Art feed

Curated by Exhibitionary

Louise Bonnet
Louise Bonnet
London - 41 Dover Street, 1st floor
until 29-02-2020

Louise Bonnet Galerie Max Hetzler is pleased to present new large-scale paintings by LA-based artist Louise Bonnet, in her first solo exhibition in the UK. Known for her portraits of voluminous bodies, Bonnet presents the weight of human stresses and emotions in physical form. In her paintings, the figures’ bodies swell and bloat to exaggerated proportions, as though heavy with the feelings of the mind.  Simple actions, like kneeling or hiding, stretch and bend the bodies into uncomfortable extremes, often bringing the figures to the edge of the canvas itself. Interested in the tension of limbs, muscles and the materials that cover them, Bonnet transforms the human form as we know it, all the while retaining a masterful sense of corporeality.  Treading a fine line between humour and discomfort, comedy and tragedy, the anonymous figures are staged in isolation often against diminished backgrounds, their physicality rendering them statuesque yet faceless. The figures are dramatically lit in settings that border the surreal, from sparse domestic rooms, to moonlit tables. Inspiration for Bonnet’s works derive from such multiple sources as Hitchcock film scenes, Cindy Sherman works, Lucas Cranach paintings, and Renaissance portraits. These references usually appear as distorted as the depicted bodies themselves. Louise Bonnet (*1970, Geneva) lives and works in Los Angeles. 

Louise Bonnet Galerie Max Hetzler is pleased to present new large-scale paintings by LA-based artist Louise Bonnet, in her first solo exhibition in the UK. Known for her portraits of voluminous bodies, Bonnet presents the weight of human stresses and emotions in physical form. In her paintings, the figures’ bodies swell and bloat to exaggerated proportions, as though heavy with the feelings of the mind.  Simple actions, like kneeling or hiding, stretch and bend the bodies into uncomfortable extremes, often bringing the figures to the edge of the canvas itself. Interested in the tension of limbs, muscles and the materials that cover them, Bonnet transforms the human form as we know it, all the while retaining a masterful sense of corporeality.  Treading a fine line between humour and discomfort, comedy and tragedy, the anonymous figures are staged in isolation often against diminished backgrounds, their physicality rendering them statuesque yet faceless. The figures are dramatically lit in settings that border the surreal, from sparse domestic rooms, to moonlit tables. Inspiration for Bonnet’s works derive from such multiple sources as Hitchcock film scenes, Cindy Sherman works, Lucas Cranach paintings, and Renaissance portraits. These references usually appear as distorted as the depicted bodies themselves. Louise Bonnet (*1970, Geneva) lives and works in Los Angeles. 
Alex Israel
Alex Israel
London - 20 Grosvenor Hill
until 14-03-2020

Alex Israel – Always on my mind  

Alex Israel – Always on my mind  
Vivian Suter
Vivian Suter
London - Arkwright Road
until 05-04-2020

Vivian Suter – Tin Tin's Sofa

Vivian Suter – Tin Tin's Sofa
Paul Anthony Harford
Paul Anthony Harford
London - 1 Davies St
until 08-02-2020

Paul Anthony Harford – Real Life  The display will focus on the strands of social realism and wry observation that run through Harford's work – as reflected by his fascination for the incidental, the everyday and the offbeat. Dating primarily from the mid-2000s, the drawings chronicle the characters and environments of the seaside towns where the artist spent much of his life, oscillating between humour and subdued melancholy.

Paul Anthony Harford – Real Life  The display will focus on the strands of social realism and wry observation that run through Harford's work – as reflected by his fascination for the incidental, the everyday and the offbeat. Dating primarily from the mid-2000s, the drawings chronicle the characters and environments of the seaside towns where the artist spent much of his life, oscillating between humour and subdued melancholy.
Richard Deacon
Richard Deacon
London - 67 Lisson Street
until 29-02-2020

Richard Deacon – Deep State Richard Deacon presents his eleventh exhibition with Lisson Gallery, showing works incorporating steel, ceramics, clay, bent wood and ink on paper that evoke different senses – from memory and touch, to sight and movement. This new collection of sculptures, reliefs and drawings also inhabit different planes – from verticality to horizontality – all while shifting between two and three dimensions and passing from porosity to solidity, suggesting their fluid possibilities as either sites for bodily experience or spaces for contemplation and, as the title suggests, for deep dives into each object.

