Art feed

Curated by Exhibitionary

Pipilotti Rist
Pipilotti Rist
Munich - Barer Strasse 40
until 31-12-2018

Pipilotti Rist – Himalaya Goldsteins Stube The new collection display also features one of the largest whole-room installations by the Swiss video artist Pipilotti Rist (b. 1962), now on show again for the first time in several yeahirs. The work Himalaya Goldsteins Stube combines everyday furnishings, video projections, light, and music to create a richly evocative environment. Superimposed over the space’s sensual materials are flickering video images, projected from armchairs, side tables, and lamps. These ghostly emanations penetrate the space’s dimensions and flit between layers of reality. The interior and exterior world, the public and private are melded into one.

Pipilotti Rist – Himalaya Goldsteins Stube The new collection display also features one of the largest whole-room installations by the Swiss video artist Pipilotti Rist (b. 1962), now on show again for the first time in several yeahirs. The work Himalaya Goldsteins Stube combines everyday furnishings, video projections, light, and music to create a richly evocative environment. Superimposed over the space’s sensual materials are flickering video images, projected from armchairs, side tables, and lamps. These ghostly emanations penetrate the space’s dimensions and flit between layers of reality. The interior and exterior world, the public and private are melded into one.
Jutta Koether
Jutta Koether
Munich - Türkenstrasse 19
until 21-10-2018

Jutta Koether – Tour de Madame There is scarcely any other artist who has shaped our current understanding of painting and the cultural landscape as significantly as Jutta Koether (born 1958). Tour de Madame is the first in-depth survey show dedicated to her work and, as such, represents a unique opportunity for the general public to view the astonishing and spectacular scope of her paintings. In many respects the exhibition will be a journey of discovery, bringing togerther more than 150 paintings in a totally novel fashion. Many of the works have either never been exhibited before, or have not been on display since their initial presentation. One highlight of the exhibition will be a newly produced 15-part series of paintings – with a nod to Cy Twombly's Battle of Lepanto cycle on permanent display at Museum Brandhorst – embodying Koether's own "battle" with art history.

Jutta Koether – Tour de Madame There is scarcely any other artist who has shaped our current understanding of painting and the cultural landscape as significantly as Jutta Koether (born 1958). Tour de Madame is the first in-depth survey show dedicated to her work and, as such, represents a unique opportunity for the general public to view the astonishing and spectacular scope of her paintings. In many respects the exhibition will be a journey of discovery, bringing togerther more than 150 paintings in a totally novel fashion. Many of the works have either never been exhibited before, or have not been on display since their initial presentation. One highlight of the exhibition will be a newly produced 15-part series of paintings – with a nod to Cy Twombly's Battle of Lepanto cycle on permanent display at Museum Brandhorst – embodying Koether's own "battle" with art history.
Olaf Metzel
Olaf Metzel
Munich - Barer Strasse 40
until 31-12-2018

Olaf Metzel – Reise nach Jerusalem / Musical Chairs For the opening of the Pinakothek der Moderne, Olaf Metzel created a sculpture that highlighted the stage-like appearance of the staircase. The artist was particularly interested by the lone column on the mid-landing, which he dressed in a dazzling robe of colourful acrylic glass, in the centre of which he stacked deformed plastic chairs. Metzel named this eccentric work “Journey to Jerusalem”, (the West-German name for musical chairs) and it soon became one of the museum’s most iconic works. This expansive work may be seen again on the occasion of the museum's 15th anniversary.

Olaf Metzel – Reise nach Jerusalem / Musical Chairs For the opening of the Pinakothek der Moderne, Olaf Metzel created a sculpture that highlighted the stage-like appearance of the staircase. The artist was particularly interested by the lone column on the mid-landing, which he dressed in a dazzling robe of colourful acrylic glass, in the centre of which he stacked deformed plastic chairs. Metzel named this eccentric work “Journey to Jerusalem”, (the West-German name for musical chairs) and it soon became one of the museum’s most iconic works. This expansive work may be seen again on the occasion of the museum's 15th anniversary.
Dan Flavin
Dan Flavin
Munich - Luisenstrasse 29
until 30-09-2018

Dan Flavin – Untitled (For Ksenija) The Kunstbau, which was designed by the architect Uwe Kiessler, opened in 1994. The new subterranean space enhanced the Lenbachhaus’s ability to mount large special presentations. For the inaugural exhibition, Dan Flavin (1933–1996) created the installation Untitled (for Ksenija). Conceived specifically for our gallery, this late work is an imposing example of Flavin’s ongoing creative engagement with the dynamic interplay between light art and architecture. His longtime friends and patrons Heiner Friedrich and Philippa de Ménil donated the work to the Lenbachhaus in memory of their parents, Harald and Erika Friedrich and John and Dominique de Ménil. In celebration of Heiner Friedrich’s eightieth birthday, the museum is bringing Untitled (for Ksenija) back to the Kunstbau.

Dan Flavin – Untitled (For Ksenija) The Kunstbau, which was designed by the architect Uwe Kiessler, opened in 1994. The new subterranean space enhanced the Lenbachhaus’s ability to mount large special presentations. For the inaugural exhibition, Dan Flavin (1933–1996) created the installation Untitled (for Ksenija). Conceived specifically for our gallery, this late work is an imposing example of Flavin’s ongoing creative engagement with the dynamic interplay between light art and architecture. His longtime friends and patrons Heiner Friedrich and Philippa de Ménil donated the work to the Lenbachhaus in memory of their parents, Harald and Erika Friedrich and John and Dominique de Ménil. In celebration of Heiner Friedrich’s eightieth birthday, the museum is bringing Untitled (for Ksenija) back to the Kunstbau.
Generations Part 2
Generations Part 2
Munich - Prinzregentenstrasse 1
until 27-01-2019

Generations Part 2: Female Artists in Dialogue – Sammlung Goetz in Haus der Kunst Curated by Cornelia Gockel and Susanne Touw From the beginning, works by women have had a significant importance in the Sammlung Goetz. Thus, central individual positions – like those of Yayoi Kusama, Rosemarie Trockel and Mona Hatoum, or groupings like the Young British Artists – were established early on, and the work of such artists collected consistently over the years. In her passion for collecting, Ingvild Goetz allowed herself to be guided by her interest in socio-political topics, formal-aesthetic issues and artistic materials, while always remaining open to new discoveries.  In the second part of the exhibition, staged in the former air shelter in Haus der Kunst, the focus is on the body and the exploration of its limits, as well as the examination of social concepts of sexuality, gender and identity in moving images.

Generations Part 2: Female Artists in Dialogue – Sammlung Goetz in Haus der Kunst Curated by Cornelia Gockel and Susanne Touw From the beginning, works by women have had a significant importance in the Sammlung Goetz. Thus, central individual positions – like those of Yayoi Kusama, Rosemarie Trockel and Mona Hatoum, or groupings like the Young British Artists – were established early on, and the work of such artists collected consistently over the years. In her passion for collecting, Ingvild Goetz allowed herself to be guided by her interest in socio-political topics, formal-aesthetic issues and artistic materials, while always remaining open to new discoveries.  In the second part of the exhibition, staged in the former air shelter in Haus der Kunst, the focus is on the body and the exploration of its limits, as well as the examination of social concepts of sexuality, gender and identity in moving images.
Marcia Hafif
Marcia Hafif
Munich - Luisenstrasse 29
until 30-09-2018

Marcia Hafif – Films (1970-1999) Starting in the 1970s, Marcia Hafif (1929–2018) probed the impact of pure color in paintings that eschewed figuration and composition to represent nothing but themselves. This reduction let Hafif undertake an analytical examination of fundamental components of painting such as material, brushwork, surface, and format. Among the works from the KiCo Collection on permanent loan to the Lenbachhaus are more than twenty paintings and drawings from all periods of Hafif’s oeuvre. They have been on view in presentations of art from the collections on several occasions since 2003. Marcia Hafif: Films (1970–1999) turns the spotlight on a lesser-known aspect of her oeuvre: film and language. 

Marcia Hafif – Films (1970-1999) Starting in the 1970s, Marcia Hafif (1929–2018) probed the impact of pure color in paintings that eschewed figuration and composition to represent nothing but themselves. This reduction let Hafif undertake an analytical examination of fundamental components of painting such as material, brushwork, surface, and format. Among the works from the KiCo Collection on permanent loan to the Lenbachhaus are more than twenty paintings and drawings from all periods of Hafif’s oeuvre. They have been on view in presentations of art from the collections on several occasions since 2003. Marcia Hafif: Films (1970–1999) turns the spotlight on a lesser-known aspect of her oeuvre: film and language. 
Peter Fischli
Peter Fischli
New York - 165 East Broadway
until 23-09-2018

Peter Fischli  

Peter Fischli  
David Wojnarowicz
David Wojnarowicz
New York - 99 Gansevoort Street
until 30-09-2018

David Wojnarowicz – History Keeps Me Awake At Night Beginning in the late 1970s, David Wojnarowicz (1954–1992) created a body of work that spanned photography, painting, music, film, sculpture, writing, and activism. Largely self-taught, he came to prominence in New York in the 1980s, a period marked by creative energy, financial precariousness, and profound cultural changes. Intersecting movements – graffiti, new and no wave music, conceptual photography, performance, and neo-expressionist painting – made New York a laboratory for innovation. Wojnarowicz refused a signature style, adopting a wide variety of techniques with an attitude of radical possibility. Distrustful of inherited structures – a feeling amplified by the resurgence of conservative politics – he varied his repertoire to better infiltrate the prevailing culture. Wojnarowicz saw the outsider as his true subject. Queer and later diagnosed as HIV-positive, he became an impassioned advocate for people with AIDS when an inconceivable number of friends, lovers, and strangers were dying due to government inaction. Wojnarowicz’s work documents and illuminates a desperate period of American history: that of the AIDS crisis and culture wars of the late 1980s and early 1990s. But his rightful place is also among the raging and haunting iconoclastic voices, from Walt Whitman to William S. Burroughs, who explore American myths, their perpetuation, their repercussions, and their violence. Like theirs, his work deals directly with the timeless subjects of sex, spirituality, love, and loss. Wojnarowicz, who was thirty-seven when he died from AIDS-related complications, wrote: “To make the private into something public is an action that has terrific ramifications.”

David Wojnarowicz – History Keeps Me Awake At Night Beginning in the late 1970s, David Wojnarowicz (1954–1992) created a body of work that spanned photography, painting, music, film, sculpture, writing, and activism. Largely self-taught, he came to prominence in New York in the 1980s, a period marked by creative energy, financial precariousness, and profound cultural changes. Intersecting movements – graffiti, new and no wave music, conceptual photography, performance, and neo-expressionist painting – made New York a laboratory for innovation. Wojnarowicz refused a signature style, adopting a wide variety of techniques with an attitude of radical possibility. Distrustful of inherited structures – a feeling amplified by the resurgence of conservative politics – he varied his repertoire to better infiltrate the prevailing culture. Wojnarowicz saw the outsider as his true subject. Queer and later diagnosed as HIV-positive, he became an impassioned advocate for people with AIDS when an inconceivable number of friends, lovers, and strangers were dying due to government inaction. Wojnarowicz’s work documents and illuminates a desperate period of American history: that of the AIDS crisis and culture wars of the late 1980s and early 1990s. But his rightful place is also among the raging and haunting iconoclastic voices, from Walt Whitman to William S. Burroughs, who explore American myths, their perpetuation, their repercussions, and their violence. Like theirs, his work deals directly with the timeless subjects of sex, spirituality, love, and loss. Wojnarowicz, who was thirty-seven when he died from AIDS-related complications, wrote: “To make the private into something public is an action that has terrific ramifications.”
Huma Bhabha
Huma Bhabha
New York - 1000 Fifth Avenue
until 28-10-2018

The Roof Garden Commission: Huma Bhabha – We Come in Peace  Huma Bhabha has been selected to create a site-specific installation for The Met’s Roof Garden. The title of the installation, We Come in Peace, has its origins in the classic American science-fiction film The Day the Earth Stood Still (1951), a tale of first contact between humans and aliens. The installation’s two sculptures—the 12-foot-tall five-headed intersex figure We Come in Peace, and the 18-foot-long prostrate Benaam (an Urdu word that translates as “without name”)—are carefully oriented toward each other as if they have just landed on The Met’s Cantor Roof. Bhabha has choreographed a dramatic mise-en-scène, inspiring visitors to envision tales of foreign visitation. The Roof Garden Commission: Huma Bhabha, We Come in Peace was conceived by the artist in consultation with Sheena Wagstaff, Leonard A. Lauder Chairman of Modern and Contemporary Art, and Shanay Jhaveri, Assistant Curator of South Asian Art, both of The Met’s Department of Modern and Contemporary Art. It is the sixth in a series of site-specific commissions for the outdoor space.  

