-specific livestream installation, and a soundtrack produced in collaboration with Milo McBride.  

Rindon Johnson – Circumscribe In CIRCUMSCRIBE, Rindon Johnson’s first institutional solo show in Europe, the artist examines material and conceptual forms of circulation and containment in relation to capital and consumption, privileging language, images, bodies, and technologies. Alongside existing paintings and sculptures, the exhibition features new videos and virtual reality works, a site-specific livestream installation, and a soundtrack produced in collaboration with Milo McBride.  
Urs Fischer
Urs Fischer
Los Angeles - 925 North Orange Drive
until 15-06-2019

Urs Fischer – Play An experience with Urs Fischer’s PLAY is not an encounter with inert objects, but a dance with capricious partners. Nine office chairs of differing colors and with mercurial personalities zoom around a gallery, each inviting the viewer into an impenetrable pas de deux. Perhaps it is even incorrect to use the word “viewer” – when interacting with Fischer’s coterie of office furniture, the gallery-goer assumes an active role not often found in white cubes. The chairs, constructed masses of wires and sensors, are equipped with a functioning AI that determines and learns from each encounter they have. As the exhibition progresses, their actions will become more and more refined until they eventually become so graceful that their artificial origin can be obscured. PLAY is a technologically advanced work, yet it is one that seeks to transcend the novelty of its creation. As Fischer affirms, “despite the complexity of the parts, the exhibition as a whole is pretty simple. It’s about what you, the viewer, project onto it. It’s not about chairs, it’s about humans.” Fischer seeks to create sculpture through interaction. While the chairs are the most visible part of PLAY, the work unfolds through exchange, expectation, and frustration. As you stand in the gallery, a chair might approach timidly or full of boisterous energy and engage you in any number of actions. Yet, the chairs defy preconceived notions of how they should behave. As you expect one to veer to the left, it darts right and wheels off to the opposite side of the room, abruptly dismissing any patterns that you may try to apply. These moments of entropy lie at the heart of the piece, confounding the observer and bestowing a kind of agency upon the chairs, making them active participants in their own arena.

Urs Fischer – Play An experience with Urs Fischer’s PLAY is not an encounter with inert objects, but a dance with capricious partners. Nine office chairs of differing colors and with mercurial personalities zoom around a gallery, each inviting the viewer into an impenetrable pas de deux. Perhaps it is even incorrect to use the word “viewer” – when interacting with Fischer’s coterie of office furniture, the gallery-goer assumes an active role not often found in white cubes. The chairs, constructed masses of wires and sensors, are equipped with a functioning AI that determines and learns from each encounter they have. As the exhibition progresses, their actions will become more and more refined until they eventually become so graceful that their artificial origin can be obscured. PLAY is a technologically advanced work, yet it is one that seeks to transcend the novelty of its creation. As Fischer affirms, “despite the complexity of the parts, the exhibition as a whole is pretty simple. It’s about what you, the viewer, project onto it. It’s not about chairs, it’s about humans.” Fischer seeks to create sculpture through interaction. While the chairs are the most visible part of PLAY, the work unfolds through exchange, expectation, and frustration. As you stand in the gallery, a chair might approach timidly or full of boisterous energy and engage you in any number of actions. Yet, the chairs defy preconceived notions of how they should behave. As you expect one to veer to the left, it darts right and wheels off to the opposite side of the room, abruptly dismissing any patterns that you may try to apply. These moments of entropy lie at the heart of the piece, confounding the observer and bestowing a kind of agency upon the chairs, making them active participants in their own arena.
Mi Kafchin
Mi Kafchin
Los Angeles - 571 South Anderson Street Suite 2
until 01-06-2019