Richard Deacon – Deep State Richard Deacon presents his eleventh exhibition with Lisson Gallery, showing works incorporating steel, ceramics, clay, bent wood and ink on paper that evoke different senses – from memory and touch, to sight and movement. This new collection of sculptures, reliefs and drawings also inhabit different planes – from verticality to horizontality – all while shifting between two and three dimensions and passing from porosity to solidity, suggesting their fluid possibilities as either sites for bodily experience or spaces for contemplation and, as the title suggests, for deep dives into each object.
Sophia Al-Maria
Sophia Al-Maria
London - Millbank
until 23-02-2020

Sophia Al-Maria – Beast Type Song Beast Type Song is a new video installation which features performances by Yumna Marwan, Elizabeth Peace and boychild, as well as Al-Maria herself. Shot inside the now derelict campus of Central Saint Martin's School of Art and Design, Al-Maria casts each figure against the science fictive backdrop of a distant solar battle as evoked by Etel Adnan in her epic war poem The Arab Apocalypse.

Sophia Al-Maria – Beast Type Song Beast Type Song is a new video installation which features performances by Yumna Marwan, Elizabeth Peace and boychild, as well as Al-Maria herself. Shot inside the now derelict campus of Central Saint Martin's School of Art and Design, Al-Maria casts each figure against the science fictive backdrop of a distant solar battle as evoked by Etel Adnan in her epic war poem The Arab Apocalypse.
Dan Flavin
Dan Flavin
London - 8 Davies Street
until 15-02-2020

Dan Flavin – For Prudence  Exhibiting significant works for the first time in the UK, the show demonstrates the artist’s interest in the relationship between space and light while also exploring the humanity in Flavin’s work.  Flavin’s material departs from the consideration of electric light and its atmospheric and colourful properties; interested in subverting the mundane, the artist used mass-manufactured fluorescent tubes to create a variety of new designs whilst retaining their standardised colour, size and form. These tubes then became his signature medium through which he tested and challenged the limitations of light with increasing magnitude and scale, as demonstrated in the geometric compositions which illuminate the gallery. Denying symbolism and spirituality in art – distancing himself from a Catholic upbringing and his early studies in priesthood – Flavin’s works set the stage for much of the experience-oriented, immersive installations that are an integral part of the contemporary art scene today.

Dan Flavin – For Prudence  Exhibiting significant works for the first time in the UK, the show demonstrates the artist’s interest in the relationship between space and light while also exploring the humanity in Flavin’s work.  Flavin’s material departs from the consideration of electric light and its atmospheric and colourful properties; interested in subverting the mundane, the artist used mass-manufactured fluorescent tubes to create a variety of new designs whilst retaining their standardised colour, size and form. These tubes then became his signature medium through which he tested and challenged the limitations of light with increasing magnitude and scale, as demonstrated in the geometric compositions which illuminate the gallery. Denying symbolism and spirituality in art – distancing himself from a Catholic upbringing and his early studies in priesthood – Flavin’s works set the stage for much of the experience-oriented, immersive installations that are an integral part of the contemporary art scene today.
Oli Epp
Oli Epp
London - 12a Savile Row
until 28-01-2020

Oli Epp – Oxymoron When Oli first came up with the title for his solo show at Carl Kostyal, “Oxymoron”, a good friend and curator shot back “oh, that’s perfect for you!” Picking up on the ‘moron’ portion of the word, Oli, characteristically, burst out laughing, enjoying the sincerity of that read.

Oli Epp – Oxymoron When Oli first came up with the title for his solo show at Carl Kostyal, “Oxymoron”, a good friend and curator shot back “oh, that’s perfect for you!” Picking up on the ‘moron’ portion of the word, Oli, characteristically, burst out laughing, enjoying the sincerity of that read.
Kara Walker
Kara Walker
London - Bankside
until 05-04-2020

Kara Walker – Fons Americanus 2019 Hyundai Commission For the 2019 Hyundai Commission at Tate Modern's Turbine Hall, Kara Walker has created a monumental sculpture and fountain entitled Fons Americanus. Directly alluding to the Victoria Memorial at Buckingham Palace, Walker’s sculpture stands as a “counter-memorial,” a playful yet incisive subversion of such monuments’ original public function within the context of European imperialist projects. Utilizing water as the foundational motif, Fons Americanus depicts a cadre of iconographic figures and scenes upon a multi-tiered platform, all interconnected through the flow of water and the legacies of the Black Atlantic: an Afro-Caribbean Venus, a team of historical sea-farers, and a tree with a hangman’s noose, in the same position as the scales of justice on the Victoria Memorial. Surrounded by two pools of water as a disaster at sea, Fons Americanus represents a counter-narrative to the Western pride of empire-building, a mythologized origin story founded upon the violent and tragic structures of our collective history.