The Roof Garden Commission: Huma Bhabha – We Come in Peace  Huma Bhabha has been selected to create a site-specific installation for The Met’s Roof Garden. The title of the installation, We Come in Peace, has its origins in the classic American science-fiction film The Day the Earth Stood Still (1951), a tale of first contact between humans and aliens. The installation’s two sculptures—the 12-foot-tall five-headed intersex figure We Come in Peace, and the 18-foot-long prostrate Benaam (an Urdu word that translates as “without name”)—are carefully oriented toward each other as if they have just landed on The Met’s Cantor Roof. Bhabha has choreographed a dramatic mise-en-scène, inspiring visitors to envision tales of foreign visitation. The Roof Garden Commission: Huma Bhabha, We Come in Peace was conceived by the artist in consultation with Sheena Wagstaff, Leonard A. Lauder Chairman of Modern and Contemporary Art, and Shanay Jhaveri, Assistant Curator of South Asian Art, both of The Met’s Department of Modern and Contemporary Art. It is the sixth in a series of site-specific commissions for the outdoor space.  
Carmen Herrera
Carmen Herrera
New York - 504 West 24th Street
until 27-10-2018

Carmen Herrera – Estructuras Carmen Herrera’s dynamic use of colour and form is realised perhaps most effectively in her series of three-dimensional works, known as the Estructuras (Structures). Based on paintings “really crying out to become sculpture”, Herrera’s Estructuras represent a rare break in Herrera’s insistent planarity and rectangular container of her paintings. The exhibition in New York will be the first ever dedicated entirely to this body of work, presenting approximately 10 works. As with many of her famous early Blanco y Verde  paintings, Herrera envisioned her Estructuras in an environmental sense, using the surrounding walls as part of the composition. The irregular shapes, unable to fit perfectly together, create negative space to play with spatial awareness and balance, and bring to life the precision of Herrera’s sharp edges. 

Carmen Herrera – Estructuras Carmen Herrera’s dynamic use of colour and form is realised perhaps most effectively in her series of three-dimensional works, known as the Estructuras (Structures). Based on paintings “really crying out to become sculpture”, Herrera’s Estructuras represent a rare break in Herrera’s insistent planarity and rectangular container of her paintings. The exhibition in New York will be the first ever dedicated entirely to this body of work, presenting approximately 10 works. As with many of her famous early Blanco y Verde  paintings, Herrera envisioned her Estructuras in an environmental sense, using the surrounding walls as part of the composition. The irregular shapes, unable to fit perfectly together, create negative space to play with spatial awareness and balance, and bring to life the precision of Herrera’s sharp edges. 
One Hand Clapping
One Hand Clapping
New York - 1071 Fifth Avenue
until 21-10-2018

One Hand Clapping Cao Fei, Duan Jianyu, Lin Yilin, Wong Ping, Samson Young Curated by Xiaoyu Weng & Hou Hanru The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum presents One Hand Clapping, a group exhibition of newly commissioned works by Cao Fei, Duan Jianyu, Lin Yilin, Wong Ping, and Samson Young. These five artists explore the ways in which globalization affects our understanding of the future. Their commissioned works represent a range of traditional and new mediums, from oil on canvas to virtual-reality software. In her paintings and sculptures, Duan Jianyu celebrates the marginal figures who haunt the transitory zone where rural and urban, primitive and modern intersect. Wong Ping’s animated video, driven by the artist’s dark and risqué humor, addresses the tension between an aging population and the relentless pace of the digital economy. Lin Yilin’s VR simulation tests the potential of such technology to enable us to inhabit the experience of another person or even an object—in this case, a basketball. In her fantastical film installation, Cao Fei examines the physical and psychological impact that automated industry exerts on the human body and society. Samson Young plays upon our obsession with values of truth and authenticity by inventing an array of impossible musical instruments and digitally engineering their sounds. Together, these works challenge a universal, homogeneous, and technocratic future determined by economic growth and technological advancement. The show’s title is derived from a koan—a riddle used in Zen Buddhist practice to transcend the limitations of logical reasoning—that asks, “We know the sound of two hands clapping. But what is the sound of one hand clapping?” Emerging from a tradition that originates in China’s Tang period (618–907), the phrase “one hand clapping” encompasses a history of cross-cultural translation and appropriation that continues into the present. Popularized by its use as the epigraph to American author J. D. Salinger’s 1953 book of fiction, Nine Stories, this koan has also served as the name of a British band, the title of an Australian film, and the title and lyrics of a Cantonese pop song. In this exhibition, “one hand clapping” serves as a metaphor for the ways in which meaning is destabilized in a globalized world. Evoking the idea of solitude, the image of “one hand clapping” also speaks to the ability of artists to put forth a singular vision that can contest entrenched beliefs, stereotypes, and power structures. The artists in this exhibition are connected by their deep involvement in specific places, namely, Beijing, Guangzhou, Hong Kong, and New York; their critical examination of our systems of exchange, communication, and production; and their imagination of multiple futures as a form of poetic revolution.

One Hand Clapping Cao Fei, Duan Jianyu, Lin Yilin, Wong Ping, Samson Young Curated by Xiaoyu Weng & Hou Hanru The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum presents One Hand Clapping, a group exhibition of newly commissioned works by Cao Fei, Duan Jianyu, Lin Yilin, Wong Ping, and Samson Young. These five artists explore the ways in which globalization affects our understanding of the future. Their commissioned works represent a range of traditional and new mediums, from oil on canvas to virtual-reality software. In her paintings and sculptures, Duan Jianyu celebrates the marginal figures who haunt the transitory zone where rural and urban, primitive and modern intersect. Wong Ping’s animated video, driven by the artist’s dark and risqué humor, addresses the tension between an aging population and the relentless pace of the digital economy. Lin Yilin’s VR simulation tests the potential of such technology to enable us to inhabit the experience of another person or even an object—in this case, a basketball. In her fantastical film installation, Cao Fei examines the physical and psychological impact that automated industry exerts on the human body and society. Samson Young plays upon our obsession with values of truth and authenticity by inventing an array of impossible musical instruments and digitally engineering their sounds. Together, these works challenge a universal, homogeneous, and technocratic future determined by economic growth and technological advancement. The show’s title is derived from a koan—a riddle used in Zen Buddhist practice to transcend the limitations of logical reasoning—that asks, “We know the sound of two hands clapping. But what is the sound of one hand clapping?” Emerging from a tradition that originates in China’s Tang period (618–907), the phrase “one hand clapping” encompasses a history of cross-cultural translation and appropriation that continues into the present. Popularized by its use as the epigraph to American author J. D. Salinger’s 1953 book of fiction, Nine Stories, this koan has also served as the name of a British band, the title of an Australian film, and the title and lyrics of a Cantonese pop song. In this exhibition, “one hand clapping” serves as a metaphor for the ways in which meaning is destabilized in a globalized world. Evoking the idea of solitude, the image of “one hand clapping” also speaks to the ability of artists to put forth a singular vision that can contest entrenched beliefs, stereotypes, and power structures. The artists in this exhibition are connected by their deep involvement in specific places, namely, Beijing, Guangzhou, Hong Kong, and New York; their critical examination of our systems of exchange, communication, and production; and their imagination of multiple futures as a form of poetic revolution.
Michael Jackson: On the Wall
Michael Jackson: On the Wall
London - St Martin?s Place
until 21-10-2018

Michael Jackson: On the Wall This landmark exhibition explores the influence of Michael Jackson on some of the leading names in contemporary art, spanning several generations of artists across all media. Curated by Dr Nicholas Cullinan, Director of the National Portrait Gallery, the exhibition will open in the summer of 2018 to coincide with what would have been Michael Jackson’s 60th birthday (on August 29, 2018). Michael Jackson is one of the most influential cultural figures to come out of the 20th century and his legacy continues into the 21st century. His significance is widely acknowledged when it comes to music, music videos, dance, choreography and fashion, but his considerable influence on contemporary art is an untold story. Since Andy Warhol first used his image in 1982, Jackson has become the most depicted cultural figure in visual art by an extraordinary array of leading contemporary artists. For the first time, Michael Jackson: On the Wall will bring together the works of over forty of these artists, drawn from public and private collections around the world, including new works made especially for the exhibition.  

Michael Jackson: On the Wall This landmark exhibition explores the influence of Michael Jackson on some of the leading names in contemporary art, spanning several generations of artists across all media. Curated by Dr Nicholas Cullinan, Director of the National Portrait Gallery, the exhibition will open in the summer of 2018 to coincide with what would have been Michael Jackson’s 60th birthday (on August 29, 2018). Michael Jackson is one of the most influential cultural figures to come out of the 20th century and his legacy continues into the 21st century. His significance is widely acknowledged when it comes to music, music videos, dance, choreography and fashion, but his considerable influence on contemporary art is an untold story. Since Andy Warhol first used his image in 1982, Jackson has become the most depicted cultural figure in visual art by an extraordinary array of leading contemporary artists. For the first time, Michael Jackson: On the Wall will bring together the works of over forty of these artists, drawn from public and private collections around the world, including new works made especially for the exhibition.  
Martin Parr
Martin Parr
London - St Martin?s Place
until 27-05-2019

Only Human: Photographs by Martin Parr A major new exhibition of works by Martin Parr, one of Britain’s best-known and most widely celebrated photographers. Only Human: Martin Parr, brings together some of Parr’s best known photographs with a number of works never exhibited before to focus on one of his most engaging subjects – people. The exhibition will include portraits of people from around the world, with a special focus on Parr’s wry observations of Britishness, explored through a series of projects that investigate British identity today, including new works which reveal Parr’s take on the social climate in Britain in the aftermath of the EU referendum.

Only Human: Photographs by Martin Parr A major new exhibition of works by Martin Parr, one of Britain’s best-known and most widely celebrated photographers. Only Human: Martin Parr, brings together some of Parr’s best known photographs with a number of works never exhibited before to focus on one of his most engaging subjects – people. The exhibition will include portraits of people from around the world, with a special focus on Parr’s wry observations of Britishness, explored through a series of projects that investigate British identity today, including new works which reveal Parr’s take on the social climate in Britain in the aftermath of the EU referendum.
Anthea Hamilton
Anthea Hamilton
London - Millbank
until 07-10-2018

Anthea Hamilton – The Squash Anthea Hamilton transforms the heart of Tate Britain with sculpture and performance A solo performer in a squash-like costume inhabits the Duveen Galleries every day for more than six months for the Tate Britain Commission 2018. Each element of The Squash has evolved from Hamilton’s interest in a photograph she found in a book several years ago when looking at improvisational theatre and participatory art practices in the 1960s and 1970s. It showed a person dressed as what looks like a vegetable lying among vines. The original photograph dated from 1960 and depicted a scene from a dance by American choreographer Erick Hawkins. Hawkins was interested in Native American philosophies and he took the form of this costume from the Squash Kachina of the Hopi culture.  

Anthea Hamilton – The Squash Anthea Hamilton transforms the heart of Tate Britain with sculpture and performance A solo performer in a squash-like costume inhabits the Duveen Galleries every day for more than six months for the Tate Britain Commission 2018. Each element of The Squash has evolved from Hamilton’s interest in a photograph she found in a book several years ago when looking at improvisational theatre and participatory art practices in the 1960s and 1970s. It showed a person dressed as what looks like a vegetable lying among vines. The original photograph dated from 1960 and depicted a scene from a dance by American choreographer Erick Hawkins. Hawkins was interested in Native American philosophies and he took the form of this costume from the Squash Kachina of the Hopi culture.  
Drag: Self-portraits and Body Politics
Drag: Self-portraits and Body Politics
London - Southbank Centre, Belvedere Rd
until 14-10-2018

Drag: Self-portraits and Body Politics Eleanor Antin, Oreet Ashery, Renate Bertlmann, Leigh Bowery, Genesis Breyer P-Orridge, Luciano Castelli, Adam Christensen, Francesco Copello, Jimmy DeSana, Rose English, VALIE EXPORT, Samuel Fosso, Lynn Hershman Leeson, Ann Hirsch, David Hoyle, Michel Journiac, Birgit Jürgenssen, Paul Kindersley, Suzy Lake, Robert Mapplethorpe, Ana Mendieta, Pierre Molinier, Tony Morgan, Hunter Reynolds, Cindy Sherman, Victoria Sin, Jo Spence, Sturtevant, Ulay, Martha Wilson, David Wojnarowicz & Jesse Hultberg, Ming Wong, Cerith Wyn Evans This exhibition features the work of more than 30 artists who have used drag to explore or question identity, gender, class and politics, from the 1960s to the present day. Rather than offering a linear or chronological narrative, this exhibition aims to present a multitude of voices that explore cultural shifts of the past 50 years and touch on topics that include the 1980s AIDS crisis and post-colonial theory.