Mi Kafchin – Chemtrails Born only a few months after the Chernobyl Disaster in 1986, Romanian artist Mi Kafchin was inundated as a young child with fear-driven remedies that would help to cure the invisible but pervasive radioactive toxins that enveloped her region and in effect her being. Trust in aspirational progress or the security of big government would dissipate into that same air. The chemtrails that criss-crossed the sky above represented a direct and constant communication of this reality but banalized into a sublime of the everyday. This toxic cocktail of aluminum, barium and strontium militaristically seeded into our atmosphere successfully keeps society under control… at least, that is, until the EMF from 5G begins to vibrate our delicate bodies. This legacy of trepidation from sources governmental, paranormal and extraterrestrial has festered into a menacing ideological vortex of possibility, one looming large in the work of Mi Kafchin and mapped out here in her second solo exhibition at Nicodim Gallery.   The artist’s research is otherworldly in every sense and very much one of exploration. She has embarked on a journey of the self, the mind and the physical plane to discover places that human fantasy has only vaguely articulated. Her ideas are naturally uncomfortable in the way new information can either cause a sickness or inoculate the people. She points to a future of transhumanism, alchemical arithmetic and esoteric realms where her creative mind scries freely into architectures of the unknown. 

Mi Kafchin – Chemtrails Born only a few months after the Chernobyl Disaster in 1986, Romanian artist Mi Kafchin was inundated as a young child with fear-driven remedies that would help to cure the invisible but pervasive radioactive toxins that enveloped her region and in effect her being. Trust in aspirational progress or the security of big government would dissipate into that same air. The chemtrails that criss-crossed the sky above represented a direct and constant communication of this reality but banalized into a sublime of the everyday. This toxic cocktail of aluminum, barium and strontium militaristically seeded into our atmosphere successfully keeps society under control… at least, that is, until the EMF from 5G begins to vibrate our delicate bodies. This legacy of trepidation from sources governmental, paranormal and extraterrestrial has festered into a menacing ideological vortex of possibility, one looming large in the work of Mi Kafchin and mapped out here in her second solo exhibition at Nicodim Gallery.   The artist’s research is otherworldly in every sense and very much one of exploration. She has embarked on a journey of the self, the mind and the physical plane to discover places that human fantasy has only vaguely articulated. Her ideas are naturally uncomfortable in the way new information can either cause a sickness or inoculate the people. She points to a future of transhumanism, alchemical arithmetic and esoteric realms where her creative mind scries freely into architectures of the unknown. 
Not the Territory
Not the Territory
Los Angeles - 1119 South La Brea Avenue
until 31-05-2019

Not the Territory Daniel T. Gaitor-Lomack, Chase Hall, Derrick Maddox, Gabriella Sanchez, Sissòn The world is warped when seen on a map. Massive sections of land that seem similar in size are really not equivalent at all. That warping emerges when the world is replaced by an abstraction, a pulling away, a departure from proximity, from the ability to touch and feel. This is an exhibition concerned with place, specifically the realities of place that escape the GPS yet still provide a sense of location, a ground. Surveying an inhabited landscape with naked eyes, mapping without maps, the artistic practices included here work with the potentialities of locality, specificity, and banality. They employ found objects, chance encounters, and the very idea of finding as a means of articulating the truth of a locale and those living there. These articulated truths need not reach out or speak explicitly, but are allowed to remain in position, asking that viewers come toward them in their specificity.  

Not the Territory Daniel T. Gaitor-Lomack, Chase Hall, Derrick Maddox, Gabriella Sanchez, Sissòn The world is warped when seen on a map. Massive sections of land that seem similar in size are really not equivalent at all. That warping emerges when the world is replaced by an abstraction, a pulling away, a departure from proximity, from the ability to touch and feel. This is an exhibition concerned with place, specifically the realities of place that escape the GPS yet still provide a sense of location, a ground. Surveying an inhabited landscape with naked eyes, mapping without maps, the artistic practices included here work with the potentialities of locality, specificity, and banality. They employ found objects, chance encounters, and the very idea of finding as a means of articulating the truth of a locale and those living there. These articulated truths need not reach out or speak explicitly, but are allowed to remain in position, asking that viewers come toward them in their specificity.  
Charles Ray
Charles Ray
Los Angeles - 1062 North Orange Grove
until 22-06-2019

