Art feed

Curated by Exhibitionary

Raphaela Vogel
Raphaela Vogel
Basel - Steinenberg 7
until 12-08-2018

Raphaela Vogel – Ultranackt Raphaela Vogel’s exhibition hosts impressive sculptural installations, mostly poised in precarious balance, often in combination with pulsating sound or videos that feature the artist herself (*1988). Her series of new works in this first solo exhibition outside the artist’s native Germany unfurls a dystopian world full of dynamic perspectives. Ultranackt, or “ultra naked,” the exhibition’s title, offers a first clue. How could nakedness be raised to a higher power? By skinning, Raphaela Vogel seems to suggest in the final room of this first solo exhibition outside her native Germany. Here, she appears in a video donning a full-body leotard imprinted with human musculature as if revealed by flaying. In other artworks leading up to it, she is, alternately, in her birthday suit, her body pressed against a lone tree and the earth, or barely clothed, barreling down a waterslide. Camera operator, editor, costume and lighting designer, sound technician: Vogel typically occupies all of these roles, including that of sole human protagonist of her videos. Thus if there is a thread that runs through the artist’s work like a red-hot vein, it is the centrality of the artist herself, unabashedly exposed and exposing; if not literally naked, then meta- phorically so, baring it all. The effect of Vogel’s unrelenting exhibitionism is an anarchic critique of phallocracy: at once taking possession of her own image and commandeering the tools and technology necessary for its production, she renders these devices emancipatory. There is a restlessness to the result, a feverishness to the sound juxtapositions created by this former teenage founder of a punk band, and to the images captured by her audacious camera placements. As an art student, Vogel threw or swung cam- eras as they recorded; for one video, she even attached a camcorder to the automatic retractable roof of a convertible car and, for another, fastened it to the leg of a galloping horse. Lately, she has secured cameras to various pre-programmed drones, literalizing the notion of a bird’s-eye view (“Vogel” means “bird” in German), or let a camera careen down a waterslide while recording her. She cuts the images so they refract and reflect or repeat as they throb with soundtracks that range from song snippets of Judas Priest or a singer auditioning for a heavy metal band to the artist’s own cracking voice as she covers sentimental ballads. To open the exhibition, she dispenses with moving images altogether and instead relies on an installation whose soundtrack features swarms of crickets periodically interspersed by eruptions of one of Borussia Dortmund’s (BVB) anthems, passionately intoned by the German soccer club's fans

Raphaela Vogel – Ultranackt Raphaela Vogel’s exhibition hosts impressive sculptural installations, mostly poised in precarious balance, often in combination with pulsating sound or videos that feature the artist herself (*1988). Her series of new works in this first solo exhibition outside the artist’s native Germany unfurls a dystopian world full of dynamic perspectives. Ultranackt, or “ultra naked,” the exhibition’s title, offers a first clue. How could nakedness be raised to a higher power? By skinning, Raphaela Vogel seems to suggest in the final room of this first solo exhibition outside her native Germany. Here, she appears in a video donning a full-body leotard imprinted with human musculature as if revealed by flaying. In other artworks leading up to it, she is, alternately, in her birthday suit, her body pressed against a lone tree and the earth, or barely clothed, barreling down a waterslide. Camera operator, editor, costume and lighting designer, sound technician: Vogel typically occupies all of these roles, including that of sole human protagonist of her videos. Thus if there is a thread that runs through the artist’s work like a red-hot vein, it is the centrality of the artist herself, unabashedly exposed and exposing; if not literally naked, then meta- phorically so, baring it all. The effect of Vogel’s unrelenting exhibitionism is an anarchic critique of phallocracy: at once taking possession of her own image and commandeering the tools and technology necessary for its production, she renders these devices emancipatory. There is a restlessness to the result, a feverishness to the sound juxtapositions created by this former teenage founder of a punk band, and to the images captured by her audacious camera placements. As an art student, Vogel threw or swung cam- eras as they recorded; for one video, she even attached a camcorder to the automatic retractable roof of a convertible car and, for another, fastened it to the leg of a galloping horse. Lately, she has secured cameras to various pre-programmed drones, literalizing the notion of a bird’s-eye view (“Vogel” means “bird” in German), or let a camera careen down a waterslide while recording her. She cuts the images so they refract and reflect or repeat as they throb with soundtracks that range from song snippets of Judas Priest or a singer auditioning for a heavy metal band to the artist’s own cracking voice as she covers sentimental ballads. To open the exhibition, she dispenses with moving images altogether and instead relies on an installation whose soundtrack features swarms of crickets periodically interspersed by eruptions of one of Borussia Dortmund’s (BVB) anthems, passionately intoned by the German soccer club's fans
Martha Rosler & Hito Steyerl
Martha Rosler & Hito Steyerl
Basel - St. Alban-Rheinweg 60
until 02-12-2018

Martha Rosler & Hito Steyerl – War Games The exhibition presents works by the artists Martha Rosler (Brooklyn, NY) and Hito Steyerl (Berlin) in a dialogue that brings intersections between their thematic interests and similarities in their uses of media into focus. It is the first exhibition at a Swiss museum for both artists and the first show anywhere in which their works appear side by side. Yet the two oeuvres have a great deal in common, growing out of an unusually tenacious commitment to critical engagement with social and political issues. Resonances between their works speak to the affinity between their stances and the concerns both share—concerns that are of global significance and suggest both artists’ probing critical attention to the political developments of our time. Reality, in their art, is always considered in its interplay with the audiovisual media that shape the fabric of today’s lifeworld and our identities, highlighting their disruptive impact on human lives. It is not surprising, then, that both Rosler and Steyerl have repeatedly turned to new media for their work. In addition to creating photography and collages, Rosler was an early pioneer of video art, which lets her broadcast feminist ideas and counter the myths peddled by television and magazines with alternative depictions of women and modern everyday life. Lately she has complemented photographs, photocollages, and action and project formats with a growing preoccupation with social media and drone technology. In part based on computer animations, Steyerl’s more recent video installations—whose aesthetic is strongly informed by the visuals disseminated through online platforms like YouTube—are among the most advanced work done by visual artists in this medium today. Both artists choose to involve themselves in contemporary controversies while also studying their historical backgrounds and the role played by media. Fascinating in their aesthetic construction, Rosler’s and Steyerl’s works are formulations of resistance to the normalization of democratic decline, the privatization of public spaces and domains of life and their subjection to economic pressures, violence and oppression at the hands of private actors as well as the authorities, the reduction of the human being to his value as a source of labor and consumer, and the militarization of spheres of social life. In light of the rising tide of illiberalism around the world, the exhibition thus also reaffirms the museum’s commitment to showing art that does not shy away from contention in asserting the need to foster democratic structures, civic values, and tolerance.  

Martha Rosler & Hito Steyerl – War Games The exhibition presents works by the artists Martha Rosler (Brooklyn, NY) and Hito Steyerl (Berlin) in a dialogue that brings intersections between their thematic interests and similarities in their uses of media into focus. It is the first exhibition at a Swiss museum for both artists and the first show anywhere in which their works appear side by side. Yet the two oeuvres have a great deal in common, growing out of an unusually tenacious commitment to critical engagement with social and political issues. Resonances between their works speak to the affinity between their stances and the concerns both share—concerns that are of global significance and suggest both artists’ probing critical attention to the political developments of our time. Reality, in their art, is always considered in its interplay with the audiovisual media that shape the fabric of today’s lifeworld and our identities, highlighting their disruptive impact on human lives. It is not surprising, then, that both Rosler and Steyerl have repeatedly turned to new media for their work. In addition to creating photography and collages, Rosler was an early pioneer of video art, which lets her broadcast feminist ideas and counter the myths peddled by television and magazines with alternative depictions of women and modern everyday life. Lately she has complemented photographs, photocollages, and action and project formats with a growing preoccupation with social media and drone technology. In part based on computer animations, Steyerl’s more recent video installations—whose aesthetic is strongly informed by the visuals disseminated through online platforms like YouTube—are among the most advanced work done by visual artists in this medium today. Both artists choose to involve themselves in contemporary controversies while also studying their historical backgrounds and the role played by media. Fascinating in their aesthetic construction, Rosler’s and Steyerl’s works are formulations of resistance to the normalization of democratic decline, the privatization of public spaces and domains of life and their subjection to economic pressures, violence and oppression at the hands of private actors as well as the authorities, the reduction of the human being to his value as a source of labor and consumer, and the militarization of spheres of social life. In light of the rising tide of illiberalism around the world, the exhibition thus also reaffirms the museum’s commitment to showing art that does not shy away from contention in asserting the need to foster democratic structures, civic values, and tolerance.  
Night Fever. Designing Club Culture 1960 – Today
Night Fever. Designing Club Culture 1960 ? Today
Basel - Charles-Eames-Strasse 2
until 09-09-2018

Night Fever. Designing Club Culture 1960 – Today »Night Fever« opens with the 1960s, exploring the emergence of nightclubs as spaces for experimentation with interior design, new media, and alternative lifestyles. The Electric Circus (1967) in New York, for example, was designed as a countercultural venue by architect Charles Forberg while graphic designers Chermayeff & Geismar created its distinctive logo and font. Its multidisciplinary approach influenced many clubs in Europe, including Space Electronic (1969) in Florence. Designed by the collective Gruppo 9999, this was one of several nightclubs associated with Italy’s Radical Design avant-garde. The same goes for Piper in Turin (1966), a club designed by Giorgio Ceretti, Pietro Derossi, and Riccardo Rosso as a multifunctional space with a modular interior suitable for concerts, happenings, and experimental theatre as well as dancing. Gruppo UFO’s Bamba Issa (1969), a beach club in Forte dei Marmi, was another highly histrionic venue, its themed interior completely overhauled for every summer of its three years of existence. With the rise of disco in the 1970s, club culture gained a new momentum. Dance music developed into a genre of its own and the dance floor emerged as a stage for individual and collective performance, with fashion designers such as Halston and Stephen Burrows providing the perfect outfits to perform and shine. New York’s Studio 54, founded by Ian Schrager and Steve Rubell in 1977 and designed by Scott Bromley and Ron Doud, soon became a celebrity favourite. Only two years later, the movie »Saturday Night Fever« marked the apex of Disco’s commercialisation, which in turn sparked a backlash with homophobic and racist overtones that peaked at the Disco Demolition Night staged at a baseball stadium in Chicago. Around the same time, places in New York’s thriving nightlife like the Mudd Club (1978) and Area (1983) offered artists new spaces to merge the club scene and the arts and launched the careers of artists like Keith Haring und Jean-Michel Basquiat. In early 1980s London, meanwhile, clubs like Blitz and Taboo brought forth the New Romantic music and fashion movement, with wild child Vivienne Westwood a frequent guest at Michael and Gerlinde Costiff’s »Kinky Gerlinky« clubnight. But it was in Manchester that architect and designer Ben Kelly created the post-industrial cathedral of rave, The Haçienda (1982), from where Acid House conquered the UK. House and Techno were arguably the last great dance music movements to define a generation of clubs and ravers. They reached Berlin in the early 1990s just after the fall of the wall, when disused and derelict spaces became available for clubs like Tresor (1991); more than a decade later, the notorious Berghain (2004) was established in a former heating plant, demonstrating yet again how a vibrant club scene can flourish in the cracks of the urban fabric, on empty lots and in vacant buildings. Developments have become ever more complex since the early 2000s. On the one hand, club culture is thriving and evolving as it is adopted by global brands and music festivals; on the other, many nightclubs have been pushed out of the city or survive merely as sad historical monuments and modern ruins of a hedonistic past. At the same time, a new generation of architects is addressing the nightclub typology. The architectural firm OMA, founded by Rem Koolhaas, has developed a proposal for a twenty-first-century Ministry of Sound II for London, while Detroit-based designers Akoaki have created a mobile DJ booth called »The Mothership« to promote their hometown’s rich club heritage.  Based on extensive research and featuring many exhibits never before displayed in a museum, »Night Fever« brings together a wide range of material, from furniture to graphic design, architectural models to art, film and photography to fashion. The exhibition takes visitors through a fascinating nocturnal world that provides a vital contrast to the rules and routines of our everyday life.  While the exhibition basically follows a chronological concept, a music and light installation created specially by exhibition designer Konstantin Grcic and lighting designer Matthias Singer offers visitors the opportunity to experience all the many facets of nightclub design, from visual effects to sounds and sensations. A display of record covers, ranging from Peter Saville’s designs for Factory Records to Grace Jones’s album cover »Nightclubbing«, underlines the significant relationship between music and design in club culture. The multidisciplinary exhibition reveals the nightclub as much more than a dance bar or a music venue; it is an immersive environment for intense experiences.   

Night Fever. Designing Club Culture 1960 – Today »Night Fever« opens with the 1960s, exploring the emergence of nightclubs as spaces for experimentation with interior design, new media, and alternative lifestyles. The Electric Circus (1967) in New York, for example, was designed as a countercultural venue by architect Charles Forberg while graphic designers Chermayeff & Geismar created its distinctive logo and font. Its multidisciplinary approach influenced many clubs in Europe, including Space Electronic (1969) in Florence. Designed by the collective Gruppo 9999, this was one of several nightclubs associated with Italy’s Radical Design avant-garde. The same goes for Piper in Turin (1966), a club designed by Giorgio Ceretti, Pietro Derossi, and Riccardo Rosso as a multifunctional space with a modular interior suitable for concerts, happenings, and experimental theatre as well as dancing. Gruppo UFO’s Bamba Issa (1969), a beach club in Forte dei Marmi, was another highly histrionic venue, its themed interior completely overhauled for every summer of its three years of existence. With the rise of disco in the 1970s, club culture gained a new momentum. Dance music developed into a genre of its own and the dance floor emerged as a stage for individual and collective performance, with fashion designers such as Halston and Stephen Burrows providing the perfect outfits to perform and shine. New York’s Studio 54, founded by Ian Schrager and Steve Rubell in 1977 and designed by Scott Bromley and Ron Doud, soon became a celebrity favourite. Only two years later, the movie »Saturday Night Fever« marked the apex of Disco’s commercialisation, which in turn sparked a backlash with homophobic and racist overtones that peaked at the Disco Demolition Night staged at a baseball stadium in Chicago. Around the same time, places in New York’s thriving nightlife like the Mudd Club (1978) and Area (1983) offered artists new spaces to merge the club scene and the arts and launched the careers of artists like Keith Haring und Jean-Michel Basquiat. In early 1980s London, meanwhile, clubs like Blitz and Taboo brought forth the New Romantic music and fashion movement, with wild child Vivienne Westwood a frequent guest at Michael and Gerlinde Costiff’s »Kinky Gerlinky« clubnight. But it was in Manchester that architect and designer Ben Kelly created the post-industrial cathedral of rave, The Haçienda (1982), from where Acid House conquered the UK. House and Techno were arguably the last great dance music movements to define a generation of clubs and ravers. They reached Berlin in the early 1990s just after the fall of the wall, when disused and derelict spaces became available for clubs like Tresor (1991); more than a decade later, the notorious Berghain (2004) was established in a former heating plant, demonstrating yet again how a vibrant club scene can flourish in the cracks of the urban fabric, on empty lots and in vacant buildings. Developments have become ever more complex since the early 2000s. On the one hand, club culture is thriving and evolving as it is adopted by global brands and music festivals; on the other, many nightclubs have been pushed out of the city or survive merely as sad historical monuments and modern ruins of a hedonistic past. At the same time, a new generation of architects is addressing the nightclub typology. The architectural firm OMA, founded by Rem Koolhaas, has developed a proposal for a twenty-first-century Ministry of Sound II for London, while Detroit-based designers Akoaki have created a mobile DJ booth called »The Mothership« to promote their hometown’s rich club heritage.  Based on extensive research and featuring many exhibits never before displayed in a museum, »Night Fever« brings together a wide range of material, from furniture to graphic design, architectural models to art, film and photography to fashion. The exhibition takes visitors through a fascinating nocturnal world that provides a vital contrast to the rules and routines of our everyday life.  While the exhibition basically follows a chronological concept, a music and light installation created specially by exhibition designer Konstantin Grcic and lighting designer Matthias Singer offers visitors the opportunity to experience all the many facets of nightclub design, from visual effects to sounds and sensations. A display of record covers, ranging from Peter Saville’s designs for Factory Records to Grace Jones’s album cover »Nightclubbing«, underlines the significant relationship between music and design in club culture. The multidisciplinary exhibition reveals the nightclub as much more than a dance bar or a music venue; it is an immersive environment for intense experiences.   
Sam Gilliam
Sam Gilliam
Basel - St. Alban-Graben 8
until 30-09-2018

Sam Gilliam – The Music of Colour Sam Gilliam (b. Tupelo, Mississippi, 1933) is one of America’s most prominent abstract painters. Works by the artist, who has lived and worked in Washington, D.C., since 1962, are held by numerous museums including the Art Institute of Chicago, the MoMA (New York), the National Gallery of Art, and the Whitney Museum of Art. The Music of Color is his first solo exhibition in Europe. The show puts the focus on the years between 1967 and 1973, the period of the greatest radicalism in Gilliam’s oeuvre. His Yves Klein Blue, which harks back to his experimental early work, was presented at the 57th Venice Biennale in 2017. In 1967, Gilliam began work on a series of what came to be known as beveled-edge paintings: he poured acrylic paint directly onto the unprimed canvas, which he folded and crumpled while the paint was still wet. He then stretched the canvas over a chamfered frame, lending the painting a spatial and object-like quality. Gilliam’s signature creative achievement is the drape paintings series, begun in 1968, for which he applied the same procedure as in the beveled-edge paintings but then released the canvas from the stretcher frame. Unlike easel paintings, which usually function independently of their context, the drape paintings evince a performative aspect and interact with their respective settings; they can be installed in a variety of ways depending on the spatial context. Gilliam strove to blur the widely accepted boundary between painting and sculpture even as prominent contemporaries such as Donald Judd sought to reaffirm it. The paintings he created between 1967 and 1973 stand out for their monumentality and forceful use of color. The canvas becomes a medium that records traces of the production process and exhibits its own physicality. At a time when painting seemed to be in decline, Gilliam breathed new life into it; jazz was an important source of inspiration for his expressive and energetic style. The Music of Color also probes the political and historical dimension of Gilliam’s oeuvre. While the artist himself rarely comments on political issues, the works in his Martin Luther King series and Jail Jungle reflect the 1968 race riots and the highly polarized debate over black art and abstract painting in 1960s and 1970s America. The Kunstmuseum Basel presents 45 outstanding works from public and private collections in Europe and the United States.  

Sam Gilliam – The Music of Colour Sam Gilliam (b. Tupelo, Mississippi, 1933) is one of America’s most prominent abstract painters. Works by the artist, who has lived and worked in Washington, D.C., since 1962, are held by numerous museums including the Art Institute of Chicago, the MoMA (New York), the National Gallery of Art, and the Whitney Museum of Art. The Music of Color is his first solo exhibition in Europe. The show puts the focus on the years between 1967 and 1973, the period of the greatest radicalism in Gilliam’s oeuvre. His Yves Klein Blue, which harks back to his experimental early work, was presented at the 57th Venice Biennale in 2017. In 1967, Gilliam began work on a series of what came to be known as beveled-edge paintings: he poured acrylic paint directly onto the unprimed canvas, which he folded and crumpled while the paint was still wet. He then stretched the canvas over a chamfered frame, lending the painting a spatial and object-like quality. Gilliam’s signature creative achievement is the drape paintings series, begun in 1968, for which he applied the same procedure as in the beveled-edge paintings but then released the canvas from the stretcher frame. Unlike easel paintings, which usually function independently of their context, the drape paintings evince a performative aspect and interact with their respective settings; they can be installed in a variety of ways depending on the spatial context. Gilliam strove to blur the widely accepted boundary between painting and sculpture even as prominent contemporaries such as Donald Judd sought to reaffirm it. The paintings he created between 1967 and 1973 stand out for their monumentality and forceful use of color. The canvas becomes a medium that records traces of the production process and exhibits its own physicality. At a time when painting seemed to be in decline, Gilliam breathed new life into it; jazz was an important source of inspiration for his expressive and energetic style. The Music of Color also probes the political and historical dimension of Gilliam’s oeuvre. While the artist himself rarely comments on political issues, the works in his Martin Luther King series and Jail Jungle reflect the 1968 race riots and the highly polarized debate over black art and abstract painting in 1960s and 1970s America. The Kunstmuseum Basel presents 45 outstanding works from public and private collections in Europe and the United States.  
Louisa Clement
Louisa Clement
Basel - Im Berowergut, Baselstrasse 71
until 12-08-2018

Louisa Clement – Language of Realities Curated by Dominique Mollet and Sue Irion Louisa Clements art work deals with the interrelation of space and body moving in the diverse levels of reality. She studied at the Academy of Arts in Düsseldorf and became master student of Andreas Gursky.

Louisa Clement – Language of Realities Curated by Dominique Mollet and Sue Irion Louisa Clements art work deals with the interrelation of space and body moving in the diverse levels of reality. She studied at the Academy of Arts in Düsseldorf and became master student of Andreas Gursky.
Bacon – Giacometti
Bacon ? Giacometti
Basel - Baselstrasse 101
until 02-09-2018

Bacon – Giacometti From April 29, 2018, the Fondation Beyeler is staging an exhibition devoted to Alberto Giacometti and Francis Bacon: two outstanding protagonists of modern art who were at once friends and rivals, and whose creative vision exerted a powerful influence that still persists today. This is the first-ever joint museum exhibition involving Giacometti and Bacon, illuminating the relationship between the two artistic personalities. Different as their art may at first appear, the dual presentation of their work reveals many striking similarities. The exhibition brings together well-known key works by both artists with other works that are rarely shown—including, in particular, a series of original plaster figures from Giacometti’s estate that have never been publicly displayed before, and four triptychs by Bacon. A multimedia room offers spectacular insights into the artists’ studios. The exhibition has been organized by the Fondation Beyeler in cooperation with the Fondation Giacometti, Paris. The British painter Bacon and the Swiss sculptor Giacometti were introduced to one another in the early 1960s by a mutual friend, the painter Isabel Rawsthorne. By 1965, their friendship had grown close enough for Bacon to visit Giacometti at the Tate Gallery in London, where he was setting up a retrospective. This meeting is documented in a series of pictures taken by the English photographer Graham Keen, showing the two artists engaged in animated conversation. Over fifty years later, they meet again at the Fondation Beyeler, where their dual portrait, in the photograph by Graham Keen, stands at the start of the present exhibition. The encounter reveals astonishing similarities The exhibition’s curators—Catherine Grenier, director of the Fondation Giacometti in Paris, Michael Peppiatt, Bacon expert and a personal friend of the artist, and Ulf Küster, curator at the Fondation Beyeler—make astonishing parallels visible in this presentation of some 100 works. Bacon and Giacometti were united by an unwavering belief in the importance of the human figure. They were intensely concerned with the role of tradition and the Old Masters, whom they studied, copied and paraphrased. Both of them engaged with the problem of the two- and three-dimensional representation of space, integrating cage-like structures into their works as a means of isolating figures in their surroundings. Both occupied themselves with the fragmented and deformed body, and shared an obsession with portraiture and the depiction of human individuality. Both claimed to be “realists”, taking the human figure as their main point of reference, yet exploring—each in his own way—new extremes of abstraction, and thereby challenging the antithesis of figuration and abstraction that played such a central part in the history of modern art. The exhibition is thematically organized, grouping works by Giacometti and Bacon in a succession of nine rooms. Differences and similarities are highlighted, paying attention to particular features, such as Bacon’s often vivid colors, and the varieties of gray that characterize the work of Giacometti. The itinerary begins with portraits of the painter Isabel Rawsthorne, who was a close friend of Giacometti and Bacon and for a time was the former’s lover. She posed for both artists and also served as their muse. They stylized her in different ways: Giacometti depicted her from a distance (in the literal and figurative sense), while Bacon painted her as a femme fatale recalling the Furies of Greek tragedy.  Giacometti and Bacon were concerned, throughout their lives, with the depiction of figures in space, through the three-dimensionality of sculpture and the two-dimensional medium of painting. The next room is devoted to this aspect of their work. Giacometti created a series of sculptures incorporating rectangular frames, including La Cage (1950), which is exhibited here in the plaster and bronze versions. Two further structures of this kind by Giacometti are also on show: the legendary Surrealist sculpture Boule suspendue (1930), simply constructed but charged with an erotic energy that fired the imagination of generations of art-lovers, and the plaster original of Le Nez (1947-49), consisting of a caged head, suspended by a wire, with a petrified scream and an exaggeratedly long nose that will inevitably remind most viewers of the children’s book character Pinocchio. Bacon, on the other hand, often placed his painted figures in illusionist spatial constructions whose function, he explained, was to focus attention on the image. This, as Louise Bourgeois remarked, gives his pictures an “extremely sculptural” appearance. An especially notable work in this room is Figure in Movement (1972), a rarely exhibited painting from a private collection. The “cage” surrounding the anthropomorphic, indefinable figure in the center lends it an exceptionally dynamic, sculptural character. The space frames in which many of Bacon’s figures are set have a symbolic significance, conveying a sense of repression and coercion that finds release in the scream. This is the theme addressed in the next room. Referring to two historical models, Bacon tirelessly explored the possible means of expression for psychological and physical pain. He was inspired on the one hand by Velázquez’s Portrait of Pope Innocent X (1650), which to him was an iconic evocation of oppression and the abuse of power; and on the other, he frequently paraphrased the famous image of the screaming nursemaid, hit in the eye by a bullet, from Sergei Eisenstein‘s film Battleship Potemkin (1925). Bacon often combined these two models, as in Study for Portrait VII (1953) from the Museum of Modern Art, New York, and Figure with Meat (1954) from the Art Institute of Chicago. Bacon’s paintings are contrasted here with a selection of painted and sculpted portraits from the later phase of Giacometti’s oeuvre. The expressiveness and compulsive extroversion of Bacon’s pictures cast an immediate spell on the viewer, yet the restraint that typifies the art of Giacometti is no less hypnotic in its effect: his figures also embody a situation of coercion, bearing the apparent marks of the pain inflicted on the artist’s models by forcing them to sit still for hours at a stretch. Giacometti himself was also under extreme duress, cursing his own supposed lack of skill and incessantly reworking the portraits to a point of uncompromising reduction and concentration—as can be seen in Annette assise dans l’atelier (c. 1960), a loan from the Fondation Giacometti, Paris. Giacometti’s prolonged failure was in a way programmatic. Without the constant sense of failure, he might have lacked the impetus to continue. Work, for him, apparently involved an element of self-punishment, as if he were seeking atonement for the fact of his artistic existence. This would also seem to be true of Bacon, although the aggression in his art appears to be directed outward. The genre that most impressively embodies the obsessions of the two artists, in their struggle to embody their personal concept of realism, is the portrait. In the next room, a number of sculptures by Giacometti, chiefly in plaster, are confronted with small-format portraits by Bacon. The latter include four small triptychs, whose form, deriving from medieval altarpieces, allowed Bacon to show more facets of his models, in various states of distortion. One of Giacometti’s best-known late works is also to be seen here: the plaster version of Grande tête mince (1954), which is essentially a portrait of the artist’s brother, Diego. The sculpture is at once flat and voluminous, playing with two- and three-dimensionality and thus with the principles of painting and sculpture. A highlight among the Bacon pictures in this room is Self-Portrait (1987), from a private collection and rarely exhibited, which has a strange air of detachment. The next room begins with a group of standing female figures by Giacometti, belonging mainly to the Femmes de Venise, created for the 1956 Venice Biennale. The figures are like centers of force, with an extreme degree of concentration and condensation: the rough, fragmentary surfaces defy ready understanding, conveying an ambivalent impression of dynamic tranquility. This also applies, to a still greater extent, to the figures devised by Giacometti in the early 1960s for the Chase Manhattan Plaza in New York, a project that never came to fruition. The most important work by Giacometti here is the plaster version of the iconic Homme qui marche II, from 1960, which is exhibited with the bronze cast from the Beyeler Collection. The striking exhibits in this room also include a selection of impressive triptychs by Bacons, together with some of his large-format single canvases. Like Giacometti, Bacon sought to explode the traditional confines of the picture, with the aim of representing energy and conveying to the viewer an impression of movement, although the work is inherently static. Among these painted studies of movement, the triptych Three Studies of Figures on Beds (1972), from the Esther Grether Family Collection, particularly stands out. Here, Bacon uses the stylistic device of the arrow, indicating the direction of movement of the writhing bodies in the three panels. The thematic focus in the exhibition’s penultimate room is on the interplay of intensity, passion and aggression in the work of both artists. The deep scars left by Giacometti’s attacks with the modeling knife on his plaster busts indicate a high level of aggression, directed possibly against the model but certainly against his own work and therefore against the artist himself. This is apparent, for example, in Buste d’Annette IV (1962). Looking at Bacon’s pictures, a similar impression emerges: bodies and faces are distorted and mutilated with startling brutality. In the work of both artists, established aesthetic categories are overturned, to an astonishing degree. What Bacon and Giacometti reveal here is the nocturnal side of human existence. The multimedia room offers spectacular insights into the artists’ studios Their small and sparse studios were very special places for Bacon and Giacometti: chaotic spaces from which great art emerged. The multimedia installation in the final room, devised specially for the exhibition in Basel, offers a fascinating insight into this personal cosmos. The studios of both artists have been reconstructed from historic photographs. Two full-scale projections by Christian Borstlap, head of the Amsterdam design studio Part of a Bigger Plan, enables the viewer to witness, as if at first hand, the unfolding of creativity across the walls and floors of these very private spaces—Bacon refused to admit visitors to his studio. The projections are overlaid with the voices of Bacon and Giacometti, speaking about their work and their studios. The audiovisual reconstruction provides a direct insight into the artists’ working methods, opening up a further, fascinating dimension of their work. The BNP Paribas Swiss Foundation, as the partner of the Fondation Beyeler for multimedia mediation, has generously supported this aspect of the exhibition. Previously unexhibited plaster works from Giacometti’s estate Giacometti’s famous bronze sculptures were often preceded by a version in plaster. This in itself is unexceptional: the making of a plaster cast is part of the normal process of developing a sculpture. However, Giacometti’s plaster casts are unusual in that the artist continued to work on them after they were made, instead of merely using them as a model for the subsequent bronze casting. The plaster versions therefore have the status of art works in their own right, showing traces of the artist’s hand in the abrasions, scratched lines and notches in the surface and the touches of paint applied with delicate brushstrokes. Some of these works—for example, Petit Buste d’Annette (1946)—are so fragile that they have never been displayed in public before. The exhibition at the Fondation Beyeler includes twenty-three of Giacometti’s plaster casts, including the plaster version, in its original state, of Homme qui marche II (1960), which is shown here in conjunction with the bronze sculpture owned by the Beyeler Collection. For the first time in several decades, the plaster cast and the bronze version of this iconic work can be seen and admired together. Four major Bacon triptychs In addition to In Memory of George Dyer (1971), from the Beyeler Collection, the exhibition includes three further large-format triptychs by Bacon—a key later work, Triptych Inspired by The Oresteia of Aeschylus (1981), which documents Bacon’s interest in Greek mythology, together with Triptych (1967) from the Hirshhorn Museum in Washington, and Three Studies of Figures on Bed (1972), a rarely exhibited work from the Esther Grether Family Collection. These three loaned works help to sharpen the eye for the unique qualities of Bacon’s oeuvre. Ernst Beyeler was a friend of both artists Bacon and Giacometti had close contacts with a circle of contemporary intellectuals, including the French author and anthropologist Michel Leiris, the British art critic and curator David Sylvester, and the French poet and writer Jacques Dupin. Ernst Beyeler also met the two artists frequently, and commented on their friendly manner and personal charm. Moreover, he contributed very significantly to the dissemination of their work. He played a key role in establishing the Alberto Giacometti Foundation in Zurich, and held two exhibitions of works by Giacometti at his gallery, which managed the sale of around 350 works by the Swiss artist. Beyeler also devoted two solo exhibitions to Bacon, and some fifty works by the latter, including several triptychs, passed through his hands. In addition, Bacon and Giacometti featured in a total of, respectively, eight and 38 group exhibitions at the Beyeler gallery. It is unsurprising, therefore, that works by both artists—including Giacometti’s complete group of figures for the Chase Manhattan Plaza, with the famous Homme qui marche II (1960), and the triptych In Memory of George Dyer (1971), Bacon’s poignant tribute to his dead lover—now occupy a central place in the Beyeler Collection. In a letter to Ernst Beyeler, Bacon remarked that he considered the painting Lying Figure (1969), also in the Beyeler Collection, to be one of his best works.   