Drag: Self-portraits and Body Politics Eleanor Antin, Oreet Ashery, Renate Bertlmann, Leigh Bowery, Genesis Breyer P-Orridge, Luciano Castelli, Adam Christensen, Francesco Copello, Jimmy DeSana, Rose English, VALIE EXPORT, Samuel Fosso, Lynn Hershman Leeson, Ann Hirsch, David Hoyle, Michel Journiac, Birgit Jürgenssen, Paul Kindersley, Suzy Lake, Robert Mapplethorpe, Ana Mendieta, Pierre Molinier, Tony Morgan, Hunter Reynolds, Cindy Sherman, Victoria Sin, Jo Spence, Sturtevant, Ulay, Martha Wilson, David Wojnarowicz & Jesse Hultberg, Ming Wong, Cerith Wyn Evans This exhibition features the work of more than 30 artists who have used drag to explore or question identity, gender, class and politics, from the 1960s to the present day. Rather than offering a linear or chronological narrative, this exhibition aims to present a multitude of voices that explore cultural shifts of the past 50 years and touch on topics that include the 1980s AIDS crisis and post-colonial theory.
Bunny Rogers
Bunny Rogers
Los Angeles - 4357 Wilshire Boulevard
until 06-01-2019

Bunny Rogers – Inattention  As an obsessive consumer and self-proclaimed Internet addict since childhood, Bunny Rogers (b. 1990, Houston, TX; lives and works in New York) probes how the media shaped her identity. Fixated on animated television shows like Clone High and Invader Zim and websites such as Neopets, Rogers grew attached to fictional people and creatures that have become recurring characters in her work. These children’s programs overlapped in time with severe and violent events widely covered by news media outlets, including the 1999 Columbine High School massacre in which 15 students and teachers died, and another 23 were injured. Rogers grew up during the rise of school shootings and cites the Columbine imagery as significant and unforgettable.  

Bunny Rogers – Inattention  As an obsessive consumer and self-proclaimed Internet addict since childhood, Bunny Rogers (b. 1990, Houston, TX; lives and works in New York) probes how the media shaped her identity. Fixated on animated television shows like Clone High and Invader Zim and websites such as Neopets, Rogers grew attached to fictional people and creatures that have become recurring characters in her work. These children’s programs overlapped in time with severe and violent events widely covered by news media outlets, including the 1999 Columbine High School massacre in which 15 students and teachers died, and another 23 were injured. Rogers grew up during the rise of school shootings and cites the Columbine imagery as significant and unforgettable.  
Challenger Deep
Challenger Deep
Los Angeles - 1345 Kellam Avenue (backyard)
until 14-10-2018

Challenger Deep  Paul Carlo Esposito, Delia Jürgens, Sarah McMenimen, Charisse Pearlina Weston  Challenger Deep – the deepest known point in Earth’s oceans – sits at the bottom of the Mariana Trench in the Pacific. Deep ocean trenches form in subduction zones where an oceanic tectonic plate slowly slides under its neighbor, returning to the Earth’s mantle. The Hadal zone of the ocean exists in these trenches and sports an unusual variety of biology accustomed to the deep. Lifeforms adapted to this seemingly unforgiving environment, forming symbiotic relationships, developing bioluminescence, and feeding off marine snow – the detritus of dead organisms drifting to the ocean floor – as well as the chemical reactions surrounding hydrothermal vents.

Challenger Deep  Paul Carlo Esposito, Delia Jürgens, Sarah McMenimen, Charisse Pearlina Weston  Challenger Deep – the deepest known point in Earth’s oceans – sits at the bottom of the Mariana Trench in the Pacific. Deep ocean trenches form in subduction zones where an oceanic tectonic plate slowly slides under its neighbor, returning to the Earth’s mantle. The Hadal zone of the ocean exists in these trenches and sports an unusual variety of biology accustomed to the deep. Lifeforms adapted to this seemingly unforgiving environment, forming symbiotic relationships, developing bioluminescence, and feeding off marine snow – the detritus of dead organisms drifting to the ocean floor – as well as the chemical reactions surrounding hydrothermal vents.
Make Me Look Beautiful, Madame d'Ora
Make Me Look Beautiful, Madame d'Ora
Vienna - Museumsplatz 1
until 29-10-2018

Make Me Look Beautiful, Madame d'Ora In her studio, d’Ora captured the great names of the 20th century’s world of art and fashion, aristocracy and politics. The first artist photographed by her was Gustav Klimt in 1908, the last Pablo Picasso in 1956. She further immortalized Emperor Charles I of Austria and members of the Rothschild family, Coco Chanel and Josephine Baker as well as Marc Chagall and Maurice Chevalier. In 1907 Dora Kallmus was one of the first women in Vienna to open a photographic studio. Within only a few months, the Atelier d’Ora had established itself as the most elegant and renowned studio for artistic portrait photographs and her images were widely disseminated through numerous newspapers and magazines in Austria and abroad. In 1925 an offer from the fashion magazine L’Officiel brought d’Ora to Paris, which became the center of her personal and professional life. She received countless commissions from fashion- and lifestyle magazines, which only started to abate from the mid-1930s when the political situation across Europe became increasingly precarious. A disenfranchised Jew, d’Ora lost her Paris studio in 1940 and for years had to hide from German occupying forces in France. Having narrowly escaped capture, the portraitist of society focused her at once sharp and empathic gaze after 1945 also on nameless concentration camp survivors as well as on the meat stock of the Parisian abattoirs. D’Ora’s work traces a unique arc from the last Austrian monarch, via the glamour of the Paris fashion world in the 1920s and 30s to a Europe entirely changed after World War II.  

Make Me Look Beautiful, Madame d'Ora In her studio, d’Ora captured the great names of the 20th century’s world of art and fashion, aristocracy and politics. The first artist photographed by her was Gustav Klimt in 1908, the last Pablo Picasso in 1956. She further immortalized Emperor Charles I of Austria and members of the Rothschild family, Coco Chanel and Josephine Baker as well as Marc Chagall and Maurice Chevalier. In 1907 Dora Kallmus was one of the first women in Vienna to open a photographic studio. Within only a few months, the Atelier d’Ora had established itself as the most elegant and renowned studio for artistic portrait photographs and her images were widely disseminated through numerous newspapers and magazines in Austria and abroad. In 1925 an offer from the fashion magazine L’Officiel brought d’Ora to Paris, which became the center of her personal and professional life. She received countless commissions from fashion- and lifestyle magazines, which only started to abate from the mid-1930s when the political situation across Europe became increasingly precarious. A disenfranchised Jew, d’Ora lost her Paris studio in 1940 and for years had to hide from German occupying forces in France. Having narrowly escaped capture, the portraitist of society focused her at once sharp and empathic gaze after 1945 also on nameless concentration camp survivors as well as on the meat stock of the Parisian abattoirs. D’Ora’s work traces a unique arc from the last Austrian monarch, via the glamour of the Paris fashion world in the 1920s and 30s to a Europe entirely changed after World War II.  
Olaf Nicolai
Olaf Nicolai
Vienna - Museumsplatz 1
until 07-10-2018

Olaf Nicolai – There Is No Place Before Arrival Curated by Luca Lo Pinto There Is No Place Before Arrival is the title of the multilayered exhibition Kunsthalle Wien dedicates to German artist Olaf Nicolai. Renowned for his inventive work with a diverse array of materials and mediums, Nicolai’s artistic output is at once conceptual, complex and poetic. He develops a variety of interdisciplinary projects that address the primary experiences of space, time and corporeality. The exhibition comprises a main installation conceived specifically for the main hall of Kunsthalle Wien and expands beyond the walls of the institution through an array of interventions – both object and time-based, physical and performative – at different venues offering an expanded project which takes place between private and public spaces. At Kunsthalle Wien Olaf Nicolai has commissioned several street and theatre painters to paint onto the floor a pool of twenty-two images of different kinds selected from his personal archive of newspaper clippings. The conceptual gesture of translating photographs from public media sources into enlarged chalk floor paintings is a way to incorporate these particular images into a different context, which affects the perception of them and thus their reception. A key aspect of Nicolai’s methodological approach is the way he engages with the context in which his work is presented. In order to reflect on this context and call it into question the exhibition extends itself outside of the institutional space and develops in the form of interdisciplinary projects, thereby multiplying the references and interactions the works make with one another and to their environment. In cooperation with museum in progress, the exhibition will find an extension within media, digital space and Instagram under a project titled media loop (#medialoop). By publishing photographs of the painted images included in the installation in international newspapers and magazines, the imagery will be exposed to a contextual feedback loop. At the Sigmund Freud Museum Trauer und Melancholie (2009/12) a translation of Freud’s text into Arabic in both written and audio form is on show. The original publication together with a video describing the complexity of the process of translation is displayed and provides a glimpse of the preparations for the reading on the radio. At ZOOM Children’s Museum Olaf Nicolai realizes a workshop for kids based on the piece A Coloring book for children after motifs by Arnulf Rainer (2002) which is on view. Drawings and collages from a portfolio of Rainer [Proportionsordnungen, 1954] were used to provide templates to be painted out or painted over in the children’s drawing book. The Georg Fritsch Antiquarian Bookshop provides a perfect structure that connects with Olaf Nicolai’s interests in experimental literature and the book as a medium. Nicolai stages an intervention inside the bookshop and the window display, centred around the seminal manifesto Eight Point Proclamation of the Poetic Act written in 1953 by H.C. Artmann. There is No Place Before Arrival at Kunsthalle Wien will be shown in conjunction with two other exhibitions presented at Kunsthalle Bielefeld (opens on June 15, 2018) and at Kunstmuseum St. Gallen (opens on July 7, 2018), respectively. Together, the three exhibitions will provide an overview of the artist’s multifaceted work and reflect the interdisciplinary concepts he has used over the past twenty years. Olaf Nicolai (* 1962) lives and works in Berlin. After studying German language and literature at the University of Leipzig, he has been a visual artist since 1990. In addition to participating in solo and group exhibitions, he has shown at documenta X (1997) and documenta 14 (2017), at the 49th and 51st Venice Biennale (2001 and 2005). For his work In The Woods There Is A Bird… commissioned by documenta 14 Olaf Nicolai was awarded the Karl-Sczuka-Prize 2017 for works of radio art.  