Charles Ray: Two Ghosts Matthew Marks is pleased to announce Charles Ray: two ghosts, the next exhibition in his galleries at 1062 North Orange Grove and 7818 Santa Monica Boulevard. The exhibition includes three new sculptures and more than twenty works on paper. The centerpiece of the exhibition is Ray’s first work in stone, Two Horses Relief (2018), carved from a single block of Virginia granite. The sculpture is twelve feet tall and fourteen feet wide and weighs more than six tons. Clothespile (2018) is a portrait of the artist’s own clothes, a recurring subject for Ray since the early 1970s. Ray began Clothespile more than fifteen years ago, ultimately completing it through a process called direct metal laser sintering (DMLS), which uses lasers to fuse powdered metal into solid structures with an intricacy that cannot be achieved through casting or carving. Mountain Lion Attacking a Dog (2018) is a hypothetical scene from the hills around Ray’s home in Los Angeles. Each animal has been machined from a solid block of aluminum, producing a reflective surface that enhances the finely sculpted details on their bodies.

Charles Ray: Two Ghosts Matthew Marks is pleased to announce Charles Ray: two ghosts, the next exhibition in his galleries at 1062 North Orange Grove and 7818 Santa Monica Boulevard. The exhibition includes three new sculptures and more than twenty works on paper. The centerpiece of the exhibition is Ray’s first work in stone, Two Horses Relief (2018), carved from a single block of Virginia granite. The sculpture is twelve feet tall and fourteen feet wide and weighs more than six tons. Clothespile (2018) is a portrait of the artist’s own clothes, a recurring subject for Ray since the early 1970s. Ray began Clothespile more than fifteen years ago, ultimately completing it through a process called direct metal laser sintering (DMLS), which uses lasers to fuse powdered metal into solid structures with an intricacy that cannot be achieved through casting or carving. Mountain Lion Attacking a Dog (2018) is a hypothetical scene from the hills around Ray’s home in Los Angeles. Each animal has been machined from a solid block of aluminum, producing a reflective surface that enhances the finely sculpted details on their bodies.
Fred Wilson
Fred Wilson
Los Angeles - 300 South Mission Road
until 25-05-2019

Fred Wilson – Afro Kismet Fred Wilson’s Afro Kismet lays bare questions of visibility: where are Africans in historical accounts of early Europe? How have the narratives institutionalized by museums erased the presence of black individuals of the past and present?    

Fred Wilson – Afro Kismet Fred Wilson’s Afro Kismet lays bare questions of visibility: where are Africans in historical accounts of early Europe? How have the narratives institutionalized by museums erased the presence of black individuals of the past and present?    
Charles White
Charles White
Los Angeles - 5905 Wilshire Boulevard
until 09-06-2019

Charles White – A Retrospective The first major 21st-century museum retrospective on this famed mid-century artist, Charles White: A Retrospective traces White’s career and impact in the cities he called home: Chicago, his birthplace; New York, where he joined social causes and gained acclaim; and Los Angeles, where he developed his mature art and became a civil rights activist. The exhibition includes approximately 100 drawings and prints along with lesser-known oil paintings. A superb draftsman, White focused on images of both historical and contemporary African Americans, depicted in ideal portraits and everyday scenes. He extolled their dignity, humanity, and heroism in the face of the country’s long history of racial injustice and encouraged his viewers and fellow artists of color to project their own self-worth. White created non-violent images despite escalating racial tensions; only in the mid-1960s did he become frustrated with the slow progress and begin to infuse his work with allusions to the continuing violence, poverty, and disparity of educational, housing, employment, and voting opportunities.  

Charles White – A Retrospective The first major 21st-century museum retrospective on this famed mid-century artist, Charles White: A Retrospective traces White’s career and impact in the cities he called home: Chicago, his birthplace; New York, where he joined social causes and gained acclaim; and Los Angeles, where he developed his mature art and became a civil rights activist. The exhibition includes approximately 100 drawings and prints along with lesser-known oil paintings. A superb draftsman, White focused on images of both historical and contemporary African Americans, depicted in ideal portraits and everyday scenes. He extolled their dignity, humanity, and heroism in the face of the country’s long history of racial injustice and encouraged his viewers and fellow artists of color to project their own self-worth. White created non-violent images despite escalating racial tensions; only in the mid-1960s did he become frustrated with the slow progress and begin to infuse his work with allusions to the continuing violence, poverty, and disparity of educational, housing, employment, and voting opportunities.  
Soul of a Nation
Soul of a Nation
Los Angeles - 221 South Grand Avenue
until 01-09-2019