Bacon – Giacometti From April 29, 2018, the Fondation Beyeler is staging an exhibition devoted to Alberto Giacometti and Francis Bacon: two outstanding protagonists of modern art who were at once friends and rivals, and whose creative vision exerted a powerful influence that still persists today. This is the first-ever joint museum exhibition involving Giacometti and Bacon, illuminating the relationship between the two artistic personalities. Different as their art may at first appear, the dual presentation of their work reveals many striking similarities. The exhibition brings together well-known key works by both artists with other works that are rarely shown—including, in particular, a series of original plaster figures from Giacometti’s estate that have never been publicly displayed before, and four triptychs by Bacon. A multimedia room offers spectacular insights into the artists’ studios. The exhibition has been organized by the Fondation Beyeler in cooperation with the Fondation Giacometti, Paris. The British painter Bacon and the Swiss sculptor Giacometti were introduced to one another in the early 1960s by a mutual friend, the painter Isabel Rawsthorne. By 1965, their friendship had grown close enough for Bacon to visit Giacometti at the Tate Gallery in London, where he was setting up a retrospective. This meeting is documented in a series of pictures taken by the English photographer Graham Keen, showing the two artists engaged in animated conversation. Over fifty years later, they meet again at the Fondation Beyeler, where their dual portrait, in the photograph by Graham Keen, stands at the start of the present exhibition. The encounter reveals astonishing similarities The exhibition’s curators—Catherine Grenier, director of the Fondation Giacometti in Paris, Michael Peppiatt, Bacon expert and a personal friend of the artist, and Ulf Küster, curator at the Fondation Beyeler—make astonishing parallels visible in this presentation of some 100 works. Bacon and Giacometti were united by an unwavering belief in the importance of the human figure. They were intensely concerned with the role of tradition and the Old Masters, whom they studied, copied and paraphrased. Both of them engaged with the problem of the two- and three-dimensional representation of space, integrating cage-like structures into their works as a means of isolating figures in their surroundings. Both occupied themselves with the fragmented and deformed body, and shared an obsession with portraiture and the depiction of human individuality. Both claimed to be “realists”, taking the human figure as their main point of reference, yet exploring—each in his own way—new extremes of abstraction, and thereby challenging the antithesis of figuration and abstraction that played such a central part in the history of modern art. The exhibition is thematically organized, grouping works by Giacometti and Bacon in a succession of nine rooms. Differences and similarities are highlighted, paying attention to particular features, such as Bacon’s often vivid colors, and the varieties of gray that characterize the work of Giacometti. The itinerary begins with portraits of the painter Isabel Rawsthorne, who was a close friend of Giacometti and Bacon and for a time was the former’s lover. She posed for both artists and also served as their muse. They stylized her in different ways: Giacometti depicted her from a distance (in the literal and figurative sense), while Bacon painted her as a femme fatale recalling the Furies of Greek tragedy.  Giacometti and Bacon were concerned, throughout their lives, with the depiction of figures in space, through the three-dimensionality of sculpture and the two-dimensional medium of painting. The next room is devoted to this aspect of their work. Giacometti created a series of sculptures incorporating rectangular frames, including La Cage (1950), which is exhibited here in the plaster and bronze versions. Two further structures of this kind by Giacometti are also on show: the legendary Surrealist sculpture Boule suspendue (1930), simply constructed but charged with an erotic energy that fired the imagination of generations of art-lovers, and the plaster original of Le Nez (1947-49), consisting of a caged head, suspended by a wire, with a petrified scream and an exaggeratedly long nose that will inevitably remind most viewers of the children’s book character Pinocchio. Bacon, on the other hand, often placed his painted figures in illusionist spatial constructions whose function, he explained, was to focus attention on the image. This, as Louise Bourgeois remarked, gives his pictures an “extremely sculptural” appearance. An especially notable work in this room is Figure in Movement (1972), a rarely exhibited painting from a private collection. The “cage” surrounding the anthropomorphic, indefinable figure in the center lends it an exceptionally dynamic, sculptural character. The space frames in which many of Bacon’s figures are set have a symbolic significance, conveying a sense of repression and coercion that finds release in the scream. This is the theme addressed in the next room. Referring to two historical models, Bacon tirelessly explored the possible means of expression for psychological and physical pain. He was inspired on the one hand by Velázquez’s Portrait of Pope Innocent X (1650), which to him was an iconic evocation of oppression and the abuse of power; and on the other, he frequently paraphrased the famous image of the screaming nursemaid, hit in the eye by a bullet, from Sergei Eisenstein‘s film Battleship Potemkin (1925). Bacon often combined these two models, as in Study for Portrait VII (1953) from the Museum of Modern Art, New York, and Figure with Meat (1954) from the Art Institute of Chicago. Bacon’s paintings are contrasted here with a selection of painted and sculpted portraits from the later phase of Giacometti’s oeuvre. The expressiveness and compulsive extroversion of Bacon’s pictures cast an immediate spell on the viewer, yet the restraint that typifies the art of Giacometti is no less hypnotic in its effect: his figures also embody a situation of coercion, bearing the apparent marks of the pain inflicted on the artist’s models by forcing them to sit still for hours at a stretch. Giacometti himself was also under extreme duress, cursing his own supposed lack of skill and incessantly reworking the portraits to a point of uncompromising reduction and concentration—as can be seen in Annette assise dans l’atelier (c. 1960), a loan from the Fondation Giacometti, Paris. Giacometti’s prolonged failure was in a way programmatic. Without the constant sense of failure, he might have lacked the impetus to continue. Work, for him, apparently involved an element of self-punishment, as if he were seeking atonement for the fact of his artistic existence. This would also seem to be true of Bacon, although the aggression in his art appears to be directed outward. The genre that most impressively embodies the obsessions of the two artists, in their struggle to embody their personal concept of realism, is the portrait. In the next room, a number of sculptures by Giacometti, chiefly in plaster, are confronted with small-format portraits by Bacon. The latter include four small triptychs, whose form, deriving from medieval altarpieces, allowed Bacon to show more facets of his models, in various states of distortion. One of Giacometti’s best-known late works is also to be seen here: the plaster version of Grande tête mince (1954), which is essentially a portrait of the artist’s brother, Diego. The sculpture is at once flat and voluminous, playing with two- and three-dimensionality and thus with the principles of painting and sculpture. A highlight among the Bacon pictures in this room is Self-Portrait (1987), from a private collection and rarely exhibited, which has a strange air of detachment. The next room begins with a group of standing female figures by Giacometti, belonging mainly to the Femmes de Venise, created for the 1956 Venice Biennale. The figures are like centers of force, with an extreme degree of concentration and condensation: the rough, fragmentary surfaces defy ready understanding, conveying an ambivalent impression of dynamic tranquility. This also applies, to a still greater extent, to the figures devised by Giacometti in the early 1960s for the Chase Manhattan Plaza in New York, a project that never came to fruition. The most important work by Giacometti here is the plaster version of the iconic Homme qui marche II, from 1960, which is exhibited with the bronze cast from the Beyeler Collection. The striking exhibits in this room also include a selection of impressive triptychs by Bacons, together with some of his large-format single canvases. Like Giacometti, Bacon sought to explode the traditional confines of the picture, with the aim of representing energy and conveying to the viewer an impression of movement, although the work is inherently static. Among these painted studies of movement, the triptych Three Studies of Figures on Beds (1972), from the Esther Grether Family Collection, particularly stands out. Here, Bacon uses the stylistic device of the arrow, indicating the direction of movement of the writhing bodies in the three panels. The thematic focus in the exhibition’s penultimate room is on the interplay of intensity, passion and aggression in the work of both artists. The deep scars left by Giacometti’s attacks with the modeling knife on his plaster busts indicate a high level of aggression, directed possibly against the model but certainly against his own work and therefore against the artist himself. This is apparent, for example, in Buste d’Annette IV (1962). Looking at Bacon’s pictures, a similar impression emerges: bodies and faces are distorted and mutilated with startling brutality. In the work of both artists, established aesthetic categories are overturned, to an astonishing degree. What Bacon and Giacometti reveal here is the nocturnal side of human existence. The multimedia room offers spectacular insights into the artists’ studios Their small and sparse studios were very special places for Bacon and Giacometti: chaotic spaces from which great art emerged. The multimedia installation in the final room, devised specially for the exhibition in Basel, offers a fascinating insight into this personal cosmos. The studios of both artists have been reconstructed from historic photographs. Two full-scale projections by Christian Borstlap, head of the Amsterdam design studio Part of a Bigger Plan, enables the viewer to witness, as if at first hand, the unfolding of creativity across the walls and floors of these very private spaces—Bacon refused to admit visitors to his studio. The projections are overlaid with the voices of Bacon and Giacometti, speaking about their work and their studios. The audiovisual reconstruction provides a direct insight into the artists’ working methods, opening up a further, fascinating dimension of their work. The BNP Paribas Swiss Foundation, as the partner of the Fondation Beyeler for multimedia mediation, has generously supported this aspect of the exhibition. Previously unexhibited plaster works from Giacometti’s estate Giacometti’s famous bronze sculptures were often preceded by a version in plaster. This in itself is unexceptional: the making of a plaster cast is part of the normal process of developing a sculpture. However, Giacometti’s plaster casts are unusual in that the artist continued to work on them after they were made, instead of merely using them as a model for the subsequent bronze casting. The plaster versions therefore have the status of art works in their own right, showing traces of the artist’s hand in the abrasions, scratched lines and notches in the surface and the touches of paint applied with delicate brushstrokes. Some of these works—for example, Petit Buste d’Annette (1946)—are so fragile that they have never been displayed in public before. The exhibition at the Fondation Beyeler includes twenty-three of Giacometti’s plaster casts, including the plaster version, in its original state, of Homme qui marche II (1960), which is shown here in conjunction with the bronze sculpture owned by the Beyeler Collection. For the first time in several decades, the plaster cast and the bronze version of this iconic work can be seen and admired together. Four major Bacon triptychs In addition to In Memory of George Dyer (1971), from the Beyeler Collection, the exhibition includes three further large-format triptychs by Bacon—a key later work, Triptych Inspired by The Oresteia of Aeschylus (1981), which documents Bacon’s interest in Greek mythology, together with Triptych (1967) from the Hirshhorn Museum in Washington, and Three Studies of Figures on Bed (1972), a rarely exhibited work from the Esther Grether Family Collection. These three loaned works help to sharpen the eye for the unique qualities of Bacon’s oeuvre. Ernst Beyeler was a friend of both artists Bacon and Giacometti had close contacts with a circle of contemporary intellectuals, including the French author and anthropologist Michel Leiris, the British art critic and curator David Sylvester, and the French poet and writer Jacques Dupin. Ernst Beyeler also met the two artists frequently, and commented on their friendly manner and personal charm. Moreover, he contributed very significantly to the dissemination of their work. He played a key role in establishing the Alberto Giacometti Foundation in Zurich, and held two exhibitions of works by Giacometti at his gallery, which managed the sale of around 350 works by the Swiss artist. Beyeler also devoted two solo exhibitions to Bacon, and some fifty works by the latter, including several triptychs, passed through his hands. In addition, Bacon and Giacometti featured in a total of, respectively, eight and 38 group exhibitions at the Beyeler gallery. It is unsurprising, therefore, that works by both artists—including Giacometti’s complete group of figures for the Chase Manhattan Plaza, with the famous Homme qui marche II (1960), and the triptych In Memory of George Dyer (1971), Bacon’s poignant tribute to his dead lover—now occupy a central place in the Beyeler Collection. In a letter to Ernst Beyeler, Bacon remarked that he considered the painting Lying Figure (1969), also in the Beyeler Collection, to be one of his best works.   
Lynn Hershman Leeson
Lynn Hershman Leeson
Basel - Freilager-Platz 9
until 05-08-2018

Lynn Hershman Leeson – Anti-Bodies This exhibition, Hershman Leesons’s first solo show in Switzerland, features several current works that take on the themes of biological progress, developments in artificial intelligence and scientific research on antibodies. Lynn Hershman Leeson is a pioneer in media art. Since the 1960s, she has created works that address the interplay between technology, media and identity and the changing relationship between the body and technology. She examines the new technological tools’ impact on our private sphere, our ideas about individual identity and individuality, and our relationship with the real and virtual world. Her oeuvre encompasses photography, film, video, objects, installations, computer-based art, software and performance.  Time and again, Hershman Leeson has developed groundbreaking works, such as the first interactive video disc, which she created in 1984. As early as the 1990s, she began working with the themes of artificial intelligence and virtual reality. At the beginning of that decade, having recognized that it was no longer necessary to have a physical body to adopt a fictitious identity in the global network, she coined the term “anti-body” to refer to her research and work on a virtual identity in cyberspace. She saw her “anti-body” as a viral presence on the Internet that manifests itself in artificial intelligence forms, such as its online persona DiNA.  In her current works, Hershman Leeson dedicates herself to the latest challenge of our time: new biotechnological developments. Accordingly, for her first solo exhibition in Switzerland, we are presenting recent works that address the topics of biological progress, regenerative medicine, genetic research and antibody research. Some were created specially for the context of the show. The exhibition at HeK is staged as a scientific laboratory – the epistemological origin of modern life sciences and a place where knowledge is produced. At the center stands the installation The Infinity Engine, which is modeled after a genetic laboratory. This complex, multi-roomed work casts a critical eye on the ramifications of genetic experiments. The installation demonstrates how the boundaries between natural and artificial life are increasingly dissolving in the age of synthetic biology and how life today can be artificially created.  Among the topics addressed in The Infinity Engine are the manipulation of DNA, the production of transgenic organisms and the artificial production of human organs via 3D bioprinting. Hershman Leeson presents these achievements of regenerative medicine as artworks with their own unique aesthetics.  An antibody named Lynn Hershman in its molecular structure was developed exclusively for this exhibition. Antibodies play an essential role in the natural immune defence and are also developed for therapeutic purposes in research. They can be used specifically for the treatment of certain diseases (for example in cancer therapy). In collaboration with Novartis, this antibody is produced, researched and documented with regard to its properties and possible uses. The "Lynn Hershman Antibody" will be on display in the exhibition. Hershman Leeson's examination of questions of identity and uniqueness is extended by a new biological dimension.  Another new work focuses on DNA as a storage medium for all kinds of information. Older video works by the artist as well as all the documents from The Infinity Engine were stored in DNA, which in turn is staged as an artwork in the exhibition. Numerous scientists also contribute their thoughts to the show. In interviews with the artist, they vividly describe the latest techniques and methods of genetic engineering, regenerative medicine and bioprinting and point out the possibilities and opportunities these advances present. To represent this ability to construct life, Hershman Leeson made the striking photograph Double Hands, which refers to Michelangelo’s famous Sistine Chapel fresco on Creation, where God’s finger touches and creates man. In Hershman Leeson’s version, God’s finger is replaced by hypodermic needles. The exhibition at HeK is convincing proof of Hershman Leeson’s continued dedication to the relevant technologies and questions of our time. She is rightly described as a portraitist of the information age, a close observer of the protocols and institutions that will shape our concepts of identity and individuality in the future. In this sense, her art is also always political, since she concerns herself with the central social issues of our time.

Lynn Hershman Leeson – Anti-Bodies This exhibition, Hershman Leesons’s first solo show in Switzerland, features several current works that take on the themes of biological progress, developments in artificial intelligence and scientific research on antibodies. Lynn Hershman Leeson is a pioneer in media art. Since the 1960s, she has created works that address the interplay between technology, media and identity and the changing relationship between the body and technology. She examines the new technological tools’ impact on our private sphere, our ideas about individual identity and individuality, and our relationship with the real and virtual world. Her oeuvre encompasses photography, film, video, objects, installations, computer-based art, software and performance.  Time and again, Hershman Leeson has developed groundbreaking works, such as the first interactive video disc, which she created in 1984. As early as the 1990s, she began working with the themes of artificial intelligence and virtual reality. At the beginning of that decade, having recognized that it was no longer necessary to have a physical body to adopt a fictitious identity in the global network, she coined the term “anti-body” to refer to her research and work on a virtual identity in cyberspace. She saw her “anti-body” as a viral presence on the Internet that manifests itself in artificial intelligence forms, such as its online persona DiNA.  In her current works, Hershman Leeson dedicates herself to the latest challenge of our time: new biotechnological developments. Accordingly, for her first solo exhibition in Switzerland, we are presenting recent works that address the topics of biological progress, regenerative medicine, genetic research and antibody research. Some were created specially for the context of the show. The exhibition at HeK is staged as a scientific laboratory – the epistemological origin of modern life sciences and a place where knowledge is produced. At the center stands the installation The Infinity Engine, which is modeled after a genetic laboratory. This complex, multi-roomed work casts a critical eye on the ramifications of genetic experiments. The installation demonstrates how the boundaries between natural and artificial life are increasingly dissolving in the age of synthetic biology and how life today can be artificially created.  Among the topics addressed in The Infinity Engine are the manipulation of DNA, the production of transgenic organisms and the artificial production of human organs via 3D bioprinting. Hershman Leeson presents these achievements of regenerative medicine as artworks with their own unique aesthetics.  An antibody named Lynn Hershman in its molecular structure was developed exclusively for this exhibition. Antibodies play an essential role in the natural immune defence and are also developed for therapeutic purposes in research. They can be used specifically for the treatment of certain diseases (for example in cancer therapy). In collaboration with Novartis, this antibody is produced, researched and documented with regard to its properties and possible uses. The "Lynn Hershman Antibody" will be on display in the exhibition. Hershman Leeson's examination of questions of identity and uniqueness is extended by a new biological dimension.  Another new work focuses on DNA as a storage medium for all kinds of information. Older video works by the artist as well as all the documents from The Infinity Engine were stored in DNA, which in turn is staged as an artwork in the exhibition. Numerous scientists also contribute their thoughts to the show. In interviews with the artist, they vividly describe the latest techniques and methods of genetic engineering, regenerative medicine and bioprinting and point out the possibilities and opportunities these advances present. To represent this ability to construct life, Hershman Leeson made the striking photograph Double Hands, which refers to Michelangelo’s famous Sistine Chapel fresco on Creation, where God’s finger touches and creates man. In Hershman Leeson’s version, God’s finger is replaced by hypodermic needles. The exhibition at HeK is convincing proof of Hershman Leeson’s continued dedication to the relevant technologies and questions of our time. She is rightly described as a portraitist of the information age, a close observer of the protocols and institutions that will shape our concepts of identity and individuality in the future. In this sense, her art is also always political, since she concerns herself with the central social issues of our time.
Hello World. Revising a Collection
Hello World. Revising a Collection
Berlin - Invalidenstrasse 50/51
until 26-08-2018

Hello World. Revising a Collection Hello World. Revising a Collection is a critical inquiry into the predominantly Western focus of the collection of the Nationalgalerie: what would the collection look like today, had a more open and inclusive understanding of art characterised its genesis? How might the art historical canon and the historical narratives themselves have been transformed, thereby widening and multiplying perspectives? Taking these questions as its starting point, the exhibition unfolds in 13 thematic chapters and builds a pluri-vocal collaboration between internal and external curators. Hello World encompasses the entire exhibition space of the Hamburger Bahnhof – Museum für Gegenwart – Berlin, the Nationalgalerie’s site for contemporary art. Hello World places the focus on transnational artistic networks and cross-cultural exchanges from the late 19th century to the present. Numerous works from the collection of the Nationalgalerie provide points of departure for multiple narratives. These stories include Heinrich Vogeler’s path to the Soviet Union, Dadaist Tomoyoshi Murayama’s sojourn in Berlin in the 1920s, and the collaborations between Nicolás García Uriburu and Joseph Beuys. More than two hundred works—paintings, sculptures, installations, videos and films—from the holdings of the Nationalgalerie are comple­mented by approximately one hundred and fifty works on loan from other collections of the Staatliche Museen zu Berlin and the Stiftung Preussischer Kulturbesitz: Ethnologisches Museum, Kunstbibliothek, Kupferstichkabinett, Museum für Asiatische Kunst and the Zentralarchiv as well as the Ibero-Amerikanisches Institut and the Staatsbibliothek zu Berlin. In addition, 400 artworks, magazines and documents are presented in the exhibition from national and international collections. In total, the show features artworks by more than 250 artists. Today, the Nationalgalerie of the Staatliche Museen zu Berlin encompasses five museums: Alte National­galerie, Neue Nationalgalerie, Museum Berggruen, Sammlung Scharf-Gerstenberg and Hamburger Bahnhof – Museum für Gegenwart – Berlin. Its extensive holdings date from the late 18th century to the present and reflect the turbulence and highpoints of this period. Founded in 1861, several artworks in the collection were classified as “degenerate” by the Nazis, a verdict which inevitably led to their removal or destruction. Germany’s division after World War II also left its traces: while the Nationalgalerie in the west of Berlin shifted its attention to Western European and North American art, the Nationalgalerie in the eastern part of the city concentrated on German art. Hello World is the first exhibition to explicitly call into question the Eurocentric character of the Nationalgalerie’s collections, opening up a discussion on how a museum collection can reposition itself today.  

Hello World. Revising a Collection Hello World. Revising a Collection is a critical inquiry into the predominantly Western focus of the collection of the Nationalgalerie: what would the collection look like today, had a more open and inclusive understanding of art characterised its genesis? How might the art historical canon and the historical narratives themselves have been transformed, thereby widening and multiplying perspectives? Taking these questions as its starting point, the exhibition unfolds in 13 thematic chapters and builds a pluri-vocal collaboration between internal and external curators. Hello World encompasses the entire exhibition space of the Hamburger Bahnhof – Museum für Gegenwart – Berlin, the Nationalgalerie’s site for contemporary art. Hello World places the focus on transnational artistic networks and cross-cultural exchanges from the late 19th century to the present. Numerous works from the collection of the Nationalgalerie provide points of departure for multiple narratives. These stories include Heinrich Vogeler’s path to the Soviet Union, Dadaist Tomoyoshi Murayama’s sojourn in Berlin in the 1920s, and the collaborations between Nicolás García Uriburu and Joseph Beuys. More than two hundred works—paintings, sculptures, installations, videos and films—from the holdings of the Nationalgalerie are comple­mented by approximately one hundred and fifty works on loan from other collections of the Staatliche Museen zu Berlin and the Stiftung Preussischer Kulturbesitz: Ethnologisches Museum, Kunstbibliothek, Kupferstichkabinett, Museum für Asiatische Kunst and the Zentralarchiv as well as the Ibero-Amerikanisches Institut and the Staatsbibliothek zu Berlin. In addition, 400 artworks, magazines and documents are presented in the exhibition from national and international collections. In total, the show features artworks by more than 250 artists. Today, the Nationalgalerie of the Staatliche Museen zu Berlin encompasses five museums: Alte National­galerie, Neue Nationalgalerie, Museum Berggruen, Sammlung Scharf-Gerstenberg and Hamburger Bahnhof – Museum für Gegenwart – Berlin. Its extensive holdings date from the late 18th century to the present and reflect the turbulence and highpoints of this period. Founded in 1861, several artworks in the collection were classified as “degenerate” by the Nazis, a verdict which inevitably led to their removal or destruction. Germany’s division after World War II also left its traces: while the Nationalgalerie in the west of Berlin shifted its attention to Western European and North American art, the Nationalgalerie in the eastern part of the city concentrated on German art. Hello World is the first exhibition to explicitly call into question the Eurocentric character of the Nationalgalerie’s collections, opening up a discussion on how a museum collection can reposition itself today.  
 Mariechen Danz
Mariechen Danz
Berlin - Tempelhofer Ufer 22
until 28-07-2018

Mariechen Danz – Ore Oral Orientation Wentrup is pleased to present the first solo exhibition by Mariechen Danz at the gallery.   With sculptures, drawings, costumes and installations, Danz examines the history of knowledge transfer, placing the body and language at the center of her process-based practice. Using subjective mapping, Danz links elements from a seemingly infinite vocabulary of handed down symbols towards a simultaneous representation. From a critical as well as affirmative perspective, she studies and documents the process of constructing history through scientific imagery, in which it is people and not facts who determine history. The artist undermines traditional and historical conventions of linear historiography, questioning both intuitive and intellectual knowledge and develops a dialog between applied means and individual narratives.   In Ore Orientation: modular mapping system, Danz employs industrial metal panels – the latest development of her cooperation with Genghis Khan Fabrication Co. which began in 2013 - as a carrier of an infinitely expandable recording system. As the proverbial “ore,” the material aluminum is ultimately processed soil, made flat and milled to become thin, punched, and finally coded. The pre-existing templates are punching dies of various sockets, plug systems and ventilation slots from the sector of electronic information and data transmission, all enable data transfer – just as punctuation marks aid in the communication of the written word. The rearrangement and grouping results in an analog, codified system, which is based on transmitters and support systems of knowledge transfer. Danz traces stylized planispheres and in doing so isolating historic world maps and anatomical representations of various cultures and eras, reducing them to their essential particularities. In this way, she traces a history of ancient information carriers that testify to continuously changing worldviews. The shadows cast through these matrices manifest the changeable perspective and result in new possible mappings where the formal vocabulary of data processing creates independent cartographies.      The individual metal panels and the organ sculptures writhing from the walls are all autonomously functioning elements of a cartography that in its sum results in an alternative overall form. Strengthened by their root-like attachment, the organs mark and embody their location within it.   These learning organs are derived from medical teaching models: brains, hearts, livers, lungs and digestive systems. Like soil samples, these organs are created from a wide range of materials such as sand, soil, shells and trash; others are made of transparent resin in which semi-precious stones and organic materials are embedded. These naturally created “implants” jump-start an immanent process of fossilization and through their origin connect each organ with different locations in the world. Scattered loose letters of the alphabet clog up intestines and the brain, initiating processes of unlearning beyond the hierarchy of the Latin ABC and locate these processes within the body itself.   The costume Cloud / Vessel / Vein, made from silk and plastic, is printed with world maps, meteorological hurricane imagery and historical anatomical illustrations. These different layers are interlaced with children’s drawings, demonstrating in their colorful, hyper-subjective understanding of the human body and the planet, a still unprejudiced worldview. Flashlight transforms the previously colorful images on the light-reflecting fabric into flat, black marks, thus creating a parable about the central problems of recording and translation technologies, that are inherently prone to omissions, errors, and misunderstandings.   With Danz’ simultaneous evocation of cartography and anatomy, she demonstrates how both have emerged directly from human bodies. Anatomy, biology, geology, cartography and astronomy are all conflated in order to place them with, through, and in the body itself. Mariechen Danz (born 1980 in Dublin, Ireland) lives and works in Berlin.  Her works have been featured in institutions such as MAK Wien, Vienna; Centre Pompidou, Paris; Kunsthaus Bregenz, Bregenz; New Museum New York; Palais de Tokyo, Paris; GAK- Gesellschaft für Aktuelle Kunst, Bremen and CAN Centre d’Art Neuchâtel, France. Currently she’s part of the group shows Blind the Faith: Between the Visceral and the Cognitive in Contemporary Art at Haus der Kunst in Munich and Agora at High Line in New York. In 2017, she participated in the 57th La Biennale di Venezia Viva Arte Viva curated by Christine Macel.

Mariechen Danz – Ore Oral Orientation Wentrup is pleased to present the first solo exhibition by Mariechen Danz at the gallery.   With sculptures, drawings, costumes and installations, Danz examines the history of knowledge transfer, placing the body and language at the center of her process-based practice. Using subjective mapping, Danz links elements from a seemingly infinite vocabulary of handed down symbols towards a simultaneous representation. From a critical as well as affirmative perspective, she studies and documents the process of constructing history through scientific imagery, in which it is people and not facts who determine history. The artist undermines traditional and historical conventions of linear historiography, questioning both intuitive and intellectual knowledge and develops a dialog between applied means and individual narratives.   In Ore Orientation: modular mapping system, Danz employs industrial metal panels – the latest development of her cooperation with Genghis Khan Fabrication Co. which began in 2013 - as a carrier of an infinitely expandable recording system. As the proverbial “ore,” the material aluminum is ultimately processed soil, made flat and milled to become thin, punched, and finally coded. The pre-existing templates are punching dies of various sockets, plug systems and ventilation slots from the sector of electronic information and data transmission, all enable data transfer – just as punctuation marks aid in the communication of the written word. The rearrangement and grouping results in an analog, codified system, which is based on transmitters and support systems of knowledge transfer. Danz traces stylized planispheres and in doing so isolating historic world maps and anatomical representations of various cultures and eras, reducing them to their essential particularities. In this way, she traces a history of ancient information carriers that testify to continuously changing worldviews. The shadows cast through these matrices manifest the changeable perspective and result in new possible mappings where the formal vocabulary of data processing creates independent cartographies.      The individual metal panels and the organ sculptures writhing from the walls are all autonomously functioning elements of a cartography that in its sum results in an alternative overall form. Strengthened by their root-like attachment, the organs mark and embody their location within it.   These learning organs are derived from medical teaching models: brains, hearts, livers, lungs and digestive systems. Like soil samples, these organs are created from a wide range of materials such as sand, soil, shells and trash; others are made of transparent resin in which semi-precious stones and organic materials are embedded. These naturally created “implants” jump-start an immanent process of fossilization and through their origin connect each organ with different locations in the world. Scattered loose letters of the alphabet clog up intestines and the brain, initiating processes of unlearning beyond the hierarchy of the Latin ABC and locate these processes within the body itself.   The costume Cloud / Vessel / Vein, made from silk and plastic, is printed with world maps, meteorological hurricane imagery and historical anatomical illustrations. These different layers are interlaced with children’s drawings, demonstrating in their colorful, hyper-subjective understanding of the human body and the planet, a still unprejudiced worldview. Flashlight transforms the previously colorful images on the light-reflecting fabric into flat, black marks, thus creating a parable about the central problems of recording and translation technologies, that are inherently prone to omissions, errors, and misunderstandings.   With Danz’ simultaneous evocation of cartography and anatomy, she demonstrates how both have emerged directly from human bodies. Anatomy, biology, geology, cartography and astronomy are all conflated in order to place them with, through, and in the body itself. Mariechen Danz (born 1980 in Dublin, Ireland) lives and works in Berlin.  Her works have been featured in institutions such as MAK Wien, Vienna; Centre Pompidou, Paris; Kunsthaus Bregenz, Bregenz; New Museum New York; Palais de Tokyo, Paris; GAK- Gesellschaft für Aktuelle Kunst, Bremen and CAN Centre d’Art Neuchâtel, France. Currently she’s part of the group shows Blind the Faith: Between the Visceral and the Cognitive in Contemporary Art at Haus der Kunst in Munich and Agora at High Line in New York. In 2017, she participated in the 57th La Biennale di Venezia Viva Arte Viva curated by Christine Macel.
VALIE EXPORT
VALIE EXPORT
Berlin - Chausseestrasse 128/129
until 12-08-2018

VALIE EXPORT VALIE EXPORT is considered one of the most important artists working in the fields of conceptual media art, performance art and film. She continues to have an ongoing influence on generations of up-and-coming artists with her feminist and media-critical works. Neuer Berliner Kunstverein (n.b.k.) is presenting VALIE EXPORT in a first representative exhibition of works and archival materials at a German institution in 15 years.  From the beginning of her career, EXPORT has been addressing the issues of an increasingly mediatized society and questioning its functions, guiding principles and mechanisms of communication. The work complexes presented at the n.b.k. stem from five decades and illustrate the diversity of subjects in VALIE EXPORT’s oeuvre. How society, architecture, technologies and media (de)form people is the central focus of research in this process. Together with the artist, the curator Sabine Folie developed an exhibition that—after its first presentation at the Lentos Kunstmuseum Linz in 2017—will now be shown in an expanded form at Neuer Berliner Kunstverein. Here, the exhibition includes important works by the artist that in a unique way document EXPORT’s creative process and combines them with archival material such as sketches, letters, photos and notes. The archival material comes from the artist‘s pre-mortem bequest, which is being researched under the direction of Sabine Folie at the VALIE EXPORT Center Linz since November 2017 and is accessible there to an interested public.  

VALIE EXPORT VALIE EXPORT is considered one of the most important artists working in the fields of conceptual media art, performance art and film. She continues to have an ongoing influence on generations of up-and-coming artists with her feminist and media-critical works. Neuer Berliner Kunstverein (n.b.k.) is presenting VALIE EXPORT in a first representative exhibition of works and archival materials at a German institution in 15 years.  From the beginning of her career, EXPORT has been addressing the issues of an increasingly mediatized society and questioning its functions, guiding principles and mechanisms of communication. The work complexes presented at the n.b.k. stem from five decades and illustrate the diversity of subjects in VALIE EXPORT’s oeuvre. How society, architecture, technologies and media (de)form people is the central focus of research in this process. Together with the artist, the curator Sabine Folie developed an exhibition that—after its first presentation at the Lentos Kunstmuseum Linz in 2017—will now be shown in an expanded form at Neuer Berliner Kunstverein. Here, the exhibition includes important works by the artist that in a unique way document EXPORT’s creative process and combines them with archival material such as sketches, letters, photos and notes. The archival material comes from the artist‘s pre-mortem bequest, which is being researched under the direction of Sabine Folie at the VALIE EXPORT Center Linz since November 2017 and is accessible there to an interested public.  
Philippe Parreno
Philippe Parreno
Berlin - Niederkirchnerstrasse 7
until 05-08-2018

Philippe Parreno as part of the programme Immersion Philippe Parreno’s untitled solo exhibition at the Gropius Bau Berlin has yet to exist and will perhaps never exist as it is described here. This is not to say that it is any less real. To be sure, this show has many different modes of existence which, as of now, are purely virtual, sites of possibility which may or may not become actual. To date, the exhibition exists in various modes that have changed over time including one which can be experienced through VR headsets. Yet at this time, nothing appears fixed, the future that the exhibition takes remains open, and we can only imagine what Parreno intends to do. It seems certain that some old works will reappear. For example, a cuttlefish, an animal that turns up often in Parreno’s work will star in Anywhen, a film shot in 2016, which has recently been entirely re-edited. Many of these past works that may reappear were never really artworks to begin with. For example, the flower wallpaper previously seen as a background element in the set of Parreno’s film Marilyn (2012) moves to the foreground becoming an individual work covering a gallery wall. Fireflies will return too: hundreds of drawings of lightning bugs flash on a large LED screen and then fade away, their lifespan governed by complex algorithms. Certainly, this coming and going of old characters has something to do with birth, death and rebirth. When (or if) these old works meet, only time will tell how they will get along. Will they resonate? What new realities might emerge? Disembodied free-floating sensations and intensities will directly affect the bodies of the works themselves and those visiting the show. In one room, three different wind vortexes designed by scientists will guide the circulation of balloon fish on an elaborate path. This course in turn will be altered in unexpected ways as the fish interact with the spectators. Live sounds, emanating from somewhere in or beyond the city, leak inside and spread from one room to the next. These sounds re-surface in the reflecting pool of the atrium as they are transduced into visual patterns of waterlilies. Light constantly changes in the galleries as automatic blinds go up and down following a rhythm governed by an unknown authority. Another area is bathed in an eerie orange glow that evokes the fictional future of our fading sun. In another room, the temperature changes drastically. Is it just our imagination? How can we feel these intensities if they have yet to be actualized? As we move through the exhibit, we begin to feel as if we had entered a dimension not organized according to our normal spatial coordinates. This is an inner space, a purely mental landscape, a site animated by a paranoiac logic. In a back room, sits a bioreactor, consisting of a beaker in which micro-organisms multiply, mutate, and adapt to their environment. Connected to computers that orchestrate the events in the exhibition, these bacteria develop a memory, a collective intelligence that learns the changing rhythms of the show and evolves to anticipate future variations. As the micro-organisms persistently interact with each other, and with the contingent events taking place in the museum, their neural circuitry sets in motion a complex non-deterministic, non linear mise en scene. This alien brain in a vat becomes the living control center, the mastermind, of the exhibition. The bioreactor’s thought process is imperceptible to humans. We can only imagine what it intends to do. – Zoe Stillpass

Philippe Parreno as part of the programme Immersion Philippe Parreno’s untitled solo exhibition at the Gropius Bau Berlin has yet to exist and will perhaps never exist as it is described here. This is not to say that it is any less real. To be sure, this show has many different modes of existence which, as of now, are purely virtual, sites of possibility which may or may not become actual. To date, the exhibition exists in various modes that have changed over time including one which can be experienced through VR headsets. Yet at this time, nothing appears fixed, the future that the exhibition takes remains open, and we can only imagine what Parreno intends to do. It seems certain that some old works will reappear. For example, a cuttlefish, an animal that turns up often in Parreno’s work will star in Anywhen, a film shot in 2016, which has recently been entirely re-edited. Many of these past works that may reappear were never really artworks to begin with. For example, the flower wallpaper previously seen as a background element in the set of Parreno’s film Marilyn (2012) moves to the foreground becoming an individual work covering a gallery wall. Fireflies will return too: hundreds of drawings of lightning bugs flash on a large LED screen and then fade away, their lifespan governed by complex algorithms. Certainly, this coming and going of old characters has something to do with birth, death and rebirth. When (or if) these old works meet, only time will tell how they will get along. Will they resonate? What new realities might emerge? Disembodied free-floating sensations and intensities will directly affect the bodies of the works themselves and those visiting the show. In one room, three different wind vortexes designed by scientists will guide the circulation of balloon fish on an elaborate path. This course in turn will be altered in unexpected ways as the fish interact with the spectators. Live sounds, emanating from somewhere in or beyond the city, leak inside and spread from one room to the next. These sounds re-surface in the reflecting pool of the atrium as they are transduced into visual patterns of waterlilies. Light constantly changes in the galleries as automatic blinds go up and down following a rhythm governed by an unknown authority. Another area is bathed in an eerie orange glow that evokes the fictional future of our fading sun. In another room, the temperature changes drastically. Is it just our imagination? How can we feel these intensities if they have yet to be actualized? As we move through the exhibit, we begin to feel as if we had entered a dimension not organized according to our normal spatial coordinates. This is an inner space, a purely mental landscape, a site animated by a paranoiac logic. In a back room, sits a bioreactor, consisting of a beaker in which micro-organisms multiply, mutate, and adapt to their environment. Connected to computers that orchestrate the events in the exhibition, these bacteria develop a memory, a collective intelligence that learns the changing rhythms of the show and evolves to anticipate future variations. As the micro-organisms persistently interact with each other, and with the contingent events taking place in the museum, their neural circuitry sets in motion a complex non-deterministic, non linear mise en scene. This alien brain in a vat becomes the living control center, the mastermind, of the exhibition. The bioreactor’s thought process is imperceptible to humans. We can only imagine what it intends to do. – Zoe Stillpass
James Turrell
James Turrell
Berlin - Lindenstrasse 9?14
until 30-09-2018

James Turrell – Ganzfeld "Aural" In a temporary structure in the museum garden, we are presenting the immersive installation Ganzfeld “Aural” by the artist James Turrell. “Aural” is the Berlin premiere of a Ganzfeld by the world’s foremost light sculptor. The installation is part of the Ganzfeld Pieces series, in which Turrell creates liminal zones of experience. Upon entering the Ganzfeld “Aural” installation, visitors are immersed in a space that reveals neither its light source nor its dimensions. Their eyes lose their frame of reference; their gaze is unleashed. Light, color, and space melt together. The installation’s gradual color shifts are punctuated by flashes of light. James Turell demands time from his visitors. Our eyes must first adjust before the light’s effect fully unfolds. Suddenly, we perceive the slightest stimuli and changes. This leads to dreamlike experiences reminiscent of thick fog, expanses of snow, or the dark of night.