Olaf Nicolai – There Is No Place Before Arrival Curated by Luca Lo Pinto There Is No Place Before Arrival is the title of the multilayered exhibition Kunsthalle Wien dedicates to German artist Olaf Nicolai. Renowned for his inventive work with a diverse array of materials and mediums, Nicolai’s artistic output is at once conceptual, complex and poetic. He develops a variety of interdisciplinary projects that address the primary experiences of space, time and corporeality. The exhibition comprises a main installation conceived specifically for the main hall of Kunsthalle Wien and expands beyond the walls of the institution through an array of interventions – both object and time-based, physical and performative – at different venues offering an expanded project which takes place between private and public spaces. At Kunsthalle Wien Olaf Nicolai has commissioned several street and theatre painters to paint onto the floor a pool of twenty-two images of different kinds selected from his personal archive of newspaper clippings. The conceptual gesture of translating photographs from public media sources into enlarged chalk floor paintings is a way to incorporate these particular images into a different context, which affects the perception of them and thus their reception. A key aspect of Nicolai’s methodological approach is the way he engages with the context in which his work is presented. In order to reflect on this context and call it into question the exhibition extends itself outside of the institutional space and develops in the form of interdisciplinary projects, thereby multiplying the references and interactions the works make with one another and to their environment. In cooperation with museum in progress, the exhibition will find an extension within media, digital space and Instagram under a project titled media loop (#medialoop). By publishing photographs of the painted images included in the installation in international newspapers and magazines, the imagery will be exposed to a contextual feedback loop. At the Sigmund Freud Museum Trauer und Melancholie (2009/12) a translation of Freud’s text into Arabic in both written and audio form is on show. The original publication together with a video describing the complexity of the process of translation is displayed and provides a glimpse of the preparations for the reading on the radio. At ZOOM Children’s Museum Olaf Nicolai realizes a workshop for kids based on the piece A Coloring book for children after motifs by Arnulf Rainer (2002) which is on view. Drawings and collages from a portfolio of Rainer [Proportionsordnungen, 1954] were used to provide templates to be painted out or painted over in the children’s drawing book. The Georg Fritsch Antiquarian Bookshop provides a perfect structure that connects with Olaf Nicolai’s interests in experimental literature and the book as a medium. Nicolai stages an intervention inside the bookshop and the window display, centred around the seminal manifesto Eight Point Proclamation of the Poetic Act written in 1953 by H.C. Artmann. There is No Place Before Arrival at Kunsthalle Wien will be shown in conjunction with two other exhibitions presented at Kunsthalle Bielefeld (opens on June 15, 2018) and at Kunstmuseum St. Gallen (opens on July 7, 2018), respectively. Together, the three exhibitions will provide an overview of the artist’s multifaceted work and reflect the interdisciplinary concepts he has used over the past twenty years. Olaf Nicolai (* 1962) lives and works in Berlin. After studying German language and literature at the University of Leipzig, he has been a visual artist since 1990. In addition to participating in solo and group exhibitions, he has shown at documenta X (1997) and documenta 14 (2017), at the 49th and 51st Venice Biennale (2001 and 2005). For his work In The Woods There Is A Bird… commissioned by documenta 14 Olaf Nicolai was awarded the Karl-Sczuka-Prize 2017 for works of radio art.  
Double Lives
Double Lives
Vienna - Museumsplatz 1
until 11-11-2018

Double Lives. Visual Artists Making Music Alva Noto (Carsten Nicolai); Laurie Anderson; Christian Ludwig Attersee; Beauties of the Night (Christian Egger, Manuel Gorkiewicz, Markus Krottendorfer, Alexander Wolff); John Cage; Captain Beefheart & His Magic Band (Alex St. Clair Snouffer, Jeff Cotton, Jerry Handley, John French); Charlemagne Palestine; Chicken (Hari Ganglberger, Nicholas Hoffman, Katrin Plav?ak); Tony Conrad; Martin Creed & Band; DA EAT (Stefan Branca, Mattias Vatter, Phillip Zaiser, Thomas Zipp), Hanne Darboven; Destroy all Monsters (Mike Kelley, Cary Loren, Jim Shaw, Niagara); Die Tödliche Doris (Tabea Blumenschein, Käthe Kruse, Wolfgang Müller, Nikolaus Utermöhlen); Essachai Vow (Christian Kosmas Mayer, Alexander Wolff); Marcel Duchamp; GRAF+ZYX; Hotel Morphila Orchester (Paul Braunsteiner, Loys Egg, Franz Machek, Wolfgang Stelzer, Peter Weibel); Yves Klein; Jutta Koether; Laibach (Milan Fras, Dejan Knez, Daniel Landin, Ivan Novak); Les Reines Prochaines (Teresa Alonso, Fränzi Madörin, Muda Mathis, Pipilotti Rist, Regina Florida Schmid); Christian Marclay; Molto Brutto (Gunther Damisch, Josef Danner, Blihal, Andreas Kunzmann, Gerwald Rockenschaub); Monoton; Phill Niblock; Hermann Nitsch; Markus Oehlen; Yoko Ono; O.T. (Lothar Fiedler, Helge Leiberg, A. R. Penck, Christoph Winckel); Nam June Paik; Pas Paravant (Felix Dorner, Karl Kowanz, Renate Kowanz-Kocer, Wolfgang Poor, Günther Schrom, ManfreDu Schu, Wolfgang Stengel, Hans Weigand); Stephen Prina; Gerhard Rühm; Luigi Russolo; Selten gehörte Musik (Günter Brus, Hermann Nitsch, Dieter Roth, Gerhard Rühm, Oswald Wiener); Suicide (Alan Vega, Martin Rev); Emily Sundblad mit Pete Drungle und Ensemble, The Alma Band (Herbert Brandl, Josef Danner, Martin Kippenberger, Albert Oehlen, Markus Oehlen); The Pop Rivets (Brand Buds, Wild Billy Childish, Big Russ, Little Russ), The Red Krayola with Art & Language (Kathryn Bigelow, Ian Burn, Jesse Chamberlain, Christine Kozlov, Nigel Lendon, Mel Ramsden, Paula Ramsden, Terry Smith, Mayo Thompson); The Wired Salutation (Andrea Belfi, Angela Bulloch, David Grubbs, Stefano Pilia); Throbbing Gristle (Chris Carter, Cosey Fanni Tutti, Peter Christopherson, Genesis P-Orridge), Wolfgang Tillmans, Trabant (Viðar Hákon Gíslason, Þorvaldur H. Gröndal, Ragnar Kjartansson, Gísli Galdur Thorgeirsson, Hlynur Aðils Vilmarsson), Wendy Gondeln (Albert Oehlen); Heimo Zobernig with Marcus Geiger, Martin Guttmann, Hans Weigand. It is quite remarkable how many fine artists also made music. This was much more than just an interest in another medium. Public musical performances and the production of recorded music involve different ways of working, different environments, and also the confrontation with a different audience. This is why art critic Jörg Heiser refers to a “contextual shift” between the fine arts and music when he writes about this phenomenon beginning in the 1960s. Alluding to the fact that some artists did not make their work in other fields transparent and open, his book is called Double Lives. It is certainly true that there are many different ways in which individuals can either combine these two fields in their lives and work—or keep them separate. In some cases, work in both fields was only known to insiders. Other artists, by contrast, made a deliberate use of the frame of the fine arts for their musical performances. There is a broad spectrum with many intermediate forms. Double Lives will focus on fine artists who wrote or produced music, who performed it in public, or who were members of artists’ bands. This raises the question as to the difference between pure musicians and artists and those working in both fields. The exhibition will also address the role of music by fine artists within the history of 20th and 21st century music. Double Lives will present “only” music, which will be linked with visual material, with videos and photographs of concert and studio performances. The exhibition will thus respect the significance of the artists’ choices of performance situations. As early as 1913, the year of his first ready-made, Marcel Duchamp used principles of chance as a compositional method in his Momentum Musicale, while in the same year futurist Luigi Russolo designed his first noise instruments (Intonarumori). Already in classical modernism, fine artists were developing questions and methods that were to define not only the fine arts but also the musical avantgarde. After World War II, the phenomenon of fine artists making music became more and more significant. Key impulses came from John Cage, a pioneering composer and musician in so many ways, who was always in close contact with fine artists and also himself created a number of visual artworks. In the second half of the 1950s, he taught at the New School for Social Research in New York, where key members of the later Fluxus movement were among his audience. In addition to Fluxus artists, in the 1960s and 1970s, more and more fine artists also came forward as musicians. Their approaches, questions, and methods often resembled those of the fine arts, as in the case of the Americans La Monte Young, Charlemagne Palestine, and Tony Conrad, whose positions were close to minimal art. The same is true of the musical work of European artists, which remained closer to the Western musical traditions than the music of their American colleagues. Important representatives of the double life between the fine arts and music are also to be found among the protagonists in the shift from rock and pop to punk and new wave music. With the success of these new musical movements, and simultaneous with a booming return to painting after the years of conceptual and performance art, the late 1970s and the following years saw a high point in the phenomenon of bands consisting partly or entirely of fine artists. It was not least the art schools that became key focuses for the development of a more or less professional (or often also deliberately amateurish) collective form of musical performance. From the 1990s, the music of fine artists entered into a period of stylistic pluralism, corresponding to developments in the visual arts. Curated by Eva Badura-Triska and Edek Bartz  

Double Lives. Visual Artists Making Music Alva Noto (Carsten Nicolai); Laurie Anderson; Christian Ludwig Attersee; Beauties of the Night (Christian Egger, Manuel Gorkiewicz, Markus Krottendorfer, Alexander Wolff); John Cage; Captain Beefheart & His Magic Band (Alex St. Clair Snouffer, Jeff Cotton, Jerry Handley, John French); Charlemagne Palestine; Chicken (Hari Ganglberger, Nicholas Hoffman, Katrin Plav?ak); Tony Conrad; Martin Creed & Band; DA EAT (Stefan Branca, Mattias Vatter, Phillip Zaiser, Thomas Zipp), Hanne Darboven; Destroy all Monsters (Mike Kelley, Cary Loren, Jim Shaw, Niagara); Die Tödliche Doris (Tabea Blumenschein, Käthe Kruse, Wolfgang Müller, Nikolaus Utermöhlen); Essachai Vow (Christian Kosmas Mayer, Alexander Wolff); Marcel Duchamp; GRAF+ZYX; Hotel Morphila Orchester (Paul Braunsteiner, Loys Egg, Franz Machek, Wolfgang Stelzer, Peter Weibel); Yves Klein; Jutta Koether; Laibach (Milan Fras, Dejan Knez, Daniel Landin, Ivan Novak); Les Reines Prochaines (Teresa Alonso, Fränzi Madörin, Muda Mathis, Pipilotti Rist, Regina Florida Schmid); Christian Marclay; Molto Brutto (Gunther Damisch, Josef Danner, Blihal, Andreas Kunzmann, Gerwald Rockenschaub); Monoton; Phill Niblock; Hermann Nitsch; Markus Oehlen; Yoko Ono; O.T. (Lothar Fiedler, Helge Leiberg, A. R. Penck, Christoph Winckel); Nam June Paik; Pas Paravant (Felix Dorner, Karl Kowanz, Renate Kowanz-Kocer, Wolfgang Poor, Günther Schrom, ManfreDu Schu, Wolfgang Stengel, Hans Weigand); Stephen Prina; Gerhard Rühm; Luigi Russolo; Selten gehörte Musik (Günter Brus, Hermann Nitsch, Dieter Roth, Gerhard Rühm, Oswald Wiener); Suicide (Alan Vega, Martin Rev); Emily Sundblad mit Pete Drungle und Ensemble, The Alma Band (Herbert Brandl, Josef Danner, Martin Kippenberger, Albert Oehlen, Markus Oehlen); The Pop Rivets (Brand Buds, Wild Billy Childish, Big Russ, Little Russ), The Red Krayola with Art & Language (Kathryn Bigelow, Ian Burn, Jesse Chamberlain, Christine Kozlov, Nigel Lendon, Mel Ramsden, Paula Ramsden, Terry Smith, Mayo Thompson); The Wired Salutation (Andrea Belfi, Angela Bulloch, David Grubbs, Stefano Pilia); Throbbing Gristle (Chris Carter, Cosey Fanni Tutti, Peter Christopherson, Genesis P-Orridge), Wolfgang Tillmans, Trabant (Viðar Hákon Gíslason, Þorvaldur H. Gröndal, Ragnar Kjartansson, Gísli Galdur Thorgeirsson, Hlynur Aðils Vilmarsson), Wendy Gondeln (Albert Oehlen); Heimo Zobernig with Marcus Geiger, Martin Guttmann, Hans Weigand. It is quite remarkable how many fine artists also made music. This was much more than just an interest in another medium. Public musical performances and the production of recorded music involve different ways of working, different environments, and also the confrontation with a different audience. This is why art critic Jörg Heiser refers to a “contextual shift” between the fine arts and music when he writes about this phenomenon beginning in the 1960s. Alluding to the fact that some artists did not make their work in other fields transparent and open, his book is called Double Lives. It is certainly true that there are many different ways in which individuals can either combine these two fields in their lives and work—or keep them separate. In some cases, work in both fields was only known to insiders. Other artists, by contrast, made a deliberate use of the frame of the fine arts for their musical performances. There is a broad spectrum with many intermediate forms. Double Lives will focus on fine artists who wrote or produced music, who performed it in public, or who were members of artists’ bands. This raises the question as to the difference between pure musicians and artists and those working in both fields. The exhibition will also address the role of music by fine artists within the history of 20th and 21st century music. Double Lives will present “only” music, which will be linked with visual material, with videos and photographs of concert and studio performances. The exhibition will thus respect the significance of the artists’ choices of performance situations. As early as 1913, the year of his first ready-made, Marcel Duchamp used principles of chance as a compositional method in his Momentum Musicale, while in the same year futurist Luigi Russolo designed his first noise instruments (Intonarumori). Already in classical modernism, fine artists were developing questions and methods that were to define not only the fine arts but also the musical avantgarde. After World War II, the phenomenon of fine artists making music became more and more significant. Key impulses came from John Cage, a pioneering composer and musician in so many ways, who was always in close contact with fine artists and also himself created a number of visual artworks. In the second half of the 1950s, he taught at the New School for Social Research in New York, where key members of the later Fluxus movement were among his audience. In addition to Fluxus artists, in the 1960s and 1970s, more and more fine artists also came forward as musicians. Their approaches, questions, and methods often resembled those of the fine arts, as in the case of the Americans La Monte Young, Charlemagne Palestine, and Tony Conrad, whose positions were close to minimal art. The same is true of the musical work of European artists, which remained closer to the Western musical traditions than the music of their American colleagues. Important representatives of the double life between the fine arts and music are also to be found among the protagonists in the shift from rock and pop to punk and new wave music. With the success of these new musical movements, and simultaneous with a booming return to painting after the years of conceptual and performance art, the late 1970s and the following years saw a high point in the phenomenon of bands consisting partly or entirely of fine artists. It was not least the art schools that became key focuses for the development of a more or less professional (or often also deliberately amateurish) collective form of musical performance. From the 1990s, the music of fine artists entered into a period of stylistic pluralism, corresponding to developments in the visual arts. Curated by Eva Badura-Triska and Edek Bartz  
Alexander Kluge
Alexander Kluge
Vienna - Arsenalstrasse 1
until 30-09-2018