Soul of a Nation: Art in the Age of Black Power 1963-1983 Soul of a Nation: Art in the Age of Black Power shines a bright light on the vital contribution of Black artists made over two revolutionary decades in American history, beginning in 1963 at the height of the civil rights movement. The exhibition examines the influences, from the civil rights and Black Power movements to Minimalism and developments in abstraction, on artists such as Romare Bearden, Barkley Hendricks, Noah Purifoy, Martin Puryear, Faith Ringgold, Betye Saar, Alma Thomas, Charles White, and William T. Williams. Los Angeles-based artists appear throughout Soul of a Nation, and more deeply in three specific galleries, foregrounding the significant role of Los Angeles in the art and history of the civil rights movement and the subsequent activist era, and the critical influence and sustained originality of the city’s artists, many of whom have lacked wider recognition. Featuring the work of more than 60 influential artists and including vibrant paintings, powerful sculptures, street photography, murals, and more, this landmark exhibition is a rare opportunity to see era-defining artworks that changed the face of art in America.

Soul of a Nation: Art in the Age of Black Power 1963-1983 Soul of a Nation: Art in the Age of Black Power shines a bright light on the vital contribution of Black artists made over two revolutionary decades in American history, beginning in 1963 at the height of the civil rights movement. The exhibition examines the influences, from the civil rights and Black Power movements to Minimalism and developments in abstraction, on artists such as Romare Bearden, Barkley Hendricks, Noah Purifoy, Martin Puryear, Faith Ringgold, Betye Saar, Alma Thomas, Charles White, and William T. Williams. Los Angeles-based artists appear throughout Soul of a Nation, and more deeply in three specific galleries, foregrounding the significant role of Los Angeles in the art and history of the civil rights movement and the subsequent activist era, and the critical influence and sustained originality of the city’s artists, many of whom have lacked wider recognition. Featuring the work of more than 60 influential artists and including vibrant paintings, powerful sculptures, street photography, murals, and more, this landmark exhibition is a rare opportunity to see era-defining artworks that changed the face of art in America.
Wendy White
Wendy White
Los Angeles - 616 N La Brea Avenue
until 25-05-2019

Wendy White – Racetrack Playa The artist’s first solo exhibition in Los Angeles, Racetrack Playa, will feature new paintings, sculptures, pigment prints, and a site-specific installation. The exhibition takes its name from a three-mile dry lakebed in Death Valley National Park where sliding rocks or “sailing stones” have inscribed mysterious linear imprints on the landscape. Using this scarred landscape as a metaphor for our current times, the works in Racetrack Playa explore power, entitlement, and imperialism via the aesthetics and evolution of American car culture.

Wendy White – Racetrack Playa The artist’s first solo exhibition in Los Angeles, Racetrack Playa, will feature new paintings, sculptures, pigment prints, and a site-specific installation. The exhibition takes its name from a three-mile dry lakebed in Death Valley National Park where sliding rocks or “sailing stones” have inscribed mysterious linear imprints on the landscape. Using this scarred landscape as a metaphor for our current times, the works in Racetrack Playa explore power, entitlement, and imperialism via the aesthetics and evolution of American car culture.
Kiki Smith
Kiki Smith
Munich - Barer Strasse 40
until 26-05-2019

Kiki Smith – ?Touch. Prints   With the exhibition Touch. Prints by Kiki Smith, the Staatliche Graphische Sammlung München is honoring the internationally acclaimed artist Kiki Smith of New York for her extraordinarily generous donation: Kiki Smith has donated her oeuvre of published prints—single sheets, series, and artist’s books—to the Staatliche Graphische Sammlung München. If the series and books are counted as single prints, this amounts to the considerable number of 800 prints.  