James Turrell – Ganzfeld "Aural" In a temporary structure in the museum garden, we are presenting the immersive installation Ganzfeld “Aural” by the artist James Turrell. “Aural” is the Berlin premiere of a Ganzfeld by the world’s foremost light sculptor. The installation is part of the Ganzfeld Pieces series, in which Turrell creates liminal zones of experience. Upon entering the Ganzfeld “Aural” installation, visitors are immersed in a space that reveals neither its light source nor its dimensions. Their eyes lose their frame of reference; their gaze is unleashed. Light, color, and space melt together. The installation’s gradual color shifts are punctuated by flashes of light. James Turell demands time from his visitors. Our eyes must first adjust before the light’s effect fully unfolds. Suddenly, we perceive the slightest stimuli and changes. This leads to dreamlike experiences reminiscent of thick fog, expanses of snow, or the dark of night.
Louise Bourgeois
Louise Bourgeois
Berlin - Oberwallstrasse 1
until 29-07-2018

Louise Bourgeois – The Empty House The Schinkel Pavillon is pleased to announce The Empty House. The solo exhibition dedicated to Bourgeois’ sack forms brings together a range of works in diverse media from the last two decades of her life. Bourgeois first explored the possibilities of the sack form in her writings from the the early 1990s, and sacks – hollow or filled, transparent or opaque – began to appear regularly in her sculptures and drawings from the early 2000s. For Bourgeois, the sack form is both an architectonic structure and a representation of the female body in its various aspects of growth and decay, plenitude and incompleteness. Thus the empty sack may suggest an empty house but also symbolize an infertile woman or the bad breast that does not provide milk. As architectonic elements, the sack forms are related to the installations called cells that Bourgeois began making in 1991. The cells explore the complex interplay of memory, desire, architecture, and the five senses. In Bourgeois’s words, they articulate “different types of pain: physical, emotional, psychological, mental and intellectual pain ... each cell is concerned with the pleasure of the voyeur, with the attraction of seeing and being seen.” A major cell is showcased at the Schinkel Pavillon: Peaux des lapins, chiffons ferrailles a? vendre (2006). The oval cage of iron bars encloses sacks of chiffon-like material in shades of skin and pink, some of which are reminiscent of organs, membranes, body parts or genitalia (wombs, empty breasts, or scrota). A slender pillar of marble fragments stacked on top of each other resembles a spine from which the flesh has fallen away. Peaux des lapins... is installed in the center of the glazed octagon of the Schinkel Pavillon, creating a kind of a cell within a cell. A focussed selection of other works featuring the sack form are presented on the ground floor of the Pavillon. A series of red gouaches (2007-08) foreground Bourgeois’s exploration of the cycles of procreation, birth, growth, and death. Four large-format vitrines, which Bourgeois realized from 2005 to 2010 (the last created shortly before her death) and which are here presented together for the first time, offer a concentrate of the thematic and formal concerns of the cells. As always in Bourgeois’s work, art and life are inextricably entangled. In one of these vitrines, Bourgeois incorporated the berets that she wore over the course of her life. Stuffed and grouped together on a large fabric torso, they are reimagined as a field of rampant breasts, full and curvaceous—perhaps a self- portrait of sorts.  

Louise Bourgeois – The Empty House The Schinkel Pavillon is pleased to announce The Empty House. The solo exhibition dedicated to Bourgeois’ sack forms brings together a range of works in diverse media from the last two decades of her life. Bourgeois first explored the possibilities of the sack form in her writings from the the early 1990s, and sacks – hollow or filled, transparent or opaque – began to appear regularly in her sculptures and drawings from the early 2000s. For Bourgeois, the sack form is both an architectonic structure and a representation of the female body in its various aspects of growth and decay, plenitude and incompleteness. Thus the empty sack may suggest an empty house but also symbolize an infertile woman or the bad breast that does not provide milk. As architectonic elements, the sack forms are related to the installations called cells that Bourgeois began making in 1991. The cells explore the complex interplay of memory, desire, architecture, and the five senses. In Bourgeois’s words, they articulate “different types of pain: physical, emotional, psychological, mental and intellectual pain ... each cell is concerned with the pleasure of the voyeur, with the attraction of seeing and being seen.” A major cell is showcased at the Schinkel Pavillon: Peaux des lapins, chiffons ferrailles a? vendre (2006). The oval cage of iron bars encloses sacks of chiffon-like material in shades of skin and pink, some of which are reminiscent of organs, membranes, body parts or genitalia (wombs, empty breasts, or scrota). A slender pillar of marble fragments stacked on top of each other resembles a spine from which the flesh has fallen away. Peaux des lapins... is installed in the center of the glazed octagon of the Schinkel Pavillon, creating a kind of a cell within a cell. A focussed selection of other works featuring the sack form are presented on the ground floor of the Pavillon. A series of red gouaches (2007-08) foreground Bourgeois’s exploration of the cycles of procreation, birth, growth, and death. Four large-format vitrines, which Bourgeois realized from 2005 to 2010 (the last created shortly before her death) and which are here presented together for the first time, offer a concentrate of the thematic and formal concerns of the cells. As always in Bourgeois’s work, art and life are inextricably entangled. In one of these vitrines, Bourgeois incorporated the berets that she wore over the course of her life. Stuffed and grouped together on a large fabric torso, they are reimagined as a field of rampant breasts, full and curvaceous—perhaps a self- portrait of sorts.  
Heiner Franzen
Heiner Franzen
Berlin - Ltzowplatz 9
until 05-08-2018

Heiner Franzen – Großes Gesichtsfeld Under a pink colored carpet, the central rooms of the Haus am Lützowplatz lose all of their edges. The visitor walks across like over a soft, new skin. Are we standing on a tongue, are we lying inside a stomach or did we end up caught in the gaze of a staring face?   “Großes Gesichtsfeld” [Great Range of Vision] is Heiner Franzen’s first institutional solo exhibition in Berlin. Franzen is known for procedural drawings, sculptures, ground covering installations and video art, which deal with the history of the moving image, from early animation to Hollywood classics.     “Großes Gesichtsfeld” transforms the Haus am Lützowplatz into a walk-in movie projector. The drawings turn into an extension of the films, the films into an extension of the drawings, and the space into a moving image. Franzen’s work has no beginning and no end. They rather follow Franzen’s own, open definition of the artwork.   Within this definition, mechanisms of personal as well as collective memory play a crucial role. Franzen’s motifs float in a state of constant mutation. Flashing details from movies or Franzen’s cartoonesque figures emerge in new forms and materiality. Thus, Franzen examines the removal of boundaries of his materials by constantly updating them. Every image is the reflection of another.   Heiner Franzen, born in Papenburg in 1961, lives and works in Berlin since 1989.  

Heiner Franzen – Großes Gesichtsfeld Under a pink colored carpet, the central rooms of the Haus am Lützowplatz lose all of their edges. The visitor walks across like over a soft, new skin. Are we standing on a tongue, are we lying inside a stomach or did we end up caught in the gaze of a staring face?   “Großes Gesichtsfeld” [Great Range of Vision] is Heiner Franzen’s first institutional solo exhibition in Berlin. Franzen is known for procedural drawings, sculptures, ground covering installations and video art, which deal with the history of the moving image, from early animation to Hollywood classics.     “Großes Gesichtsfeld” transforms the Haus am Lützowplatz into a walk-in movie projector. The drawings turn into an extension of the films, the films into an extension of the drawings, and the space into a moving image. Franzen’s work has no beginning and no end. They rather follow Franzen’s own, open definition of the artwork.   Within this definition, mechanisms of personal as well as collective memory play a crucial role. Franzen’s motifs float in a state of constant mutation. Flashing details from movies or Franzen’s cartoonesque figures emerge in new forms and materiality. Thus, Franzen examines the removal of boundaries of his materials by constantly updating them. Every image is the reflection of another.   Heiner Franzen, born in Papenburg in 1961, lives and works in Berlin since 1989.  
Carsten Nicolai
Carsten Nicolai
Berlin - Alte Jakobstrasse 124?128
until 03-09-2018

Carsten Nicolai – tele Works by Carsten Nicolai (*1965 in Karl-Marx-Stadt, now Chemnitz) oscillate around the interfaces between art and science. He often explores sensory impressions and their (media-based) translation, with transmitters and receivers, classification systems and their breakpoints. Nicolai investigates intangible phenomena that give rise to fundamental questions about human consciousness—such as how much of what we perceive exists beyond our perceptions and to what extent it is constructed by the neural networks in our brains. Inspired by themes usually associated with neurobiology and other natural sciences, which relate to the study of micro- and macrosystems, his objects and installations result from a process of distillation and reduction. He created the light installation tele for the first exhibition space in the Berlinische Galerie. It alludes to a peculiar property of quantum entanglement. The phenomenon whereby two quantum systems that are widely separate in space share the same condition was described by Albert Einstein as “spukhafte Fernwirkung”: the two particles are so interconnected that any change in one has a direct, instantaneous effect on the state of the other, as if there were some telepathic link between them. The two mirror sculptures nearly three metres high, which resemble an Archimedean solid split in two, appear to communicate in equally eerie ways: laser beams flow back and forth between them, and as they hit the photocells they trigger new impulses which constantly replenish the beams. Nicolai builds here on a long-standing interest in self-perpetuating systems which, once they have been designed and set in motion, function without the need for any further intervention by the artist. Although light is immaterial, these laser beams dominate and define the exhibition space. Because electromagnetic waves spread at the speed of light, they are perceived by the human eye as continuous, straight rays, and this lends them a sculptural quality. The mirrors make it look as though the rays carry on into infinity, hinting at another universe, an autonomous system created by the artist. Our ability to see the laser beams varies according to where we stand. Besides, changing perspectives on the sculpted mirrors generate a plethora of images. Nicolai’s intervention tele makes us think about how we perceive: “You have to first perceive percipience in order to speak of perception at all.” (Heinz von Foerster, 1989) Carsten Nicolai has been accustomed to interdisciplinary working and thinking ever since he studied landscape architecture in Dresden. His course combined specialist knowledge from ecology, mathematics, biology, forest management, communication theory, and town and country planning. He grew up and acquired his early views of art in Chemnitz. The creative atmosphere in the city, where there was no art college or musical conservatory, was the product of autodidactic approaches applied in all kinds of contexts. Carsten Nicolai began by painting, until a creative crisis in the mid-1990s made him realize that he missed not having a time dimension in his visual works. It was around then that he began experimenting with high frequencies and the ability of the human ear to perceive them. This introduced him to sound as a material which—rather like the light in tele—is able to transport space and time. His interest in sound has continued, and not merely in his art: he is also active as a musician under the pseudonym alva noto and with his own music label. Carsten Nicolai operates across established boundaries between disciplines. Despite his interest in scientific phenomena and issues, it is the ephemerality, process and speculation that fascinate him, rather than the conclusions. This results in alternative models and semiotic systems for thinking about things we cannot describe and for comprehending reality.

Carsten Nicolai – tele Works by Carsten Nicolai (*1965 in Karl-Marx-Stadt, now Chemnitz) oscillate around the interfaces between art and science. He often explores sensory impressions and their (media-based) translation, with transmitters and receivers, classification systems and their breakpoints. Nicolai investigates intangible phenomena that give rise to fundamental questions about human consciousness—such as how much of what we perceive exists beyond our perceptions and to what extent it is constructed by the neural networks in our brains. Inspired by themes usually associated with neurobiology and other natural sciences, which relate to the study of micro- and macrosystems, his objects and installations result from a process of distillation and reduction. He created the light installation tele for the first exhibition space in the Berlinische Galerie. It alludes to a peculiar property of quantum entanglement. The phenomenon whereby two quantum systems that are widely separate in space share the same condition was described by Albert Einstein as “spukhafte Fernwirkung”: the two particles are so interconnected that any change in one has a direct, instantaneous effect on the state of the other, as if there were some telepathic link between them. The two mirror sculptures nearly three metres high, which resemble an Archimedean solid split in two, appear to communicate in equally eerie ways: laser beams flow back and forth between them, and as they hit the photocells they trigger new impulses which constantly replenish the beams. Nicolai builds here on a long-standing interest in self-perpetuating systems which, once they have been designed and set in motion, function without the need for any further intervention by the artist. Although light is immaterial, these laser beams dominate and define the exhibition space. Because electromagnetic waves spread at the speed of light, they are perceived by the human eye as continuous, straight rays, and this lends them a sculptural quality. The mirrors make it look as though the rays carry on into infinity, hinting at another universe, an autonomous system created by the artist. Our ability to see the laser beams varies according to where we stand. Besides, changing perspectives on the sculpted mirrors generate a plethora of images. Nicolai’s intervention tele makes us think about how we perceive: “You have to first perceive percipience in order to speak of perception at all.” (Heinz von Foerster, 1989) Carsten Nicolai has been accustomed to interdisciplinary working and thinking ever since he studied landscape architecture in Dresden. His course combined specialist knowledge from ecology, mathematics, biology, forest management, communication theory, and town and country planning. He grew up and acquired his early views of art in Chemnitz. The creative atmosphere in the city, where there was no art college or musical conservatory, was the product of autodidactic approaches applied in all kinds of contexts. Carsten Nicolai began by painting, until a creative crisis in the mid-1990s made him realize that he missed not having a time dimension in his visual works. It was around then that he began experimenting with high frequencies and the ability of the human ear to perceive them. This introduced him to sound as a material which—rather like the light in tele—is able to transport space and time. His interest in sound has continued, and not merely in his art: he is also active as a musician under the pseudonym alva noto and with his own music label. Carsten Nicolai operates across established boundaries between disciplines. Despite his interest in scientific phenomena and issues, it is the ephemerality, process and speculation that fascinate him, rather than the conclusions. This results in alternative models and semiotic systems for thinking about things we cannot describe and for comprehending reality.
Loris Gréaud
Loris Graud
Berlin - Goethestrasse 2/3
until 21-07-2018

Loris Gréaud – LADI ROGEURS: SIR LOUDRAGE - a still life Galerie Max Hetzler is pleased to announce the upcoming solo exhibition LADI ROGEURS: SIR LOUDRAGE – a still life by Loris Gréaud at Goethestraße 2/3.  Since the beginning of the 2000s, Loris Gréaud has pursued an atypical path in the field of contemporary art. His work prioritises the idea of the ‘project’. Using this temporally limited concept as a frame for his practice enables the artist to intervene with the given conditions of space and time. Systematically blurring and erasing the limits and borders between fiction and reality, Gréaud's projects create fluid, challenging and otherworldly experiences. Gréaud's first solo exhibition LADI ROGEURS with Galerie Max Hetzler in Paris in the beginning of this year was conceived as a three-dimensional sketch, encompassing the entire gallery space. In the spirit of the cinematic cross-fade principle, the show in Berlin is a continuation of Paris, reconfiguring the gallery space while drawing from the codes of a still life.  Tinted in a purple, diffuse light, the space is interrupted by organically formed sculptures, Spores, hanging from the ceiling, which spread the sound frequencies of dying stars into the surrounding space. Openings in the gallery floor, filled with mud, sand rust, liquids and waste collected at the original shooting site near Tallinn of Russian filmmaker Andrei Tarkovsky's science fiction masterpiece Stalker (1979) pick up the film's exceptional sentiment. And MACHINE, a tree-like sculpture transforms into an autonomous entity, seemingly moving its limbs beyond any control. Thus, creating a landscape that seems to emerge from another world – a synthetic, supernatural, and disruptively unreal sphere – the installation offers a vision of a contemporary form of vanitas.   The two solo exhibitions of Loris Gréaud at Galerie Max Hetzler introduce the last part of the trilogy initially started in 2008 with Cellar Door (2008-2011) and continued with The Unplayed Notes (2012-2017).  At the same time, Galerie Max Hetzler presents a solo exhibition with new works by Thomas Struth at Bleibtreustraße 45 and the gallery's temporary exhibition space at Kurfürstendamm 213. Loris Gréaud (*1979, Eaubonne) lives and works in Eaubonne in the suburbs of Paris. Gréaud’s projects have given rise to important solo exhibitions. He was the first artist to use the entire space of the Palais de Tokyo in Paris with his project Cellar Door (2008-2011), which was further developed at the Institute of Contemporary Art, London, Kunsthalle Wien, Vienna, Kunsthalle St. Gallen and at La Conservera, Murcia. In 2013, a double exhibition of his acclaimed project [I] was held at the Louvre and the Centre Pompidou in Paris. Gréaud took over the Dallas Contemporary in 2015 with his project The Unplayed Notes Museum. In 2016, he produced the project Sculpt specially for LACMA, Los Angeles, on the occasion of his eponymous solo show. His latest project is The Unplayed Notes Factory in Murano, which was curated by Nicolas Bourriaud as part of the 57th Venice Biennale. Gréaud’s work forms part of numerous public collections, including the Centre Pompidou, Paris; the LACMA, Los Angeles; the Musée d'Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris, Paris; Collection François Pinault, Venice; Fondation Louis Vuitton, Paris; Israel Museum, Jerusalem; Margulies Collection, Miami; Goetz Collection, Munich; Rubell Family Collection, Miami; Nam June Paik Art Centre, Yongin, among others.  

Loris Gréaud – LADI ROGEURS: SIR LOUDRAGE - a still life Galerie Max Hetzler is pleased to announce the upcoming solo exhibition LADI ROGEURS: SIR LOUDRAGE – a still life by Loris Gréaud at Goethestraße 2/3.  Since the beginning of the 2000s, Loris Gréaud has pursued an atypical path in the field of contemporary art. His work prioritises the idea of the ‘project’. Using this temporally limited concept as a frame for his practice enables the artist to intervene with the given conditions of space and time. Systematically blurring and erasing the limits and borders between fiction and reality, Gréaud's projects create fluid, challenging and otherworldly experiences. Gréaud's first solo exhibition LADI ROGEURS with Galerie Max Hetzler in Paris in the beginning of this year was conceived as a three-dimensional sketch, encompassing the entire gallery space. In the spirit of the cinematic cross-fade principle, the show in Berlin is a continuation of Paris, reconfiguring the gallery space while drawing from the codes of a still life.  Tinted in a purple, diffuse light, the space is interrupted by organically formed sculptures, Spores, hanging from the ceiling, which spread the sound frequencies of dying stars into the surrounding space. Openings in the gallery floor, filled with mud, sand rust, liquids and waste collected at the original shooting site near Tallinn of Russian filmmaker Andrei Tarkovsky's science fiction masterpiece Stalker (1979) pick up the film's exceptional sentiment. And MACHINE, a tree-like sculpture transforms into an autonomous entity, seemingly moving its limbs beyond any control. Thus, creating a landscape that seems to emerge from another world – a synthetic, supernatural, and disruptively unreal sphere – the installation offers a vision of a contemporary form of vanitas.   The two solo exhibitions of Loris Gréaud at Galerie Max Hetzler introduce the last part of the trilogy initially started in 2008 with Cellar Door (2008-2011) and continued with The Unplayed Notes (2012-2017).  At the same time, Galerie Max Hetzler presents a solo exhibition with new works by Thomas Struth at Bleibtreustraße 45 and the gallery's temporary exhibition space at Kurfürstendamm 213. Loris Gréaud (*1979, Eaubonne) lives and works in Eaubonne in the suburbs of Paris. Gréaud’s projects have given rise to important solo exhibitions. He was the first artist to use the entire space of the Palais de Tokyo in Paris with his project Cellar Door (2008-2011), which was further developed at the Institute of Contemporary Art, London, Kunsthalle Wien, Vienna, Kunsthalle St. Gallen and at La Conservera, Murcia. In 2013, a double exhibition of his acclaimed project [I] was held at the Louvre and the Centre Pompidou in Paris. Gréaud took over the Dallas Contemporary in 2015 with his project The Unplayed Notes Museum. In 2016, he produced the project Sculpt specially for LACMA, Los Angeles, on the occasion of his eponymous solo show. His latest project is The Unplayed Notes Factory in Murano, which was curated by Nicolas Bourriaud as part of the 57th Venice Biennale. Gréaud’s work forms part of numerous public collections, including the Centre Pompidou, Paris; the LACMA, Los Angeles; the Musée d'Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris, Paris; Collection François Pinault, Venice; Fondation Louis Vuitton, Paris; Israel Museum, Jerusalem; Margulies Collection, Miami; Goetz Collection, Munich; Rubell Family Collection, Miami; Nam June Paik Art Centre, Yongin, among others.  
Michelangelo Pistoletto
Michelangelo Pistoletto
Berlin - Hildebrandstrasse 2
until 29-09-2018

Michelangelo Pistoletto – Mirrors and Reflections  

Michelangelo Pistoletto – Mirrors and Reflections  
The Way Things Run. Part II: Cargo
The Way Things Run. Part II: Cargo
Berlin - Potsdamer Strasse 120
until 28-07-2018

The Way Things Run. Part II: Cargo El Anatsui, Alighiero Boetti, Cercle d'Art des Travailleurs de Plantation Congolaise (CATPC), Moyra Davey, Edith Dekyndt, Igor Hosnedl, David Lamelas, Christian Kosmas Mayer, Paulo Nazareth, Jala Wahid   On the occasion of this year's Berlin Biennial, the independent art space PS120 is pleased to announce its second exhibition in the trilogy The Way Things Run (Part II: Cargo). Cargo, the second iteration in the trilogy sets out to explore the ways in which artists narrate complex migratory histories in and through the commodity form. The commodity—understood as any kind of object, material, or experience that exists in a logic of exchange—is the most common cultural form in our global capitalist society. Proposing the commodity as a kind of material palimpsest, a container of social and political histories of movement of both people and things.   The exhibition begins with El Anatsui’s Diaspora (2012), who makes cloth-like sculptures from repurposed scrap metal from African dump sites. Anatsui examines the role of consumer debris within a globalizing African continent connecting issues of consumption with those of identity-formation.   Several works in the exhibition speculate the basic process of commodity signification: David Lamelas’s 1972 film installation Conflict of Meaning (Film Script) speaks to the shifting media semiotics of consumer goods by juxtaposing film and photography alongside each other, while Igor Hosnedl’s repeated use of Ancient Greek icons and motifs in his paintings serves as a way to comment upon their popular use in modern media society, particularly in early computer games, and later graphic design.   In Edith Dekyndt’s sculpture Don’t they (2017), human hair sourced from Brazil is suspended in a ponytail from the ceiling. A historical symbol of femininity, this bodily material has developed into a highly desired consumer object circulating between different consumer markets around the globe. In Copperheads (2018), Moyra Davey reflects upon the abstraction of value in a commodity society by photographing one of its lowest material denominators: the one-cent coin.   The series of chocolate sculptures by Cercle d'Art des Travailleurs de Plantation Congolaise (Congolese Plantation Workers Art League, or CATPC) extends the paradoxes of valorization into the context of art. Produced by Emery Mohamba & Mbuku Kimpala, two workers from a Belgian-owned chocolate plantation in Lusanga, The Democratic Republic of the Congo, these sculptures use as raw material the very commodity (pure chocolate) they produce as laborers—thus enhancing the demand of their own product.   Mobility and non-mobility across borders is a central question in the work of Alighiero Boetti (1940-1994). Engaging the changing geopolitics of his time, Boetti collected articles from the Italian newspaper La Stampa from 1967 until 1971, in the time between the Six Day War in the Sinai Peninsula and the secession of Bangladesh from Pakistan.   Bodies appear in abstract and fragmented renderings in the sculptural works of Jala Wahid, as lumpen parts or homeless biomorphic objects. Paulo Nazareth memorializes the most violent form of commodification, that of humans, by staging self-portraits with posters that mark the presence of dead slavers and slaves in his native Brazil.   The exhibition ends with a monumental installation The Life Story of Cornelius Johnson’s Olympic Oak and Other Matters of Survival (2017) by German artist Christian Kosmas Mayer, presented for the first time in Germany. The work tells the story of the African-American athlete who won gold at the High Jump competition in the 1936 Nazi Olympic Games in Berlin—a victory that was met with discrimination and delegitimization by both the German and U.S. Heads of States (Adolf Hitler and Franklin D. Roosevelt respectively). This perplexing case speaks to the way in which discrimination continues to manifest materially, that is, through materials and their circulation; but also to how strategies of survival and resistance may recurrently regenerate and manifest across history, time, and place.

The Way Things Run. Part II: Cargo El Anatsui, Alighiero Boetti, Cercle d'Art des Travailleurs de Plantation Congolaise (CATPC), Moyra Davey, Edith Dekyndt, Igor Hosnedl, David Lamelas, Christian Kosmas Mayer, Paulo Nazareth, Jala Wahid   On the occasion of this year's Berlin Biennial, the independent art space PS120 is pleased to announce its second exhibition in the trilogy The Way Things Run (Part II: Cargo). Cargo, the second iteration in the trilogy sets out to explore the ways in which artists narrate complex migratory histories in and through the commodity form. The commodity—understood as any kind of object, material, or experience that exists in a logic of exchange—is the most common cultural form in our global capitalist society. Proposing the commodity as a kind of material palimpsest, a container of social and political histories of movement of both people and things.   The exhibition begins with El Anatsui’s Diaspora (2012), who makes cloth-like sculptures from repurposed scrap metal from African dump sites. Anatsui examines the role of consumer debris within a globalizing African continent connecting issues of consumption with those of identity-formation.   Several works in the exhibition speculate the basic process of commodity signification: David Lamelas’s 1972 film installation Conflict of Meaning (Film Script) speaks to the shifting media semiotics of consumer goods by juxtaposing film and photography alongside each other, while Igor Hosnedl’s repeated use of Ancient Greek icons and motifs in his paintings serves as a way to comment upon their popular use in modern media society, particularly in early computer games, and later graphic design.   In Edith Dekyndt’s sculpture Don’t they (2017), human hair sourced from Brazil is suspended in a ponytail from the ceiling. A historical symbol of femininity, this bodily material has developed into a highly desired consumer object circulating between different consumer markets around the globe. In Copperheads (2018), Moyra Davey reflects upon the abstraction of value in a commodity society by photographing one of its lowest material denominators: the one-cent coin.   The series of chocolate sculptures by Cercle d'Art des Travailleurs de Plantation Congolaise (Congolese Plantation Workers Art League, or CATPC) extends the paradoxes of valorization into the context of art. Produced by Emery Mohamba & Mbuku Kimpala, two workers from a Belgian-owned chocolate plantation in Lusanga, The Democratic Republic of the Congo, these sculptures use as raw material the very commodity (pure chocolate) they produce as laborers—thus enhancing the demand of their own product.   Mobility and non-mobility across borders is a central question in the work of Alighiero Boetti (1940-1994). Engaging the changing geopolitics of his time, Boetti collected articles from the Italian newspaper La Stampa from 1967 until 1971, in the time between the Six Day War in the Sinai Peninsula and the secession of Bangladesh from Pakistan.   Bodies appear in abstract and fragmented renderings in the sculptural works of Jala Wahid, as lumpen parts or homeless biomorphic objects. Paulo Nazareth memorializes the most violent form of commodification, that of humans, by staging self-portraits with posters that mark the presence of dead slavers and slaves in his native Brazil.   The exhibition ends with a monumental installation The Life Story of Cornelius Johnson’s Olympic Oak and Other Matters of Survival (2017) by German artist Christian Kosmas Mayer, presented for the first time in Germany. The work tells the story of the African-American athlete who won gold at the High Jump competition in the 1936 Nazi Olympic Games in Berlin—a victory that was met with discrimination and delegitimization by both the German and U.S. Heads of States (Adolf Hitler and Franklin D. Roosevelt respectively). This perplexing case speaks to the way in which discrimination continues to manifest materially, that is, through materials and their circulation; but also to how strategies of survival and resistance may recurrently regenerate and manifest across history, time, and place.
Andro Wekua
Andro Wekua
Zrich - Lwenbru Areal, Limmatstrasse 270
until 05-08-2018

Andro Wekua This summer Kunsthalle Zürich will present the largest solo exhibition to date of the Georgian artist Andro Wekua. On show will be older and little known works, as well as new sculptures, a selection of current paintings and collages as well as the world premier of his newest film. Wekua’s art leaves no one indifferent, whether you happen to like the work or not. It is unabashed and intensive, it shines with a knowledge of materials, form, staging and the power of images possesses a distinctive feeling for both enticement and denial. The result is the creation of evocative and often uncanny spaces. They are places between before and after that serve  to conjure a present where time itself  appears to be waiting. Taking a long view of the work, the various motifs that the artist has been reconfiguring like a set of chess pieces for twenty years become apparent: the house, the landscape, the interior, the animal, the figure, the face, the machine.  We know this variation, re-formulating and interlacing of motifs from music, literature and film. In art, this approach has been somewhat forgotten, or is erroneously equated with repetition. However Wekua’s work shows how important motifs are, how they circle and capture impressions, memories and the unutterable. Landscapes of the soul are thus evoked, whose depths one might gladly wish to escape, be it by leaving the exhibition. These are by no means just apparent inner-worlds outside of time. History plays an important role here – or to put it better: another experience of history. Wekua’s art has been beholden to his interests and his life in the West since 1995, but also to his time before that in Sochumi, Tbilisi and civil war-affected Georgia. In his work west meets east, or more precisely east encounters west, though not as opposites, as many would like to see it, but as a complex and contradictory entanglement: „It is directed against everything that belongs to the system of art” (Wekua). Colour is central, but also – somewhat surprisingly – the seam. It is the scar and the punctuation mark of his work , nothing and yet everything. Because a seam is wholly dependant on the parts which it connects, and without them it is lost. Without a seam there is no film (the cut is a seam), no collage (joined by cutting). The same is true for Wekua’s sculptures or any of his latest paintings, many of which will be on show for the first time in Zürich. In its arbitrariness the seam reminds us that art is always a composition; that it is artificial, and like a text, a film, or a stage, reality is condensed. This double experience is what we will be exposed to in Kunsthalle Zürich: All is Fair in Dreams and War. Andro Wekua, born 1977 in Sochumi (former Soviet Union), lives and works in Berlin.

Andro Wekua This summer Kunsthalle Zürich will present the largest solo exhibition to date of the Georgian artist Andro Wekua. On show will be older and little known works, as well as new sculptures, a selection of current paintings and collages as well as the world premier of his newest film. Wekua’s art leaves no one indifferent, whether you happen to like the work or not. It is unabashed and intensive, it shines with a knowledge of materials, form, staging and the power of images possesses a distinctive feeling for both enticement and denial. The result is the creation of evocative and often uncanny spaces. They are places between before and after that serve  to conjure a present where time itself  appears to be waiting. Taking a long view of the work, the various motifs that the artist has been reconfiguring like a set of chess pieces for twenty years become apparent: the house, the landscape, the interior, the animal, the figure, the face, the machine.  We know this variation, re-formulating and interlacing of motifs from music, literature and film. In art, this approach has been somewhat forgotten, or is erroneously equated with repetition. However Wekua’s work shows how important motifs are, how they circle and capture impressions, memories and the unutterable. Landscapes of the soul are thus evoked, whose depths one might gladly wish to escape, be it by leaving the exhibition. These are by no means just apparent inner-worlds outside of time. History plays an important role here – or to put it better: another experience of history. Wekua’s art has been beholden to his interests and his life in the West since 1995, but also to his time before that in Sochumi, Tbilisi and civil war-affected Georgia. In his work west meets east, or more precisely east encounters west, though not as opposites, as many would like to see it, but as a complex and contradictory entanglement: „It is directed against everything that belongs to the system of art” (Wekua). Colour is central, but also – somewhat surprisingly – the seam. It is the scar and the punctuation mark of his work , nothing and yet everything. Because a seam is wholly dependant on the parts which it connects, and without them it is lost. Without a seam there is no film (the cut is a seam), no collage (joined by cutting). The same is true for Wekua’s sculptures or any of his latest paintings, many of which will be on show for the first time in Zürich. In its arbitrariness the seam reminds us that art is always a composition; that it is artificial, and like a text, a film, or a stage, reality is condensed. This double experience is what we will be exposed to in Kunsthalle Zürich: All is Fair in Dreams and War. Andro Wekua, born 1977 in Sochumi (former Soviet Union), lives and works in Berlin.
Doug Aitken
Doug Aitken
Zrich - Maag Areal, Zahnradstrasse 21
until 21-07-2018

Doug Aitken Galerie Eva Presenhuber is pleased to present a solo exhibition by Doug Aitken. The exhibition will open on June 9 during Zurich Art Weekend, just before the opening of Art Basel. It will feature Aitken’s newest video work, New Era, and will also premiere two new large-scale installations. Aitken has developed a multimedia oeuvre that both studies and leads into new art forms. His work spans a wide array of mediums, integrating film, sound, photography, sculpture, performance, happenings, and site-specific installations. He creates immersive multimedia landscapes and disrupts the conventions of the contemporary art world. This exhibition features three new installations including the video work New Era, and adds a new chapter to Aitken's oeuvre. Aitken believes that as we move forward, the viewer’s role will change and be far less passive. As new forms of art making are created that are living, interactive and continuously changing, so too will the viewer have continuously changing dialogues with these artworks. It is important to change the way art is seen and find alternatives that move beyond the traditional role of the viewer as voyeur and spectator. In Aitken’s work the viewer is immersed, activating the work and being activated by it. This new body of artwork takes the viewer into a different world, a world that explores ideas and takes you places that language cannot fully articulate. Through image, forms and sound, the artworks conceptualize the idea of a current world that is completely kinetic and synchronized, yet at other times a landscape that’s vastly isolating. Entering the first room of the gallery, New Era creates a hexagonal space of alternating mirrors and projections; the film takes the 1973 invention of the very first cellular telephone by Martin Cooper as a starting idea. It weaves his role in the history of mobile communication into a poetic narrative. This narrative disintegrates and abstracts, mirroring how the diametrically opposed notions of connectivity and freedom have been underlined in this paradigm-shifting moment in history. In the second room, the viewer steps directly into 3 Modern Figures (don’t forget to breathe), an installation of three human figures resting on a raw wooden floor. The figures are seen frozen only in form, crystallized in translucent glass. These are not heroic figures but a candid snapshot of modern individuals frozen as if time had stopped. In the empty core of the sculptures light emanates and pulses.   Light choreographs from person to person creating a rhythm that seems to both connect the figures and alienate each from the other. The figures are caught in the midst of making calls. Where a phone should be clutched in their hands there is instead a negative space. The patterns of light create a landscape of patterns and pulses of glowing colors. Echoing through the space is an original audio composition of layered vocals that moves in sync with the light choreography. In the third darkened room stands a 12-foot rock and concrete sculpture with visual parallels to a brutalist monument, titled Crossing the Border. The slab of stone and concrete is cut in the shape of a silhouetted image of Gandhi. In this seminal image of the 20th century, he is pictured climbing upward on a rocky trail keeping his balance with a wooden staff. In the dimly lit space we see his body and outline frozen in granite and stone. In place of the wooden stick he holds a glowing staff, made of translucent glass and glowing from within. Echoing in the large room we hear patterns of dripping water, the water appearing out of openings in the rock figure. Gradually the drips increase, building momentum until water pours out from all over the rock figure, the cascade of water synchronizing in speed with the pulsing of the light staff. Crossing the Border is a beacon, a marker standing in a perpetual twilight while looking toward the future. Connecting three works in the sequence of three rooms, this exhibition starts with the invention of the cellular phone, reflects the way humans are both in and out of sync in this age of technology and ends with Crossing the Border. The exhibition creates a fragmented narrative of today’s digital contemporary landscape. In this landscape, Aitken's works are signposts, making the viewer pause, stop and evaluate their surroundings.  Doug Aitken lives and works in Los Angeles, CA, USA.   