Alexander Kluge – Pluriverse. The Poetic Power of Theory Alexander Kluge (born 1932) has long been known as an engaged poet, polyphonic chronologist, and seismographer of the present. Using images, texts, and objects, the author and filmmaker creates ever new constellations, the meanings of which are mainly derived from the nature of their arrangement. Kluge has won a number of awards for his interdisciplinary works. In 2017, he was awarded the Jean-Paul Prize for his lifetime literary achievements.

Alexander Kluge – Pluriverse. The Poetic Power of Theory Alexander Kluge (born 1932) has long been known as an engaged poet, polyphonic chronologist, and seismographer of the present. Using images, texts, and objects, the author and filmmaker creates ever new constellations, the meanings of which are mainly derived from the nature of their arrangement. Kluge has won a number of awards for his interdisciplinary works. In 2017, he was awarded the Jean-Paul Prize for his lifetime literary achievements.
Class Reunion
Class Reunion
Vienna - Museumsplatz 1
until 11-11-2018

?Class Reunion. Works from the Gaby and Wilhelm Schürmann Collection Nairy Baghramian, Silvia Bächli, Monika Baer, John Baldessari/Meg Cranston, Francesco Barocco, Jennifer Bornstein, Nicola Brunnhuber, Ernst Caramelle, Kate Davis, Heinrich Dunst, Marina Faust, Morgan Fisher, Jef Geys, Ralph Gibson, Julian Göthe, Trixi Groiss, Gerhard Gronefeld, Julia Haller, Rachel Harrison, Lone Haugaard Madsen, Georg Herold, Nicolas Jasmin, Raimer Jochims, Mike Kelley, , Martin Kippenberger, Silke Otto Knapp, Alwin Lay, Brandon Lattu, Michael Light, Sonia Leimer, Anita Leisz, Jochen Lempert, Zoe Leonard, Chris Martin, Park McArthur, Paul McCarthy, Meuser, Lisette Model, Oswald Oberhuber, Albert Oehlen, Anna Oppermann, Anna Ostoya, Jens Preusse, Rebecca Quaytman, Susanne Paesler, Laurie Parsons, Stephen Prina, Deborah Remington, Lin May Saeed, Pentti Sammallahti, Stefan Sandner, Arlene Shechet, Sigune Siévi, Michael Simpson, Michael E. Smith, Lewis Stein, Jana Sterbark, Esther Stocker, Walter Swennen, Alice Tippit, Joëlle Tuerlinckx, Nora Turato, Anne-Mie Van Kerckhoven, Miriam Visaczki, Franz West, Tristan Wilczek, Christopher Williams, Heimo Zobernig Curated by Wilhelm Schürmann Gaby and Wilhelm Schürmann do not see their collection as just private property or a prestige object, but rather as an item of cultural value that needs exchange with the public. Their collection has been constantly growing since the late 1970s, and it provides an incomparable view of the development of contemporary art from the 1980s onward. This is a progressive statement on behalf of contemporary art that is anchored in social issues and sees itself as a form of communication. The rationale behind the collection, which is held in Herzogenrath near Aachen and in Berlin, is both creative and productive, and the two collectors’ practice can be described as a particularly free-spirited form of cultural production. The act of collecting is realized less in the processes of keeping and completing artworks and is instead understood mainly as an invitation to participate in the public production of connections. This very pragmatic and hands-on approach is manifested in sensual and unconventional gestures of presenting, including the principle of “comparative seeing.” In this sense, the Class Reunion exhibition, the title of which refers to a 2008 installation of the same name by Berlin artist Nairy Baghramian, will unravel an exciting, humorous, and surprising dialogue between the diverse artistic positions in the collection, establishing unexpected points of contact. One focus in this is on Viennese influences on this international collection and its networks.  

?Class Reunion. Works from the Gaby and Wilhelm Schürmann Collection Nairy Baghramian, Silvia Bächli, Monika Baer, John Baldessari/Meg Cranston, Francesco Barocco, Jennifer Bornstein, Nicola Brunnhuber, Ernst Caramelle, Kate Davis, Heinrich Dunst, Marina Faust, Morgan Fisher, Jef Geys, Ralph Gibson, Julian Göthe, Trixi Groiss, Gerhard Gronefeld, Julia Haller, Rachel Harrison, Lone Haugaard Madsen, Georg Herold, Nicolas Jasmin, Raimer Jochims, Mike Kelley, , Martin Kippenberger, Silke Otto Knapp, Alwin Lay, Brandon Lattu, Michael Light, Sonia Leimer, Anita Leisz, Jochen Lempert, Zoe Leonard, Chris Martin, Park McArthur, Paul McCarthy, Meuser, Lisette Model, Oswald Oberhuber, Albert Oehlen, Anna Oppermann, Anna Ostoya, Jens Preusse, Rebecca Quaytman, Susanne Paesler, Laurie Parsons, Stephen Prina, Deborah Remington, Lin May Saeed, Pentti Sammallahti, Stefan Sandner, Arlene Shechet, Sigune Siévi, Michael Simpson, Michael E. Smith, Lewis Stein, Jana Sterbark, Esther Stocker, Walter Swennen, Alice Tippit, Joëlle Tuerlinckx, Nora Turato, Anne-Mie Van Kerckhoven, Miriam Visaczki, Franz West, Tristan Wilczek, Christopher Williams, Heimo Zobernig Curated by Wilhelm Schürmann Gaby and Wilhelm Schürmann do not see their collection as just private property or a prestige object, but rather as an item of cultural value that needs exchange with the public. Their collection has been constantly growing since the late 1970s, and it provides an incomparable view of the development of contemporary art from the 1980s onward. This is a progressive statement on behalf of contemporary art that is anchored in social issues and sees itself as a form of communication. The rationale behind the collection, which is held in Herzogenrath near Aachen and in Berlin, is both creative and productive, and the two collectors’ practice can be described as a particularly free-spirited form of cultural production. The act of collecting is realized less in the processes of keeping and completing artworks and is instead understood mainly as an invitation to participate in the public production of connections. This very pragmatic and hands-on approach is manifested in sensual and unconventional gestures of presenting, including the principle of “comparative seeing.” In this sense, the Class Reunion exhibition, the title of which refers to a 2008 installation of the same name by Berlin artist Nairy Baghramian, will unravel an exciting, humorous, and surprising dialogue between the diverse artistic positions in the collection, establishing unexpected points of contact. One focus in this is on Viennese influences on this international collection and its networks.  
Markus Oehlen
Markus Oehlen
Zürich - Weststrasse 75
until 13-10-2018

Markus Oehlen – They Show Horses, Don't They?  

Markus Oehlen – They Show Horses, Don't They?  
Cornelia Baltes
Cornelia Baltes
Zürich - Limmatstrasse 214
until 06-10-2018

Cornelia Baltes – Mingle Mime You are being watched.  Keep your cool. It is natural to feel uncomfortable when noticing eyes are following you.  I suggest you walk slowly towards one corner of the room and keep your eyes directed to the ground.  You do not want to attract too much attention. When in a comfortable position, lift up your head and carefully look at what fills the room, see what you are surrounded by and register familiar faces.  You may feel compelled to get involved or you may prefer to slip into the role of an observer.  Whichever position you choose, find your moment, define your territory and stay confident.  Move from one person to another – mingle and mime! ‘Mingle Mime’ is the first solo show in Switzerland by Berlin-based artist Cornelia Baltes.  The title’s frisky alliteration may at first sound slightly clunky to native English speakers: hum the words, hear the hook.  The verb “mingling” is used to describe the active engagement with others in social situations. Here, placed within a specific context and merged with the word ‘mime’, it automatically alludes to the culture of social get-togethers at art events. A theatre in the round. Hung in the space is a suite of eight new paintings.  They do not immediately reveal their faces upon entry.  Perched in areas of the gallery, they are showing their backs, emphasising the three-dimensionality of each work.  Navigating through the space, we find abstracted, multi-layered and immaculate surfaces. Paint is applied with precision and with the most economical of gestures.  We grow a desire to read the elusive forms. We start to detect gazes. Viewed from the distance, the black marks on the canvases form into recognisable contours. Everything seems carefully arranged, but there is a constant play of hiding, disguising and revealing. In this exhibition, Baltes explores the subject matter of head portraits and questions how we assign meaning to surfaces on a daily basis.  Humans analyse facial expressions within 100 milliseconds. To better identify and remember people, the brain is trained to filter out main characteristic features.  Baltes makes use of this deduction process on her canvases. Her visual signs are based on the everyday. Baltes relies on her memory to render these forms by extracting the essence of the image with the use of highly graphic, choreographed marks.  Each brushstroke is meticulously planned before being committed to canvas. A striking aesthetic remains: Monochrome marks and bold motifs fight for the viewer’s attention, disrupted only by flawlessly gradating shades and occasional, colourful scribbles on the surface. In line with the playful nature of Baltes practice, the exhibition also displays an architectural awareness as paint spills out like a physical score over the surfaces and on the surrounding walls, dominating the space.  It evokes Baltes’s previous distinct installations, which introduced the notion of a ‘Gesamtkunstwerk’. Her works have often been suspended from the ceiling or installed on wheels on the floor of the exhibition space, in order to be arranged by the audience. Individual paintings have been transformed into eery sculptures, with legs attached to them.  Baltes artistic practice is ambiguous as works can take on different personas, whilst the audience is given the freedom to interact and perform within her compositions. Carefully selected titles help characterise the elements within her work. It encourages the audience to instantly connect with what is being depicted.  Here, Baltes has casted the works in the exhibition as actors by transforming their surrounding environment into a stage that the audience is invited to share with the works.  Inherently, the exhibition becomes a gentle invitation to socialise. ‘Mingle Mime’ reflects the artist continued fascination with abstraction and representation.  The works constantly shift between recognition and obscurity, the absurd and incongruous. The process by which images are evoked plays a pivotal role.  Each of Baltes paintings offers a visual conundrum inviting the viewer to decipher through the combination of intuition and observation. — Katharina Worf