Kiki Smith – ?Touch. Prints   With the exhibition Touch. Prints by Kiki Smith, the Staatliche Graphische Sammlung München is honoring the internationally acclaimed artist Kiki Smith of New York for her extraordinarily generous donation: Kiki Smith has donated her oeuvre of published prints—single sheets, series, and artist’s books—to the Staatliche Graphische Sammlung München. If the series and books are counted as single prints, this amounts to the considerable number of 800 prints.  
Thomas Ruff
Thomas Ruff
Munich - Amalienstrasse 41
until 01-06-2019

Thomas Ruff – Series Thomas Ruff is renowned for his conceptual approach. In the late 1970s he helped shape the paradigm shift from documentary to art photography and continues to enrich the genre with new ideas: from the interior views of German living spaces of the 1950s and ’70s, the oversize portraits, to the photographs of buildings reduced to their core, followed by shots of the night sky, which marked the first time Ruff did not create work based on his own photographs. The subsequent series were also shaped by the investigation and inspiration of found photographic footage. Here, Ruff’s main concern was not the mere depiction of an interesting scene but rather the idea from which these images evolved. The Negative series has Thomas Ruff relying on nineteenth-century original photographs, scanning the originals, inverting the appealing subjects into their negatives, and transforming the typical sepia tones into cyan blue, thus expanding the former manual photochemical process with digital cyanotypes.  

Thomas Ruff – Series Thomas Ruff is renowned for his conceptual approach. In the late 1970s he helped shape the paradigm shift from documentary to art photography and continues to enrich the genre with new ideas: from the interior views of German living spaces of the 1950s and ’70s, the oversize portraits, to the photographs of buildings reduced to their core, followed by shots of the night sky, which marked the first time Ruff did not create work based on his own photographs. The subsequent series were also shaped by the investigation and inspiration of found photographic footage. Here, Ruff’s main concern was not the mere depiction of an interesting scene but rather the idea from which these images evolved. The Negative series has Thomas Ruff relying on nineteenth-century original photographs, scanning the originals, inverting the appealing subjects into their negatives, and transforming the typical sepia tones into cyan blue, thus expanding the former manual photochemical process with digital cyanotypes.  
El Anatsui
El Anatsui
Munich - Prinzregentenstrasse 1
until 28-07-2019

El Anatsui – Triumphant Scale El Anatsui: Triumphant Scale is a major survey of the work of the acclaimed artist El Anatsui (*1944, Anyako, Ghana), perhaps Africa’s most prominent living artist. This survey — the largest ever mounted on Anatsui’s work —will occupy the museum’s entire East Wing and encompass every media in the artist’s prodigious fifty-year career. As the exhibition title suggests, the survey will focus on the triumphant and monumental quality of Anatsui’s sculptures, with the signature bottle-cap series developed over the last two decades situated at the core of the presentation. Along with these ambitious works, with their imposing physical presence and dazzling colors, the exhibition will also include wood sculptures and wall reliefs spanning the mid-1970s to the late 1990s; ceramic sculptures of the late 1970s; as well as drawings, prints, and books. In addition, Anatsui will create several new sculptures responding to the sweeping scale of the museum’s galleries, including a grand outdoor work on the building’s monumental façade.  

El Anatsui – Triumphant Scale El Anatsui: Triumphant Scale is a major survey of the work of the acclaimed artist El Anatsui (*1944, Anyako, Ghana), perhaps Africa’s most prominent living artist. This survey — the largest ever mounted on Anatsui’s work —will occupy the museum’s entire East Wing and encompass every media in the artist’s prodigious fifty-year career. As the exhibition title suggests, the survey will focus on the triumphant and monumental quality of Anatsui’s sculptures, with the signature bottle-cap series developed over the last two decades situated at the core of the presentation. Along with these ambitious works, with their imposing physical presence and dazzling colors, the exhibition will also include wood sculptures and wall reliefs spanning the mid-1970s to the late 1990s; ceramic sculptures of the late 1970s; as well as drawings, prints, and books. In addition, Anatsui will create several new sculptures responding to the sweeping scale of the museum’s galleries, including a grand outdoor work on the building’s monumental façade.  
Batia Suter
Batia Suter
Munich - Galeriestrasse 4
until 25-08-2019