Doug Aitken Galerie Eva Presenhuber is pleased to present a solo exhibition by Doug Aitken. The exhibition will open on June 9 during Zurich Art Weekend, just before the opening of Art Basel. It will feature Aitken’s newest video work, New Era, and will also premiere two new large-scale installations. Aitken has developed a multimedia oeuvre that both studies and leads into new art forms. His work spans a wide array of mediums, integrating film, sound, photography, sculpture, performance, happenings, and site-specific installations. He creates immersive multimedia landscapes and disrupts the conventions of the contemporary art world. This exhibition features three new installations including the video work New Era, and adds a new chapter to Aitken's oeuvre. Aitken believes that as we move forward, the viewer’s role will change and be far less passive. As new forms of art making are created that are living, interactive and continuously changing, so too will the viewer have continuously changing dialogues with these artworks. It is important to change the way art is seen and find alternatives that move beyond the traditional role of the viewer as voyeur and spectator. In Aitken’s work the viewer is immersed, activating the work and being activated by it. This new body of artwork takes the viewer into a different world, a world that explores ideas and takes you places that language cannot fully articulate. Through image, forms and sound, the artworks conceptualize the idea of a current world that is completely kinetic and synchronized, yet at other times a landscape that’s vastly isolating. Entering the first room of the gallery, New Era creates a hexagonal space of alternating mirrors and projections; the film takes the 1973 invention of the very first cellular telephone by Martin Cooper as a starting idea. It weaves his role in the history of mobile communication into a poetic narrative. This narrative disintegrates and abstracts, mirroring how the diametrically opposed notions of connectivity and freedom have been underlined in this paradigm-shifting moment in history. In the second room, the viewer steps directly into 3 Modern Figures (don’t forget to breathe), an installation of three human figures resting on a raw wooden floor. The figures are seen frozen only in form, crystallized in translucent glass. These are not heroic figures but a candid snapshot of modern individuals frozen as if time had stopped. In the empty core of the sculptures light emanates and pulses.   Light choreographs from person to person creating a rhythm that seems to both connect the figures and alienate each from the other. The figures are caught in the midst of making calls. Where a phone should be clutched in their hands there is instead a negative space. The patterns of light create a landscape of patterns and pulses of glowing colors. Echoing through the space is an original audio composition of layered vocals that moves in sync with the light choreography. In the third darkened room stands a 12-foot rock and concrete sculpture with visual parallels to a brutalist monument, titled Crossing the Border. The slab of stone and concrete is cut in the shape of a silhouetted image of Gandhi. In this seminal image of the 20th century, he is pictured climbing upward on a rocky trail keeping his balance with a wooden staff. In the dimly lit space we see his body and outline frozen in granite and stone. In place of the wooden stick he holds a glowing staff, made of translucent glass and glowing from within. Echoing in the large room we hear patterns of dripping water, the water appearing out of openings in the rock figure. Gradually the drips increase, building momentum until water pours out from all over the rock figure, the cascade of water synchronizing in speed with the pulsing of the light staff. Crossing the Border is a beacon, a marker standing in a perpetual twilight while looking toward the future. Connecting three works in the sequence of three rooms, this exhibition starts with the invention of the cellular phone, reflects the way humans are both in and out of sync in this age of technology and ends with Crossing the Border. The exhibition creates a fragmented narrative of today’s digital contemporary landscape. In this landscape, Aitken's works are signposts, making the viewer pause, stop and evaluate their surroundings.  Doug Aitken lives and works in Los Angeles, CA, USA.   
BRD
BRD
Zrich - Lrchentobelstrasse 25
until 09-09-2018

BRD Albert Oehlen, Georg Baselitz, Katharina Grosse, Karl Horst Hödicke, Martin Kippenberger, Imi Knoebel, Michael Krebber, Thomas Schütte, Sigmar Polke, Stefan Müller Grieder Contemporary is delighted to present the group show: BRD presenting works by three generations of German painters. Characterised by “historical flair.” German art of the 1990s and early 2000s was shaped by the political and social effects of the fall of the Berlin Wall, which resulted in the reunification of the two German states into a "BRD" (The Federal Re-public of Germany), as well as the generational change of the visual artists. Painting in particular occu-pied a pioneering position in the history of German 20th century art. After the Second World War, both East and West German artists set important attitudes for international art history. On the west side of the wall the focus was on the US and its application of abstract painting, whilst the east side emulated the socialist ideologies of Moscow in a more figurative strain. The West German Post-war style, influenced by artists who had escaped from the DDR in the BRD, such as Gerhard Richter, Sigmar Polke and Georg Baselitz, was founded in the late 1980s and developed into the new millennium. It was advanced by a new generation, some of whom were direct students who like their teachers, sought abstraction for new possibilities of expression. Artists such as Albert Oehlen, Mar-tin Kippenberger, Michael Krebber, or also Thomas Schütte, whose sculptural works tie in with the tradi-tion and themes of the 1960s and 1970s, but who distance themselves through the development of their own formal language. "BRD" creates a direct comparison of three generations of German painters. The third generation began in the 2000s and represented here by Stefan Müller and Katharina Grosse, characterises the continuous development of abstract painting in Germany and emphasizes the relevance and importance of German painting and art today.  

BRD Albert Oehlen, Georg Baselitz, Katharina Grosse, Karl Horst Hödicke, Martin Kippenberger, Imi Knoebel, Michael Krebber, Thomas Schütte, Sigmar Polke, Stefan Müller Grieder Contemporary is delighted to present the group show: BRD presenting works by three generations of German painters. Characterised by “historical flair.” German art of the 1990s and early 2000s was shaped by the political and social effects of the fall of the Berlin Wall, which resulted in the reunification of the two German states into a "BRD" (The Federal Re-public of Germany), as well as the generational change of the visual artists. Painting in particular occu-pied a pioneering position in the history of German 20th century art. After the Second World War, both East and West German artists set important attitudes for international art history. On the west side of the wall the focus was on the US and its application of abstract painting, whilst the east side emulated the socialist ideologies of Moscow in a more figurative strain. The West German Post-war style, influenced by artists who had escaped from the DDR in the BRD, such as Gerhard Richter, Sigmar Polke and Georg Baselitz, was founded in the late 1980s and developed into the new millennium. It was advanced by a new generation, some of whom were direct students who like their teachers, sought abstraction for new possibilities of expression. Artists such as Albert Oehlen, Mar-tin Kippenberger, Michael Krebber, or also Thomas Schütte, whose sculptural works tie in with the tradi-tion and themes of the 1960s and 1970s, but who distance themselves through the development of their own formal language. "BRD" creates a direct comparison of three generations of German painters. The third generation began in the 2000s and represented here by Stefan Müller and Katharina Grosse, characterises the continuous development of abstract painting in Germany and emphasizes the relevance and importance of German painting and art today.  
John Baldessari
John Baldessari
Zrich - Rmistrasse 37
until 28-07-2018

John Baldessari The exhibition at Mai 36 Galerie presents a new group of works by American artist John Baldessari, who has been represented by the gallery since 1991. The new group of works reprises combinations of text and image, and melds the motif of various windmills and a wind farm with a textual field in contrasting color, referring on Miguel de Cervantes’ novel Don Quijote. Baldessari, who will celebrate his 87th birthday in June, explores the relationship between image and language by deploying writing as a means of (visual) expression. This approach brings together two kinds of communication within a single work and addresses the complex relationship between two fundamentally different forms of human articulation. While teaching at the California Institute of the Arts, Baldessari influenced generations of artists. In the early 1970s, he founded and led the Post Studio seminar, with his now legendary Post Studio Art Class going on to foster such famous names as David Salle, James Welling, Matt Mullican, Troy Brauntuch and many more besides.  

John Baldessari The exhibition at Mai 36 Galerie presents a new group of works by American artist John Baldessari, who has been represented by the gallery since 1991. The new group of works reprises combinations of text and image, and melds the motif of various windmills and a wind farm with a textual field in contrasting color, referring on Miguel de Cervantes’ novel Don Quijote. Baldessari, who will celebrate his 87th birthday in June, explores the relationship between image and language by deploying writing as a means of (visual) expression. This approach brings together two kinds of communication within a single work and addresses the complex relationship between two fundamentally different forms of human articulation. While teaching at the California Institute of the Arts, Baldessari influenced generations of artists. In the early 1970s, he founded and led the Post Studio seminar, with his now legendary Post Studio Art Class going on to foster such famous names as David Salle, James Welling, Matt Mullican, Troy Brauntuch and many more besides.  
John Giorno
John Giorno
Zrich - Eisfeldstrasse/Grubenackerstrasse
until 02-09-2018

John Giorno: Let it Come, Let it Go, 2017 Since the late 1950s, it has been impossible to imagine New York’s bohemian culture without poet, artist and activist John Giorno (b. 1936 in the USA). Within the milieu of Andy Warhol’s Factory and the beatnik writers’ scene surrounding Allen Ginsberg, Giorno developed an oeuvre of his own, which manifests itself as a synthesis of poetry, performance and art. Inspired by pop culture, Giorno already had his tweet-like poems printed on T-shirts in the 1960s. In 1968, he developed a free hotline for his poetry, under the motto “Dial A Poem”. The popularisation of cultural energy is a matter of importance to this avowed Buddhist. In the exhibition New North Zurich, John Giorno presents two rocks, each of which has a poem engraved into its surface in capital letters. In the context of Schwamendingen and Oerlikon, where they can be seen on green lawns, Giorno’s poems generate new interpretations. Becoming, being, vanishing: these are the grand cosmological themes that Giorno’s poetry addresses – themes that are also strikingly reproduced in these neighbourhoods, which are strongly affected by structural and social transformation.

John Giorno: Let it Come, Let it Go, 2017 Since the late 1950s, it has been impossible to imagine New York’s bohemian culture without poet, artist and activist John Giorno (b. 1936 in the USA). Within the milieu of Andy Warhol’s Factory and the beatnik writers’ scene surrounding Allen Ginsberg, Giorno developed an oeuvre of his own, which manifests itself as a synthesis of poetry, performance and art. Inspired by pop culture, Giorno already had his tweet-like poems printed on T-shirts in the 1960s. In 1968, he developed a free hotline for his poetry, under the motto “Dial A Poem”. The popularisation of cultural energy is a matter of importance to this avowed Buddhist. In the exhibition New North Zurich, John Giorno presents two rocks, each of which has a poem engraved into its surface in capital letters. In the context of Schwamendingen and Oerlikon, where they can be seen on green lawns, Giorno’s poems generate new interpretations. Becoming, being, vanishing: these are the grand cosmological themes that Giorno’s poetry addresses – themes that are also strikingly reproduced in these neighbourhoods, which are strongly affected by structural and social transformation.
Teresa Burga
Teresa Burga
Zrich - Lwenbru Areal, Limmatstrasse 270
until 12-08-2018

Teresa Burga – Aleatory Structures Since the 1960s, the Peruvian artist Teresa Burga (b. Iquitos, Peru, 1935) has created works that constitute a fine-grained record of the social realities of her time. Her extensive oeuvre encompasses Pop Art-style paintings and environments as well as conceptual drawings and objects and cybernetic installations. The unifying constant in the artist’s formally and aesthetically diverse output in a wide range of media is her insistent endeavor to visualize complex social structures, but also the individual’s capacity for practical self-determination. The latter, Burga argues, is inextricably bound up with the exchange of information and an understanding of its contexts. As a female exponent of Latin American art, Burga was often ahead of her time in her creative practice. Due to the political situation in her native Peru, which long suffered under a military dictatorship and struggled with economic crises, she worked largely in isolation from the local and international arts scenes. The comprehensive retrospective Teresa Burga: Aleatory Structures at the Migros Museum für Gegenwartskunst is the artist’s first solo exhibition in Switzerland. The exhibition is curated by Heike Munder (director, Migros Museum für Gegenwartskunst). In conjunction with the opening, JRP|Ringier will publish a monograph with an introduction by Heike Munder and essays by Dorota Biczel, Julieta González, Kalliopi Minioudaki, Cristiana Tejo, and Jorge Villacorta as well as an interview with Teresa Burga by Miguel A. López. The exhibition and catalogue are produced in cooperation with the Kestner Gesellschaft, Hannover. Teresa Burga lives and works in Lima, Peru. Her work has recently attracted growing interest around the world, with exhibitions at the Hammer Museum, Los Angeles (2017), the Sculpture Center, New York (2017), the Tate Modern, London (2015), MALBA, Buenos Aires (2015), the Museum Ludwig, Cologne (2015), the Art Institute of Chicago (2015), the Venice Biennale (2015), the Sala de Arte Público Siqueiros, Mexico City (2014), the Palais des Beaux-Arts, Brussels (2014), the Museu de Arte Moderna do Rio de Janeiro (2014), the Istanbul Biennale (2012), the Württembergischer Kunstverein, Stuttgart (2011), and elsewhere.  

Teresa Burga – Aleatory Structures Since the 1960s, the Peruvian artist Teresa Burga (b. Iquitos, Peru, 1935) has created works that constitute a fine-grained record of the social realities of her time. Her extensive oeuvre encompasses Pop Art-style paintings and environments as well as conceptual drawings and objects and cybernetic installations. The unifying constant in the artist’s formally and aesthetically diverse output in a wide range of media is her insistent endeavor to visualize complex social structures, but also the individual’s capacity for practical self-determination. The latter, Burga argues, is inextricably bound up with the exchange of information and an understanding of its contexts. As a female exponent of Latin American art, Burga was often ahead of her time in her creative practice. Due to the political situation in her native Peru, which long suffered under a military dictatorship and struggled with economic crises, she worked largely in isolation from the local and international arts scenes. The comprehensive retrospective Teresa Burga: Aleatory Structures at the Migros Museum für Gegenwartskunst is the artist’s first solo exhibition in Switzerland. The exhibition is curated by Heike Munder (director, Migros Museum für Gegenwartskunst). In conjunction with the opening, JRP|Ringier will publish a monograph with an introduction by Heike Munder and essays by Dorota Biczel, Julieta González, Kalliopi Minioudaki, Cristiana Tejo, and Jorge Villacorta as well as an interview with Teresa Burga by Miguel A. López. The exhibition and catalogue are produced in cooperation with the Kestner Gesellschaft, Hannover. Teresa Burga lives and works in Lima, Peru. Her work has recently attracted growing interest around the world, with exhibitions at the Hammer Museum, Los Angeles (2017), the Sculpture Center, New York (2017), the Tate Modern, London (2015), MALBA, Buenos Aires (2015), the Museum Ludwig, Cologne (2015), the Art Institute of Chicago (2015), the Venice Biennale (2015), the Sala de Arte Público Siqueiros, Mexico City (2014), the Palais des Beaux-Arts, Brussels (2014), the Museu de Arte Moderna do Rio de Janeiro (2014), the Istanbul Biennale (2012), the Württembergischer Kunstverein, Stuttgart (2011), and elsewhere.  
Peter Fischli & David Weiss
Peter Fischli & David Weiss
Zrich - Thurgauerstrasse 2
until 02-09-2018

Peter Fischli & David Weiss: Das Haus The idea behind Haus was first implemented by Peter Fischli (b. 1952) and David Weiss (1946-2012) as part of Sculpture Projects Münster in 1987. Haus was intended as a 1:5 scale representation of a four-storey commercial building in the modern international style, which was to atmospherically fit into Münster’s cityscape “near the railway station, between the cinema and the sausage stand”. It was dismantled when the exhibition ended. In 2016, for the Fischli/Weiss retrospective at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York, it was recreated in cast aluminium on the basis of the original plans. As of May 2018, this work is permanently installed on a lawn in front of the cycle-racing track Offene Rennbahn Oerlikon. In a 2006 interview with Hans Ulrich Obrist, David Weiss explained that Haus was already retrospective in nature when it first came about: “The observer of the building becomes slightly melancholy because it represents a disappearing era, a time when people still had very different hopes to today.”  At its new permanent location in the middle of Oerlikon Haus acts as an intact fragment of memory that silently counters the incessant expansions and alterations. Part of Neuer Norden Zürich ?http://neuernorden.org

Peter Fischli & David Weiss: Das Haus The idea behind Haus was first implemented by Peter Fischli (b. 1952) and David Weiss (1946-2012) as part of Sculpture Projects Münster in 1987. Haus was intended as a 1:5 scale representation of a four-storey commercial building in the modern international style, which was to atmospherically fit into Münster’s cityscape “near the railway station, between the cinema and the sausage stand”. It was dismantled when the exhibition ended. In 2016, for the Fischli/Weiss retrospective at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York, it was recreated in cast aluminium on the basis of the original plans. As of May 2018, this work is permanently installed on a lawn in front of the cycle-racing track Offene Rennbahn Oerlikon. In a 2006 interview with Hans Ulrich Obrist, David Weiss explained that Haus was already retrospective in nature when it first came about: “The observer of the building becomes slightly melancholy because it represents a disappearing era, a time when people still had very different hopes to today.”  At its new permanent location in the middle of Oerlikon Haus acts as an intact fragment of memory that silently counters the incessant expansions and alterations. Part of Neuer Norden Zürich ?http://neuernorden.org
Otto Piene
Otto Piene
Vienna - Seilersttte 16
until 03-08-2018

Otto Piene – Selected Works 1957-2014 Curated by Harald Krejci Otto Piene was born in 1928 in Bad Laasphe, Germany. From 1949 to 1953 he studied painting and art education at the Academy of Arts in Munich, followed by a philosophy degree in Cologne. In response to the gloomy post-war art, Otto Piene and Heinz Mack founded the avant-garde group ZERO in the spring of 1957, whose predominant idea was a new beginning in art involving the elements of light, movement, wind, fire, air and energy - at this time he created his first grid-paintings. By pushing pure pigments through a sieve, the artist created a mechanical pattern that vibrates on the retina and releases the light energy of the pigment. Piene also explored other techniques to "liberate light," for example by burning candles through stencils that left traces of soot. By erasing his personal touch in these works, Piene separated from gestural painting, for him it was not the manuscript of the artist, but the experience of the viewer, which defines the artwork. As a pioneer of multimedia art, Piene worked early on with light and movement. For his light sculptures Lichtbalette (since 1958), the artist used various forms, such as cubes or spheres, from which light is projected onto the surrounding walls through grid surfaces. Piene also emphasized the dialogical character of his art in his light installations. His installations are defined by the locations, by use, staging. Finally, in old age, Piene transferred the idea of the grid-paintins to clay and ceramic works, he used special glazes to further extend the possibilities of light reflection. Piene’s great painterly works refer to his big SkyArt projects, which he developed in Boston from 1968 on until his unexpected death in Berlin in 2014. In addition to oil, fire and smoke pictures, light reliefs, clay-works there will also the light installation Pirouetten 2012/14 to be seen in the exhibition.  

Otto Piene – Selected Works 1957-2014 Curated by Harald Krejci Otto Piene was born in 1928 in Bad Laasphe, Germany. From 1949 to 1953 he studied painting and art education at the Academy of Arts in Munich, followed by a philosophy degree in Cologne. In response to the gloomy post-war art, Otto Piene and Heinz Mack founded the avant-garde group ZERO in the spring of 1957, whose predominant idea was a new beginning in art involving the elements of light, movement, wind, fire, air and energy - at this time he created his first grid-paintings. By pushing pure pigments through a sieve, the artist created a mechanical pattern that vibrates on the retina and releases the light energy of the pigment. Piene also explored other techniques to "liberate light," for example by burning candles through stencils that left traces of soot. By erasing his personal touch in these works, Piene separated from gestural painting, for him it was not the manuscript of the artist, but the experience of the viewer, which defines the artwork. As a pioneer of multimedia art, Piene worked early on with light and movement. For his light sculptures Lichtbalette (since 1958), the artist used various forms, such as cubes or spheres, from which light is projected onto the surrounding walls through grid surfaces. Piene also emphasized the dialogical character of his art in his light installations. His installations are defined by the locations, by use, staging. Finally, in old age, Piene transferred the idea of the grid-paintins to clay and ceramic works, he used special glazes to further extend the possibilities of light reflection. Piene’s great painterly works refer to his big SkyArt projects, which he developed in Boston from 1968 on until his unexpected death in Berlin in 2014. In addition to oil, fire and smoke pictures, light reliefs, clay-works there will also the light installation Pirouetten 2012/14 to be seen in the exhibition.  
​Class Reunion
?Class Reunion
Vienna - Museumsplatz 1
until 11-11-2018

?Class Reunion. Works from the Gaby and Wilhelm Schürmann Collection Nairy Baghramian, Silvia Bächli, Monika Baer, John Baldessari/Meg Cranston, Francesco Barocco, Jennifer Bornstein, Nicola Brunnhuber, Ernst Caramelle, Kate Davis, Heinrich Dunst, Marina Faust, Morgan Fisher, Jef Geys, Ralph Gibson, Julian Göthe, Trixi Groiss, Gerhard Gronefeld, Julia Haller, Rachel Harrison, Lone Haugaard Madsen, Georg Herold, Nicolas Jasmin, Raimer Jochims, Mike Kelley, , Martin Kippenberger, Silke Otto Knapp, Alwin Lay, Brandon Lattu, Michael Light, Sonia Leimer, Anita Leisz, Jochen Lempert, Zoe Leonard, Chris Martin, Park McArthur, Paul McCarthy, Meuser, Lisette Model, Oswald Oberhuber, Albert Oehlen, Anna Oppermann, Anna Ostoya, Jens Preusse, Rebecca Quaytman, Susanne Paesler, Laurie Parsons, Stephen Prina, Deborah Remington, Lin May Saeed, Pentti Sammallahti, Stefan Sandner, Arlene Shechet, Sigune Siévi, Michael Simpson, Michael E. Smith, Lewis Stein, Jana Sterbark, Esther Stocker, Walter Swennen, Alice Tippit, Joëlle Tuerlinckx, Nora Turato, Anne-Mie Van Kerckhoven, Miriam Visaczki, Franz West, Tristan Wilczek, Christopher Williams, Heimo Zobernig Curated by Wilhelm Schürmann Gaby and Wilhelm Schürmann do not see their collection as just private property or a prestige object, but rather as an item of cultural value that needs exchange with the public. Their collection has been constantly growing since the late 1970s, and it provides an incomparable view of the development of contemporary art from the 1980s onward. This is a progressive statement on behalf of contemporary art that is anchored in social issues and sees itself as a form of communication. The rationale behind the collection, which is held in Herzogenrath near Aachen and in Berlin, is both creative and productive, and the two collectors’ practice can be described as a particularly free-spirited form of cultural production. The act of collecting is realized less in the processes of keeping and completing artworks and is instead understood mainly as an invitation to participate in the public production of connections. This very pragmatic and hands-on approach is manifested in sensual and unconventional gestures of presenting, including the principle of “comparative seeing.” In this sense, the Class Reunion exhibition, the title of which refers to a 2008 installation of the same name by Berlin artist Nairy Baghramian, will unravel an exciting, humorous, and surprising dialogue between the diverse artistic positions in the collection, establishing unexpected points of contact. One focus in this is on Viennese influences on this international collection and its networks.  

?Class Reunion. Works from the Gaby and Wilhelm Schürmann Collection Nairy Baghramian, Silvia Bächli, Monika Baer, John Baldessari/Meg Cranston, Francesco Barocco, Jennifer Bornstein, Nicola Brunnhuber, Ernst Caramelle, Kate Davis, Heinrich Dunst, Marina Faust, Morgan Fisher, Jef Geys, Ralph Gibson, Julian Göthe, Trixi Groiss, Gerhard Gronefeld, Julia Haller, Rachel Harrison, Lone Haugaard Madsen, Georg Herold, Nicolas Jasmin, Raimer Jochims, Mike Kelley, , Martin Kippenberger, Silke Otto Knapp, Alwin Lay, Brandon Lattu, Michael Light, Sonia Leimer, Anita Leisz, Jochen Lempert, Zoe Leonard, Chris Martin, Park McArthur, Paul McCarthy, Meuser, Lisette Model, Oswald Oberhuber, Albert Oehlen, Anna Oppermann, Anna Ostoya, Jens Preusse, Rebecca Quaytman, Susanne Paesler, Laurie Parsons, Stephen Prina, Deborah Remington, Lin May Saeed, Pentti Sammallahti, Stefan Sandner, Arlene Shechet, Sigune Siévi, Michael Simpson, Michael E. Smith, Lewis Stein, Jana Sterbark, Esther Stocker, Walter Swennen, Alice Tippit, Joëlle Tuerlinckx, Nora Turato, Anne-Mie Van Kerckhoven, Miriam Visaczki, Franz West, Tristan Wilczek, Christopher Williams, Heimo Zobernig Curated by Wilhelm Schürmann Gaby and Wilhelm Schürmann do not see their collection as just private property or a prestige object, but rather as an item of cultural value that needs exchange with the public. Their collection has been constantly growing since the late 1970s, and it provides an incomparable view of the development of contemporary art from the 1980s onward. This is a progressive statement on behalf of contemporary art that is anchored in social issues and sees itself as a form of communication. The rationale behind the collection, which is held in Herzogenrath near Aachen and in Berlin, is both creative and productive, and the two collectors’ practice can be described as a particularly free-spirited form of cultural production. The act of collecting is realized less in the processes of keeping and completing artworks and is instead understood mainly as an invitation to participate in the public production of connections. This very pragmatic and hands-on approach is manifested in sensual and unconventional gestures of presenting, including the principle of “comparative seeing.” In this sense, the Class Reunion exhibition, the title of which refers to a 2008 installation of the same name by Berlin artist Nairy Baghramian, will unravel an exciting, humorous, and surprising dialogue between the diverse artistic positions in the collection, establishing unexpected points of contact. One focus in this is on Viennese influences on this international collection and its networks.  
Rachel Whiteread
Rachel Whiteread
Vienna - Arsenalstrasse 1
until 29-07-2018

Rachel Whiteread For over three decades, Rachel Whiteread has materialized the intangible. Her sculptures make voids visible and awaken memories of that which has been irretrievably lost. For the first time in Austria, the Belvedere 21 shows a cross-section of the renowned British artist's work. Rachel Whiteread is one of the leading international artists of her generation. Born 1963 in London, she was the first woman to win the prestigious Turner Prize in 1993 and went on to represent the UK at the 1997 Venice Biennale. In Vienna, she is principally known for her Holocaust memorial at the Judenplatz. With this monument, the British artist left a lasting mark on the city and transformed the discourse surrounding remembrance. For her casts of empty spaces that range in scale from the monumental to the intimate Whiteread uses industrial materials such as plaster, concrete, resin, rubber, metal, and paper. Despite their minimalist language and severity, her sculptures have a poetic quality and evoke personal and universal human experiences and memories. For the first time in Austria, Belvedere 21 shows a cross-section of Rachel Whiteread's entire oeuvre. The range of sculptures on view covers casts of entire rooms and architectural features such as floors, doors, and windows as well as negative casts of domestic objects such as tables, boxes, and water bottles. Also on view are milestones from Whiteread's career, such as Closet and Mantle (both from 1988) as well as Untitled (Twenty-Five Spaces) from 1995. A special emphasis of the exhibition is focused on her memorial for the Austrian Jewish victims of the Holocaust, first unveiled in 2000 at the Judenplatz in Vienna.  

Rachel Whiteread For over three decades, Rachel Whiteread has materialized the intangible. Her sculptures make voids visible and awaken memories of that which has been irretrievably lost. For the first time in Austria, the Belvedere 21 shows a cross-section of the renowned British artist's work. Rachel Whiteread is one of the leading international artists of her generation. Born 1963 in London, she was the first woman to win the prestigious Turner Prize in 1993 and went on to represent the UK at the 1997 Venice Biennale. In Vienna, she is principally known for her Holocaust memorial at the Judenplatz. With this monument, the British artist left a lasting mark on the city and transformed the discourse surrounding remembrance. For her casts of empty spaces that range in scale from the monumental to the intimate Whiteread uses industrial materials such as plaster, concrete, resin, rubber, metal, and paper. Despite their minimalist language and severity, her sculptures have a poetic quality and evoke personal and universal human experiences and memories. For the first time in Austria, Belvedere 21 shows a cross-section of Rachel Whiteread's entire oeuvre. The range of sculptures on view covers casts of entire rooms and architectural features such as floors, doors, and windows as well as negative casts of domestic objects such as tables, boxes, and water bottles. Also on view are milestones from Whiteread's career, such as Closet and Mantle (both from 1988) as well as Untitled (Twenty-Five Spaces) from 1995. A special emphasis of the exhibition is focused on her memorial for the Austrian Jewish victims of the Holocaust, first unveiled in 2000 at the Judenplatz in Vienna.  
Double Lives
Double Lives
Vienna - Museumsplatz 1
until 11-11-2018

Double Lives. Visual Artists Making Music Alva Noto (Carsten Nicolai); Laurie Anderson; Christian Ludwig Attersee; Beauties of the Night (Christian Egger, Manuel Gorkiewicz, Markus Krottendorfer, Alexander Wolff); John Cage; Captain Beefheart & His Magic Band (Alex St. Clair Snouffer, Jeff Cotton, Jerry Handley, John French); Charlemagne Palestine; Chicken (Hari Ganglberger, Nicholas Hoffman, Katrin Plav?ak); Tony Conrad; Martin Creed & Band; DA EAT (Stefan Branca, Mattias Vatter, Phillip Zaiser, Thomas Zipp), Hanne Darboven; Destroy all Monsters (Mike Kelley, Cary Loren, Jim Shaw, Niagara); Die Tödliche Doris (Tabea Blumenschein, Käthe Kruse, Wolfgang Müller, Nikolaus Utermöhlen); Essachai Vow (Christian Kosmas Mayer, Alexander Wolff); Marcel Duchamp; GRAF+ZYX; Hotel Morphila Orchester (Paul Braunsteiner, Loys Egg, Franz Machek, Wolfgang Stelzer, Peter Weibel); Yves Klein; Jutta Koether; Laibach (Milan Fras, Dejan Knez, Daniel Landin, Ivan Novak); Les Reines Prochaines (Teresa Alonso, Fränzi Madörin, Muda Mathis, Pipilotti Rist, Regina Florida Schmid); Christian Marclay; Molto Brutto (Gunther Damisch, Josef Danner, Blihal, Andreas Kunzmann, Gerwald Rockenschaub); Monoton; Phill Niblock; Hermann Nitsch; Markus Oehlen; Yoko Ono; O.T. (Lothar Fiedler, Helge Leiberg, A. R. Penck, Christoph Winckel); Nam June Paik; Pas Paravant (Felix Dorner, Karl Kowanz, Renate Kowanz-Kocer, Wolfgang Poor, Günther Schrom, ManfreDu Schu, Wolfgang Stengel, Hans Weigand); Stephen Prina; Gerhard Rühm; Luigi Russolo; Selten gehörte Musik (Günter Brus, Hermann Nitsch, Dieter Roth, Gerhard Rühm, Oswald Wiener); Suicide (Alan Vega, Martin Rev); Emily Sundblad mit Pete Drungle und Ensemble, The Alma Band (Herbert Brandl, Josef Danner, Martin Kippenberger, Albert Oehlen, Markus Oehlen); The Pop Rivets (Brand Buds, Wild Billy Childish, Big Russ, Little Russ), The Red Krayola with Art & Language (Kathryn Bigelow, Ian Burn, Jesse Chamberlain, Christine Kozlov, Nigel Lendon, Mel Ramsden, Paula Ramsden, Terry Smith, Mayo Thompson); The Wired Salutation (Andrea Belfi, Angela Bulloch, David Grubbs, Stefano Pilia); Throbbing Gristle (Chris Carter, Cosey Fanni Tutti, Peter Christopherson, Genesis P-Orridge), Wolfgang Tillmans, Trabant (Viðar Hákon Gíslason, Þorvaldur H. Gröndal, Ragnar Kjartansson, Gísli Galdur Thorgeirsson, Hlynur Aðils Vilmarsson), Wendy Gondeln (Albert Oehlen); Heimo Zobernig with Marcus Geiger, Martin Guttmann, Hans Weigand. It is quite remarkable how many fine artists also made music. This was much more than just an interest in another medium. Public musical performances and the production of recorded music involve different ways of working, different environments, and also the confrontation with a different audience. This is why art critic Jörg Heiser refers to a “contextual shift” between the fine arts and music when he writes about this phenomenon beginning in the 1960s. Alluding to the fact that some artists did not make their work in other fields transparent and open, his book is called Double Lives. It is certainly true that there are many different ways in which individuals can either combine these two fields in their lives and work—or keep them separate. In some cases, work in both fields was only known to insiders. Other artists, by contrast, made a deliberate use of the frame of the fine arts for their musical performances. There is a broad spectrum with many intermediate forms. Double Lives will focus on fine artists who wrote or produced music, who performed it in public, or who were members of artists’ bands. This raises the question as to the difference between pure musicians and artists and those working in both fields. The exhibition will also address the role of music by fine artists within the history of 20th and 21st century music. Double Lives will present “only” music, which will be linked with visual material, with videos and photographs of concert and studio performances. The exhibition will thus respect the significance of the artists’ choices of performance situations. As early as 1913, the year of his first ready-made, Marcel Duchamp used principles of chance as a compositional method in his Momentum Musicale, while in the same year futurist Luigi Russolo designed his first noise instruments (Intonarumori). Already in classical modernism, fine artists were developing questions and methods that were to define not only the fine arts but also the musical avantgarde. After World War II, the phenomenon of fine artists making music became more and more significant. Key impulses came from John Cage, a pioneering composer and musician in so many ways, who was always in close contact with fine artists and also himself created a number of visual artworks. In the second half of the 1950s, he taught at the New School for Social Research in New York, where key members of the later Fluxus movement were among his audience. In addition to Fluxus artists, in the 1960s and 1970s, more and more fine artists also came forward as musicians. Their approaches, questions, and methods often resembled those of the fine arts, as in the case of the Americans La Monte Young, Charlemagne Palestine, and Tony Conrad, whose positions were close to minimal art. The same is true of the musical work of European artists, which remained closer to the Western musical traditions than the music of their American colleagues. Important representatives of the double life between the fine arts and music are also to be found among the protagonists in the shift from rock and pop to punk and new wave music. With the success of these new musical movements, and simultaneous with a booming return to painting after the years of conceptual and performance art, the late 1970s and the following years saw a high point in the phenomenon of bands consisting partly or entirely of fine artists. It was not least the art schools that became key focuses for the development of a more or less professional (or often also deliberately amateurish) collective form of musical performance. From the 1990s, the music of fine artists entered into a period of stylistic pluralism, corresponding to developments in the visual arts. Curated by Eva Badura-Triska and Edek Bartz  

Double Lives. Visual Artists Making Music Alva Noto (Carsten Nicolai); Laurie Anderson; Christian Ludwig Attersee; Beauties of the Night (Christian Egger, Manuel Gorkiewicz, Markus Krottendorfer, Alexander Wolff); John Cage; Captain Beefheart & His Magic Band (Alex St. Clair Snouffer, Jeff Cotton, Jerry Handley, John French); Charlemagne Palestine; Chicken (Hari Ganglberger, Nicholas Hoffman, Katrin Plav?ak); Tony Conrad; Martin Creed & Band; DA EAT (Stefan Branca, Mattias Vatter, Phillip Zaiser, Thomas Zipp), Hanne Darboven; Destroy all Monsters (Mike Kelley, Cary Loren, Jim Shaw, Niagara); Die Tödliche Doris (Tabea Blumenschein, Käthe Kruse, Wolfgang Müller, Nikolaus Utermöhlen); Essachai Vow (Christian Kosmas Mayer, Alexander Wolff); Marcel Duchamp; GRAF+ZYX; Hotel Morphila Orchester (Paul Braunsteiner, Loys Egg, Franz Machek, Wolfgang Stelzer, Peter Weibel); Yves Klein; Jutta Koether; Laibach (Milan Fras, Dejan Knez, Daniel Landin, Ivan Novak); Les Reines Prochaines (Teresa Alonso, Fränzi Madörin, Muda Mathis, Pipilotti Rist, Regina Florida Schmid); Christian Marclay; Molto Brutto (Gunther Damisch, Josef Danner, Blihal, Andreas Kunzmann, Gerwald Rockenschaub); Monoton; Phill Niblock; Hermann Nitsch; Markus Oehlen; Yoko Ono; O.T. (Lothar Fiedler, Helge Leiberg, A. R. Penck, Christoph Winckel); Nam June Paik; Pas Paravant (Felix Dorner, Karl Kowanz, Renate Kowanz-Kocer, Wolfgang Poor, Günther Schrom, ManfreDu Schu, Wolfgang Stengel, Hans Weigand); Stephen Prina; Gerhard Rühm; Luigi Russolo; Selten gehörte Musik (Günter Brus, Hermann Nitsch, Dieter Roth, Gerhard Rühm, Oswald Wiener); Suicide (Alan Vega, Martin Rev); Emily Sundblad mit Pete Drungle und Ensemble, The Alma Band (Herbert Brandl, Josef Danner, Martin Kippenberger, Albert Oehlen, Markus Oehlen); The Pop Rivets (Brand Buds, Wild Billy Childish, Big Russ, Little Russ), The Red Krayola with Art & Language (Kathryn Bigelow, Ian Burn, Jesse Chamberlain, Christine Kozlov, Nigel Lendon, Mel Ramsden, Paula Ramsden, Terry Smith, Mayo Thompson); The Wired Salutation (Andrea Belfi, Angela Bulloch, David Grubbs, Stefano Pilia); Throbbing Gristle (Chris Carter, Cosey Fanni Tutti, Peter Christopherson, Genesis P-Orridge), Wolfgang Tillmans, Trabant (Viðar Hákon Gíslason, Þorvaldur H. Gröndal, Ragnar Kjartansson, Gísli Galdur Thorgeirsson, Hlynur Aðils Vilmarsson), Wendy Gondeln (Albert Oehlen); Heimo Zobernig with Marcus Geiger, Martin Guttmann, Hans Weigand. It is quite remarkable how many fine artists also made music. This was much more than just an interest in another medium. Public musical performances and the production of recorded music involve different ways of working, different environments, and also the confrontation with a different audience. This is why art critic Jörg Heiser refers to a “contextual shift” between the fine arts and music when he writes about this phenomenon beginning in the 1960s. Alluding to the fact that some artists did not make their work in other fields transparent and open, his book is called Double Lives. It is certainly true that there are many different ways in which individuals can either combine these two fields in their lives and work—or keep them separate. In some cases, work in both fields was only known to insiders. Other artists, by contrast, made a deliberate use of the frame of the fine arts for their musical performances. There is a broad spectrum with many intermediate forms. Double Lives will focus on fine artists who wrote or produced music, who performed it in public, or who were members of artists’ bands. This raises the question as to the difference between pure musicians and artists and those working in both fields. The exhibition will also address the role of music by fine artists within the history of 20th and 21st century music. Double Lives will present “only” music, which will be linked with visual material, with videos and photographs of concert and studio performances. The exhibition will thus respect the significance of the artists’ choices of performance situations. As early as 1913, the year of his first ready-made, Marcel Duchamp used principles of chance as a compositional method in his Momentum Musicale, while in the same year futurist Luigi Russolo designed his first noise instruments (Intonarumori). Already in classical modernism, fine artists were developing questions and methods that were to define not only the fine arts but also the musical avantgarde. After World War II, the phenomenon of fine artists making music became more and more significant. Key impulses came from John Cage, a pioneering composer and musician in so many ways, who was always in close contact with fine artists and also himself created a number of visual artworks. In the second half of the 1950s, he taught at the New School for Social Research in New York, where key members of the later Fluxus movement were among his audience. In addition to Fluxus artists, in the 1960s and 1970s, more and more fine artists also came forward as musicians. Their approaches, questions, and methods often resembled those of the fine arts, as in the case of the Americans La Monte Young, Charlemagne Palestine, and Tony Conrad, whose positions were close to minimal art. The same is true of the musical work of European artists, which remained closer to the Western musical traditions than the music of their American colleagues. Important representatives of the double life between the fine arts and music are also to be found among the protagonists in the shift from rock and pop to punk and new wave music. With the success of these new musical movements, and simultaneous with a booming return to painting after the years of conceptual and performance art, the late 1970s and the following years saw a high point in the phenomenon of bands consisting partly or entirely of fine artists. It was not least the art schools that became key focuses for the development of a more or less professional (or often also deliberately amateurish) collective form of musical performance. From the 1990s, the music of fine artists entered into a period of stylistic pluralism, corresponding to developments in the visual arts. Curated by Eva Badura-Triska and Edek Bartz  
Thomas Bayrle
Thomas Bayrle
New York - 235 Bowery
until 02-09-2018