Cornelia Baltes – Mingle Mime You are being watched.  Keep your cool. It is natural to feel uncomfortable when noticing eyes are following you.  I suggest you walk slowly towards one corner of the room and keep your eyes directed to the ground.  You do not want to attract too much attention. When in a comfortable position, lift up your head and carefully look at what fills the room, see what you are surrounded by and register familiar faces.  You may feel compelled to get involved or you may prefer to slip into the role of an observer.  Whichever position you choose, find your moment, define your territory and stay confident.  Move from one person to another – mingle and mime! ‘Mingle Mime’ is the first solo show in Switzerland by Berlin-based artist Cornelia Baltes.  The title’s frisky alliteration may at first sound slightly clunky to native English speakers: hum the words, hear the hook.  The verb “mingling” is used to describe the active engagement with others in social situations. Here, placed within a specific context and merged with the word ‘mime’, it automatically alludes to the culture of social get-togethers at art events. A theatre in the round. Hung in the space is a suite of eight new paintings.  They do not immediately reveal their faces upon entry.  Perched in areas of the gallery, they are showing their backs, emphasising the three-dimensionality of each work.  Navigating through the space, we find abstracted, multi-layered and immaculate surfaces. Paint is applied with precision and with the most economical of gestures.  We grow a desire to read the elusive forms. We start to detect gazes. Viewed from the distance, the black marks on the canvases form into recognisable contours. Everything seems carefully arranged, but there is a constant play of hiding, disguising and revealing. In this exhibition, Baltes explores the subject matter of head portraits and questions how we assign meaning to surfaces on a daily basis.  Humans analyse facial expressions within 100 milliseconds. To better identify and remember people, the brain is trained to filter out main characteristic features.  Baltes makes use of this deduction process on her canvases. Her visual signs are based on the everyday. Baltes relies on her memory to render these forms by extracting the essence of the image with the use of highly graphic, choreographed marks.  Each brushstroke is meticulously planned before being committed to canvas. A striking aesthetic remains: Monochrome marks and bold motifs fight for the viewer’s attention, disrupted only by flawlessly gradating shades and occasional, colourful scribbles on the surface. In line with the playful nature of Baltes practice, the exhibition also displays an architectural awareness as paint spills out like a physical score over the surfaces and on the surrounding walls, dominating the space.  It evokes Baltes’s previous distinct installations, which introduced the notion of a ‘Gesamtkunstwerk’. Her works have often been suspended from the ceiling or installed on wheels on the floor of the exhibition space, in order to be arranged by the audience. Individual paintings have been transformed into eery sculptures, with legs attached to them.  Baltes artistic practice is ambiguous as works can take on different personas, whilst the audience is given the freedom to interact and perform within her compositions. Carefully selected titles help characterise the elements within her work. It encourages the audience to instantly connect with what is being depicted.  Here, Baltes has casted the works in the exhibition as actors by transforming their surrounding environment into a stage that the audience is invited to share with the works.  Inherently, the exhibition becomes a gentle invitation to socialise. ‘Mingle Mime’ reflects the artist continued fascination with abstraction and representation.  The works constantly shift between recognition and obscurity, the absurd and incongruous. The process by which images are evoked plays a pivotal role.  Each of Baltes paintings offers a visual conundrum inviting the viewer to decipher through the combination of intuition and observation. — Katharina Worf
Thomas Bayrle
Thomas Bayrle
Zürich - Löwenbräu Areal, Limmatstrasse 268
until 13-10-2018

Thomas Bayrle – Film, Video, Materialien 1989-1999

Thomas Bayrle – Film, Video, Materialien 1989-1999
Mathieu Mercier
Mathieu Mercier
Zürich - Limmatstrasse 291
until 13-10-2018

Mathieu Mercier – DiagraMM

Mathieu Mercier – DiagraMM
Shana Moulton
Shana Moulton
Zürich - Löwenbräu Areal, Limmatstrasse 268
until 06-10-2018

Shana Moulton – Whispering Pines Shana Moulton is a performance and video artist based in California. At the core of this exhibition is a major video work titled ‘Whispering Pines 10’ which is a development from a performance project with an original musical score and libretto written by composer and collaborator Nick Hallett and performed by Daisy Press, Katie Eastburn as well as Nick Hallett himself. The work was originally performed live at The Kitchen, New York in 2010 and has since been shown at The New Museum, SFMOMA, The Andy Warhol Museum and Cricoteka in Kraków. Three episodes were recently shown at Canada Gallery in New York and featured on the New Museum website as a part of “First Look,” a joint venture of Rhizome and the New Museum. This exhibition at Galerie Gregor Staiger will show the video in its entirety for the first time within an installation featuring a number of additional projections as well as a new series of works on small screens relating to the project.

Shana Moulton – Whispering Pines Shana Moulton is a performance and video artist based in California. At the core of this exhibition is a major video work titled ‘Whispering Pines 10’ which is a development from a performance project with an original musical score and libretto written by composer and collaborator Nick Hallett and performed by Daisy Press, Katie Eastburn as well as Nick Hallett himself. The work was originally performed live at The Kitchen, New York in 2010 and has since been shown at The New Museum, SFMOMA, The Andy Warhol Museum and Cricoteka in Kraków. Three episodes were recently shown at Canada Gallery in New York and featured on the New Museum website as a part of “First Look,” a joint venture of Rhizome and the New Museum. This exhibition at Galerie Gregor Staiger will show the video in its entirety for the first time within an installation featuring a number of additional projections as well as a new series of works on small screens relating to the project.
Karen Rifas
Karen Rifas
Miami - 2100 Collins Avenue
until 21-10-2018

Karen Rifas – Deceptive Constructions For more than thirty years, Miami-based artist Karen Rifas has amassed a body of work that endeavors to understand and re-imagine space. Well known for her minimal cord and leaf installations, and precise, methodical line drawings, in 2016, Rifas began a focused exploration into the constructive possibilities of color. Employing densely hued shapes and irregular lines, Rifas creates spaces that oscillate between the two- and three-dimensional. Deceptive Constructions surveys this recent body of work for the artist’s first solo museum exhibition in over 10 years. Through variegated floor and sculptural installations, works on paper, and wood panel, Rifas uses a concise language of richly contrasted color to alter our perception of space. Karen Rifas (Chicago, b. 1942) lives and works in Miami and is a professor at New World School of the Arts. Recent solo exhibitions have been held at: Emerson Dorsch (2017), Meeting House Gallery (2016), De La Cruz Collection (2010), Pinnacle Gallery, Savannah College of Art and Design (2007), Polk Museum of Art (2004), and Museo De Arte Comtemporaneo, Panama City (1993). She has also exhibited in group shows and presented the following projects: Transphysics, Art and Culture Center, Hollywood (2017), 100+ Degrees in the Shade: A Survey of South Florida Art (2015), MIA-BER, Berlin Arts Club (2014), Following the Line, Girls’ Club (2012), I Triennial, Santo Domingo (2010), globe>miami<island, DC Museum of Contemporary Art (2002) and The Bass (2001). Rifas is represented in various permanent collections, including The Bass (Miami Beach), Fairchild Tropical Gardens (Miami), Metro-Dade Art in Public Places Trust (Miami), Museo de Arte de Ponce (Puerto Rico), Museum of Contemporary Art (North Miami), Perez Art Museum Miami, and Valencia Community College (Orlando).  

Karen Rifas – Deceptive Constructions For more than thirty years, Miami-based artist Karen Rifas has amassed a body of work that endeavors to understand and re-imagine space. Well known for her minimal cord and leaf installations, and precise, methodical line drawings, in 2016, Rifas began a focused exploration into the constructive possibilities of color. Employing densely hued shapes and irregular lines, Rifas creates spaces that oscillate between the two- and three-dimensional. Deceptive Constructions surveys this recent body of work for the artist’s first solo museum exhibition in over 10 years. Through variegated floor and sculptural installations, works on paper, and wood panel, Rifas uses a concise language of richly contrasted color to alter our perception of space. Karen Rifas (Chicago, b. 1942) lives and works in Miami and is a professor at New World School of the Arts. Recent solo exhibitions have been held at: Emerson Dorsch (2017), Meeting House Gallery (2016), De La Cruz Collection (2010), Pinnacle Gallery, Savannah College of Art and Design (2007), Polk Museum of Art (2004), and Museo De Arte Comtemporaneo, Panama City (1993). She has also exhibited in group shows and presented the following projects: Transphysics, Art and Culture Center, Hollywood (2017), 100+ Degrees in the Shade: A Survey of South Florida Art (2015), MIA-BER, Berlin Arts Club (2014), Following the Line, Girls’ Club (2012), I Triennial, Santo Domingo (2010), globe>miami<island, DC Museum of Contemporary Art (2002) and The Bass (2001). Rifas is represented in various permanent collections, including The Bass (Miami Beach), Fairchild Tropical Gardens (Miami), Metro-Dade Art in Public Places Trust (Miami), Museo de Arte de Ponce (Puerto Rico), Museum of Contemporary Art (North Miami), Perez Art Museum Miami, and Valencia Community College (Orlando).  
Charles Gaines
Charles Gaines
Miami - 61 NE 41st Street
until 04-11-2018

Charles Gaines Activating the staircase's vertical cantilevers, the site-specific installation by Charles Gaines will explore the artists's application of seriality on a massive scale. Gaine's practice places him within the legacy of conceptualism, evidenced by works such as his gridded, serial images of trees painted on Plexiglas.

Charles Gaines Activating the staircase's vertical cantilevers, the site-specific installation by Charles Gaines will explore the artists's application of seriality on a massive scale. Gaine's practice places him within the legacy of conceptualism, evidenced by works such as his gridded, serial images of trees painted on Plexiglas.
Force and Form
Force and Form
Miami - 23 NE 41st Street
until 01-11-2018

Force and Form Kathryn Andrews, Tauba Auerbach, Hernan Bas, Walead Beshty, Mark Bradford, Joe Bradley, Dan Colen, Martin Creed, Aaron Curry, Salvador Dalí, Peter Doig, Isa Genzken, Félix González-Torres, Mark Grotjahn, Wade Guyton, Guyton/Walker, Rachel Harrison, Arturo Herrera, Jim Hodges, Evan Holloway, Thomas Houseago, Alex Israel, Rashid Johnson, Alex Katz, Martin Kippenberger, Michael Krebber, Wifredo Lam, Glenn Ligon, Michael Linares, Nate Lowman, Adam McEwen, Ana Mendieta, Albert Oehlen, Laura Owens, Jorge Pardo, Manfred Pernice, Sigmar Polke, Seth Price, Sterling Ruby, Analia Saban, Josh Smith, Reena Spaulings, Rudolf Stingel, Rufino Tamayo, Kelley Walker, Christopher Wool Force and Form, further explores shifts in contemporary visual culture, as revealed through the vision of collectors, Rosa and Carlos de la Cruz. “Our exhibitions are a collective effort that includes the voice of the artists. This exchange helps us build possibilities that extend beyond our understanding of current art practices, and allows for the inclusion of the artists’ vision.” – Rosa de la Cruz In response to the acceleration of communication and global technological advancements, new modes of production are reshaping the way in which artists employ inventive mark making, digital language, and the use of non-traditional and commercial fabrication. In this context, media is freely deconstructed, pushing the boundaries of high-art and presenting new possibilities.  Force and Form brings together pivotal works from artists in the collection whose practices respond to issues of identity, gender, class, power, and the values that contribute to our social fabric. Challenging traditional practices of sculpture, installation, and painting, familiar materials and found imagery address the innate conflicts of the mechanical gesture and human intention found within commodities and popular culture.  