Schaufenster am Hofgarten and Foyer: Batia Suter – Hexamiles (Odyssee) Batia Suter is a dedicated collector of images, which she scavenges from all manner of printed sources. In her work, the artist repurposes, combines, reorders, and alters these found images, exaggerating the distortion of reproductive technologies and producing new associations through poetic and spontaneous juxtaposition. Suter’s exhibition at Kunstverein München primarily considers representations of the landscape as both a historical genre and as an ideological tool for the claiming of territory, history, and the organization of relationships between humans and nature. Suter’s new works respond directly to the iconic murals in the Hofgarten Arkades by Richard Seewald, which were commissioned by Kunstverein München in 1961. In the schaufenster and in a video installation in the foyer, the artist combines Seewald’s post-expressionist Greek landscapes with similar photographic images from her archive, conflating photographic and painterly depiction to reveal compositional correlations. A comment on the artificial and idealized representations of the landscape in the hofgarten itself, her new works demonstrate how certain forms of representation exert a powerful influence on the real, and proposes formal and structural relationships beyond what is immediately apparent.

Schaufenster am Hofgarten and Foyer: Batia Suter – Hexamiles (Odyssee) Batia Suter is a dedicated collector of images, which she scavenges from all manner of printed sources. In her work, the artist repurposes, combines, reorders, and alters these found images, exaggerating the distortion of reproductive technologies and producing new associations through poetic and spontaneous juxtaposition. Suter’s exhibition at Kunstverein München primarily considers representations of the landscape as both a historical genre and as an ideological tool for the claiming of territory, history, and the organization of relationships between humans and nature. Suter’s new works respond directly to the iconic murals in the Hofgarten Arkades by Richard Seewald, which were commissioned by Kunstverein München in 1961. In the schaufenster and in a video installation in the foyer, the artist combines Seewald’s post-expressionist Greek landscapes with similar photographic images from her archive, conflating photographic and painterly depiction to reveal compositional correlations. A comment on the artificial and idealized representations of the landscape in the hofgarten itself, her new works demonstrate how certain forms of representation exert a powerful influence on the real, and proposes formal and structural relationships beyond what is immediately apparent.
Cici Wu
Cici Wu
Hong Kong - 19/F, Grand Marine Center ? 3 Yue Fung Street
until 25-05-2019

Cici Wu – Unfinished Return Empty Gallery is pleased to present “Unfinished Return”, New-York based artist Cici Wu’s first solo exhibition in Hong Kong. The centerpiece of Wu’s exhibition is her new film, Unfinished Return of Yu Man Hon. Shot in Hong Kong and Minneapolis, the film stars Jonathan Chang - a Taiwanese child-star best known for his role in Yi Yi (by Edward Yang, 2000) - in the role of a grown-up Yu Man Hon. Installed in the gallery as a looped 16mm projection, the film draws inspiration from the tradition of structuralist/ materialist film in its exploration of cinema as an analogy for internal experience. .

Cici Wu – Unfinished Return Empty Gallery is pleased to present “Unfinished Return”, New-York based artist Cici Wu’s first solo exhibition in Hong Kong. The centerpiece of Wu’s exhibition is her new film, Unfinished Return of Yu Man Hon. Shot in Hong Kong and Minneapolis, the film stars Jonathan Chang - a Taiwanese child-star best known for his role in Yi Yi (by Edward Yang, 2000) - in the role of a grown-up Yu Man Hon. Installed in the gallery as a looped 16mm projection, the film draws inspiration from the tradition of structuralist/ materialist film in its exploration of cinema as an analogy for internal experience. .
An Opera for Animals
An Opera for Animals
Hong Kong - 22/F, Wing Wah Industrial Building ? 677 King?s Road
until 09-06-2019