Thomas Bayrle – Playtime ents across media and their prescient commentary on the relationship between consumerism, technology, propaganda, and desire. One of the most important artists to have emerged during the 1960s West German economic boom, Bayrle has received belated recognition for his influential works and processes. Long before the advent of current visual technologies, he foresaw our digital reality, employing photocopy machines and other midcentury tools in his early works to create analog visualizations of what are now fundamental traits of our digital culture. Bayrle’s thematic investigations have ranged from a visual analysis of mass culture and consumerism to reflections on the intersection of technology with global politics. Presented on the third and fourth floors of the Museum, this comprehensive survey will bring together over 115 works, including paintings, sculptures, drawings, wallpapers and prints, early computer-based art, videos, and 16mm films. The exhibition will present selections from Bayrle’s most iconic series, including several of his rarely exhibited “painted machines”—hand-painted kinetic works inspired by images of Chinese pageants and other mass demonstrations. Bayrle created these works during a period when he was working simultaneously in corporate advertising and for Germany’s student protest movement. In his words, he “mixed communist and capitalist patterns without qualm, simply under the aspect of accumulation.” This logic of accumulation would lead to the development of Bayrle’s “super-forms,” densely composed images in which smaller units are used to build larger figurative forms. These works, several of which will be on view, take the form of silkscreen prints depicting a variety of figures and objects from consumer culture. The exhibition will also highlight how the artist has expanded these serial patterns beyond traditional artworks into textiles, wallpaper, carpeting, and garments. Bayrle’s work has also looked at the proliferation and uniformity of the global mega-city and its infrastructure networks. The show brings together a number of works created by Bayrle starting in the 1970s that model anonymous grids of city blocks and highways—works he initially envisioned while working as a jacquard weaver and staring into the hypnotic patterns of the thread crossings. Also during this period, Bayrle began to directly address the seductive nature of technology by creating paintings, paper assemblages, and kinetic sculptures that adopt the language of religious icon and symbols. Over the past several decades, his working methods have expanded to incorporate the sort of digital technologies his earliest work anticipated. He was one of the first artists to experiment with computers, and this presentation will explore his innovations across a variety of media including paintings, films, and tapestries. The fourth floor of the exhibition will feature a number of large-scale works by Bayrle, including his monumental Flugzeug (Airplane) (1984), presented alongside his recent kinetic sculptures made of repurposed automobile parts repeatedly reciting the rosary, as in his much-celebrated inclusion in dOCUMENTA 13 (2012). The five decades’ worth of work in this exhibition will demonstrate the critical prescience of Bayrle’s output and the profound influence he has had on younger artists working around the world today. The exhibition is curated by Massimiliano Gioni, Edlis Neeson Artistic Director; Gary Carrion-Murayari, Kraus Family Curator; and Helga Christoffersen, Associate Curator. The exhibition will be accompanied by a fully illustrated catalog published by Phaidon, with contributions from Kerstin Brätsch, Mark Godfrey, Alex Kitnick, Oliver Laric, and Christine Mehring, as well as a new interview between the artist and Massimiliano Gioni. Thomas Bayrle was born in Berlin, Germany, in 1937, and lives and works in Frankfurt. 

Thomas Bayrle – Playtime ents across media and their prescient commentary on the relationship between consumerism, technology, propaganda, and desire. One of the most important artists to have emerged during the 1960s West German economic boom, Bayrle has received belated recognition for his influential works and processes. Long before the advent of current visual technologies, he foresaw our digital reality, employing photocopy machines and other midcentury tools in his early works to create analog visualizations of what are now fundamental traits of our digital culture. Bayrle’s thematic investigations have ranged from a visual analysis of mass culture and consumerism to reflections on the intersection of technology with global politics. Presented on the third and fourth floors of the Museum, this comprehensive survey will bring together over 115 works, including paintings, sculptures, drawings, wallpapers and prints, early computer-based art, videos, and 16mm films. The exhibition will present selections from Bayrle’s most iconic series, including several of his rarely exhibited “painted machines”—hand-painted kinetic works inspired by images of Chinese pageants and other mass demonstrations. Bayrle created these works during a period when he was working simultaneously in corporate advertising and for Germany’s student protest movement. In his words, he “mixed communist and capitalist patterns without qualm, simply under the aspect of accumulation.” This logic of accumulation would lead to the development of Bayrle’s “super-forms,” densely composed images in which smaller units are used to build larger figurative forms. These works, several of which will be on view, take the form of silkscreen prints depicting a variety of figures and objects from consumer culture. The exhibition will also highlight how the artist has expanded these serial patterns beyond traditional artworks into textiles, wallpaper, carpeting, and garments. Bayrle’s work has also looked at the proliferation and uniformity of the global mega-city and its infrastructure networks. The show brings together a number of works created by Bayrle starting in the 1970s that model anonymous grids of city blocks and highways—works he initially envisioned while working as a jacquard weaver and staring into the hypnotic patterns of the thread crossings. Also during this period, Bayrle began to directly address the seductive nature of technology by creating paintings, paper assemblages, and kinetic sculptures that adopt the language of religious icon and symbols. Over the past several decades, his working methods have expanded to incorporate the sort of digital technologies his earliest work anticipated. He was one of the first artists to experiment with computers, and this presentation will explore his innovations across a variety of media including paintings, films, and tapestries. The fourth floor of the exhibition will feature a number of large-scale works by Bayrle, including his monumental Flugzeug (Airplane) (1984), presented alongside his recent kinetic sculptures made of repurposed automobile parts repeatedly reciting the rosary, as in his much-celebrated inclusion in dOCUMENTA 13 (2012). The five decades’ worth of work in this exhibition will demonstrate the critical prescience of Bayrle’s output and the profound influence he has had on younger artists working around the world today. The exhibition is curated by Massimiliano Gioni, Edlis Neeson Artistic Director; Gary Carrion-Murayari, Kraus Family Curator; and Helga Christoffersen, Associate Curator. The exhibition will be accompanied by a fully illustrated catalog published by Phaidon, with contributions from Kerstin Brätsch, Mark Godfrey, Alex Kitnick, Oliver Laric, and Christine Mehring, as well as a new interview between the artist and Massimiliano Gioni. Thomas Bayrle was born in Berlin, Germany, in 1937, and lives and works in Frankfurt. 
Summer
Summer
New York - 140 Grand Street
until 27-07-2018

Summer David Adamo, Geoffrey Hendricks, Shara Hughes, Stephen Pace, Emily Mae Smith, Ned Smyth, Pat Steir Curated by Ugo Rondinone In memory of Geoffrey Hendricks, 1931–2018. Summer, brings together 34 works by 7 artists who combine skeptical clarity with a mindful and at times humor-tinged desire to locate the intersection of spiritual and physical presence in daily life.  The natural world serves as a doorway into a highly rarefied metaphysical realm where the sea of consciousness surges against the tangible world.  Here all is in flux as distinctions between self and soul, body and spirit, past and present, mortification and bliss, confinement and escape all blur and waver. Summer celebrates the disparate elements of the Earth, while exploring the human connection to nature. – Ugo Rondinone   David Adamo (b. 1979) presents a group of "termite mound" sculptures, with their cathedral-like forms that are based on constructions made by a species of insect better known for its destructive nature. These works are representative of his interest in creating sculpture from processes that can be observed in nature.   A prominent member of the Fluxus movement, Geoffrey Hendricks (b. 1931; d. 2018) has often explored his fascination with nature through both his performance art and visual art. His Sky Paintings (1965) on view here render the visible invisible and the immaterial material. Shara Hughes (b. 1981) describes her enchanted vistas as “invented landscapes.” They recall picturesque images from vintage postcards, blown up and abstracted to assume a fantastical ambiguity.  After an established career in New York as an abstract expressionist, Stephen Pace (b. 1918; d. 2010) shifted to figurative painting in 1962 when he relocated to Maine. There, he found the coastal working waterfronts compelling, in particular the activities of the fisherman: digging clams, setting lobster traps, restocking bait. In her paintings, Emily Mae Smith (b. 1979) plays with legacies of Pop art, in particular its glamour finish and populist appeal. Finely rendered, complex in their psychodrama, they reference classic animation, art history, mythology, and science-fiction kitsch. Ned Smyth (b. 1948) explores the expression of reverence in his work, which comprises both sculpture and public arts projects. His practice is informed by his study of archeological sites, temples, cathedrals, and past structural periods and details. Early in her career, Pat Steir (b. 1940) was loosely allied with Conceptual Art and Minimalism, but she is now best known for her dripped, splashed, and poured "waterfall" paintings that she first started making in the 1980s.

Summer David Adamo, Geoffrey Hendricks, Shara Hughes, Stephen Pace, Emily Mae Smith, Ned Smyth, Pat Steir Curated by Ugo Rondinone In memory of Geoffrey Hendricks, 1931–2018. Summer, brings together 34 works by 7 artists who combine skeptical clarity with a mindful and at times humor-tinged desire to locate the intersection of spiritual and physical presence in daily life.  The natural world serves as a doorway into a highly rarefied metaphysical realm where the sea of consciousness surges against the tangible world.  Here all is in flux as distinctions between self and soul, body and spirit, past and present, mortification and bliss, confinement and escape all blur and waver. Summer celebrates the disparate elements of the Earth, while exploring the human connection to nature. – Ugo Rondinone   David Adamo (b. 1979) presents a group of "termite mound" sculptures, with their cathedral-like forms that are based on constructions made by a species of insect better known for its destructive nature. These works are representative of his interest in creating sculpture from processes that can be observed in nature.   A prominent member of the Fluxus movement, Geoffrey Hendricks (b. 1931; d. 2018) has often explored his fascination with nature through both his performance art and visual art. His Sky Paintings (1965) on view here render the visible invisible and the immaterial material. Shara Hughes (b. 1981) describes her enchanted vistas as “invented landscapes.” They recall picturesque images from vintage postcards, blown up and abstracted to assume a fantastical ambiguity.  After an established career in New York as an abstract expressionist, Stephen Pace (b. 1918; d. 2010) shifted to figurative painting in 1962 when he relocated to Maine. There, he found the coastal working waterfronts compelling, in particular the activities of the fisherman: digging clams, setting lobster traps, restocking bait. In her paintings, Emily Mae Smith (b. 1979) plays with legacies of Pop art, in particular its glamour finish and populist appeal. Finely rendered, complex in their psychodrama, they reference classic animation, art history, mythology, and science-fiction kitsch. Ned Smyth (b. 1948) explores the expression of reverence in his work, which comprises both sculpture and public arts projects. His practice is informed by his study of archeological sites, temples, cathedrals, and past structural periods and details. Early in her career, Pat Steir (b. 1940) was loosely allied with Conceptual Art and Minimalism, but she is now best known for her dripped, splashed, and poured "waterfall" paintings that she first started making in the 1980s.
Seth Price
Seth Price
New York - 22-25 Jackson Avenue
until 03-09-2018

Seth Price – Danny, Mila, Hannah, Ariana, Bob, Brad This recent series of large-scale photographs by Seth Price (American, b. 1973) depicts magnified details of human skin in high resolution, bearing only the first names of the people who served as the artist’s models. Presented as a discrete installation, these abstract portraits of people of various ages, genders, and races document portions of each subject’s body in extreme detail. Using a robotic camera typically deployed for scientific research or forensic study, Price captured thousands of high-definition images in a single sitting, focusing on a specific area such as the arm or leg. The resulting images were subsequently stitched together using satellite-imaging software, run through a 3D graphics program, and adjusted by a fashion retoucher. Printed on fabric and stretched over commercial light boxes, these digital skins take on an inner light, fusing human warmth with a screen-like glow. Since the mid-2000s, Price’s work has been celebrated for its reflection of the cultural, political, and economic conditions of this new century through the use of disparate image formats, fashion, music, commercial packaging, and advertising applications. Less noted is the connection that much of his art has to the body. Whether invoking it through violent media images, sexual cartoons, casts, clothing, or sewage pipes, Price returns repeatedly to the body as the site where technology’s effects register most acutely, if mysteriously. Combining the crisp detail of close observation with the impersonal breadth afforded by panoramic view, the photographs presented here provide uncannily intimate representations that nevertheless reveal very little about their models.  

Seth Price – Danny, Mila, Hannah, Ariana, Bob, Brad This recent series of large-scale photographs by Seth Price (American, b. 1973) depicts magnified details of human skin in high resolution, bearing only the first names of the people who served as the artist’s models. Presented as a discrete installation, these abstract portraits of people of various ages, genders, and races document portions of each subject’s body in extreme detail. Using a robotic camera typically deployed for scientific research or forensic study, Price captured thousands of high-definition images in a single sitting, focusing on a specific area such as the arm or leg. The resulting images were subsequently stitched together using satellite-imaging software, run through a 3D graphics program, and adjusted by a fashion retoucher. Printed on fabric and stretched over commercial light boxes, these digital skins take on an inner light, fusing human warmth with a screen-like glow. Since the mid-2000s, Price’s work has been celebrated for its reflection of the cultural, political, and economic conditions of this new century through the use of disparate image formats, fashion, music, commercial packaging, and advertising applications. Less noted is the connection that much of his art has to the body. Whether invoking it through violent media images, sexual cartoons, casts, clothing, or sewage pipes, Price returns repeatedly to the body as the site where technology’s effects register most acutely, if mysteriously. Combining the crisp detail of close observation with the impersonal breadth afforded by panoramic view, the photographs presented here provide uncannily intimate representations that nevertheless reveal very little about their models.  
Difference Engine
Difference Engine
New York - 504 West 24th Street
until 10-08-2018

Difference Engine Cory Arcangel, Carol Bove, Jacob Ciocci, Aleksandra Domanovi?, Lonnie Holley, Jamian Juliano-Villani, JODI, Konrad Klapheck, Guthrie Lonergan, Michel Majerus, Jayson Musson, Deborah Remington, Hayley Silverman, Jessie Stead, Paul Thek, Ernest Trova Curated by Cory Arcangel and Tina Kukielski Emerging from two poles—the machine’s mechanistic logic on the one hand and the fetishistic objectivity of surrealism at the other—the works in 'Difference Engine' explore the art of contradiction.  André Breton’s surrealist doctrine of objective chance drew inspiration from a now well-known, singular quote by the young poet Comte de Lautréamont who tragically died at the age of twenty-four: “The chance encounter of a sewing machine and an umbrella on an operating table.” Difference Engine explores a similar conceit, ripe with the undercurrents of our twenty-first century technological narcissism set in stark contrast to its utopian possibilities.  The exhibition’s title is taken from Charles Babbage’s name for his invention of a calculating engine powered by a cranking handle that, upon its completion in 1832, would be the first automated mechanical calculator.  Furthering the allusion, a 1990 sci-fi novel of the same name by William Gibson and Bruce Sterling would play a significant role in the setting off of the genre of steampunk through its envisioning of a speculative reality sprung from this historical turning point.  The works in Difference Engine embrace an uncanny or nauseated condition that is nonetheless replete with humor and comic relief. The miracle and misery of the information age is explored. The beauty and grotesque of pop syncopates against a curious and contradictory surrealist imaginary. 

Difference Engine Cory Arcangel, Carol Bove, Jacob Ciocci, Aleksandra Domanovi?, Lonnie Holley, Jamian Juliano-Villani, JODI, Konrad Klapheck, Guthrie Lonergan, Michel Majerus, Jayson Musson, Deborah Remington, Hayley Silverman, Jessie Stead, Paul Thek, Ernest Trova Curated by Cory Arcangel and Tina Kukielski Emerging from two poles—the machine’s mechanistic logic on the one hand and the fetishistic objectivity of surrealism at the other—the works in 'Difference Engine' explore the art of contradiction.  André Breton’s surrealist doctrine of objective chance drew inspiration from a now well-known, singular quote by the young poet Comte de Lautréamont who tragically died at the age of twenty-four: “The chance encounter of a sewing machine and an umbrella on an operating table.” Difference Engine explores a similar conceit, ripe with the undercurrents of our twenty-first century technological narcissism set in stark contrast to its utopian possibilities.  The exhibition’s title is taken from Charles Babbage’s name for his invention of a calculating engine powered by a cranking handle that, upon its completion in 1832, would be the first automated mechanical calculator.  Furthering the allusion, a 1990 sci-fi novel of the same name by William Gibson and Bruce Sterling would play a significant role in the setting off of the genre of steampunk through its envisioning of a speculative reality sprung from this historical turning point.  The works in Difference Engine embrace an uncanny or nauseated condition that is nonetheless replete with humor and comic relief. The miracle and misery of the information age is explored. The beauty and grotesque of pop syncopates against a curious and contradictory surrealist imaginary. 
Ben Schumacher
Ben Schumacher
New York - 39 Walker Street
until 10-08-2018

Ben Schumacher – The China Chalet Group We are pleased to present The China Chalet Group, Ben Schumacher’s third solo exhibition with Bortolami. For the exhibition, Schumacher has replicated the interior of China Chalet, a Chinese banquet hall turned after-hours club located just around the corner from the New York Stock Exchange. China Chalet became a go-to destination in the late 2000s, attracting a socially diverse clientele seeking an alternative to the stereotypical NYC club scene. It’s still popular today as a venue for surprise DJ sets from pop stars, incognito celebrity sightings, and a meet-up for artists. Schumacher’s replica of China Chalet, made from memory at approximately 3/4 scale, falls somewhere between earnest tribute and satire. Booths, audio equipment and tables are constructed with little more than anodized aluminum, screws, and faux upholstery. They lack any utility as furniture or as a model, a twist on Schumacher’s training and early career as an architect. But each piece of “furniture” also displays its own miniature model, embedded with small sculptures and dioramas which serve as a constellational map of Schumacher’s biography and past projects. These objects range from a toy theatre made with dollhouse furniture to a plush model of a church in Montreal in which Schumacher had curated a show. An aluminum “dance floor” even doubles as replica of a typical NYC rooftop. The faux restaurant environment includes new paintings by Schumacher which combine oil paint with printed collages of exhibition announcements and record releases. In each work, figuration fades into printed block lettering and graphic design, the typography stretched over brushstrokes underneath. Ben Schumacher was born in 1985 in Kitchener, Canada. Recent exhibitions include The Testing Place, Croy Nielsen, Vienna, Austria, Käsesakramentsystem, Kunstverein Braunschweig, Braunschweig, Germany, Privilege and Melancholy, Johan Berggren, Malmö, Sweden, Selten Gehörte Musik, Kavita B Schmid, Queens, NY, Motor Earth, Hannah Hoffman Gallery, Los Angeles, CA and The Fellbach Triennial, Fellbach, Germany. Forthcoming projects include the film The China Chalet Group, written by Franco Polish Black Jeans Porn Club and a group exhibition, I WAS RAISED ON THE INTERNET at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, Chicago, IL. Schumacher received a Bachelor of Architecture from Waterloo University and a Masters of Fine Art from New York University.

Ben Schumacher – The China Chalet Group We are pleased to present The China Chalet Group, Ben Schumacher’s third solo exhibition with Bortolami. For the exhibition, Schumacher has replicated the interior of China Chalet, a Chinese banquet hall turned after-hours club located just around the corner from the New York Stock Exchange. China Chalet became a go-to destination in the late 2000s, attracting a socially diverse clientele seeking an alternative to the stereotypical NYC club scene. It’s still popular today as a venue for surprise DJ sets from pop stars, incognito celebrity sightings, and a meet-up for artists. Schumacher’s replica of China Chalet, made from memory at approximately 3/4 scale, falls somewhere between earnest tribute and satire. Booths, audio equipment and tables are constructed with little more than anodized aluminum, screws, and faux upholstery. They lack any utility as furniture or as a model, a twist on Schumacher’s training and early career as an architect. But each piece of “furniture” also displays its own miniature model, embedded with small sculptures and dioramas which serve as a constellational map of Schumacher’s biography and past projects. These objects range from a toy theatre made with dollhouse furniture to a plush model of a church in Montreal in which Schumacher had curated a show. An aluminum “dance floor” even doubles as replica of a typical NYC rooftop. The faux restaurant environment includes new paintings by Schumacher which combine oil paint with printed collages of exhibition announcements and record releases. In each work, figuration fades into printed block lettering and graphic design, the typography stretched over brushstrokes underneath. Ben Schumacher was born in 1985 in Kitchener, Canada. Recent exhibitions include The Testing Place, Croy Nielsen, Vienna, Austria, Käsesakramentsystem, Kunstverein Braunschweig, Braunschweig, Germany, Privilege and Melancholy, Johan Berggren, Malmö, Sweden, Selten Gehörte Musik, Kavita B Schmid, Queens, NY, Motor Earth, Hannah Hoffman Gallery, Los Angeles, CA and The Fellbach Triennial, Fellbach, Germany. Forthcoming projects include the film The China Chalet Group, written by Franco Polish Black Jeans Porn Club and a group exhibition, I WAS RAISED ON THE INTERNET at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, Chicago, IL. Schumacher received a Bachelor of Architecture from Waterloo University and a Masters of Fine Art from New York University.
Sue de Beer
Sue de Beer
New York - 507 West 24th Street
until 03-08-2018

Sue de Beer – The White Wolf MARIANNE BOESKY GALLERY is pleased to premiere artist Sue de Beer’s sixth major film, The White Wolf. The film uses the classic werewolf narrative as a lens through which to explore broader themes of transformation, memory, and the psychology and physicality that form our sense of self. The low-budget horror-thriller was developed as part of de Beer’s John Simon Guggenheim Fellowship, which she received in 2016, with additional support from Mana Contemporary. On view June 21 – August 3, 2018 at the gallery’s 507 W. 24th Street location, the exhibition will also feature a group of de Beer’s early career, horror-inspired photographs, which informed portions of the new film.   The film, which is set on a fictional island off the coast of New England in the late 1980s, follows the intersecting experiences of several characters connected through a medical clinic, to a secret history shared by inhabitants of the town. Presented as a non-linear, two-channel installation, The White Wolf fuses the elements characteristic of the werewolf genre with a lyrical examination of the body and its relationship to the ephemeral sense of self. This dynamic counter-play is best exemplified in the lead character—a reclusive doctor who heads the clinic—played by New York-based experimental musician and composer Yuka Honda. Her quiet but confident presence defines the voice and tone of the film.   The Doctor relates the history of the island through a series of stories—written by artist Nathaniel Axel for the film. Among these is an account of the local lighthouse keeper and his wife whose lives are altered by inexplicable external forces acting upon them. It is suggested, throughout the film, that these forces take the form of a werewolf, but whether this is fact or fiction remains unclear. As the film’s elliptical narrative progresses, the characters grapple with finding equilibrium and meaning in the midst of an experience that is out of their control. This is particularly felt in the final story of the film, as told by the clinic’s nurse—played by Cara McManus—who says, “Our memories are not ours alone. Instead we have been grafted onto a story far greater than our own.”   The film embodies de Beer’s trademark style of editing, which uses techniques such as persistence of vision, duplication, and reflection. These approaches, along with her signature non-linear narrative structures, allow de Beer to infuse her stories with image-making and the physical presence of the film itself. Her use of colored light, glass lenses, and quiet attention to the luminosity of the figures that perform for her camera bring the viewer more deeply into her fictional realms. In The White Wolf, de Beer also incorporates dance sequences, performed by McManus and Blakely White-McGuire of the Martha Graham Dance Company and by Honda’s bandmate, the tap dancer Kazu Kumagai, to further relate the themes of the film.   For The White Wolf, de Beer also returns to handmade sets and spaces for the first time since the completion of her film, The Ghost (2011). This re-engagement with the hand-built also inspired a wider review of her early work, including a selection of photographs shot between 1998 and 2001. A selection of these images, which are inspired by the type of graphic imagery associated with horror, will be included in the exhibition to underscore the trajectory of de Beer’s practice and relationship to this genre. As part of the development of the film, de Beer spent several months working at Mana Contemporary in Jersey City, NJ creating the projections and constructing the environs that would become the medical clinic, home interiors, and island views seen in the film. In keeping with prior presentations of her work, the colors and textures of the film will be brought into the gallery space to more fully transport viewers into the world of the characters.  

Sue de Beer – The White Wolf MARIANNE BOESKY GALLERY is pleased to premiere artist Sue de Beer’s sixth major film, The White Wolf. The film uses the classic werewolf narrative as a lens through which to explore broader themes of transformation, memory, and the psychology and physicality that form our sense of self. The low-budget horror-thriller was developed as part of de Beer’s John Simon Guggenheim Fellowship, which she received in 2016, with additional support from Mana Contemporary. On view June 21 – August 3, 2018 at the gallery’s 507 W. 24th Street location, the exhibition will also feature a group of de Beer’s early career, horror-inspired photographs, which informed portions of the new film.   The film, which is set on a fictional island off the coast of New England in the late 1980s, follows the intersecting experiences of several characters connected through a medical clinic, to a secret history shared by inhabitants of the town. Presented as a non-linear, two-channel installation, The White Wolf fuses the elements characteristic of the werewolf genre with a lyrical examination of the body and its relationship to the ephemeral sense of self. This dynamic counter-play is best exemplified in the lead character—a reclusive doctor who heads the clinic—played by New York-based experimental musician and composer Yuka Honda. Her quiet but confident presence defines the voice and tone of the film.   The Doctor relates the history of the island through a series of stories—written by artist Nathaniel Axel for the film. Among these is an account of the local lighthouse keeper and his wife whose lives are altered by inexplicable external forces acting upon them. It is suggested, throughout the film, that these forces take the form of a werewolf, but whether this is fact or fiction remains unclear. As the film’s elliptical narrative progresses, the characters grapple with finding equilibrium and meaning in the midst of an experience that is out of their control. This is particularly felt in the final story of the film, as told by the clinic’s nurse—played by Cara McManus—who says, “Our memories are not ours alone. Instead we have been grafted onto a story far greater than our own.”   The film embodies de Beer’s trademark style of editing, which uses techniques such as persistence of vision, duplication, and reflection. These approaches, along with her signature non-linear narrative structures, allow de Beer to infuse her stories with image-making and the physical presence of the film itself. Her use of colored light, glass lenses, and quiet attention to the luminosity of the figures that perform for her camera bring the viewer more deeply into her fictional realms. In The White Wolf, de Beer also incorporates dance sequences, performed by McManus and Blakely White-McGuire of the Martha Graham Dance Company and by Honda’s bandmate, the tap dancer Kazu Kumagai, to further relate the themes of the film.   For The White Wolf, de Beer also returns to handmade sets and spaces for the first time since the completion of her film, The Ghost (2011). This re-engagement with the hand-built also inspired a wider review of her early work, including a selection of photographs shot between 1998 and 2001. A selection of these images, which are inspired by the type of graphic imagery associated with horror, will be included in the exhibition to underscore the trajectory of de Beer’s practice and relationship to this genre. As part of the development of the film, de Beer spent several months working at Mana Contemporary in Jersey City, NJ creating the projections and constructing the environs that would become the medical clinic, home interiors, and island views seen in the film. In keeping with prior presentations of her work, the colors and textures of the film will be brought into the gallery space to more fully transport viewers into the world of the characters.  
Radical Women
Radical Women
New York - 200 Eastern Parkway
until 22-07-2018

Radical Women: Latin American Art, 1960–1985 The Brooklyn Museum presents Radical Women: Latin American Art, 1960–1985, the first comprehensive exhibition to explore the pioneering artistic practices of Latin American and Latina women artists during a tumultuous and transformational period in the history of the Americas and the development of contemporary art. Radical Women includes more than 260 works—including photography, video, and other experimental mediums, as well as paintings, sculpture, and prints—by more than 120 artists working in 15 countries. The Brooklyn Museum is the only East Coast venue of this critically acclaimed exhibition organized by the Hammer Museum in Los Angeles. Addressing an art-historical vacuum, one that has largely excluded Latin American and US-based Latina women artists from the record, Radical Women highlights work created during a period of profound political and social turmoil in many Latin American countries in the 1960s, 1970s, and early 1980s, a period that saw the emergence of multiple dictatorships as well as significant and often subversive interventions by the government of the United States. The artworks in Radical Women can be viewed as heroic acts giving voice to generations of women across Latin America and the United States. Proposing both aesthetic and political radicality, the work in the exhibition foregrounds feminist concerns such as bodily autonomy, oppressive social norms, gendered violence, and the environment.

Radical Women: Latin American Art, 1960–1985 The Brooklyn Museum presents Radical Women: Latin American Art, 1960–1985, the first comprehensive exhibition to explore the pioneering artistic practices of Latin American and Latina women artists during a tumultuous and transformational period in the history of the Americas and the development of contemporary art. Radical Women includes more than 260 works—including photography, video, and other experimental mediums, as well as paintings, sculpture, and prints—by more than 120 artists working in 15 countries. The Brooklyn Museum is the only East Coast venue of this critically acclaimed exhibition organized by the Hammer Museum in Los Angeles. Addressing an art-historical vacuum, one that has largely excluded Latin American and US-based Latina women artists from the record, Radical Women highlights work created during a period of profound political and social turmoil in many Latin American countries in the 1960s, 1970s, and early 1980s, a period that saw the emergence of multiple dictatorships as well as significant and often subversive interventions by the government of the United States. The artworks in Radical Women can be viewed as heroic acts giving voice to generations of women across Latin America and the United States. Proposing both aesthetic and political radicality, the work in the exhibition foregrounds feminist concerns such as bodily autonomy, oppressive social norms, gendered violence, and the environment.
Excavation
Excavation
New York - 176 Grand Street
until 27-07-2018

Excavation Zahoor ul Akhlaq, N. Dash, Josephine Halvorson, Corin Hewitt, Erik Lindman, Stanley Rosen Peter Blum Gallery is pleased to announce Excavation, featuring works by: Zahoor ul Akhlaq, N. Dash, Josephine Halvorson, Corin Hewitt, Erik Lindman, and Stanley Rosen, on view at 176 Grand Street, New York. There will be an opening reception on Thursday, June 7 from 6-8 pm.  The exhibition runs through July 27.   Zahoor ul Akhlaq (1941–1999, Lahore, Pakistan) was a pioneering artist from Pakistan whose works combine Southeast Asian traditional aesthetic values with Western modernism, pop art, and color-field painting. Akhlaq's paintings incorporate motifs from Mughal Miniatures, calligraphy, and vernacular architecture, among a wide range of other influences from around the world.  Most of Akhlaq’s career was spent in post-colonial Pakistan during a time of social and political instability.  The works he made in this environment resonate with the complicated dichotomy between “East” and “West”.  We will present a group of small heavily textured paintings from the early to mid-1990’s.   N. Dash (b.1980, Miami, FL) has a multivalent practice that involves painting, sculpture, and photography, and often incorporates linen, graphite, styrofoam and adobe earth.  In all of Dash’s work there is a concern with bodily intelligence as it is expressed through tactile interactions and interventions with natural and synthetic materials.  The ultimate form, color, and constitution of the works is shaped by the artist’s physical engagement with material over time.  We will present a new large scale painting.   Josephine Halvorson (b.1981, Brewster, MA) investigates objects and environments through paintings made directly on site. Working within arm’s length of her subject over the course of daylight hours, Halvorson’s position foregrounds attention, experience and locale. We will present five recent gouache on paper works, which were made of the dirt and detritus Halvorson observed at a disused mine in the California/Nevada desert.                                                                                          Corin Hewitt (b.1971, Vermont) has a project-based practice that spans sculpture, photography, video, and installation.  Hewitt’s work probes history and domestic life, creating narratives and integrating personal biography into the places and objects that he encounters.  The resulting constellation of artworks and experiences conflate real and fabricated histories, playing with notions of authenticity and value.  Since last spring, Hewitt has been digging trenches, excavating walls, and conducting archival research into the history of his current home/studio in Richmond, Virginia. We will present sculptures that come out of this recent ongoing project titled The Granby Inn, which takes its name from a bar and restaurant that occupied Hewitt’s house from 1932-74.   Erik Lindman (b.1985, New York, NY) uses anonymous found surfaces as compositional elements in his paintings. Found sheets of painted luan or marred shards of stainless steel are joined, glued, and screwed to the canvas, initiating a cascade of decisions that ultimately articulate value and attention.  Cropping, awareness of scale, and use of negative space combine with the absorbency, luminosity, and superficial variation of these surfaces.  The specific processes and material choices Lindman makes function to both focus attention on the cultural ramifications of the works and assert the plain material fact of their existence.  We will present three recent large scale paintings.   Stanley Rosen (b.1926, Brooklyn, NY), makes intimately scaled ceramic stoneware sculptures, often unglazed and within a range of earthy browns, tans, and grays.  Rosen’s objects are built up with a slow accumulation of small rolled coils of clay around an inch in length.  The sculptures show clear reverence for artifacts, architecture and aesthetic principles of past civilizations while at the same time resonating with an energy that seems foreign and futuristic.  We will present a selection of five ceramic sculptures.