Force and Form Kathryn Andrews, Tauba Auerbach, Hernan Bas, Walead Beshty, Mark Bradford, Joe Bradley, Dan Colen, Martin Creed, Aaron Curry, Salvador Dalí, Peter Doig, Isa Genzken, Félix González-Torres, Mark Grotjahn, Wade Guyton, Guyton/Walker, Rachel Harrison, Arturo Herrera, Jim Hodges, Evan Holloway, Thomas Houseago, Alex Israel, Rashid Johnson, Alex Katz, Martin Kippenberger, Michael Krebber, Wifredo Lam, Glenn Ligon, Michael Linares, Nate Lowman, Adam McEwen, Ana Mendieta, Albert Oehlen, Laura Owens, Jorge Pardo, Manfred Pernice, Sigmar Polke, Seth Price, Sterling Ruby, Analia Saban, Josh Smith, Reena Spaulings, Rudolf Stingel, Rufino Tamayo, Kelley Walker, Christopher Wool Force and Form, further explores shifts in contemporary visual culture, as revealed through the vision of collectors, Rosa and Carlos de la Cruz. “Our exhibitions are a collective effort that includes the voice of the artists. This exchange helps us build possibilities that extend beyond our understanding of current art practices, and allows for the inclusion of the artists’ vision.” – Rosa de la Cruz In response to the acceleration of communication and global technological advancements, new modes of production are reshaping the way in which artists employ inventive mark making, digital language, and the use of non-traditional and commercial fabrication. In this context, media is freely deconstructed, pushing the boundaries of high-art and presenting new possibilities.  Force and Form brings together pivotal works from artists in the collection whose practices respond to issues of identity, gender, class, power, and the values that contribute to our social fabric. Challenging traditional practices of sculpture, installation, and painting, familiar materials and found imagery address the innate conflicts of the mechanical gesture and human intention found within commodities and popular culture.  
Terry Adkins
Terry Adkins
Miami - 61 NE 41st Street
until 23-09-2018

Terry Adkins – Less Than One One of the great conceptual artists of the 21st century, Terry Adkins was renowned for his pioneering work across mediums—including sculpture, performance video, and photography—which were often inspired by or refer to significant black cultural figures who have been under-represented throughout history. For “Infinity is Always Less Than One,” ICA Miami presents a major thematic survey highlighting Adkins’s crucial contributions to the medium of sculpture and cultural protest, featuring major installations that have not been viewed in decades. The exhibition explores significant periods and influences in the artist’s career, beginning with his transitional ready-mades through to his exploring his major installations. Known for his deep engagement with the collective rituals of musical performance and “abstract portraits” of African-American luminaries who have often been relegated to the historical margins and erasure, Terry Adkins (b. 1953, Washington, D.C.; d. 2014, Brooklyn, New York) was a New York-based artist and musician. His works span a number media, including sculpture, drawing, site-specific installation, photography, video, and performance. His often elegiac and always resonant objects, which are the focus of this exhibition, challenge dominant historical narratives, and set us to think of ways of being and moving in the world that rely on deep and long views of displacement and the sociability and community that happen despite it. These objects, deftly assembled, remind us, too, of the immaterial legacies that are passed on through ritual and sound. Adkins passed away in 2014, at the peak of his powers. This is the first exhibition to consider the entirety of his sculptural production and its place in a global historical context.Adkins has been honored with exhibitions in numerous museums, including the Whitney Museum of American Art at Philip Morris, New York; the Tang Museum at Skidmore College, in Saratoga Springs, NY; Projekt Binz 39, Zurich; Sculpture Center, New York; Indianapolis Museum of Art; and The Institute of Contemporary Art, Philadelphia. His work has been included in group exhibitions at P.S. 1 Contemporary Art Center, Long Island City; Contemporary Art Museum, Houston; Brooklyn Museum of Art; De Young Museum, San Francisco; New Museum of Contemporary Art, New York; and Museum of African Art, New York, among others. Adkins was a long-time Professor of Fine Arts at the University of Pennsylvania.  

Terry Adkins – Less Than One One of the great conceptual artists of the 21st century, Terry Adkins was renowned for his pioneering work across mediums—including sculpture, performance video, and photography—which were often inspired by or refer to significant black cultural figures who have been under-represented throughout history. For “Infinity is Always Less Than One,” ICA Miami presents a major thematic survey highlighting Adkins’s crucial contributions to the medium of sculpture and cultural protest, featuring major installations that have not been viewed in decades. The exhibition explores significant periods and influences in the artist’s career, beginning with his transitional ready-mades through to his exploring his major installations. Known for his deep engagement with the collective rituals of musical performance and “abstract portraits” of African-American luminaries who have often been relegated to the historical margins and erasure, Terry Adkins (b. 1953, Washington, D.C.; d. 2014, Brooklyn, New York) was a New York-based artist and musician. His works span a number media, including sculpture, drawing, site-specific installation, photography, video, and performance. His often elegiac and always resonant objects, which are the focus of this exhibition, challenge dominant historical narratives, and set us to think of ways of being and moving in the world that rely on deep and long views of displacement and the sociability and community that happen despite it. These objects, deftly assembled, remind us, too, of the immaterial legacies that are passed on through ritual and sound. Adkins passed away in 2014, at the peak of his powers. This is the first exhibition to consider the entirety of his sculptural production and its place in a global historical context.Adkins has been honored with exhibitions in numerous museums, including the Whitney Museum of American Art at Philip Morris, New York; the Tang Museum at Skidmore College, in Saratoga Springs, NY; Projekt Binz 39, Zurich; Sculpture Center, New York; Indianapolis Museum of Art; and The Institute of Contemporary Art, Philadelphia. His work has been included in group exhibitions at P.S. 1 Contemporary Art Center, Long Island City; Contemporary Art Museum, Houston; Brooklyn Museum of Art; De Young Museum, San Francisco; New Museum of Contemporary Art, New York; and Museum of African Art, New York, among others. Adkins was a long-time Professor of Fine Arts at the University of Pennsylvania.  
Simon Fujiwara
Simon Fujiwara
Berlin - Potsdamer Strasse 81E
until 30-09-2018

Simon Fujiwara – Empathy I Esther Schipper is pleased to announce Simon Fujiwara’s first solo exhibition with the gallery. The artist, who joined the gallery in January 2018, will present a new large-scale installation, which will feature an immersive simulator experience.    Empathy I was inspired by the artists’ experiences of several sites of popular leisure, from mass historical tourist attractions such as Neuschwanstein Castle to theme parks such as Disneyland Paris. Closely collaborating with a company that produces theme park rides, Fujiwara began to develop his own immersive simulator experience that, rather than dealing with fantasy or historical experiences, brings the viewers into the ‘real world’ by simulating found footage and first person perspective camerawork. Fujiwara’s simulator ride not only physically mimics the gestures of the various people’s experiences in the film, but also suggests a physical connection between the images on the screen and the audience’s own bodies through the synchronization of the motion platform seating.   Fujiwara's point of departure for this work was his interest in the accelerated dynamics of today's production and consumption of images and the increasing fetishization of the individual experience and in an age of mass social media. In Empathy I, Fujiwara radically shifts the focus from the image to the body, describing the work as a ‘sculptural experience’ rather than a film. Experienced in an intimate setting–the work can only be viewed by two visitors at a time–Empathy I translates and augments a range of the experiences of others–from the tragic, ecstatic to the banal–into one’s own physical experience. As such, the duration of the work is a function of the human body's biological constraints, and its content selected according to the brain’s ability to register meaning under such intense simulated physical conditions. In this sense the images evoke the primary bodily experience of danger, stillness and speed, sadness and pleasure.   In a socio-technological climate where the individual is increasingly prized over group or mass identification, Empathy I reflects on an increasingly simulated world which is at once thrillingly emotive and disturbingly efficient.   Over the past decade, Fujiwara (born 1982 in London, lives and works in Berlin) has become known for his staging of large, complex exhibitions that explore the deeply rooted mechanisms of identity construction for both individuals and societies. Addressing the inherent contradictions of image and narrative making – from social media and self-presentation to marketing and history formation – Fujiwara revels in the complexity and paradox of our simultaneous quest for fantasy and authenticity. Crossing multiple media, from sculpture and installation to video and painting and mining worlds as diverse as advertising and archaeology, Fujiwara's works are a constant reportage on the real-world sources from which they draw inspiration. However, rather than simply presenting commentary, the artist creates a unique universe of his own – one that is populated with challenging and often absurd new narratives that are as intellectually rigorous as they are emotionally stimulating.   The catalogue of Fujiwara's major solo presentation at the Kunsthaus Bregenz, Hope House, is forthcoming in August. The book features essays by Joshua Simon, Thomas D. Trummer and Norman Rosenthal and complete documentation of the exhibition which included a full-scale replica of the Anne Frank House Museum reconstructed within the Kunsthaus Bregenz that took its inspiration from a “build your own” model of the Anne Frank House Museum and a comprehensive overview of recent work.  

Simon Fujiwara – Empathy I Esther Schipper is pleased to announce Simon Fujiwara’s first solo exhibition with the gallery. The artist, who joined the gallery in January 2018, will present a new large-scale installation, which will feature an immersive simulator experience.    Empathy I was inspired by the artists’ experiences of several sites of popular leisure, from mass historical tourist attractions such as Neuschwanstein Castle to theme parks such as Disneyland Paris. Closely collaborating with a company that produces theme park rides, Fujiwara began to develop his own immersive simulator experience that, rather than dealing with fantasy or historical experiences, brings the viewers into the ‘real world’ by simulating found footage and first person perspective camerawork. Fujiwara’s simulator ride not only physically mimics the gestures of the various people’s experiences in the film, but also suggests a physical connection between the images on the screen and the audience’s own bodies through the synchronization of the motion platform seating.   Fujiwara's point of departure for this work was his interest in the accelerated dynamics of today's production and consumption of images and the increasing fetishization of the individual experience and in an age of mass social media. In Empathy I, Fujiwara radically shifts the focus from the image to the body, describing the work as a ‘sculptural experience’ rather than a film. Experienced in an intimate setting–the work can only be viewed by two visitors at a time–Empathy I translates and augments a range of the experiences of others–from the tragic, ecstatic to the banal–into one’s own physical experience. As such, the duration of the work is a function of the human body's biological constraints, and its content selected according to the brain’s ability to register meaning under such intense simulated physical conditions. In this sense the images evoke the primary bodily experience of danger, stillness and speed, sadness and pleasure.   In a socio-technological climate where the individual is increasingly prized over group or mass identification, Empathy I reflects on an increasingly simulated world which is at once thrillingly emotive and disturbingly efficient.   Over the past decade, Fujiwara (born 1982 in London, lives and works in Berlin) has become known for his staging of large, complex exhibitions that explore the deeply rooted mechanisms of identity construction for both individuals and societies. Addressing the inherent contradictions of image and narrative making – from social media and self-presentation to marketing and history formation – Fujiwara revels in the complexity and paradox of our simultaneous quest for fantasy and authenticity. Crossing multiple media, from sculpture and installation to video and painting and mining worlds as diverse as advertising and archaeology, Fujiwara's works are a constant reportage on the real-world sources from which they draw inspiration. However, rather than simply presenting commentary, the artist creates a unique universe of his own – one that is populated with challenging and often absurd new narratives that are as intellectually rigorous as they are emotionally stimulating.   The catalogue of Fujiwara's major solo presentation at the Kunsthaus Bregenz, Hope House, is forthcoming in August. The book features essays by Joshua Simon, Thomas D. Trummer and Norman Rosenthal and complete documentation of the exhibition which included a full-scale replica of the Anne Frank House Museum reconstructed within the Kunsthaus Bregenz that took its inspiration from a “build your own” model of the Anne Frank House Museum and a comprehensive overview of recent work.  
Katharina Koppenwallner
Katharina Koppenwallner
Berlin - Prinzenallee 78-79
until 07-10-2018

Katharina Koppenwallner – I offer this horse to you

Katharina Koppenwallner – I offer this horse to you
David Zink Yi
David Zink Yi
Berlin - Alexandrinenstrasse 118-121
until 23-09-2018

David Zink Yi – Being the Measure  

David Zink Yi – Being the Measure  
Arthur Jafa
Arthur Jafa
Berlin - Leipziger Str. 60, entrance: Jerusalemer Str.
until 25-11-2018

Arthur Jafa – A Series of Utterly Improbable, Yet Extraordinary Renditions “How do we imagine things that are lost? What kind of legacy can we imagine despite that lass and despite the absence of things that never were?” Arthur Jafa The JULIA STOSCHEK COLLECTION is excited to present the work of the acclaimed US filmmaker, cinematographer and artist Arthur Jafa (Born 1960 in Tupelo, Missisippi, USA) in his first exhibition in Germany, featuring Ming Smith, Frida Orupabo, and Missylanyus. The exhibition was developed in partnership with Serpentine Galleries, London and curated by Hans-Ulrich Obrist and Amira Gad.  Across three decades, Jafa has developed a dynamic, multidisciplinary practice ranging from films and installations to lecture-performances and happenings that tackle, challenge and question prevailing cultural assumptions about identity and race. Jafa's work is driven by a recurrent question: how might one identify and develop a specifically Black visual aesthetics equal to the 'power, beauty and alienation' of Black music in US culture? The title of the exhibition A SERIES OF UTTERLY IMPROBABLE, YET EXTRAORDINARY RENDITIONS,relates to the sense of absence that Jafa observes as haunting Black life. The word 'rendition' refers to the artist's interpretation of the aesthetics associated with Black being, which are historically-inscribed in images, objects and artefacts. By re-performing these narratives in the present, Jafa imagines and constructs new possibilities for making them visible. Jafa creates work that approximates the radical alienation of Black life in the West while seeking to make visible - or emancipate - the power embedded in modes of African expression. With reference points ranging from Fang sculpture to Mississippi juke joints, Duchamp's urinal to jazz, he is a filmmaker with a unique understanding of how to cut and juxtapose a sequence to draw out maximum visceral effect. Jafa has collaborated with directors ranging from Spike Lee (CROOKLYN, 1994) to John Akomfrah (SEVEN SONGS FOR MALCOLM X,1993) and artists including Kara Walker and Fred Moten. He has also been recognised for his work on the Solange Knowles videos, DON'T TOUCH MY HAIR and CRANES IN THE SKY (2016). Explaining his favourite medium, Jafa has said: "Film is one of the few things, particularly in the theatrical context, that takes up as much space as architecture but like music is fundamentally immaterial." A SERIES OF UTTERLY IMPROBABLE, YET EXTRAORDINARY RENDITIONS also includes the work of three additional voices: the photographer Ming Smith, @nemiepeba - the lnstagram feed of artist Frida 0rupabo - and content from the YouTube channel of Missylanyus. Together, these three 'platforms' or 'guests' are integral to Jafa's presentation in the Gallery, and acknowledge the influence of others within his own practice.  