An Opera for Animals Kenojuak Ashevak, Shuvinai Ashoona, Firelei Baez, Julie Buffalohead, Lee Bul, Chen Qiulin, Ali Cherri, Clara Cheung, Narcisa Chindoy, Lok Chitrakar, Chto Delat, Cui Jie, Juan Davila, Heri Dono, Ticio Escobar, Jes Fan, Sofia Ferrer, Fifita Family, Chitra Ganesh, Beatriz González, Ho Tzu Nyen, Vivian Ho, Saodat Ismailova, Ilya and Emilia Kabakov, Alexander Kluge, Lawrence Lek, Candice Lin, Euan Macdonald, David Medalla, Barayuwa Munu?gurr, Ciprian Mure?an, Adam Nankervis, Kelly Nipper, Gabriel Pareyon, Gary Ross Pastrana, Tim Pitsiulak, Gala Porras Kim, Christoph Schlingensief, Simon Soon, Angela Su, Tao Hui, Wang Wei, Ming Wong, Haegue Yang, Yang Shen, Yee I-Lann, Samson Young, Robert Zhao Renhui, Constanze Zikos “Opera” has been used as the name to describe various traditions of performance, social arrangement, entertainment, and spiritual work from around the world. Many of these are ancient and radically different from each other but are nevertheless classified as regional variants of the (relatively young) Western model. But more than being yet another example of lingering colonial taxonomy, this brings into discussion the status of opera as the highest art form, reflecting the European colonial project. There is an almost perfect chronological overlap between the golden age of Western opera and Europe’s occupation of most of the world, at the end of the 19th century and beginning of the 20th. There are, as well, the obvious cases of operas built on exotic desire like Turandot and Madama Butterfly or the case of Aida, commissioned for the inauguration of the Suez Canal. But there is more to this than just chronological coincidence. The scale of ambition needed to imagine the absolute art form that opera was, aiming to organise every aspect and implication of the viewer’s experience, is intimately connected to that moment of absolute hubris when Europe imagined that it could dominate and reorganise the entire world. But European opera was not only a form of bourgeois entertainment, even one that was celebrating the glory of imperial conquest. These total spectacles, held in some of the grandest buildings erected in this time period—in the symbolic urban position previously occupied by cathedrals—with society neatly organised by class facing the elaborate scene on the stage, were in many ways quasi-religious experiences, where European glory was not just a subject of the performance but a collectively lived ecstatic apotheosis. This was happening as Europe was priding itself on its modern rationality, seeing itself in opposition to the “animist” world of the peoples it was occupying at the same time. The modern view, deeply connected to the colonial project, also changed the physical, emotional, and symbolic relationship between humans and animals, elevating the status of humans, in a view radically different from many indigenous systems of knowledge and value. But European opera contained the clues exposing this charade, for it was far from its official claim of a secular spectacle, amusing a modern society. The phantoms, monsters, and sacred animals of European Empires have always haunted these opera houses, where they were sacrificed, channeled, and embodied within the great shrines of modernity. An Opera for Animals is nevertheless interested in how these complexities are still alive, even after the demise of the colonial era and of Western opera as a fully living art form. As a parallel discussion, it includes less discussed connections between European classical music and other music systems. More extensively, the exhibition looks at different acts of staging that have been crucial to our imagination of modernity. The conflicts of staging, controlling, hiding, and repressing that occur within the operatic space are at the very core of our contemporary reality, defined by constructed and “alternative” truths, digital parallel worlds, self-staging of personal identities, and the increasingly palpable promise of a new technological turn in the field of intelligence. As such, the exhibition understands opera and related issues such as “staging” and “operatic environment” broadly, as terms describing the synthetic landscapes imagined and generated in our world today. Equally, the animal spirit connects the still very present ancient beliefs with a highly futuristic fear of new forms of irrationality and intelligence colonising our future. The world of technology continues to draw influence from the unique characteristics of certain animal species, enforcing this connection. This exhibition explores the way in which the future is now projected less as the rational thinking commonly remembered from the post-war era – advanced machinery, design, and social forms – but once more as a place of amorphous fear, of animals that might take over in artificial landscapes. The future it seems, will again be an opera for animals. Curated by Cosmin Costinas and Claire Shea.   