Excavation Zahoor ul Akhlaq, N. Dash, Josephine Halvorson, Corin Hewitt, Erik Lindman, Stanley Rosen Peter Blum Gallery is pleased to announce Excavation, featuring works by: Zahoor ul Akhlaq, N. Dash, Josephine Halvorson, Corin Hewitt, Erik Lindman, and Stanley Rosen, on view at 176 Grand Street, New York. There will be an opening reception on Thursday, June 7 from 6-8 pm.  The exhibition runs through July 27.   Zahoor ul Akhlaq (1941–1999, Lahore, Pakistan) was a pioneering artist from Pakistan whose works combine Southeast Asian traditional aesthetic values with Western modernism, pop art, and color-field painting. Akhlaq's paintings incorporate motifs from Mughal Miniatures, calligraphy, and vernacular architecture, among a wide range of other influences from around the world.  Most of Akhlaq’s career was spent in post-colonial Pakistan during a time of social and political instability.  The works he made in this environment resonate with the complicated dichotomy between “East” and “West”.  We will present a group of small heavily textured paintings from the early to mid-1990’s.   N. Dash (b.1980, Miami, FL) has a multivalent practice that involves painting, sculpture, and photography, and often incorporates linen, graphite, styrofoam and adobe earth.  In all of Dash’s work there is a concern with bodily intelligence as it is expressed through tactile interactions and interventions with natural and synthetic materials.  The ultimate form, color, and constitution of the works is shaped by the artist’s physical engagement with material over time.  We will present a new large scale painting.   Josephine Halvorson (b.1981, Brewster, MA) investigates objects and environments through paintings made directly on site. Working within arm’s length of her subject over the course of daylight hours, Halvorson’s position foregrounds attention, experience and locale. We will present five recent gouache on paper works, which were made of the dirt and detritus Halvorson observed at a disused mine in the California/Nevada desert.                                                                                          Corin Hewitt (b.1971, Vermont) has a project-based practice that spans sculpture, photography, video, and installation.  Hewitt’s work probes history and domestic life, creating narratives and integrating personal biography into the places and objects that he encounters.  The resulting constellation of artworks and experiences conflate real and fabricated histories, playing with notions of authenticity and value.  Since last spring, Hewitt has been digging trenches, excavating walls, and conducting archival research into the history of his current home/studio in Richmond, Virginia. We will present sculptures that come out of this recent ongoing project titled The Granby Inn, which takes its name from a bar and restaurant that occupied Hewitt’s house from 1932-74.   Erik Lindman (b.1985, New York, NY) uses anonymous found surfaces as compositional elements in his paintings. Found sheets of painted luan or marred shards of stainless steel are joined, glued, and screwed to the canvas, initiating a cascade of decisions that ultimately articulate value and attention.  Cropping, awareness of scale, and use of negative space combine with the absorbency, luminosity, and superficial variation of these surfaces.  The specific processes and material choices Lindman makes function to both focus attention on the cultural ramifications of the works and assert the plain material fact of their existence.  We will present three recent large scale paintings.   Stanley Rosen (b.1926, Brooklyn, NY), makes intimately scaled ceramic stoneware sculptures, often unglazed and within a range of earthy browns, tans, and grays.  Rosen’s objects are built up with a slow accumulation of small rolled coils of clay around an inch in length.  The sculptures show clear reverence for artifacts, architecture and aesthetic principles of past civilizations while at the same time resonating with an energy that seems foreign and futuristic.  We will present a selection of five ceramic sculptures.
Frances Stark
Frances Stark
New York - 439 W 127 Street
until 10-08-2018

Frances Stark – TEEN O.P.E.R.A.   

Frances Stark – TEEN O.P.E.R.A.   
Igor Hosnedl
Igor Hosnedl
New York - 96 Bowery, 2nd floor
until 03-08-2018

Igor Hosnedl – The Opening of the Wells June 20, 1954 Nice, France Dear Mikeš, It was worth it. The ragged smoke from potato fires will shroud the start to next year’s dandelion romance. Beside us, communist functionaries compromise advantageously, slumped in alternate readings of alkaline mud and plains grated down to silt sand. Two figures, thus pontine, bridge two totemically classificatory schemes. Together among performers, this is, parenthetically, a show of chromophilous hands.  Letn?ní: the drying out of ponds in summer. And, so, we spatter oatmeal among the grave goods and watch this space for a little status quo that does not come. In Poli?ka, a hornet buzzing childhood nocturnes; in Vienna, a growling appetite for Beethoven’s frieze mints machinic inclusions: rabbit skins for the museum’s hierologies. In Berlin, a hollow as night doubles into lack of day; when we first arrived in New York it was then a gray market for windscreens or a parure of misremembrances. Thus, where claims to jurisdiction are typical signs of the grain of another’s fields, we did find two of everything and charming dividers. Shaped like a molar, the gajdy dances quarter turns inlaid with unison tuning. It’s been days of searching for symmetrical faces, but we are just now noticing the tragic calm of the beneficiaries, saccades between grass snakes and sacrificial birds. The auditor repeats: a cosmos of geometric embellishments is to be the first work of design. A slipslop of polychrome apertures above Hoffman’s stairs, likewise, sieves the stars full of rocks. “A cimbalom is built from the sour scent of sessile oak,” others say among the standstill of things not to be mentioned. And, later, with nebula on the table, “The trick to realism is ellipsis.” The inorganic character of the ornamental envelope is a lake is a hole is the Janus-faced, terricolous laugh of anti-fragility and velvet divorces. They lobbed gobbets of bonito off the side of the boat, and you watched from one of five copses while one of us drank leisurely for a spell. By then we had long been singing of the pear pits that grew in the river and oozed sap as you bit them. Snow leopard harmonics are a ritual of huge pastels covetous of the slow chamois notoriously difficult to speak to. Yours always, D.R. Igor Hosnedl (b. 1988, CZ; lives and works in Berlin). The artist gained his arts education at the Academy of Fine Arts Prague, where he studied under Ji?í Kovanda, Vladimír Skrepl, Florian Pumhösl, Silke Otto-Knapp, Althea Thauberger, and Jitka Svobodová.   

Igor Hosnedl – The Opening of the Wells June 20, 1954 Nice, France Dear Mikeš, It was worth it. The ragged smoke from potato fires will shroud the start to next year’s dandelion romance. Beside us, communist functionaries compromise advantageously, slumped in alternate readings of alkaline mud and plains grated down to silt sand. Two figures, thus pontine, bridge two totemically classificatory schemes. Together among performers, this is, parenthetically, a show of chromophilous hands.  Letn?ní: the drying out of ponds in summer. And, so, we spatter oatmeal among the grave goods and watch this space for a little status quo that does not come. In Poli?ka, a hornet buzzing childhood nocturnes; in Vienna, a growling appetite for Beethoven’s frieze mints machinic inclusions: rabbit skins for the museum’s hierologies. In Berlin, a hollow as night doubles into lack of day; when we first arrived in New York it was then a gray market for windscreens or a parure of misremembrances. Thus, where claims to jurisdiction are typical signs of the grain of another’s fields, we did find two of everything and charming dividers. Shaped like a molar, the gajdy dances quarter turns inlaid with unison tuning. It’s been days of searching for symmetrical faces, but we are just now noticing the tragic calm of the beneficiaries, saccades between grass snakes and sacrificial birds. The auditor repeats: a cosmos of geometric embellishments is to be the first work of design. A slipslop of polychrome apertures above Hoffman’s stairs, likewise, sieves the stars full of rocks. “A cimbalom is built from the sour scent of sessile oak,” others say among the standstill of things not to be mentioned. And, later, with nebula on the table, “The trick to realism is ellipsis.” The inorganic character of the ornamental envelope is a lake is a hole is the Janus-faced, terricolous laugh of anti-fragility and velvet divorces. They lobbed gobbets of bonito off the side of the boat, and you watched from one of five copses while one of us drank leisurely for a spell. By then we had long been singing of the pear pits that grew in the river and oozed sap as you bit them. Snow leopard harmonics are a ritual of huge pastels covetous of the slow chamois notoriously difficult to speak to. Yours always, D.R. Igor Hosnedl (b. 1988, CZ; lives and works in Berlin). The artist gained his arts education at the Academy of Fine Arts Prague, where he studied under Ji?í Kovanda, Vladimír Skrepl, Florian Pumhösl, Silke Otto-Knapp, Althea Thauberger, and Jitka Svobodová.   
Keith Sonnier
Keith Sonnier
New York - 23 Corwith Avenue
until 26-05-2019

Keith Sonnier – Dis-Play II Keith Sonnier’s Dis-Play II (1970) is an environmental installation of foam rubber, fluorescent powder, strobe light, black light, neon, plywood, and glass. Dis-Play II is shown with Film and Videos 1968–1977, a selection reflecting Sonnier’s decade-long exploration of sound and media work. Alongside peers such as Carl Andre, Dan Flavin, Eva Hesse, Bruce Nauman, and Jackie Winsor, Sonnier utilized nontraditional and specifically ephemeral materials in his production. In his own words, “we made art that was defined by its defiance of the traditional idea of what could be considered art.” First exhibited in Sonnier’s solo exhibition at the Castelli Warehouse in New York in 1970, Dis-Play II brings together his ongoing interest in film, light, and experiential art environments.  

Keith Sonnier – Dis-Play II Keith Sonnier’s Dis-Play II (1970) is an environmental installation of foam rubber, fluorescent powder, strobe light, black light, neon, plywood, and glass. Dis-Play II is shown with Film and Videos 1968–1977, a selection reflecting Sonnier’s decade-long exploration of sound and media work. Alongside peers such as Carl Andre, Dan Flavin, Eva Hesse, Bruce Nauman, and Jackie Winsor, Sonnier utilized nontraditional and specifically ephemeral materials in his production. In his own words, “we made art that was defined by its defiance of the traditional idea of what could be considered art.” First exhibited in Sonnier’s solo exhibition at the Castelli Warehouse in New York in 1970, Dis-Play II brings together his ongoing interest in film, light, and experiential art environments.  
Jeff Koons
Jeff Koons
New York - 976 Madison Avenue
until 24-08-2018

Jeff Koons  

Jeff Koons  
Tony Oursler
Tony Oursler
New York - 138 10th Avenue
until 10-08-2018

Tony Oursler – TC: the most interesting man alive  

Tony Oursler – TC: the most interesting man alive  
Christopher Wool
Christopher Wool
New York - 25 Knickerbocker Ave
until 10-08-2018

Christopher Wool – A New Sculpture On view in the gallery’s Bushwick space is a new, previously unexhibited large-scale bronze and copper plated steel sculpture, which is presented alongside a 2014 sculpture and a set of etchings from 2016. In the past few years, Wool has cultivated a sculptural practice that intersects with his more widely known two-dimensional body of work. The sculptures demonstrate his penchant for appropriating existing forms, deriving their structure from ranching wire found around his property in Texas. The structures are uniquely defined by their coiled and twisted lines, evoking the silkscreened and spray painted contours found in the artist’s earlier two-dimensional work. The etchings highlight Wool’s gestural style and singular sensibility towards line, displaying affinities with the wiry loops and curves of his sculptures.

Christopher Wool – A New Sculpture On view in the gallery’s Bushwick space is a new, previously unexhibited large-scale bronze and copper plated steel sculpture, which is presented alongside a 2014 sculpture and a set of etchings from 2016. In the past few years, Wool has cultivated a sculptural practice that intersects with his more widely known two-dimensional body of work. The sculptures demonstrate his penchant for appropriating existing forms, deriving their structure from ranching wire found around his property in Texas. The structures are uniquely defined by their coiled and twisted lines, evoking the silkscreened and spray painted contours found in the artist’s earlier two-dimensional work. The etchings highlight Wool’s gestural style and singular sensibility towards line, displaying affinities with the wiry loops and curves of his sculptures.
Haegue Yang
Haegue Yang
Cologne - Heinrich-Bll-Platz
until 12-08-2018

Haegue Yang – ETA 1994–2018.  2018 Wolfgang Hahn Prize   In 2018, the Gesellschaft für Moderne Kunst am Museum Ludwig will recognize Haegue Yang for her extraordinary body of work with the Wolfgang Hahn Prize. The Museum Ludwig will showcase the remarkable versatility of her entire oeuvre in the artist’s first-ever survey exhibition with over 120 works ranging from action-based objects from the 1990s to lacquer paintings, photographs, works on paper, video essays, anthropomorphic sculptures, performative pieces, and large-scale installations.   The abbreviation ETA stands for “estimated time of arrival,” among other things. Thus, the exhibition title points to an artistic career in transit and the constant itineracy of an artist who maintains studios in Seoul and Berlin and has exhibited internationally since 1994.   The exhibition will begin with Yang’s first venetian blind installation from her 2006 Series of Vulnerable Arrangements—the 2006 Version Utrecht, an immersive and sensorial experience unfolding from a composition of various materials and the simultaneous use of wind, scents, light, and heat. Within this arrangement, video essays document the artist’s travels through cities around the world and convey feelings of home, isolation, and dislocation associated with her itineracy in quite personal commentaries.   One of the first rooms will feature early and in some cases reconstructed works that reveal Yang’s examination of Western art history from Duchamp to Fluxus and tendencies of Institutional Critique as well as the then-current Context Art. As in her first few exhibitions in the 1990s, these works will be staged or ironically shown in display cases, like in an archive.   A central part of the exhibition is Storage Piece. This key work was created in 2004 out of financial need and an acute lack of space as a collection of packaged works on shipping pallets. The work has since been exhibited in several configurations, and its arrangement will also change at regular intervals in the Cologne exhibition—a reflection of Yang’s consideration of transitory states. Furthermore, it was an important contribution to Conceptual Art in the mid-2000s, as well as a striking commentary on a rapidly changing art market and the increasing commodification of art.   Yang’s well-known anthropomorphic light sculptures will be represented in the exhibition with the "Medicine Men" series from 2010, among other works. These consist of a variety of materials: functional and industrially manufactured everyday objects such as clothing racks, light bulbs, electric cables, and party wigs. Yang herself refers to these sculptures as “shamans” or “transvestites,” thus pointing to the ambiguous gender and social roles that medicine men take on in nature religions. They also pose questions of exoticism and cultural identity which run throughout Yang’s work.   Yang will also continue her series "VIP's Union" (2001–) with a version for Cologne. Well-known local figures—VIPs from different areas of society such as culture, sports, business, and politics—will be invited to lend their favorite chair or table for the duration of the exhibition. This collection of different pieces of furniture will portray the local society and its domestic preferences.   The 12-meter-high DC Hall will feature two works consisting of blinds, Mountains of Encounter (2008) and Sol LeWitt Upside Down – K123456, Expanded 1078 Times, Doubled and Mirrored (2015). For the first time, two very different types of venetian blind installations will be juxtaposed in a single room: while Mountains of Encounter marked the beginning of a series of structurally complex compositions relating to historical events and personalities in Yang’s oeuvre, Sol LeWitt Upside Down – K123456, Expanded 1078 Times, Doubled and Mirrored is based on a cubic structure by the Minimalist artist Sol LeWitt, which Yang not only physically expands, but also conceptually condenses, doubles, mirrors, and finally turns upside down.   With her diverse oeuvre, Yang adeptly avoids clear attributions. Her works demonstrate elements of Institutional Critique and are conceptual as well as rich in cultural and historical references, while simultaneously sensually complex and emotionally charged. Across over 1500 square meters of exhibition space, this comprehensive retrospective’s spatial scenography will echo the conceptual dynamics of the works, lending the exhibition the quality of a Gesamtkunstwerk—harmonious yet full of dissonances.   Haegue Yang (*1971 in Seoul) lives and works in Berlin and Seoul. Since 2017, she has been teaching at the Städelschule, where she herself began her studies under Georg Herold in 1994. She was twice represented at the Venice Biennale in 2009 (in the programmatic exhibition fare mondi and in a solo exhibition in the Korean pavilion), and in 2012 she participated in dOCUMENTA (13).

Haegue Yang – ETA 1994–2018.  2018 Wolfgang Hahn Prize   In 2018, the Gesellschaft für Moderne Kunst am Museum Ludwig will recognize Haegue Yang for her extraordinary body of work with the Wolfgang Hahn Prize. The Museum Ludwig will showcase the remarkable versatility of her entire oeuvre in the artist’s first-ever survey exhibition with over 120 works ranging from action-based objects from the 1990s to lacquer paintings, photographs, works on paper, video essays, anthropomorphic sculptures, performative pieces, and large-scale installations.   The abbreviation ETA stands for “estimated time of arrival,” among other things. Thus, the exhibition title points to an artistic career in transit and the constant itineracy of an artist who maintains studios in Seoul and Berlin and has exhibited internationally since 1994.   The exhibition will begin with Yang’s first venetian blind installation from her 2006 Series of Vulnerable Arrangements—the 2006 Version Utrecht, an immersive and sensorial experience unfolding from a composition of various materials and the simultaneous use of wind, scents, light, and heat. Within this arrangement, video essays document the artist’s travels through cities around the world and convey feelings of home, isolation, and dislocation associated with her itineracy in quite personal commentaries.   One of the first rooms will feature early and in some cases reconstructed works that reveal Yang’s examination of Western art history from Duchamp to Fluxus and tendencies of Institutional Critique as well as the then-current Context Art. As in her first few exhibitions in the 1990s, these works will be staged or ironically shown in display cases, like in an archive.   A central part of the exhibition is Storage Piece. This key work was created in 2004 out of financial need and an acute lack of space as a collection of packaged works on shipping pallets. The work has since been exhibited in several configurations, and its arrangement will also change at regular intervals in the Cologne exhibition—a reflection of Yang’s consideration of transitory states. Furthermore, it was an important contribution to Conceptual Art in the mid-2000s, as well as a striking commentary on a rapidly changing art market and the increasing commodification of art.   Yang’s well-known anthropomorphic light sculptures will be represented in the exhibition with the "Medicine Men" series from 2010, among other works. These consist of a variety of materials: functional and industrially manufactured everyday objects such as clothing racks, light bulbs, electric cables, and party wigs. Yang herself refers to these sculptures as “shamans” or “transvestites,” thus pointing to the ambiguous gender and social roles that medicine men take on in nature religions. They also pose questions of exoticism and cultural identity which run throughout Yang’s work.   Yang will also continue her series "VIP's Union" (2001–) with a version for Cologne. Well-known local figures—VIPs from different areas of society such as culture, sports, business, and politics—will be invited to lend their favorite chair or table for the duration of the exhibition. This collection of different pieces of furniture will portray the local society and its domestic preferences.   The 12-meter-high DC Hall will feature two works consisting of blinds, Mountains of Encounter (2008) and Sol LeWitt Upside Down – K123456, Expanded 1078 Times, Doubled and Mirrored (2015). For the first time, two very different types of venetian blind installations will be juxtaposed in a single room: while Mountains of Encounter marked the beginning of a series of structurally complex compositions relating to historical events and personalities in Yang’s oeuvre, Sol LeWitt Upside Down – K123456, Expanded 1078 Times, Doubled and Mirrored is based on a cubic structure by the Minimalist artist Sol LeWitt, which Yang not only physically expands, but also conceptually condenses, doubles, mirrors, and finally turns upside down.   With her diverse oeuvre, Yang adeptly avoids clear attributions. Her works demonstrate elements of Institutional Critique and are conceptual as well as rich in cultural and historical references, while simultaneously sensually complex and emotionally charged. Across over 1500 square meters of exhibition space, this comprehensive retrospective’s spatial scenography will echo the conceptual dynamics of the works, lending the exhibition the quality of a Gesamtkunstwerk—harmonious yet full of dissonances.   Haegue Yang (*1971 in Seoul) lives and works in Berlin and Seoul. Since 2017, she has been teaching at the Städelschule, where she herself began her studies under Georg Herold in 1994. She was twice represented at the Venice Biennale in 2009 (in the programmatic exhibition fare mondi and in a solo exhibition in the Korean pavilion), and in 2012 she participated in dOCUMENTA (13).
Micha Cattaui
Micha Cattaui
Cologne - Erftstrasse 29
until 25-08-2018

Micha Cattaui – Antiquity 2.0  What if ancient Greek philosophers, gods, heroes, and artists came alive today? What would they say? How would we perceive them? How prophetic were their thoughts? How relevant are they for our world today?   The 21st century is the most interesting century of all the humankind’s history. Almost every section of human activity from politics to sciences has changed and improved significantly. Contemporary and modern artists have repeatedly used sculptures from antiquity as the starting point for their inspiration. One can only admire the quality and craftsmanship seen in antique art; often rivaled, mimicked, copied, but never equaled. With Micha’s new works, the artist bridges that sense of artistic perfection seen in Ancient Greece and merges it with our modern society of mass consumerism. The result is a collaboration and a conversation between three body of works; the sculpture, a “pop” photograph of the sculpture and a museum location shoot where the sculpture is imagined back into “context”. All three items, although based on the same sculpture, allows for a different political expression in each individual artwork. Artist Statement:  “I believe that art should be critical of our times and try to engage the viewer in having a conversation. In ancient Greece, art and humor was applied on an almost industrial scale on items such as vases. They are a centuries old testament that humor is a cornerstone of a civilization and a prerequisite for democracy. With my new works, I try to combine that very idea that humor/sarcasm should be an integral part of a political observation.” Antiquity 2.0 started its European tour in Monte Carlo, where Prince Albert II of Monaco inaugurated the opening, followed by an exhibition in Cologne, Germany, with Mirko Mayer gallery and will finally be seen, in its entirety with DL galleries in Piraeus.

Micha Cattaui – Antiquity 2.0  What if ancient Greek philosophers, gods, heroes, and artists came alive today? What would they say? How would we perceive them? How prophetic were their thoughts? How relevant are they for our world today?   The 21st century is the most interesting century of all the humankind’s history. Almost every section of human activity from politics to sciences has changed and improved significantly. Contemporary and modern artists have repeatedly used sculptures from antiquity as the starting point for their inspiration. One can only admire the quality and craftsmanship seen in antique art; often rivaled, mimicked, copied, but never equaled. With Micha’s new works, the artist bridges that sense of artistic perfection seen in Ancient Greece and merges it with our modern society of mass consumerism. The result is a collaboration and a conversation between three body of works; the sculpture, a “pop” photograph of the sculpture and a museum location shoot where the sculpture is imagined back into “context”. All three items, although based on the same sculpture, allows for a different political expression in each individual artwork. Artist Statement:  “I believe that art should be critical of our times and try to engage the viewer in having a conversation. In ancient Greece, art and humor was applied on an almost industrial scale on items such as vases. They are a centuries old testament that humor is a cornerstone of a civilization and a prerequisite for democracy. With my new works, I try to combine that very idea that humor/sarcasm should be an integral part of a political observation.” Antiquity 2.0 started its European tour in Monte Carlo, where Prince Albert II of Monaco inaugurated the opening, followed by an exhibition in Cologne, Germany, with Mirko Mayer gallery and will finally be seen, in its entirety with DL galleries in Piraeus.
Martha Rosler
Martha Rosler
Cologne - Elisenstrasse 4-6
until 31-08-2018

Martha Rosler, 1981: The year the future began Curated by Jorge Ribalta, originally organized by àngels barcelona The exhibition, which is curated by Jorge Ribalta and was originally organized by àngels barcelona, presents a group of mostly unpublished photographs, taken in 1981, a key moment in the neo-vanguardist politicization of Rosler’s work. That year, Rosler published her book 3 Works, which synthesized some key works from the 1970s and which marked a turning point in her career, partly because it included the publication of the essay “In, Around and Afterthoughts … On Documentary Photography,” one of the key theoretical texts on the “reinvention” of the documentary. (Also in this book was a work centering on the coup in Chile and a visit to northern Mexico.) Further, in that same year she was part of a group of North American artists and intellectuals traveling to Cuba, while a few months later, she participated in the second Latin American Colloquium of Photography in Mexico City. Her artistic and intellectual activity is indissociable from the democratic struggles in Latin America. With the various projects she was working on at the time, this became a biographically crucial moment for her (marked by her return to New York after over a decade in California and Canada), that made her contribute decisively to the paradigm shift in documentary discourse. A couple of days later, on May 3, she marched to the steps of the Pentagon in Washington D.C. as part of the largest anti-war demonstration in a decade, opposing U.S. intervention in El Salvador.

Martha Rosler, 1981: The year the future began Curated by Jorge Ribalta, originally organized by àngels barcelona The exhibition, which is curated by Jorge Ribalta and was originally organized by àngels barcelona, presents a group of mostly unpublished photographs, taken in 1981, a key moment in the neo-vanguardist politicization of Rosler’s work. That year, Rosler published her book 3 Works, which synthesized some key works from the 1970s and which marked a turning point in her career, partly because it included the publication of the essay “In, Around and Afterthoughts … On Documentary Photography,” one of the key theoretical texts on the “reinvention” of the documentary. (Also in this book was a work centering on the coup in Chile and a visit to northern Mexico.) Further, in that same year she was part of a group of North American artists and intellectuals traveling to Cuba, while a few months later, she participated in the second Latin American Colloquium of Photography in Mexico City. Her artistic and intellectual activity is indissociable from the democratic struggles in Latin America. With the various projects she was working on at the time, this became a biographically crucial moment for her (marked by her return to New York after over a decade in California and Canada), that made her contribute decisively to the paradigm shift in documentary discourse. A couple of days later, on May 3, she marched to the steps of the Pentagon in Washington D.C. as part of the largest anti-war demonstration in a decade, opposing U.S. intervention in El Salvador.
Larry Sultan
Larry Sultan
Cologne - Schnhauser Strasse 8
until 25-08-2018

Larry Sultan – Swimmers  

Larry Sultan – Swimmers  
Jessica Twitchell
Jessica Twitchell
Cologne - Albertusstrasse 4
until 21-07-2018

Jessica Twitchell – Neo-Luddismus Is 2018 the year of the Neo-Luddites? So asked the British Guardian referring to the currently pervasive and excessive demand to surrender before the principal threats of technology.i The Facebook data scandal; raging taxi drivers, who in Paris and other cities have taken to the streets to vent their anger at the threat to their livelihood by the start-up competitor Uber; artificial intelligence that has to be developed gradually and restrained in order to ensure that it does not exceed the intelligence of its creators. Has a watershed been reached where awareness of the lurking threats from Big Data & Co. is overshadowing those benefits of digitization that facilitate quality of life improving measure and where paralyzing fears and irritating discomfort turn into violence? The sculptor Jessica Twitchell (*1983 in Mellrichstadt, lives and works in Cologne) has investigated for her exhibition NEO-LUDDISMUS the societal phenomenon the name of which refers to the Luddites, a movement at the beginning of the nineteenth century that was protesting against societal after-effects of the industrial revolution, seeking to physically destroy labor saving machinery that eradicated their means of support. At the center of the exhibition is a series of objects that emerged on the island of Majorca. These are presented like rare stones or archaeological readymades. However, visible on the surfaces of the blocks of stone one can see plates, pieces of plastic and metal, they are parts of mobile phones that the artist had smashed and disassembled into minute parts. These “rare earths”, mined in Africa by children’s hands, are a vital component in the manufacture of rechargeable batteries for cell phones in China, produced with questionable impacts and significant detriment to the health of both the miners and the local population. In a stone ware process the artist cast these “rare earths” as formal reproductions of limestone bricks, which she collected on Mallorquine ground. Twitchell has transformed her research and thoughts on Neo-Luddism into a series of graphic drawings: illegible patterns reminiscent of QR codes without content that can be scanned. A space-specific posting, the photograph of a rock, which she has reduced to a decorative structure, is another element in the exhibition. Jessica Twitchell works with the traditional methods of sculpting in order to address contemporary content. She uses various artistic processes which range from two-dimensional wall postings to space filling constructed installations. Often her conceptual notion is based on processes of reproduction and repetition which she applies in a minimalist fashion. To demolish something old in order to produce something new, something lasting, a unique piece as in the case of the above mentioned stones. Text: Leonie Pfennig Translation: Uta Hoffmann

Jessica Twitchell – Neo-Luddismus Is 2018 the year of the Neo-Luddites? So asked the British Guardian referring to the currently pervasive and excessive demand to surrender before the principal threats of technology.i The Facebook data scandal; raging taxi drivers, who in Paris and other cities have taken to the streets to vent their anger at the threat to their livelihood by the start-up competitor Uber; artificial intelligence that has to be developed gradually and restrained in order to ensure that it does not exceed the intelligence of its creators. Has a watershed been reached where awareness of the lurking threats from Big Data & Co. is overshadowing those benefits of digitization that facilitate quality of life improving measure and where paralyzing fears and irritating discomfort turn into violence? The sculptor Jessica Twitchell (*1983 in Mellrichstadt, lives and works in Cologne) has investigated for her exhibition NEO-LUDDISMUS the societal phenomenon the name of which refers to the Luddites, a movement at the beginning of the nineteenth century that was protesting against societal after-effects of the industrial revolution, seeking to physically destroy labor saving machinery that eradicated their means of support. At the center of the exhibition is a series of objects that emerged on the island of Majorca. These are presented like rare stones or archaeological readymades. However, visible on the surfaces of the blocks of stone one can see plates, pieces of plastic and metal, they are parts of mobile phones that the artist had smashed and disassembled into minute parts. These “rare earths”, mined in Africa by children’s hands, are a vital component in the manufacture of rechargeable batteries for cell phones in China, produced with questionable impacts and significant detriment to the health of both the miners and the local population. In a stone ware process the artist cast these “rare earths” as formal reproductions of limestone bricks, which she collected on Mallorquine ground. Twitchell has transformed her research and thoughts on Neo-Luddism into a series of graphic drawings: illegible patterns reminiscent of QR codes without content that can be scanned. A space-specific posting, the photograph of a rock, which she has reduced to a decorative structure, is another element in the exhibition. Jessica Twitchell works with the traditional methods of sculpting in order to address contemporary content. She uses various artistic processes which range from two-dimensional wall postings to space filling constructed installations. Often her conceptual notion is based on processes of reproduction and repetition which she applies in a minimalist fashion. To demolish something old in order to produce something new, something lasting, a unique piece as in the case of the above mentioned stones. Text: Leonie Pfennig Translation: Uta Hoffmann
Generation Loss
Generation Loss
Dsseldorf - Schanzenstrasse 54
until 29-07-2018

Generation Loss. 10 Years of the Julia Stoschek Collection Eleanor Antin, Ed Atkins & Simon Thompson, Charles Atlas, Lutz Bacher, Lynda Benglis, Bernadette Corporation, Johanna Billing, Dara Birnbaum, Hannah Black, Chris Burden, Matt Calderwood, Patty Chang, Ian Cheng, Jen DeNike, Nathalie Djurberg & Hans Berg, Cheryl Donegan, Trisha Donnelly, Cao Fei, Peter Fischli & David Weiss, Dara Friedman, Cyprien Gaillard, Douglas Gordon, Barbara Hammer, Christian Jankowski, Joan Jonas, Jesper Just, Imi Knoebel, Mark Leckey, Klara Lidén, Gordon Matta-Clark, Paul McCarthy, Lutz Mommartz, Bruce Nauman, Jon Rafman, Lucy Raven, Reynold Reynolds & Patrick Jolley, James Richards, Rachel Rose, Jack Smith, Wolfgang Tillmans, Ulay & Marina Abramovi?, Steina Vasulka, Klaus vom Bruch, Hannah Wilke, Jordan Wolfson, Tobias Zielony After more than 15 exhibitions and eight international collaborative projects attracting over 100,000 visitors, JULIA STOSCHEK COLLECTION is now celebrating its 10th anniversary in June this year. The anniversary exhibition titled “Generation Loss” is being conceived in collaboration with British artist Ed Atkins. As a singularly holistic technology, video has maintained its status as the most popular medium. In the last decade the distribution of video has become simpler in terms of access, and more complex as regards the mode of distribution itself.The technological advances that account for these changes pervade artistic practice particularly, pragmatically as well as conceptually: Not only new reflexively approached formats abound, but new modes of behavior, communication and forms of representation, forms that are able to decisively alter our perception. Unique among art forms, artist moving image has always been singularly driven by the medium, as it moves within the mainstream – cleaving, albeit critically, to the technologies’ processes of fidelity and capitalistic progress. The term “Generation Loss” generally refers to the process of a qualitative loss in successively copied data. Everything that reduces the representative quality as copies of data are made, can be regarded as a form of ‘generation loss’. However, this holds true not just for data formats or material media, but also manifests itself in an ideological sense in politics, culture, nature, from one generation to the next. The basic idea of the exhibition concept is to show the ways in which generations of artists affect one another; the discourses that awkwardly straddle technology-specific periods of artists’ moving image makers; how influence may auger revolt, revision, renewed accord; how artists’ moving image is a uniquely reactive, dependent medium whose intimacy with the vicissitudes of mainstream tech confers a kind of automatic collusion with the culture at large that is pretty much unique to it – to moving image works. Formally, the exhibition will very visibly connect works, in a sort of straightforward, socially demonstrative way: projected works will be screened in choreographed sequences and in proximity to one another. This will be partially achieved using acoustic glass to divide the works and effectively block sound leaks, but allows you to see through to other spaces, works. We plan to pretty much do away with the preeminent, isolated black box of video installation. No work alone, all works in relation.  

Generation Loss. 10 Years of the Julia Stoschek Collection Eleanor Antin, Ed Atkins & Simon Thompson, Charles Atlas, Lutz Bacher, Lynda Benglis, Bernadette Corporation, Johanna Billing, Dara Birnbaum, Hannah Black, Chris Burden, Matt Calderwood, Patty Chang, Ian Cheng, Jen DeNike, Nathalie Djurberg & Hans Berg, Cheryl Donegan, Trisha Donnelly, Cao Fei, Peter Fischli & David Weiss, Dara Friedman, Cyprien Gaillard, Douglas Gordon, Barbara Hammer, Christian Jankowski, Joan Jonas, Jesper Just, Imi Knoebel, Mark Leckey, Klara Lidén, Gordon Matta-Clark, Paul McCarthy, Lutz Mommartz, Bruce Nauman, Jon Rafman, Lucy Raven, Reynold Reynolds & Patrick Jolley, James Richards, Rachel Rose, Jack Smith, Wolfgang Tillmans, Ulay & Marina Abramovi?, Steina Vasulka, Klaus vom Bruch, Hannah Wilke, Jordan Wolfson, Tobias Zielony After more than 15 exhibitions and eight international collaborative projects attracting over 100,000 visitors, JULIA STOSCHEK COLLECTION is now celebrating its 10th anniversary in June this year. The anniversary exhibition titled “Generation Loss” is being conceived in collaboration with British artist Ed Atkins. As a singularly holistic technology, video has maintained its status as the most popular medium. In the last decade the distribution of video has become simpler in terms of access, and more complex as regards the mode of distribution itself.The technological advances that account for these changes pervade artistic practice particularly, pragmatically as well as conceptually: Not only new reflexively approached formats abound, but new modes of behavior, communication and forms of representation, forms that are able to decisively alter our perception. Unique among art forms, artist moving image has always been singularly driven by the medium, as it moves within the mainstream – cleaving, albeit critically, to the technologies’ processes of fidelity and capitalistic progress. The term “Generation Loss” generally refers to the process of a qualitative loss in successively copied data. Everything that reduces the representative quality as copies of data are made, can be regarded as a form of ‘generation loss’. However, this holds true not just for data formats or material media, but also manifests itself in an ideological sense in politics, culture, nature, from one generation to the next. The basic idea of the exhibition concept is to show the ways in which generations of artists affect one another; the discourses that awkwardly straddle technology-specific periods of artists’ moving image makers; how influence may auger revolt, revision, renewed accord; how artists’ moving image is a uniquely reactive, dependent medium whose intimacy with the vicissitudes of mainstream tech confers a kind of automatic collusion with the culture at large that is pretty much unique to it – to moving image works. Formally, the exhibition will very visibly connect works, in a sort of straightforward, socially demonstrative way: projected works will be screened in choreographed sequences and in proximity to one another. This will be partially achieved using acoustic glass to divide the works and effectively block sound leaks, but allows you to see through to other spaces, works. We plan to pretty much do away with the preeminent, isolated black box of video installation. No work alone, all works in relation.  
Thomas Ruff
Thomas Ruff
Dsseldorf - Platanenstrasse 7
until 28-07-2018

Thomas Ruff

Thomas Ruff
Juan Muñoz
Juan Muoz
Dsseldorf - Berger Weg 16
until 12-08-2018

Juan Muñoz  

Juan Muñoz  
Douglas Gordon
Douglas Gordon
Dsseldorf - Grabbeplatz 5
until 19-08-2018

Douglas Gordon – k.364 The internationally acclaimed Scottish artist Douglas Gordon (*1966) presents his striking, largescale video installation "k.364", 2010 in the Grabbe Halle of the K20. In this 50-minute work, which is projected onto a pair of two-sided screens, the artist follows two Israeli musicians of Polish-Jewish heritage on their journey by train from Berlin to Warsaw, where they are scheduled to perform Mozart’s "Sinfonia Concertante for Violin, Viola, and Orchestra in E flat Major, KV 364" in the National Philharmonic. Their reflections concerning the Holocaust, the landscape, so charged with historical memory, and their visit to a synagogue in Poznan – misappropriated as a swimming hall since in the National Socialist era – are mixed with the sound of the rolling train and the soothing tones of Mozart's symphony. The work movingly documents of the profound trust of the  protagonists in the power of music against the subtly delineated background of a dark and unredeemed history.