Arthur Jafa – A Series of Utterly Improbable, Yet Extraordinary Renditions “How do we imagine things that are lost? What kind of legacy can we imagine despite that lass and despite the absence of things that never were?” Arthur Jafa The JULIA STOSCHEK COLLECTION is excited to present the work of the acclaimed US filmmaker, cinematographer and artist Arthur Jafa (Born 1960 in Tupelo, Missisippi, USA) in his first exhibition in Germany, featuring Ming Smith, Frida Orupabo, and Missylanyus. The exhibition was developed in partnership with Serpentine Galleries, London and curated by Hans-Ulrich Obrist and Amira Gad.  Across three decades, Jafa has developed a dynamic, multidisciplinary practice ranging from films and installations to lecture-performances and happenings that tackle, challenge and question prevailing cultural assumptions about identity and race. Jafa's work is driven by a recurrent question: how might one identify and develop a specifically Black visual aesthetics equal to the 'power, beauty and alienation' of Black music in US culture? The title of the exhibition A SERIES OF UTTERLY IMPROBABLE, YET EXTRAORDINARY RENDITIONS,relates to the sense of absence that Jafa observes as haunting Black life. The word 'rendition' refers to the artist's interpretation of the aesthetics associated with Black being, which are historically-inscribed in images, objects and artefacts. By re-performing these narratives in the present, Jafa imagines and constructs new possibilities for making them visible. Jafa creates work that approximates the radical alienation of Black life in the West while seeking to make visible - or emancipate - the power embedded in modes of African expression. With reference points ranging from Fang sculpture to Mississippi juke joints, Duchamp's urinal to jazz, he is a filmmaker with a unique understanding of how to cut and juxtapose a sequence to draw out maximum visceral effect. Jafa has collaborated with directors ranging from Spike Lee (CROOKLYN, 1994) to John Akomfrah (SEVEN SONGS FOR MALCOLM X,1993) and artists including Kara Walker and Fred Moten. He has also been recognised for his work on the Solange Knowles videos, DON'T TOUCH MY HAIR and CRANES IN THE SKY (2016). Explaining his favourite medium, Jafa has said: "Film is one of the few things, particularly in the theatrical context, that takes up as much space as architecture but like music is fundamentally immaterial." A SERIES OF UTTERLY IMPROBABLE, YET EXTRAORDINARY RENDITIONS also includes the work of three additional voices: the photographer Ming Smith, @nemiepeba - the lnstagram feed of artist Frida 0rupabo - and content from the YouTube channel of Missylanyus. Together, these three 'platforms' or 'guests' are integral to Jafa's presentation in the Gallery, and acknowledge the influence of others within his own practice.  
Sanya Kantarovsky
Sanya Kantarovsky
Basel - Steinenberg 7
until 11-11-2018

Sanya Kantarovsky – Disease of the Eyes The lush, moody paintings of Sanya Kantarovsky (*1982) combine wry humor and the silhouettes of contemporary characters with the acrid hues and stylistic inflections reminiscent of painter Paul Gauguin. Here, a selection of new and recent paintings set the scene for the premiere of the Russian-born artist’s new animation film, his largest cinematic venture to date.

Sanya Kantarovsky – Disease of the Eyes The lush, moody paintings of Sanya Kantarovsky (*1982) combine wry humor and the silhouettes of contemporary characters with the acrid hues and stylistic inflections reminiscent of painter Paul Gauguin. Here, a selection of new and recent paintings set the scene for the premiere of the Russian-born artist’s new animation film, his largest cinematic venture to date.
Sam Gilliam
Sam Gilliam
Basel - St. Alban-Graben 8
until 30-09-2018

Sam Gilliam – The Music of Colour Sam Gilliam (b. Tupelo, Mississippi, 1933) is one of America’s most prominent abstract painters. Works by the artist, who has lived and worked in Washington, D.C., since 1962, are held by numerous museums including the Art Institute of Chicago, the MoMA (New York), the National Gallery of Art, and the Whitney Museum of Art. The Music of Color is his first solo exhibition in Europe. The show puts the focus on the years between 1967 and 1973, the period of the greatest radicalism in Gilliam’s oeuvre. His Yves Klein Blue, which harks back to his experimental early work, was presented at the 57th Venice Biennale in 2017. In 1967, Gilliam began work on a series of what came to be known as beveled-edge paintings: he poured acrylic paint directly onto the unprimed canvas, which he folded and crumpled while the paint was still wet. He then stretched the canvas over a chamfered frame, lending the painting a spatial and object-like quality. Gilliam’s signature creative achievement is the drape paintings series, begun in 1968, for which he applied the same procedure as in the beveled-edge paintings but then released the canvas from the stretcher frame. Unlike easel paintings, which usually function independently of their context, the drape paintings evince a performative aspect and interact with their respective settings; they can be installed in a variety of ways depending on the spatial context. Gilliam strove to blur the widely accepted boundary between painting and sculpture even as prominent contemporaries such as Donald Judd sought to reaffirm it. The paintings he created between 1967 and 1973 stand out for their monumentality and forceful use of color. The canvas becomes a medium that records traces of the production process and exhibits its own physicality. At a time when painting seemed to be in decline, Gilliam breathed new life into it; jazz was an important source of inspiration for his expressive and energetic style. The Music of Color also probes the political and historical dimension of Gilliam’s oeuvre. While the artist himself rarely comments on political issues, the works in his Martin Luther King series and Jail Jungle reflect the 1968 race riots and the highly polarized debate over black art and abstract painting in 1960s and 1970s America. The Kunstmuseum Basel presents 45 outstanding works from public and private collections in Europe and the United States.  

Sam Gilliam – The Music of Colour Sam Gilliam (b. Tupelo, Mississippi, 1933) is one of America’s most prominent abstract painters. Works by the artist, who has lived and worked in Washington, D.C., since 1962, are held by numerous museums including the Art Institute of Chicago, the MoMA (New York), the National Gallery of Art, and the Whitney Museum of Art. The Music of Color is his first solo exhibition in Europe. The show puts the focus on the years between 1967 and 1973, the period of the greatest radicalism in Gilliam’s oeuvre. His Yves Klein Blue, which harks back to his experimental early work, was presented at the 57th Venice Biennale in 2017. In 1967, Gilliam began work on a series of what came to be known as beveled-edge paintings: he poured acrylic paint directly onto the unprimed canvas, which he folded and crumpled while the paint was still wet. He then stretched the canvas over a chamfered frame, lending the painting a spatial and object-like quality. Gilliam’s signature creative achievement is the drape paintings series, begun in 1968, for which he applied the same procedure as in the beveled-edge paintings but then released the canvas from the stretcher frame. Unlike easel paintings, which usually function independently of their context, the drape paintings evince a performative aspect and interact with their respective settings; they can be installed in a variety of ways depending on the spatial context. Gilliam strove to blur the widely accepted boundary between painting and sculpture even as prominent contemporaries such as Donald Judd sought to reaffirm it. The paintings he created between 1967 and 1973 stand out for their monumentality and forceful use of color. The canvas becomes a medium that records traces of the production process and exhibits its own physicality. At a time when painting seemed to be in decline, Gilliam breathed new life into it; jazz was an important source of inspiration for his expressive and energetic style. The Music of Color also probes the political and historical dimension of Gilliam’s oeuvre. While the artist himself rarely comments on political issues, the works in his Martin Luther King series and Jail Jungle reflect the 1968 race riots and the highly polarized debate over black art and abstract painting in 1960s and 1970s America. The Kunstmuseum Basel presents 45 outstanding works from public and private collections in Europe and the United States.  
Martha Rosler & Hito Steyerl
Martha Rosler & Hito Steyerl
Basel - St. Alban-Rheinweg 60
until 02-12-2018

Martha Rosler & Hito Steyerl – War Games The exhibition presents works by the artists Martha Rosler (Brooklyn, NY) and Hito Steyerl (Berlin) in a dialogue that brings intersections between their thematic interests and similarities in their uses of media into focus. It is the first exhibition at a Swiss museum for both artists and the first show anywhere in which their works appear side by side. Yet the two oeuvres have a great deal in common, growing out of an unusually tenacious commitment to critical engagement with social and political issues. Resonances between their works speak to the affinity between their stances and the concerns both share—concerns that are of global significance and suggest both artists’ probing critical attention to the political developments of our time. Reality, in their art, is always considered in its interplay with the audiovisual media that shape the fabric of today’s lifeworld and our identities, highlighting their disruptive impact on human lives. It is not surprising, then, that both Rosler and Steyerl have repeatedly turned to new media for their work. In addition to creating photography and collages, Rosler was an early pioneer of video art, which lets her broadcast feminist ideas and counter the myths peddled by television and magazines with alternative depictions of women and modern everyday life. Lately she has complemented photographs, photocollages, and action and project formats with a growing preoccupation with social media and drone technology. In part based on computer animations, Steyerl’s more recent video installations—whose aesthetic is strongly informed by the visuals disseminated through online platforms like YouTube—are among the most advanced work done by visual artists in this medium today. Both artists choose to involve themselves in contemporary controversies while also studying their historical backgrounds and the role played by media. Fascinating in their aesthetic construction, Rosler’s and Steyerl’s works are formulations of resistance to the normalization of democratic decline, the privatization of public spaces and domains of life and their subjection to economic pressures, violence and oppression at the hands of private actors as well as the authorities, the reduction of the human being to his value as a source of labor and consumer, and the militarization of spheres of social life. In light of the rising tide of illiberalism around the world, the exhibition thus also reaffirms the museum’s commitment to showing art that does not shy away from contention in asserting the need to foster democratic structures, civic values, and tolerance.  

Martha Rosler & Hito Steyerl – War Games The exhibition presents works by the artists Martha Rosler (Brooklyn, NY) and Hito Steyerl (Berlin) in a dialogue that brings intersections between their thematic interests and similarities in their uses of media into focus. It is the first exhibition at a Swiss museum for both artists and the first show anywhere in which their works appear side by side. Yet the two oeuvres have a great deal in common, growing out of an unusually tenacious commitment to critical engagement with social and political issues. Resonances between their works speak to the affinity between their stances and the concerns both share—concerns that are of global significance and suggest both artists’ probing critical attention to the political developments of our time. Reality, in their art, is always considered in its interplay with the audiovisual media that shape the fabric of today’s lifeworld and our identities, highlighting their disruptive impact on human lives. It is not surprising, then, that both Rosler and Steyerl have repeatedly turned to new media for their work. In addition to creating photography and collages, Rosler was an early pioneer of video art, which lets her broadcast feminist ideas and counter the myths peddled by television and magazines with alternative depictions of women and modern everyday life. Lately she has complemented photographs, photocollages, and action and project formats with a growing preoccupation with social media and drone technology. In part based on computer animations, Steyerl’s more recent video installations—whose aesthetic is strongly informed by the visuals disseminated through online platforms like YouTube—are among the most advanced work done by visual artists in this medium today. Both artists choose to involve themselves in contemporary controversies while also studying their historical backgrounds and the role played by media. Fascinating in their aesthetic construction, Rosler’s and Steyerl’s works are formulations of resistance to the normalization of democratic decline, the privatization of public spaces and domains of life and their subjection to economic pressures, violence and oppression at the hands of private actors as well as the authorities, the reduction of the human being to his value as a source of labor and consumer, and the militarization of spheres of social life. In light of the rising tide of illiberalism around the world, the exhibition thus also reaffirms the museum’s commitment to showing art that does not shy away from contention in asserting the need to foster democratic structures, civic values, and tolerance.