An Opera for Animals Kenojuak Ashevak, Shuvinai Ashoona, Firelei Baez, Julie Buffalohead, Lee Bul, Chen Qiulin, Ali Cherri, Clara Cheung, Narcisa Chindoy, Lok Chitrakar, Chto Delat, Cui Jie, Juan Davila, Heri Dono, Ticio Escobar, Jes Fan, Sofia Ferrer, Fifita Family, Chitra Ganesh, Beatriz González, Ho Tzu Nyen, Vivian Ho, Saodat Ismailova, Ilya and Emilia Kabakov, Alexander Kluge, Lawrence Lek, Candice Lin, Euan Macdonald, David Medalla, Barayuwa Munu?gurr, Ciprian Mure?an, Adam Nankervis, Kelly Nipper, Gabriel Pareyon, Gary Ross Pastrana, Tim Pitsiulak, Gala Porras Kim, Christoph Schlingensief, Simon Soon, Angela Su, Tao Hui, Wang Wei, Ming Wong, Haegue Yang, Yang Shen, Yee I-Lann, Samson Young, Robert Zhao Renhui, Constanze Zikos “Opera” has been used as the name to describe various traditions of performance, social arrangement, entertainment, and spiritual work from around the world. Many of these are ancient and radically different from each other but are nevertheless classified as regional variants of the (relatively young) Western model. But more than being yet another example of lingering colonial taxonomy, this brings into discussion the status of opera as the highest art form, reflecting the European colonial project. There is an almost perfect chronological overlap between the golden age of Western opera and Europe’s occupation of most of the world, at the end of the 19th century and beginning of the 20th. There are, as well, the obvious cases of operas built on exotic desire like Turandot and Madama Butterfly or the case of Aida, commissioned for the inauguration of the Suez Canal. But there is more to this than just chronological coincidence. The scale of ambition needed to imagine the absolute art form that opera was, aiming to organise every aspect and implication of the viewer’s experience, is intimately connected to that moment of absolute hubris when Europe imagined that it could dominate and reorganise the entire world. But European opera was not only a form of bourgeois entertainment, even one that was celebrating the glory of imperial conquest. These total spectacles, held in some of the grandest buildings erected in this time period—in the symbolic urban position previously occupied by cathedrals—with society neatly organised by class facing the elaborate scene on the stage, were in many ways quasi-religious experiences, where European glory was not just a subject of the performance but a collectively lived ecstatic apotheosis. This was happening as Europe was priding itself on its modern rationality, seeing itself in opposition to the “animist” world of the peoples it was occupying at the same time. The modern view, deeply connected to the colonial project, also changed the physical, emotional, and symbolic relationship between humans and animals, elevating the status of humans, in a view radically different from many indigenous systems of knowledge and value. But European opera contained the clues exposing this charade, for it was far from its official claim of a secular spectacle, amusing a modern society. The phantoms, monsters, and sacred animals of European Empires have always haunted these opera houses, where they were sacrificed, channeled, and embodied within the great shrines of modernity. An Opera for Animals is nevertheless interested in how these complexities are still alive, even after the demise of the colonial era and of Western opera as a fully living art form. As a parallel discussion, it includes less discussed connections between European classical music and other music systems. More extensively, the exhibition looks at different acts of staging that have been crucial to our imagination of modernity. The conflicts of staging, controlling, hiding, and repressing that occur within the operatic space are at the very core of our contemporary reality, defined by constructed and “alternative” truths, digital parallel worlds, self-staging of personal identities, and the increasingly palpable promise of a new technological turn in the field of intelligence. As such, the exhibition understands opera and related issues such as “staging” and “operatic environment” broadly, as terms describing the synthetic landscapes imagined and generated in our world today. Equally, the animal spirit connects the still very present ancient beliefs with a highly futuristic fear of new forms of irrationality and intelligence colonising our future. The world of technology continues to draw influence from the unique characteristics of certain animal species, enforcing this connection. This exhibition explores the way in which the future is now projected less as the rational thinking commonly remembered from the post-war era – advanced machinery, design, and social forms – but once more as a place of amorphous fear, of animals that might take over in artificial landscapes. The future it seems, will again be an opera for animals. Curated by Cosmin Costinas and Claire Shea.