Douglas Gordon – k.364 The internationally acclaimed Scottish artist Douglas Gordon (*1966) presents his striking, largescale video installation "k.364", 2010 in the Grabbe Halle of the K20. In this 50-minute work, which is projected onto a pair of two-sided screens, the artist follows two Israeli musicians of Polish-Jewish heritage on their journey by train from Berlin to Warsaw, where they are scheduled to perform Mozart’s "Sinfonia Concertante for Violin, Viola, and Orchestra in E flat Major, KV 364" in the National Philharmonic. Their reflections concerning the Holocaust, the landscape, so charged with historical memory, and their visit to a synagogue in Poznan – misappropriated as a swimming hall since in the National Socialist era – are mixed with the sound of the rolling train and the soothing tones of Mozart's symphony. The work movingly documents of the profound trust of the  protagonists in the power of music against the subtly delineated background of a dark and unredeemed history.
Jack Goldstein
Jack Goldstein
Los Angeles - 6150 Wilshire Boulevard
until 18-08-2018

Jack Goldstein – Under Water Sea Fantasy 1301PE is pleased to present its fourth exhibition with the late Jack Goldstein. The show includes Goldstein’s significant film Under Water Sea Fantasy along with nine silkscreened text and color photographs: Portfolio of Performance, and James Welling’s Jack Goldstein’s Studio. A central figure of the “Pictures Generation”, Goldstein’s work included film, performance, writing, text, painting, sound, and sculpture. Under Water Sea Fantasy began production in 1983 and was completed before his untimely death in 2003. His film reveals Goldstein’s acute understanding of the perception of spectacle and the power of image. Using production values influenced by Hollywood studio techniques, he exploits the spectacular effects of visual presence and the interplay of sound and image. Footage of natural phenomena such as underwater life, volcanic eruptions and celestial events is montaged into a flow of appearing and disappearing energies with no clear narrative structure. At once serene and violent, the seductive visual impact of this film is mesmerizing. Underwater Sea Fantasy premiered in the 2004 Whitney Biennial. Goldstein’s Portfolio of Performance documents and describes in exacting detail nine of his proposed art performances from 1976 - 1985: The Jump, Sound Performance, Two Boxers, Two Fencers, Records, The Murder, Fire/Body/Light, Body Contortionist and Burning Window. These performances are cinematic in nature and parallel his film work from this period. They remove the artist centric nature of performances. The portfolio serves almost as a set of instructions for additional stagings or interpretations of the original performances, essentially rendering the artist unnecessary to the process.  

Jack Goldstein – Under Water Sea Fantasy 1301PE is pleased to present its fourth exhibition with the late Jack Goldstein. The show includes Goldstein’s significant film Under Water Sea Fantasy along with nine silkscreened text and color photographs: Portfolio of Performance, and James Welling’s Jack Goldstein’s Studio. A central figure of the “Pictures Generation”, Goldstein’s work included film, performance, writing, text, painting, sound, and sculpture. Under Water Sea Fantasy began production in 1983 and was completed before his untimely death in 2003. His film reveals Goldstein’s acute understanding of the perception of spectacle and the power of image. Using production values influenced by Hollywood studio techniques, he exploits the spectacular effects of visual presence and the interplay of sound and image. Footage of natural phenomena such as underwater life, volcanic eruptions and celestial events is montaged into a flow of appearing and disappearing energies with no clear narrative structure. At once serene and violent, the seductive visual impact of this film is mesmerizing. Underwater Sea Fantasy premiered in the 2004 Whitney Biennial. Goldstein’s Portfolio of Performance documents and describes in exacting detail nine of his proposed art performances from 1976 - 1985: The Jump, Sound Performance, Two Boxers, Two Fencers, Records, The Murder, Fire/Body/Light, Body Contortionist and Burning Window. These performances are cinematic in nature and parallel his film work from this period. They remove the artist centric nature of performances. The portfolio serves almost as a set of instructions for additional stagings or interpretations of the original performances, essentially rendering the artist unnecessary to the process.  
Ethan Cook
Ethan Cook
Los Angeles - 2660 South La Cienega Boulevard
until 11-08-2018

Ethan Cook – Propositions  

Ethan Cook – Propositions  
Andrea Zittel
Andrea Zittel
Los Angeles - 10899 Wilshire Boulevard
until 30-09-2018

Hammer Museum Store: A-Z West Works Pop-Up by Andrea Zittel The A-Z West Works pop-up shop, now open at the Hammer Museum Store, features a selection of works generated from A-Z West, Andrea Zittel's home and testing grounds for living prototypes in Joshua Tree, CA, and from High Desert Test Sites (HDTS), the arts nonprofit founded in 2002 by Andrea Zittel, Andy Stillpass, John Connelly, Lisa Anne Auerbach, and Shaun Caley Regen that promotes experimental exchanges in the High Desert of Southern California. Proceeds from all HDTS rock and product sales will support HDTS projects and monthly programming. The pop-up includes a new line of A-Z West Works products alongside an array of one-of-a-kind ceramics, textiles, furnishings, books, snacks, tinctures, and clothing made by artists from the High Desert community. The pop-up also features the annual High Desert Test Sites Gem/Mineral Expo, which offers stones sourced from Quartzsite, Arizona, as well as other HDTS products including publications, postcards, and print editions. Special A-Z West Works events will take place at the store throughout the duration of the pop-up, and more details will be announced.

Hammer Museum Store: A-Z West Works Pop-Up by Andrea Zittel The A-Z West Works pop-up shop, now open at the Hammer Museum Store, features a selection of works generated from A-Z West, Andrea Zittel's home and testing grounds for living prototypes in Joshua Tree, CA, and from High Desert Test Sites (HDTS), the arts nonprofit founded in 2002 by Andrea Zittel, Andy Stillpass, John Connelly, Lisa Anne Auerbach, and Shaun Caley Regen that promotes experimental exchanges in the High Desert of Southern California. Proceeds from all HDTS rock and product sales will support HDTS projects and monthly programming. The pop-up includes a new line of A-Z West Works products alongside an array of one-of-a-kind ceramics, textiles, furnishings, books, snacks, tinctures, and clothing made by artists from the High Desert community. The pop-up also features the annual High Desert Test Sites Gem/Mineral Expo, which offers stones sourced from Quartzsite, Arizona, as well as other HDTS products including publications, postcards, and print editions. Special A-Z West Works events will take place at the store throughout the duration of the pop-up, and more details will be announced.
Ed Ruscha
Ed Ruscha
Los Angeles - 2622 La Cienega Boulevard
until 18-08-2018

Ed Ruscha – Prints & Ephemera Ed Ruscha moved to Los Angeles to study at Chouinard Art Institute (now California Institute of the Arts) in 1956, graduating in 1960. Stemming from an interest in landscape, signage, literature, and poetry, Ruscha has explored the relationship between image and language for nearly six decades. His work has been associated with movements spanning Pop, Surrealism, and Conceptual Art. Printmaking has been integral to Ruscha’s work alongside his painting and drawing practice. This exhibition brings together a collection of prints, ephemera, and films spanning the artist's rich career. 

Ed Ruscha – Prints & Ephemera Ed Ruscha moved to Los Angeles to study at Chouinard Art Institute (now California Institute of the Arts) in 1956, graduating in 1960. Stemming from an interest in landscape, signage, literature, and poetry, Ruscha has explored the relationship between image and language for nearly six decades. His work has been associated with movements spanning Pop, Surrealism, and Conceptual Art. Printmaking has been integral to Ruscha’s work alongside his painting and drawing practice. This exhibition brings together a collection of prints, ephemera, and films spanning the artist's rich career. 
David Hockney
David Hockney
Los Angeles - 5905 Wilshire Boulevard
until 29-07-2018

David Hockney – 82 Portraits and 1 Still-life In 82 Portraits and 1 Still-life, David Hockney offers a vibrant and intimate view of people with whom he has developed relationships over the past 50 years. The majority of the portraits were painted in Hockney’s Los Angeles studio, all from life and over a period of two or three days, which the artist has described as “a 20-hour exposure.” None of Hockney’s portraits are commissioned; for this series he invited family, members of his staff, and close friends to sit for him—including several curators, art dealers, and collectors with local and international renown. John Baldessari, Douglas Baxter, Edith Devaney, Larry Gagosian, Frank Gehry, Peter Goulds, Barry Humphries, David Juda, Rita Pynoos, Joan Quinn, Norman Rosenthal, Jacob Rothschild, and Benedikt Taschen are among those portrayed, as well as LACMA’s Stephanie Barron and Dagny Corcoran. This exhibition originated at the Royal Academy of Arts in London, and has traveled to Melbourne, Venice, and Bilbao. LACMA will host the only United States presentation.  

David Hockney – 82 Portraits and 1 Still-life In 82 Portraits and 1 Still-life, David Hockney offers a vibrant and intimate view of people with whom he has developed relationships over the past 50 years. The majority of the portraits were painted in Hockney’s Los Angeles studio, all from life and over a period of two or three days, which the artist has described as “a 20-hour exposure.” None of Hockney’s portraits are commissioned; for this series he invited family, members of his staff, and close friends to sit for him—including several curators, art dealers, and collectors with local and international renown. John Baldessari, Douglas Baxter, Edith Devaney, Larry Gagosian, Frank Gehry, Peter Goulds, Barry Humphries, David Juda, Rita Pynoos, Joan Quinn, Norman Rosenthal, Jacob Rothschild, and Benedikt Taschen are among those portrayed, as well as LACMA’s Stephanie Barron and Dagny Corcoran. This exhibition originated at the Royal Academy of Arts in London, and has traveled to Melbourne, Venice, and Bilbao. LACMA will host the only United States presentation.  
Mark Grotjahn
Mark Grotjahn
Los Angeles - 5905 Wilshire Boulevard
until 19-08-2018

Mark Grotjahn – 50 Kitchens Los Angeles-based artist Mark Grotjahn (b. 1968) has made “Butterfly” compositions since 2002, and the latest to come out of his studio is 50 Kitchens (2013–18), exhibited here for the first time. Conceived as one work, 50 Kitchens takes its inspiration from a single composition (in black and cream-colored pencil) that Grotjahn made to meet the dimensional specifications of a wall in his kitchen. The more than 50 subsequent chromatic drawings explore pairs of radiating colors (like Tuscan Red and Chartreuse, or Grass Green and Canary Yellow) and together create a prismatic display. The works allude to artists interested in color, light, and optics, such as Wassily Kandinsky and the Op art painters of the 1960s, and also incorporate residual traces of earlier drawings that have been seamlessly integrated into the new works.  

Mark Grotjahn – 50 Kitchens Los Angeles-based artist Mark Grotjahn (b. 1968) has made “Butterfly” compositions since 2002, and the latest to come out of his studio is 50 Kitchens (2013–18), exhibited here for the first time. Conceived as one work, 50 Kitchens takes its inspiration from a single composition (in black and cream-colored pencil) that Grotjahn made to meet the dimensional specifications of a wall in his kitchen. The more than 50 subsequent chromatic drawings explore pairs of radiating colors (like Tuscan Red and Chartreuse, or Grass Green and Canary Yellow) and together create a prismatic display. The works allude to artists interested in color, light, and optics, such as Wassily Kandinsky and the Op art painters of the 1960s, and also incorporate residual traces of earlier drawings that have been seamlessly integrated into the new works.  
Olafur Eliasson
Olafur Eliasson
Los Angeles - 4357 Wilshire Boulevard
until 25-08-2018

Olafur Eliasson – Reality Projector Marciano Art Foundation is excited to announce its second artist project, a site-specific installation created for the foundation’s expansive first floor Theater Gallery. Maurice and Paul Marciano have invited renowned interdisciplinary artist Olafur Eliasson for his first major exhibition in Los Angeles, in over a decade. Eliasson’s art–comprising sculpture, painting, photography, film, and installation–is driven by his interests in perception, movement, embodied experience, and feelings of self. For his exhibition at the foundation, titled Reality projector (2018), Eliasson has conceived of a seemingly simple, yet complex installation that uses projected light and the existing architecture of the space to create a dynamic shadow play. The artwork references the space’s former function as a theater as well as the history of filmmaking in the city by turning the entire space into an abstract, three-dimensional film. Eliasson’s exhibition offers visitors the opportunity to fully experience the magnificence of the space free of objects. Reality projector will be on view beginning March 1, 2018 and will remain on view until August. Eliasson strives to make the concerns of art relevant to society at large. Art, for him, is a crucial means for turning thinking into doing in the world. Not limited to the confines of the museum and gallery, his practice engages the broader public sphere through architectural projects and interventions in civic space. Due to these interests and the experiential nature of his work, Eliasson was a natural choice to create a site-specific installation in the distinctive 13,500 square-foot space. Olafur Eliasson, born 1967, grew up in Iceland and Denmark. In 1995, he moved to Berlin and founded Studio Olafur Eliasson, which today encompasses some ninety craftsmen, specialized technicians, architects, archivists, administrators, programmers, art historians, and cooks. Since the mid-1990s, Eliasson has realized numerous major exhibitions and projects around the world. In 2003, Eliasson represented Denmark at the 50th Venice Biennale and later that year, he installed The weather project in Tate Modern’s Turbine Hall, London. Take your time: Olafur Eliasson, a survey exhibition organized by SFMOMA in 2007, travelled until 2010 to various venues, including the Museum of Modern Art, New York. Eliasson’s projects in public space include The New York City Waterfalls, 2008, commissioned by Public Art Fund, and Ice Watch, which brought melting icebergs from Greenland to Copenhagen in 2014 and to Paris on the occasion of the COP21 Climate Conference in 2015. In 2012, Eliasson and engineer Frederik Ottesen founded the social business Little Sun, which provides clean, affordable light to communities without access to electricity and spreads awareness about the need to expand access to sustainable energy to all (www.littlesun.com). Eliasson and architect Sebastian Behmann founded Studio Other Spaces, an international office for art and architecture focusing on interdisciplinary and experimental building projects and works in public space, in 2014. (www.studiootherspaces.net).

Olafur Eliasson – Reality Projector Marciano Art Foundation is excited to announce its second artist project, a site-specific installation created for the foundation’s expansive first floor Theater Gallery. Maurice and Paul Marciano have invited renowned interdisciplinary artist Olafur Eliasson for his first major exhibition in Los Angeles, in over a decade. Eliasson’s art–comprising sculpture, painting, photography, film, and installation–is driven by his interests in perception, movement, embodied experience, and feelings of self. For his exhibition at the foundation, titled Reality projector (2018), Eliasson has conceived of a seemingly simple, yet complex installation that uses projected light and the existing architecture of the space to create a dynamic shadow play. The artwork references the space’s former function as a theater as well as the history of filmmaking in the city by turning the entire space into an abstract, three-dimensional film. Eliasson’s exhibition offers visitors the opportunity to fully experience the magnificence of the space free of objects. Reality projector will be on view beginning March 1, 2018 and will remain on view until August. Eliasson strives to make the concerns of art relevant to society at large. Art, for him, is a crucial means for turning thinking into doing in the world. Not limited to the confines of the museum and gallery, his practice engages the broader public sphere through architectural projects and interventions in civic space. Due to these interests and the experiential nature of his work, Eliasson was a natural choice to create a site-specific installation in the distinctive 13,500 square-foot space. Olafur Eliasson, born 1967, grew up in Iceland and Denmark. In 1995, he moved to Berlin and founded Studio Olafur Eliasson, which today encompasses some ninety craftsmen, specialized technicians, architects, archivists, administrators, programmers, art historians, and cooks. Since the mid-1990s, Eliasson has realized numerous major exhibitions and projects around the world. In 2003, Eliasson represented Denmark at the 50th Venice Biennale and later that year, he installed The weather project in Tate Modern’s Turbine Hall, London. Take your time: Olafur Eliasson, a survey exhibition organized by SFMOMA in 2007, travelled until 2010 to various venues, including the Museum of Modern Art, New York. Eliasson’s projects in public space include The New York City Waterfalls, 2008, commissioned by Public Art Fund, and Ice Watch, which brought melting icebergs from Greenland to Copenhagen in 2014 and to Paris on the occasion of the COP21 Climate Conference in 2015. In 2012, Eliasson and engineer Frederik Ottesen founded the social business Little Sun, which provides clean, affordable light to communities without access to electricity and spreads awareness about the need to expand access to sustainable energy to all (www.littlesun.com). Eliasson and architect Sebastian Behmann founded Studio Other Spaces, an international office for art and architecture focusing on interdisciplinary and experimental building projects and works in public space, in 2014. (www.studiootherspaces.net).
Matthew Porter
Matthew Porter
Los Angeles - 612 North Almont Drive
until 25-08-2018

Matthew Porter – News From Nowhere M+B is pleased to present News From Nowhere, Matthew Porter’s fifth solo exhibition with the gallery. The exhibition consists of a series of color and black & white photographs, depicting a fictional place that centers around the construction, abandonment, and rediscovery of a series of dome structures. The location is a tropical island, and three discrete characters make appearances. They are seen performing tasks, but their roles, and the timeline of their involvement, is never clear. Part science fiction, part fantasy, and part narrative riff, the work is a nod to both the real and literary tradition of placing stories of post colonial hubris in tropical locations.   

Matthew Porter – News From Nowhere M+B is pleased to present News From Nowhere, Matthew Porter’s fifth solo exhibition with the gallery. The exhibition consists of a series of color and black & white photographs, depicting a fictional place that centers around the construction, abandonment, and rediscovery of a series of dome structures. The location is a tropical island, and three discrete characters make appearances. They are seen performing tasks, but their roles, and the timeline of their involvement, is never clear. Part science fiction, part fantasy, and part narrative riff, the work is a nod to both the real and literary tradition of placing stories of post colonial hubris in tropical locations.   
Seth Bogart
Seth Bogart
Los Angeles - 1107 Greenacre Avenue
until 04-08-2018

Seth Bogart – Lick Nino Mier Gallery is thrilled to announce its first exhibition with Los Angeles-based artist Seth Bogart, LICK, opening June 28th and on view through August 4th. There will be an opening reception Thursday, June 28th from 6-8pm.   Culling from his extensive and multidisciplinary background as a musician, performer and visual artist, Bogart creates a complete environment in the gallery space. Envisioned as a cross between a zine stand, backroom of a sex shop and an art exhibition, the exhibition presents a range of his early and recent painting in addition to ceramics, limited-run publications and his trademark papier-mâché objects. Rooted in a long lineage of the artist’s creative pursuits, with nods to the legacies of both punk and queer art, Bogart seamlessly blends camp with deeper connections to readymade consumer products, pop culture and the idea of the queer archive.   Bogart is known for elaborate multimedia presentations, often incorporating vividly-painted chromatic backdrops, oversized objects, video work and props that seemingly operate in the space of installation art intersecting with a children’s program television set. Given his background in punk, Bogart’s earliest engagement with visual art was at the ‘merch table’–a staple of DIY music culture with its assortment of t-shirts, zines and CDR mixtape covers, all handmade and intended for quick, easy accessibility. This fascination with readymade objects carried through to his first exhibitions, in which video, ceramics and paintings were presented as surreal installations, draws equally from John Waters, Pee-Wee’s Playhouse and Warhol’s first Factory.   In this exhibition, Bogart uses the entirety of the gallery space to create an immersive, retail-like environment filled with salon-hung paintings, ceramics, papier-mâché props and a pink painted walls with logo-like signature decals. Paying homage to the gallery’s location in West Hollywood, he focuses on the idea of the queer archive–objects that form nodes of identification within queer culture, especially considering the lessened role that physical objects, code words, sex stores and club memberships now play as a result of hookup apps and social media. Plinths present an array of ceramic objects modeled after recognizable gay paraphernalia, from poppers and handcuffs, to condom wrappers, virility supplements, Truvada bottles and mascara. Similarly, the front space of the gallery is converted into a sex shop, with contemporary and historic gay magazines spanning an array of subcultures and genres to read and explore amongst more erotic ceramic objects.   Going against the dry, antiseptic presentation of artwork and curatorial intent, Bogart actively undermines the institution of the gallery setting, using lightness and camp humor to form deeper observations on mass consumer and aesthetic culture. Writing in her 1964 essay ‘Notes on Camp’, Susan Sontag observes:   Camp sees everything in quotation marks. It's not a lamp, but a "lamp"; not a woman, but a "woman." To perceive Camp in objects and persons is to understand Being-as-Playing-a-Role. It is the farthest extension, in sensibility, of the metaphor of life as theater   Fittingly, Bogart’s embrace of theatricality in his work exposes the absurdity of much of our visual culture. As ceramics, toothbrushes become useless, and a clay whip is fragile and unintimidating. Yet it is this method of formal flattening, similar to artists like Katherine Bernhardt, that Bogart readily portrays the idea of an object rather than obsessing over its precise physical details. In so doing, he re-emphasizes the preciousness of objects, and the importance of physical culture, especially for those little trinkets and ephemera that allowed otherwise invisible communities to endure and thrive.   Seth Bogart (b. 1980 in Tucson, AZ) lives and works in Los Angeles, CA. Bogart was involved in the bands Gravy Train!!!! followed by Hunx and His Punks, and now releases music under his own name. He held his first solo show, The Seth Bogart Show, at 356 S. Mission Rd. in 2015. He has since performed at LACMA, MOCA and has exhibited with galleries and institutions including the ONE Archives of USC, Los Angeles and PARTICIPANT INC, New York. Bogart remains an interdisciplinary artist and continues to work on his music, art, apparel and newly launched streaming show Feelin’ Fruity.

Seth Bogart – Lick Nino Mier Gallery is thrilled to announce its first exhibition with Los Angeles-based artist Seth Bogart, LICK, opening June 28th and on view through August 4th. There will be an opening reception Thursday, June 28th from 6-8pm.   Culling from his extensive and multidisciplinary background as a musician, performer and visual artist, Bogart creates a complete environment in the gallery space. Envisioned as a cross between a zine stand, backroom of a sex shop and an art exhibition, the exhibition presents a range of his early and recent painting in addition to ceramics, limited-run publications and his trademark papier-mâché objects. Rooted in a long lineage of the artist’s creative pursuits, with nods to the legacies of both punk and queer art, Bogart seamlessly blends camp with deeper connections to readymade consumer products, pop culture and the idea of the queer archive.   Bogart is known for elaborate multimedia presentations, often incorporating vividly-painted chromatic backdrops, oversized objects, video work and props that seemingly operate in the space of installation art intersecting with a children’s program television set. Given his background in punk, Bogart’s earliest engagement with visual art was at the ‘merch table’–a staple of DIY music culture with its assortment of t-shirts, zines and CDR mixtape covers, all handmade and intended for quick, easy accessibility. This fascination with readymade objects carried through to his first exhibitions, in which video, ceramics and paintings were presented as surreal installations, draws equally from John Waters, Pee-Wee’s Playhouse and Warhol’s first Factory.   In this exhibition, Bogart uses the entirety of the gallery space to create an immersive, retail-like environment filled with salon-hung paintings, ceramics, papier-mâché props and a pink painted walls with logo-like signature decals. Paying homage to the gallery’s location in West Hollywood, he focuses on the idea of the queer archive–objects that form nodes of identification within queer culture, especially considering the lessened role that physical objects, code words, sex stores and club memberships now play as a result of hookup apps and social media. Plinths present an array of ceramic objects modeled after recognizable gay paraphernalia, from poppers and handcuffs, to condom wrappers, virility supplements, Truvada bottles and mascara. Similarly, the front space of the gallery is converted into a sex shop, with contemporary and historic gay magazines spanning an array of subcultures and genres to read and explore amongst more erotic ceramic objects.   Going against the dry, antiseptic presentation of artwork and curatorial intent, Bogart actively undermines the institution of the gallery setting, using lightness and camp humor to form deeper observations on mass consumer and aesthetic culture. Writing in her 1964 essay ‘Notes on Camp’, Susan Sontag observes:   Camp sees everything in quotation marks. It's not a lamp, but a "lamp"; not a woman, but a "woman." To perceive Camp in objects and persons is to understand Being-as-Playing-a-Role. It is the farthest extension, in sensibility, of the metaphor of life as theater   Fittingly, Bogart’s embrace of theatricality in his work exposes the absurdity of much of our visual culture. As ceramics, toothbrushes become useless, and a clay whip is fragile and unintimidating. Yet it is this method of formal flattening, similar to artists like Katherine Bernhardt, that Bogart readily portrays the idea of an object rather than obsessing over its precise physical details. In so doing, he re-emphasizes the preciousness of objects, and the importance of physical culture, especially for those little trinkets and ephemera that allowed otherwise invisible communities to endure and thrive.   Seth Bogart (b. 1980 in Tucson, AZ) lives and works in Los Angeles, CA. Bogart was involved in the bands Gravy Train!!!! followed by Hunx and His Punks, and now releases music under his own name. He held his first solo show, The Seth Bogart Show, at 356 S. Mission Rd. in 2015. He has since performed at LACMA, MOCA and has exhibited with galleries and institutions including the ONE Archives of USC, Los Angeles and PARTICIPANT INC, New York. Bogart remains an interdisciplinary artist and continues to work on his music, art, apparel and newly launched streaming show Feelin’ Fruity.
Stephen Prina
Stephen Prina
Los Angeles - 5900 Wilshire Boulevard
until 12-08-2018

Stephen Prina  

Stephen Prina  
ReVerb
ReVerb
Los Angeles - The Bendix Building, 1206 Maple Avenue, 5th floor, #523
until 22-07-2018

ReVerb Tiger Strikes Asteroid Los Angeles is excited to announce ReVerb, an exhibition featuring works by artists Clint Campbell, Maureen Keaveny, Nick Rodrigues, and Peter Segerstrom and curated by TSA LA member Kari Reardon. The show runs from June 30 to July 22, 2018 with an opening reception on Saturday, June 30th, from 7 to 10 PM and a performace starting at 8 PM.   Reverb is a limitless effect of a reflection on space. Signals, technological or natural, constantly move through and around us. Existing in the build up and then decay, reverberations become absorbed by the objects and surfaces they encounter. ReVerb is an exhibition that explores the intersection between nature and technology through a variety of mediums including poetry, sculpture, photography, and electronic music.  From the forest's trail to an indoor office space, reverb exists where reflection exists adding depth and fullness to the environment. Interpreting nature through various technologies, these artist consider and explore ideas concerning order, wild/erness, and simulated environments. Whether the art searches to alter a certain space to make it more “natural” or plays with concepts of bringing order and pattern to what we might understand as “wild,” these artists locate moments where human interaction draws nature and technology to places of interaction. How far into the wild can we incorporate our technology? How much nature can we bring into our technological structures? Modern people need both nature and technology: within these myriad reverberations we will certainly find harmony.  

ReVerb Tiger Strikes Asteroid Los Angeles is excited to announce ReVerb, an exhibition featuring works by artists Clint Campbell, Maureen Keaveny, Nick Rodrigues, and Peter Segerstrom and curated by TSA LA member Kari Reardon. The show runs from June 30 to July 22, 2018 with an opening reception on Saturday, June 30th, from 7 to 10 PM and a performace starting at 8 PM.   Reverb is a limitless effect of a reflection on space. Signals, technological or natural, constantly move through and around us. Existing in the build up and then decay, reverberations become absorbed by the objects and surfaces they encounter. ReVerb is an exhibition that explores the intersection between nature and technology through a variety of mediums including poetry, sculpture, photography, and electronic music.  From the forest's trail to an indoor office space, reverb exists where reflection exists adding depth and fullness to the environment. Interpreting nature through various technologies, these artist consider and explore ideas concerning order, wild/erness, and simulated environments. Whether the art searches to alter a certain space to make it more “natural” or plays with concepts of bringing order and pattern to what we might understand as “wild,” these artists locate moments where human interaction draws nature and technology to places of interaction. How far into the wild can we incorporate our technology? How much nature can we bring into our technological structures? Modern people need both nature and technology: within these myriad reverberations we will certainly find harmony.  
Suzanne Wright
Suzanne Wright
Los Angeles - 939 South Santa Fe Avenue
until 21-07-2018

Suzanne Wright – Feminist Alchemy Alchemy is the hermetic science and art of causing change, both physically and spiritually, a seemingly magical process of transformation, creation, or combination.  For this series Suzanne Wright researched the ‘secret architecture’ of Washington DC, and it’s hidden zodiac and cosmological symbolism. Using Google Earth to view the capital city from an arial perspective, she has created an inverted, ‘feminized’ version of the city’s monuments, opening a dialogue that responds to those historically masculine symbols of power.  The piece A Goddess Eye View (detail below) references the Washington Memorial, a giant obelisk which was inspired by the Egyptian obelisk ‘Tekhenu’, a phallic salutation to the sun god. Wright’s version sees the memorial topographically from above, transforming the masculine symbol into a universal one: the overlapping of two spheres to form a Vesica Piscis. Wright proposes a contemporary feminist alchemy, forging alternative frames of reference with new perspectives that lead us to a re-vitalized kind of perception, equality and empowerment. 

Suzanne Wright – Feminist Alchemy Alchemy is the hermetic science and art of causing change, both physically and spiritually, a seemingly magical process of transformation, creation, or combination.  For this series Suzanne Wright researched the ‘secret architecture’ of Washington DC, and it’s hidden zodiac and cosmological symbolism. Using Google Earth to view the capital city from an arial perspective, she has created an inverted, ‘feminized’ version of the city’s monuments, opening a dialogue that responds to those historically masculine symbols of power.  The piece A Goddess Eye View (detail below) references the Washington Memorial, a giant obelisk which was inspired by the Egyptian obelisk ‘Tekhenu’, a phallic salutation to the sun god. Wright’s version sees the memorial topographically from above, transforming the masculine symbol into a universal one: the overlapping of two spheres to form a Vesica Piscis. Wright proposes a contemporary feminist alchemy, forging alternative frames of reference with new perspectives that lead us to a re-vitalized kind of perception, equality and empowerment. 
Katja Novitskova
Katja Novitskova
London - 77-82 Whitechapel High Street
until 02-09-2018

Katja Novitskova – Invasion Curves Trawling through the digital sphere’s ‘ocean of signs’, Katja Novitskova (b. 1984, Estonia) creates immersive environments inhabited by a luminous bestiary. She is known for her dramatic, cutout images of animals at play with representations from financial and scientific sources. Her latest installation presents a landscape overcome by a ‘biotic crisis’, where imaging and technology are used in a process of mapping the exploitation of life. Images captured by scanners, cameras and satellites – from the bodies of lab organisms to the flows generated by image processing algorithms – are rendered as vivid sculptures, and projections. Worms defy gravity and genetically modified life forms hatch from eggs among a tangled undergrowth of cables. At the heart of the exhibition, modified baby rockers gyrate eerily. Surrounding this unsettling landscape, floating resin clouds are inscribed with phrases speculating on the impact of global data on our consciousness and the environment. Growth curves, derived from corporate culture, echoed in the forms of the worms and cables, offer a wry comment on humanity’s drive towards advancement in the name of profit. The display brings together elements from Novitskova’s presentation at the Estonian Pavilion, 57th Venice Biennale, 2017.

Katja Novitskova – Invasion Curves Trawling through the digital sphere’s ‘ocean of signs’, Katja Novitskova (b. 1984, Estonia) creates immersive environments inhabited by a luminous bestiary. She is known for her dramatic, cutout images of animals at play with representations from financial and scientific sources. Her latest installation presents a landscape overcome by a ‘biotic crisis’, where imaging and technology are used in a process of mapping the exploitation of life. Images captured by scanners, cameras and satellites – from the bodies of lab organisms to the flows generated by image processing algorithms – are rendered as vivid sculptures, and projections. Worms defy gravity and genetically modified life forms hatch from eggs among a tangled undergrowth of cables. At the heart of the exhibition, modified baby rockers gyrate eerily. Surrounding this unsettling landscape, floating resin clouds are inscribed with phrases speculating on the impact of global data on our consciousness and the environment. Growth curves, derived from corporate culture, echoed in the forms of the worms and cables, offer a wry comment on humanity’s drive towards advancement in the name of profit. The display brings together elements from Novitskova’s presentation at the Estonian Pavilion, 57th Venice Biennale, 2017.
Rob Pruitt
Rob Pruitt
London - 55 South Audley Street
until 21-07-2018

Rob Pruitt – American Quilts 2018 Massimo De Carlo London is pleased to present American Quilts 2018, a new exhibition by artist Rob Pruitt. For his third exhibition at Massimo De Carlo London, Rob Pruitt presents a series of new works based on American quilt patterns. Utilising a range of different materials and techniques, Pruitt expands upon the tradition of American handicraft to create works that feel both up to the minute and traditional. Thematically, the quilts speak to an American culture in turmoil, roiled by stark divisions at home and an abdication of leadership abroad. Pruitt first explored quilt patterns in a body of work from 2010 dealing with the Amish rite of Rumspringa. The allegiance of Amish youth to their insulated world is tested in Rumspringa by exposure to the temptations of sex, drugs, and popular culture. It is this clash of traditional and new worlds from which the Rumspringa quilt paintings arose. The crisis in American democracy spurred on by Donald Trump’s presidency serves as a backdrop to Pruitt’s latest exploration of quilt-making. In a traditional quilt, patterns often have symbolicmeaning, interlocking wedding bands, and geese migrating south for the Summer. The geometric design is further imbued with humanity through the leftover scraps of fabric from which it is sewn. Using these elements of symbolism and design, quilts tell stories. It is this language that Pruitt uses to tell new stories of present-day American life. Several paintings in the show are made with sheets of steel, on which patterns have been etched in rust. These works evoke the dying US industrial era of mining and manufacturing, and the empty promises of Donald Trump to bring back jobs in these industries. Other quilts collage US currency to form traditional patterns like zig-zag and basket-weave. Areas filled with pennies are juxtaposed with areas of 100-dollar bills, suggesting an economic disparity that continues to widen. In another painting variant, futuristic black and white quilts employ QR codes. In one, when the viewer scans the painting with a cell phone, they are directed to a URL address of a reading list for survival in the Trump era. Several of the works in the show employ a palette of red, white and blue. In one, based on the classic checkerboard pattern, red and blue squares mix randomly, suggesting a map of the US electorate. In another, rendered with Pruitt's signature gradient technique, an updated version of the classic snail wave pattern portends a "blue wave" to come in the upcoming US midterm elections. Pruitt has long employed craft traditions in his work, as well as experimenting with, and embracing new technology. Pruitt's work both comments on contemporary American culture as well as becoming part of it's stream. As such, American Quilts 2018, serves as a set of graphic danger signs and a document of America today. Rob Pruitt was born in Washington, DC, and studied at the Corcoran College of Art and Design in Washington, DC, and Parsons School of Design in New York.   

Rob Pruitt – American Quilts 2018 Massimo De Carlo London is pleased to present American Quilts 2018, a new exhibition by artist Rob Pruitt. For his third exhibition at Massimo De Carlo London, Rob Pruitt presents a series of new works based on American quilt patterns. Utilising a range of different materials and techniques, Pruitt expands upon the tradition of American handicraft to create works that feel both up to the minute and traditional. Thematically, the quilts speak to an American culture in turmoil, roiled by stark divisions at home and an abdication of leadership abroad. Pruitt first explored quilt patterns in a body of work from 2010 dealing with the Amish rite of Rumspringa. The allegiance of Amish youth to their insulated world is tested in Rumspringa by exposure to the temptations of sex, drugs, and popular culture. It is this clash of traditional and new worlds from which the Rumspringa quilt paintings arose. The crisis in American democracy spurred on by Donald Trump’s presidency serves as a backdrop to Pruitt’s latest exploration of quilt-making. In a traditional quilt, patterns often have symbolicmeaning, interlocking wedding bands, and geese migrating south for the Summer. The geometric design is further imbued with humanity through the leftover scraps of fabric from which it is sewn. Using these elements of symbolism and design, quilts tell stories. It is this language that Pruitt uses to tell new stories of present-day American life. Several paintings in the show are made with sheets of steel, on which patterns have been etched in rust. These works evoke the dying US industrial era of mining and manufacturing, and the empty promises of Donald Trump to bring back jobs in these industries. Other quilts collage US currency to form traditional patterns like zig-zag and basket-weave. Areas filled with pennies are juxtaposed with areas of 100-dollar bills, suggesting an economic disparity that continues to widen. In another painting variant, futuristic black and white quilts employ QR codes. In one, when the viewer scans the painting with a cell phone, they are directed to a URL address of a reading list for survival in the Trump era. Several of the works in the show employ a palette of red, white and blue. In one, based on the classic checkerboard pattern, red and blue squares mix randomly, suggesting a map of the US electorate. In another, rendered with Pruitt's signature gradient technique, an updated version of the classic snail wave pattern portends a "blue wave" to come in the upcoming US midterm elections. Pruitt has long employed craft traditions in his work, as well as experimenting with, and embracing new technology. Pruitt's work both comments on contemporary American culture as well as becoming part of it's stream. As such, American Quilts 2018, serves as a set of graphic danger signs and a document of America today. Rob Pruitt was born in Washington, DC, and studied at the Corcoran College of Art and Design in Washington, DC, and Parsons School of Design in New York.   
Urs Fischer
Urs Fischer
London - 62 Kingly St
until 18-08-2018

Urs Fischer – Soft Because I am painting with light, I had to find an awesome printer to retain that. I say what I want them to look like, to hold that light, and get as close as we can through the printing. Usually you are making a print that is the result of a digital instruction from a computer to a printer and you have to accept the limits of that format. You cannot get back in there and change it. That is also why they are printed on gesso, to help them retain that glow. And to my surprise they do glow, they look glowing.  

Urs Fischer – Soft Because I am painting with light, I had to find an awesome printer to retain that. I say what I want them to look like, to hold that light, and get as close as we can through the printing. Usually you are making a print that is the result of a digital instruction from a computer to a printer and you have to accept the limits of that format. You cannot get back in there and change it. That is also why they are printed on gesso, to help them retain that glow. And to my surprise they do glow, they look glowing.  
Sarah Sze
Sarah Sze
London - 16 Wharf Road
until 28-07-2018

Sarah Sze Victoria Miro is delighted to present two new site-specific works by US artist Sarah Sze: Images in Debris, an installation of images, light, sound, film, and objects that seeks to transform a visitor’s perception and experience of the first-floor gallery; and Afterimage, an environment of wall-based works in the ground-floor gallery that replicates aspects of the artist’s studio and includes elements made in situ as well as images collected, gathered, and discarded in the process of making the work. In both works Sze continues her decades-long exploration of the ways in which the proliferation of images – printed in magazines and newspapers, gleaned from the Web and television, intercepted from outer space, and ultimately imprinted on our conscious and unconscious selves – fundamentally changes our relationship to physical objects, memories, and time.

Sarah Sze Victoria Miro is delighted to present two new site-specific works by US artist Sarah Sze: Images in Debris, an installation of images, light, sound, film, and objects that seeks to transform a visitor’s perception and experience of the first-floor gallery; and Afterimage, an environment of wall-based works in the ground-floor gallery that replicates aspects of the artist’s studio and includes elements made in situ as well as images collected, gathered, and discarded in the process of making the work. In both works Sze continues her decades-long exploration of the ways in which the proliferation of images – printed in magazines and newspapers, gleaned from the Web and television, intercepted from outer space, and ultimately imprinted on our conscious and unconscious selves – fundamentally changes our relationship to physical objects, memories, and time.
Joan Jonas
Joan Jonas
London - Bankside
until 05-08-2018

Joan Jonas Hero to a generation of younger artists, Joan Jonas is a pioneer of performance and video who has pushed the boundaries of art for the last five decades. Experience the largest exhibition of Jonas’s work ever held in the UK. Early works from the late 1960s are shown alongside recent installations dealing with topical themes such as climate change and extinction. You can see her landmark installations including Lines in the Sand, The Juniper Tree and Reanimation. For the first time at Tate Modern, a single artist’s work is explored in the exhibition galleries, and in film screenings in the Starr Cinema and installations in the Tanks – an experimental exhibition for an experimental artist. Joan Jonas will also perform live alongside other artists as part of the BMW Tate Live Exhibition: Ten Days Six Nights programme.  

Joan Jonas Hero to a generation of younger artists, Joan Jonas is a pioneer of performance and video who has pushed the boundaries of art for the last five decades. Experience the largest exhibition of Jonas’s work ever held in the UK. Early works from the late 1960s are shown alongside recent installations dealing with topical themes such as climate change and extinction. You can see her landmark installations including Lines in the Sand, The Juniper Tree and Reanimation. For the first time at Tate Modern, a single artist’s work is explored in the exhibition galleries, and in film screenings in the Starr Cinema and installations in the Tanks – an experimental exhibition for an experimental artist. Joan Jonas will also perform live alongside other artists as part of the BMW Tate Live Exhibition: Ten Days Six Nights programme.  
Shape of Light
Shape of Light
London - Bankside
until 14-10-2018

Shape of Light For the first time, Tate Modern tells the intertwined stories of photography and abstract art The birth of abstract art and the invention of photography were both defining moments in modern visual culture, but these two stories are often told separately.  Shape of Light is the first major exhibition to explore the relationship between the two, spanning the century from the 1910s to the present day. It brings to life the innovation and originality of photographers over this period, and shows how they responded and contributed to the development of abstraction.  Key photographs are brought together from pioneers including Man Ray and Alfred Stieglitz, major contemporary artists such as Barbara Kasten and Thomas Ruff, right up to exciting new work by Antony Cairns, Maya Rochat and Daisuke Yokota, made especially for the exhibition.  

Shape of Light For the first time, Tate Modern tells the intertwined stories of photography and abstract art The birth of abstract art and the invention of photography were both defining moments in modern visual culture, but these two stories are often told separately.  Shape of Light is the first major exhibition to explore the relationship between the two, spanning the century from the 1910s to the present day. It brings to life the innovation and originality of photographers over this period, and shows how they responded and contributed to the development of abstraction.  Key photographs are brought together from pioneers including Man Ray and Alfred Stieglitz, major contemporary artists such as Barbara Kasten and Thomas Ruff, right up to exciting new work by Antony Cairns, Maya Rochat and Daisuke Yokota, made especially for the exhibition.  
Pablo Bronstein
Pablo Bronstein
London - 50 Finsbury Square
until 12-01-2019

Pablo Bronstein – London in its Original Splendour  

Pablo Bronstein – London in its Original Splendour  
Franz West
Franz West
London - 17?19 Davies Street
until 27-07-2018

Franz West – Sisyphos Sculptures  

Franz West – Sisyphos Sculptures  
Hunter Reynolds
Hunter Reynolds
London - 7 Bethnal Green Road
until 04-08-2018

Hunter Reynolds – Love Light Hales is delighted to announce Love Light, Hunter Reynolds’ first solo exhibition with the gallery. Through intimate moments, the exhibition explores symbolic dedications to past friends, family and lovers. The artworks presented in Love Light contribute to the portrayal of the artist as a survivor, living a life of art - a story integral to identity politics and the history of AIDS.   Reynolds’ practice is concerned with issues of gender, sexuality, HIV/AIDS, politics, mortality and rebirth through performance, photography, installations and his alter ego, Patina du Prey. His work is directly influenced by his own lived experiences as an HIV-positive gay man living in the age of AIDS. As a member of Act-Up (Aids Coalition to Unleash Power) and a co-founder of Art Positive (an affinity group fighting homophobia and censorship in the arts), he uses his work to spread a message of survival and hope. After discovering in 1989 that he had been HIV positive since 1984, Reynolds was inspired by the advice of his friend, the artist Ray Navarro, to not let his disease control him but to take it inside his body and live it. It was at this point that Reynolds ‘realized that my work had to do with this experience of death, emotions, and that I wanted people to feel, to experience pain and loss, but also to have hope in life.’ Love Light focuses on work made from this period of empowerment to the present day: tracing memories, moments, and creating a nuanced expression of the illness, including the often-overlooked love, beauty and tenderness of friendships and erotic romance in the context of mortality.   Forming a major part of this exhibition are Hunter Reynolds’ photo-weavings, which he considers as metaphorical ‘portraits of loss, people, memorials, lovers, and myself.’ The honest and affecting photographic tapestries universalise Hunter Reynolds’ lived experience, inviting the viewer to look closely at individual photographs of personal moments, then to step back to take in a vast quasi-abstract scape of the human condition. Love Light is a testament to a dedicated, empowered practice; by bringing together the intimate and the public, the visual and verbal, the abstract and the didactic, this exhibition affirms the importance of Reynolds’ transformative revelation, of the possibility for a courageous art filled with both pain and hope.

Hunter Reynolds – Love Light Hales is delighted to announce Love Light, Hunter Reynolds’ first solo exhibition with the gallery. Through intimate moments, the exhibition explores symbolic dedications to past friends, family and lovers. The artworks presented in Love Light contribute to the portrayal of the artist as a survivor, living a life of art - a story integral to identity politics and the history of AIDS.   Reynolds’ practice is concerned with issues of gender, sexuality, HIV/AIDS, politics, mortality and rebirth through performance, photography, installations and his alter ego, Patina du Prey. His work is directly influenced by his own lived experiences as an HIV-positive gay man living in the age of AIDS. As a member of Act-Up (Aids Coalition to Unleash Power) and a co-founder of Art Positive (an affinity group fighting homophobia and censorship in the arts), he uses his work to spread a message of survival and hope. After discovering in 1989 that he had been HIV positive since 1984, Reynolds was inspired by the advice of his friend, the artist Ray Navarro, to not let his disease control him but to take it inside his body and live it. It was at this point that Reynolds ‘realized that my work had to do with this experience of death, emotions, and that I wanted people to feel, to experience pain and loss, but also to have hope in life.’ Love Light focuses on work made from this period of empowerment to the present day: tracing memories, moments, and creating a nuanced expression of the illness, including the often-overlooked love, beauty and tenderness of friendships and erotic romance in the context of mortality.   Forming a major part of this exhibition are Hunter Reynolds’ photo-weavings, which he considers as metaphorical ‘portraits of loss, people, memorials, lovers, and myself.’ The honest and affecting photographic tapestries universalise Hunter Reynolds’ lived experience, inviting the viewer to look closely at individual photographs of personal moments, then to step back to take in a vast quasi-abstract scape of the human condition. Love Light is a testament to a dedicated, empowered practice; by bringing together the intimate and the public, the visual and verbal, the abstract and the didactic, this exhibition affirms the importance of Reynolds’ transformative revelation, of the possibility for a courageous art filled with both pain and hope.
Lee Bul
Lee Bul
London - 180 The Strand
until 19-08-2018

Lee Bul – Crashing For the past three decades, Lee Bul (b. 1964, Seoul, South Korea) has explored questions of intimacy, gender, technology and class—as well as the tension between despair and hope, horror and beauty—through works that range from provocative guerrilla performances, to large-scale installations that attempt to get our body and our brain "working at the same time, together." Taking over the entire Hayward Gallery, Lee Bul: Crashing brings together more than 100 works from the late 1980s to the present day, including a number of new sculptures and a site-specific commission, in order to explore the full range of her pioneering, thought-provoking and highly inventive practice. Shaped by her experience of growing up in South Korea during a period of political upheaval, much of Lee Bul’s work is concerned with trauma, and the way that idealism or the pursuit of perfection—bodily, political or aesthetic—might lead to failure, or disaster. Questioning women’s place in society, particularly Korean society, she also addresses the ways in which popular culture—in both the East and West—informs and shapes our idea of "feminine" beauty. Setting out to "mix things together, conceptually and also materially," Lee Bul draws on diverse sources that include science fiction, 20th century history, philosophy and personal experience, whilst making use of deliberately "clashing" materials that range from the organic to the industrial, from silk and mother of pearl, to fibreglass and silicone. Since the early 2000s, she has focused on architectural utopianism, bringing together references to both real and imagined architecture in sprawling sculptures of futuristic cityscapes. At the core of her most recent work is an investigation into landscape, which for the artist includes the intimate landscape of the body, ideal or fictional landscapes, and the physical world that surrounds us. Opening with the artist’s iconic Cyborg, Monster and Anagram series, Lee Bul: Crashing features documentation of her early performances, seminal works such as Majestic Splendor (1991–2018)—an installation consisting of rotting, sequinned fish—and the pivotal Live Forever III (2001), which acts as a bridge between her early figurative works and the later installations. Also on display, some for the first time, are the artist’s paintings and wall pieces, along with drawings and architectural models that illuminate the way that her three-dimensional works are developed. The exhibition culminates with the monumental Willing To Be Vulnerable – Metalized Balloon (2015–16), suspended above a mirrored floor in Hayward’s light-filled upper galleries. This colossal sculpture—which references the 1937 Hindenburg disaster—is at once aspirational and optimistic, and concerned with technological failure, fragmentation and destruction. It is accompanied by the artist’s new intricate sculptural work Scale of Tongue (2017–18), which makes subtle reference to the Sewol Ferry Disaster of 2014.  

Lee Bul – Crashing For the past three decades, Lee Bul (b. 1964, Seoul, South Korea) has explored questions of intimacy, gender, technology and class—as well as the tension between despair and hope, horror and beauty—through works that range from provocative guerrilla performances, to large-scale installations that attempt to get our body and our brain "working at the same time, together." Taking over the entire Hayward Gallery, Lee Bul: Crashing brings together more than 100 works from the late 1980s to the present day, including a number of new sculptures and a site-specific commission, in order to explore the full range of her pioneering, thought-provoking and highly inventive practice. Shaped by her experience of growing up in South Korea during a period of political upheaval, much of Lee Bul’s work is concerned with trauma, and the way that idealism or the pursuit of perfection—bodily, political or aesthetic—might lead to failure, or disaster. Questioning women’s place in society, particularly Korean society, she also addresses the ways in which popular culture—in both the East and West—informs and shapes our idea of "feminine" beauty. Setting out to "mix things together, conceptually and also materially," Lee Bul draws on diverse sources that include science fiction, 20th century history, philosophy and personal experience, whilst making use of deliberately "clashing" materials that range from the organic to the industrial, from silk and mother of pearl, to fibreglass and silicone. Since the early 2000s, she has focused on architectural utopianism, bringing together references to both real and imagined architecture in sprawling sculptures of futuristic cityscapes. At the core of her most recent work is an investigation into landscape, which for the artist includes the intimate landscape of the body, ideal or fictional landscapes, and the physical world that surrounds us. Opening with the artist’s iconic Cyborg, Monster and Anagram series, Lee Bul: Crashing features documentation of her early performances, seminal works such as Majestic Splendor (1991–2018)—an installation consisting of rotting, sequinned fish—and the pivotal Live Forever III (2001), which acts as a bridge between her early figurative works and the later installations. Also on display, some for the first time, are the artist’s paintings and wall pieces, along with drawings and architectural models that illuminate the way that her three-dimensional works are developed. The exhibition culminates with the monumental Willing To Be Vulnerable – Metalized Balloon (2015–16), suspended above a mirrored floor in Hayward’s light-filled upper galleries. This colossal sculpture—which references the 1937 Hindenburg disaster—is at once aspirational and optimistic, and concerned with technological failure, fragmentation and destruction. It is accompanied by the artist’s new intricate sculptural work Scale of Tongue (2017–18), which makes subtle reference to the Sewol Ferry Disaster of 2014.  
Charles Gaines
Charles Gaines
Miami - 61 NE 41st Street
until 04-11-2018

Charles Gaines Activating the staircase's vertical cantilevers, the site-specific installation by Charles Gaines will explore the artists's application of seriality on a massive scale. Gaine's practice places him within the legacy of conceptualism, evidenced by works such as his gridded, serial images of trees painted on Plexiglas.

Charles Gaines Activating the staircase's vertical cantilevers, the site-specific installation by Charles Gaines will explore the artists's application of seriality on a massive scale. Gaine's practice places him within the legacy of conceptualism, evidenced by works such as his gridded, serial images of trees painted on Plexiglas.
The World's Game
The World's Game
Miami - 1103 Biscayne Blvd
until 02-09-2018

The World's Game. Fútbol and Contemporary Art The World’s Game: Fútbol and Contemporary Art is an art-based exhibition on the subject of soccer, or fútbol, and its interactions with societies around the world. Planned to overlap with the 2018 FIFA World Cup™, the exhibition will explore how the sport has stimulated artists to reflect upon its implications on society. With approximately twenty artists working in video, photography, painting, and sculpture, the aim of this exhibition is to create an experience where the viewer/spectator can use a universal theme to engage with the work of contemporary artists from around the world. Through visual art, PAMM seeks to present the art form of soccer—a place where social, cultural, and political issues of identity, nationalism, globalism, and mass spectacle play out vibrantly. The exhibition celebrates the commonality of human experience through a sport that has been one of the few common languages worldwide.  

The World's Game. Fútbol and Contemporary Art The World’s Game: Fútbol and Contemporary Art is an art-based exhibition on the subject of soccer, or fútbol, and its interactions with societies around the world. Planned to overlap with the 2018 FIFA World Cup™, the exhibition will explore how the sport has stimulated artists to reflect upon its implications on society. With approximately twenty artists working in video, photography, painting, and sculpture, the aim of this exhibition is to create an experience where the viewer/spectator can use a universal theme to engage with the work of contemporary artists from around the world. Through visual art, PAMM seeks to present the art form of soccer—a place where social, cultural, and political issues of identity, nationalism, globalism, and mass spectacle play out vibrantly. The exhibition celebrates the commonality of human experience through a sport that has been one of the few common languages worldwide.  
Laure Prouvost
Laure Prouvost
Miami - 2100 Collins Avenue
until 02-09-2018

Laure Prouvost They Are Waiting for You presents Laure Prouvost’s absorbing moving image installations in which she conflates reality with fiction and art with everyday life. Often narrated in the artist’s voice, and interspersed with spoken and written instructions that directly address the viewer, her works confound expectations through a rapid-fire succession of moving images and sounds. Combining painting, sculpture, and found objects, Prouvost draws us into a shifting terrain where we lose our grasp of words and meanings, while the objects around us seem to gain theirs. Laure Prouvost’s artistic output consistently returns to themes of escape into unfamiliar worlds or imaginings of unexpected alternative environments. A strong narrative impulse propels her practice, resulting in immersive, trans-medial installations with interwoven story lines that combine fiction and reality. Her videos, installations, paintings and tapestries unhinge commonplace and expected connections between language, image, and perception. Stepping away from traditional linear narratives, the artist crafts sensual environments laden with playful mistranslation that open a space for the viewer to grapple with the unstable relationship between imagination and reality. Prouvost (b. 1978, Croix-Lille, France) lives and works in London, U.K. and Antwerp, Belgium. Recent solo exhibitions include: Softer and rounder so as to shine through your smooth marble, SALT Galata, Istanbul (2017); the wet wet wanderer, Witte de With Center for Contemporary Art, Rotterdam (2017); Laure Prouvost, wot hit talk, Laznia Centre for Contemporary Art, Gda?sk (2017); And she will say: hi her, ailleurs, to higher grounds…, Kunstmuseum Luzern (2016); GDM-Grandad Visitor Center, Pirelli Hangar Bicocca, Milan (2016); all behind, we’ll go deeper, deep down and she will say:, MMK, Frankfurt (2016); Dropped here and then, to live, leave it all behind, FRAC/ Consortium Dijon (2016); A Way To Leak, Lick, Leek, Fahrenheit, Los Angeles (2016); We Will Go Far, Musée Départemental d’Art Contemporain de Rochechouart (2015), It, Heat, Hit, e-flux, New York (2015), Der Öffentlichkeit — Von Den Freunden Haus Der Kunst, Haus der Kunst, Munich (2015), For Forgetting, New Museum, New York (2014). Provoust received the Max Mara Art Prize for Women in 2011 and the Turner Prize in 2013.

Laure Prouvost They Are Waiting for You presents Laure Prouvost’s absorbing moving image installations in which she conflates reality with fiction and art with everyday life. Often narrated in the artist’s voice, and interspersed with spoken and written instructions that directly address the viewer, her works confound expectations through a rapid-fire succession of moving images and sounds. Combining painting, sculpture, and found objects, Prouvost draws us into a shifting terrain where we lose our grasp of words and meanings, while the objects around us seem to gain theirs. Laure Prouvost’s artistic output consistently returns to themes of escape into unfamiliar worlds or imaginings of unexpected alternative environments. A strong narrative impulse propels her practice, resulting in immersive, trans-medial installations with interwoven story lines that combine fiction and reality. Her videos, installations, paintings and tapestries unhinge commonplace and expected connections between language, image, and perception. Stepping away from traditional linear narratives, the artist crafts sensual environments laden with playful mistranslation that open a space for the viewer to grapple with the unstable relationship between imagination and reality. Prouvost (b. 1978, Croix-Lille, France) lives and works in London, U.K. and Antwerp, Belgium. Recent solo exhibitions include: Softer and rounder so as to shine through your smooth marble, SALT Galata, Istanbul (2017); the wet wet wanderer, Witte de With Center for Contemporary Art, Rotterdam (2017); Laure Prouvost, wot hit talk, Laznia Centre for Contemporary Art, Gda?sk (2017); And she will say: hi her, ailleurs, to higher grounds…, Kunstmuseum Luzern (2016); GDM-Grandad Visitor Center, Pirelli Hangar Bicocca, Milan (2016); all behind, we’ll go deeper, deep down and she will say:, MMK, Frankfurt (2016); Dropped here and then, to live, leave it all behind, FRAC/ Consortium Dijon (2016); A Way To Leak, Lick, Leek, Fahrenheit, Los Angeles (2016); We Will Go Far, Musée Départemental d’Art Contemporain de Rochechouart (2015), It, Heat, Hit, e-flux, New York (2015), Der Öffentlichkeit — Von Den Freunden Haus Der Kunst, Haus der Kunst, Munich (2015), For Forgetting, New Museum, New York (2014). Provoust received the Max Mara Art Prize for Women in 2011 and the Turner Prize in 2013.
Still Human
Still Human
Miami - 95 NW 29th Street
until 25-08-2018

Still Human   Ed Atkins, Neil Beloufa, Frank Benson, Paul Chan, Andrea Crespo, Simon Denny, Cécile B. Evans, Loretta Fahrenholz, Isa Genzken, Christian Holstad, Anne Imhof, Josh Kline, Liu Chuang, Shahryar Nashat, Katja Novitskova, Yuri Pattison, Seth Price, Christina Quarles, Jon Rafman, Sean Raspet, Charles Ray, Jennifer Rubell, Max Hooper Schneider, Frances Stark, Hito Steyerl, Iiu Susiraja, Hank Willis Thomas, Ryan Trecartin, Theo Triantafyllidis, Stewart Uoo, Wang Shang, Andro Wekua, Jordan Wolfson, Anicka Yi ?Still Human confronts the complex consequences of the digital revolution and recent technological developments as they redefine the human condition. Twenty-five artists working across a range of mediums address concerns related to artificial intelligence, biotechnology, bioethics, planned obsolescence, desire as mediated by technology, surveillance, social justice, and virtual existence.  Is there perhaps something in the universe that cannot be reduced to data? Suppose non-conscious algorithms could eventually outperform conscious intelligence in all known data-processing tasks -- what, if anything, would be lost by replacing conscious intelligence with superior non-conscious algorithms?    – Yuval Noah Harari

Still Human   Ed Atkins, Neil Beloufa, Frank Benson, Paul Chan, Andrea Crespo, Simon Denny, Cécile B. Evans, Loretta Fahrenholz, Isa Genzken, Christian Holstad, Anne Imhof, Josh Kline, Liu Chuang, Shahryar Nashat, Katja Novitskova, Yuri Pattison, Seth Price, Christina Quarles, Jon Rafman, Sean Raspet, Charles Ray, Jennifer Rubell, Max Hooper Schneider, Frances Stark, Hito Steyerl, Iiu Susiraja, Hank Willis Thomas, Ryan Trecartin, Theo Triantafyllidis, Stewart Uoo, Wang Shang, Andro Wekua, Jordan Wolfson, Anicka Yi ?Still Human confronts the complex consequences of the digital revolution and recent technological developments as they redefine the human condition. Twenty-five artists working across a range of mediums address concerns related to artificial intelligence, biotechnology, bioethics, planned obsolescence, desire as mediated by technology, surveillance, social justice, and virtual existence.  Is there perhaps something in the universe that cannot be reduced to data? Suppose non-conscious algorithms could eventually outperform conscious intelligence in all known data-processing tasks -- what, if anything, would be lost by replacing conscious intelligence with superior non-conscious algorithms?    – Yuval Noah Harari
Francis Alÿs
Francis Als
Miami - 61 NE 41st Street
until 25-11-2018

Francis Alÿs The Institute of Contemporary Art, Miami hosts a presentation of paintings by Francis Alÿs based on three important multipanel works in the museum’s permanent collection. The artist’s “Sign Painting Project” series (1993–97), one of his first important bodies of work, involves his close collaboration with three commercial sign makers in Mexico City who copied, enlarged, or otherwise interpreted his original paintings. Alÿs in turn made new versions of his paintings based on these interpretations, calling into question the final works’ authorship and value. This body of work is typical to Alÿs for its deft navigation of social and economic factors. Reflecting on the declining art of commercial sign painting in a digital and hyper-capitalist age, the artist considers the culture of image making and disrupts the market, redistributing value to traditional image makers. Francis Alÿs (b. 1959, Antwerp, Belgium) is an interdisciplinary conceptual artist working in installation, video, painting, drawing, photography, and performance to address issues of geopolitical and social conflict in urban environments. Trained as an architect, Alÿs moved to Mexico City in 1986, where he began making public performance works as meditations on the experience of urban living. These interventions into urban space reflect conditions of dynamic unrest among communities living on Latin American borders. Alÿs’s solo exhibitions at major international institutions include the Museum of Contemporary Art Tokyo; Tate Modern, London; Wiels Centre d’Art Contemporain, Brussels; Museum of Modern Art, New York; and Hammer Museum, Los Angeles. His work belongs to the permanent collections of, among many others, the Institute of Contemporary Art, Miami; Philadelphia Museum of Art; Art Institute of Chicago; Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York; and Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam. The artist lives and works in Mexico City.  

Francis Alÿs The Institute of Contemporary Art, Miami hosts a presentation of paintings by Francis Alÿs based on three important multipanel works in the museum’s permanent collection. The artist’s “Sign Painting Project” series (1993–97), one of his first important bodies of work, involves his close collaboration with three commercial sign makers in Mexico City who copied, enlarged, or otherwise interpreted his original paintings. Alÿs in turn made new versions of his paintings based on these interpretations, calling into question the final works’ authorship and value. This body of work is typical to Alÿs for its deft navigation of social and economic factors. Reflecting on the declining art of commercial sign painting in a digital and hyper-capitalist age, the artist considers the culture of image making and disrupts the market, redistributing value to traditional image makers. Francis Alÿs (b. 1959, Antwerp, Belgium) is an interdisciplinary conceptual artist working in installation, video, painting, drawing, photography, and performance to address issues of geopolitical and social conflict in urban environments. Trained as an architect, Alÿs moved to Mexico City in 1986, where he began making public performance works as meditations on the experience of urban living. These interventions into urban space reflect conditions of dynamic unrest among communities living on Latin American borders. Alÿs’s solo exhibitions at major international institutions include the Museum of Contemporary Art Tokyo; Tate Modern, London; Wiels Centre d’Art Contemporain, Brussels; Museum of Modern Art, New York; and Hammer Museum, Los Angeles. His work belongs to the permanent collections of, among many others, the Institute of Contemporary Art, Miami; Philadelphia Museum of Art; Art Institute of Chicago; Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York; and Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam. The artist lives and works in Mexico City.  
Karen Rifas
Karen Rifas
Miami - 2100 Collins Avenue
until 21-10-2018

Karen Rifas – Deceptive Constructions For more than thirty years, Miami-based artist Karen Rifas has amassed a body of work that endeavors to understand and re-imagine space. Well known for her minimal cord and leaf installations, and precise, methodical line drawings, in 2016, Rifas began a focused exploration into the constructive possibilities of color. Employing densely hued shapes and irregular lines, Rifas creates spaces that oscillate between the two- and three-dimensional. Deceptive Constructions surveys this recent body of work for the artist’s first solo museum exhibition in over 10 years. Through variegated floor and sculptural installations, works on paper, and wood panel, Rifas uses a concise language of richly contrasted color to alter our perception of space. Karen Rifas (Chicago, b. 1942) lives and works in Miami and is a professor at New World School of the Arts. Recent solo exhibitions have been held at: Emerson Dorsch (2017), Meeting House Gallery (2016), De La Cruz Collection (2010), Pinnacle Gallery, Savannah College of Art and Design (2007), Polk Museum of Art (2004), and Museo De Arte Comtemporaneo, Panama City (1993). She has also exhibited in group shows and presented the following projects: Transphysics, Art and Culture Center, Hollywood (2017), 100+ Degrees in the Shade: A Survey of South Florida Art (2015), MIA-BER, Berlin Arts Club (2014), Following the Line, Girls’ Club (2012), I Triennial, Santo Domingo (2010), globe>miami<island, DC Museum of Contemporary Art (2002) and The Bass (2001). Rifas is represented in various permanent collections, including The Bass (Miami Beach), Fairchild Tropical Gardens (Miami), Metro-Dade Art in Public Places Trust (Miami), Museo de Arte de Ponce (Puerto Rico), Museum of Contemporary Art (North Miami), Perez Art Museum Miami, and Valencia Community College (Orlando).  

Karen Rifas – Deceptive Constructions For more than thirty years, Miami-based artist Karen Rifas has amassed a body of work that endeavors to understand and re-imagine space. Well known for her minimal cord and leaf installations, and precise, methodical line drawings, in 2016, Rifas began a focused exploration into the constructive possibilities of color. Employing densely hued shapes and irregular lines, Rifas creates spaces that oscillate between the two- and three-dimensional. Deceptive Constructions surveys this recent body of work for the artist’s first solo museum exhibition in over 10 years. Through variegated floor and sculptural installations, works on paper, and wood panel, Rifas uses a concise language of richly contrasted color to alter our perception of space. Karen Rifas (Chicago, b. 1942) lives and works in Miami and is a professor at New World School of the Arts. Recent solo exhibitions have been held at: Emerson Dorsch (2017), Meeting House Gallery (2016), De La Cruz Collection (2010), Pinnacle Gallery, Savannah College of Art and Design (2007), Polk Museum of Art (2004), and Museo De Arte Comtemporaneo, Panama City (1993). She has also exhibited in group shows and presented the following projects: Transphysics, Art and Culture Center, Hollywood (2017), 100+ Degrees in the Shade: A Survey of South Florida Art (2015), MIA-BER, Berlin Arts Club (2014), Following the Line, Girls’ Club (2012), I Triennial, Santo Domingo (2010), globe>miami<island, DC Museum of Contemporary Art (2002) and The Bass (2001). Rifas is represented in various permanent collections, including The Bass (Miami Beach), Fairchild Tropical Gardens (Miami), Metro-Dade Art in Public Places Trust (Miami), Museo de Arte de Ponce (Puerto Rico), Museum of Contemporary Art (North Miami), Perez Art Museum Miami, and Valencia Community College (Orlando).  
Walter Darby Bannard
Walter Darby Bannard
Miami - 61 NE 41st Street
until 09-09-2018

Walter Darby Bannard: 1959-1962 “Walter Darby Bannard: 1959-1962” is a focused presentation of a series of breakthrough paintings Walter Darby Bannard produced over a period of several years during which he abandoned gestural brushwork and developed a pared-down geometric vocabulary. As was the case for other artists of his generation who aspired to advance abstraction, the years in which these paintings were produced represented for Bannard a moment of reckoning with the lessons and legacy of Abstract Expressionism-and with the desire to inaugurate a new era in American painting. Living in Princeton, New Jersey, at the time that he made these works and working alongside fellow artist Frank Stella, who was on the verge of his own breakthrough with his series “Black Paintings” (1958-60), and Michael Fried, who would soon become one of the leading art critics of his generation, Bannard purged his paintings of any vestiges of self-expression and pared the canvases down to a single geometric form in a colored field. This allowed him to explore what he deemed painting’s most important aspects: the use of color and a “total, in-your-face presentation,” whereby all that the painting had to offer was right there in front of the viewer, all at once. Although Bannard would go on to become a leading figure in the development of Color painting and would be included in seminal exhibitions beginning in the mid-1960s, the early works presented in “Walter Darby Bannard: 1959-1962” have rarely and only recently been exhibited. As Fried writes in the catalogue accompanying the exhibition, these paintings “never had their moment in the sun around the time they were made, which is to say that catching up with them now-at long last acknowledging their ambition, refinement, and unorthodox beauty-has the additional character of doing belated justice to a remarkable achievement.” This presentation provides an opportunity to help serve this belated justice and doubles as homage to Bannard’s presence in and contribution to the Miami community, through both his studio work and as a leading professor in the departmet of art and art history at the University of Miami from 1989 to 2016. Walter Darby Bannard (b. 1934, New Haven; d. 2016, Miami), a leading figure in the development of Color Field painting, held over one hundred solo exhibitions during his lifetime, and was included the seminal exhibitions “Post-Painterly Abstraction,” curated by Clement Greenberg at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art in 1964, and “The Responsive Eye,” curated by William Seitz at the Museum of Modern Art, New York, in 1965. His work can be found in the permanent collections of the Centre George Pompidou, Paris; Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; Museum of Modern Art, New York; Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; and the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, among many others. Bannard served as the chair of the art and art history department at the University of Miami from 1989 to 1992.  

Walter Darby Bannard: 1959-1962 “Walter Darby Bannard: 1959-1962” is a focused presentation of a series of breakthrough paintings Walter Darby Bannard produced over a period of several years during which he abandoned gestural brushwork and developed a pared-down geometric vocabulary. As was the case for other artists of his generation who aspired to advance abstraction, the years in which these paintings were produced represented for Bannard a moment of reckoning with the lessons and legacy of Abstract Expressionism-and with the desire to inaugurate a new era in American painting. Living in Princeton, New Jersey, at the time that he made these works and working alongside fellow artist Frank Stella, who was on the verge of his own breakthrough with his series “Black Paintings” (1958-60), and Michael Fried, who would soon become one of the leading art critics of his generation, Bannard purged his paintings of any vestiges of self-expression and pared the canvases down to a single geometric form in a colored field. This allowed him to explore what he deemed painting’s most important aspects: the use of color and a “total, in-your-face presentation,” whereby all that the painting had to offer was right there in front of the viewer, all at once. Although Bannard would go on to become a leading figure in the development of Color painting and would be included in seminal exhibitions beginning in the mid-1960s, the early works presented in “Walter Darby Bannard: 1959-1962” have rarely and only recently been exhibited. As Fried writes in the catalogue accompanying the exhibition, these paintings “never had their moment in the sun around the time they were made, which is to say that catching up with them now-at long last acknowledging their ambition, refinement, and unorthodox beauty-has the additional character of doing belated justice to a remarkable achievement.” This presentation provides an opportunity to help serve this belated justice and doubles as homage to Bannard’s presence in and contribution to the Miami community, through both his studio work and as a leading professor in the departmet of art and art history at the University of Miami from 1989 to 2016. Walter Darby Bannard (b. 1934, New Haven; d. 2016, Miami), a leading figure in the development of Color Field painting, held over one hundred solo exhibitions during his lifetime, and was included the seminal exhibitions “Post-Painterly Abstraction,” curated by Clement Greenberg at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art in 1964, and “The Responsive Eye,” curated by William Seitz at the Museum of Modern Art, New York, in 1965. His work can be found in the permanent collections of the Centre George Pompidou, Paris; Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; Museum of Modern Art, New York; Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; and the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, among many others. Bannard served as the chair of the art and art history department at the University of Miami from 1989 to 1992.  
Allison Zuckerman
Allison Zuckerman
Miami - 95 NW 29th Street
until 25-08-2018

Allison Zuckerman – Stranger in Paradise Allison Zuckerman, the foundation's 2017 artist-in-residence, has created large format paintings and sculptures using the foundation’s main gallery as her studio this summer. These new works take historical paintings and internet culture as their point of departure and utilize paint and digitally manipulated printed images to create hybridized portraits suffused with cultural and societal critiques. ?  

Allison Zuckerman – Stranger in Paradise Allison Zuckerman, the foundation's 2017 artist-in-residence, has created large format paintings and sculptures using the foundation’s main gallery as her studio this summer. These new works take historical paintings and internet culture as their point of departure and utilize paint and digitally manipulated printed images to create hybridized portraits suffused with cultural and societal critiques. ?