Kara Walker – Fons Americanus 2019 Hyundai Commission For the 2019 Hyundai Commission at Tate Modern's Turbine Hall, Kara Walker has created a monumental sculpture and fountain entitled Fons Americanus. Directly alluding to the Victoria Memorial at Buckingham Palace, Walker’s sculpture stands as a “counter-memorial,” a playful yet incisive subversion of such monuments’ original public function within the context of European imperialist projects. Utilizing water as the foundational motif, Fons Americanus depicts a cadre of iconographic figures and scenes upon a multi-tiered platform, all interconnected through the flow of water and the legacies of the Black Atlantic: an Afro-Caribbean Venus, a team of historical sea-farers, and a tree with a hangman’s noose, in the same position as the scales of justice on the Victoria Memorial. Surrounded by two pools of water as a disaster at sea, Fons Americanus represents a counter-narrative to the Western pride of empire-building, a mythologized origin story founded upon the violent and tragic structures of our collective history.
Lara Favaretto
Lara Favaretto
Miami - 2100 Collins Avenue
until 19-04-2020

Lara Favaretto – Blind Spot  Incorporating paintings, sculpture and interactive installations, Lara Favaretto: Blind Spot presents an arrangement of new and recent works alongside ongoing series from the artist’s practice. The exhibition also features a new, site-specific work commissioned for the museum’s permanent collection. Favaretto embraces the idea of constant change, creating works of art and situations that are in flux. Though often humorous and playful, her works address more serious matters such as decay, consumption and loss. Using elements like obsolete technologies to subtly refer to the passing of time, Favaretto incorporates found materials that are repurposed in her work. These upcycled materials – such as found paintings, discarded books and weathered construction materials – serve as commentary on the lifecycle of material detritus. Favaretto’s oeuvre highlights her interest in exploring ideas of the survival of certain objects over others, while contemplating their legitimacy in relation to the forgotten and exposing their inevitable destiny of wear, corrosion, erosion and breakage.

Lara Favaretto – Blind Spot  Incorporating paintings, sculpture and interactive installations, Lara Favaretto: Blind Spot presents an arrangement of new and recent works alongside ongoing series from the artist’s practice. The exhibition also features a new, site-specific work commissioned for the museum’s permanent collection. Favaretto embraces the idea of constant change, creating works of art and situations that are in flux. Though often humorous and playful, her works address more serious matters such as decay, consumption and loss. Using elements like obsolete technologies to subtly refer to the passing of time, Favaretto incorporates found materials that are repurposed in her work. These upcycled materials – such as found paintings, discarded books and weathered construction materials – serve as commentary on the lifecycle of material detritus. Favaretto’s oeuvre highlights her interest in exploring ideas of the survival of certain objects over others, while contemplating their legitimacy in relation to the forgotten and exposing their inevitable destiny of wear, corrosion, erosion and breakage.
Wong Ping
Wong Ping
Miami - 61 NE 41st Street
until 26-04-2020

Wong Ping  With a signature style that is both psychedelic and provocative, and narratives that are richly symbolic, engaging and absurd, Wong Ping creates episodic cinematic tales that are profoundly universal, while often deeply psychological and personal. Wong’s animated videos and installations humorously allegorize contemporary issues of sexuality, culture, politics, and power. Often alluding to fable and fiction, adopting narrative forms such as the detective novel and creating anthropomorphic characters, Wong’s visual language exposes crude realities while offering a space for reflection through fantasy, humor and shared experience.

Wong Ping  With a signature style that is both psychedelic and provocative, and narratives that are richly symbolic, engaging and absurd, Wong Ping creates episodic cinematic tales that are profoundly universal, while often deeply psychological and personal. Wong’s animated videos and installations humorously allegorize contemporary issues of sexuality, culture, politics, and power. Often alluding to fable and fiction, adopting narrative forms such as the detective novel and creating anthropomorphic characters, Wong’s visual language exposes crude realities while offering a space for reflection through fantasy, humor and shared experience.
Sterling Ruby
Sterling Ruby
Miami - 61 NE 41st Street
until 02-02-2020

Sterling Ruby The exhibition features over 100 works that demonstrate the relationship between material transformation in Ruby’s practice and the rapid evolution of contemporary culture, institutions, and labor. Spanning more than two decades of the artist’s career, the exhibition features an array of works created in various mediums, from his renowned ceramics and paintings to lesser-known drawings and installations. Since his earliest works, Ruby has investigated the role of the artist as an outsider. Critiquing the structures of modernism and traditional institutions, Ruby addresses the repressed underpinnings of American culture and the coding of power and violence. Craft is central to his inquiry, as he explores traditions from Amish quilt-making to California’s radical ceramics tradition, shaped by his upbringing in Pennsylvania Dutch country.

Sterling Ruby The exhibition features over 100 works that demonstrate the relationship between material transformation in Ruby’s practice and the rapid evolution of contemporary culture, institutions, and labor. Spanning more than two decades of the artist’s career, the exhibition features an array of works created in various mediums, from his renowned ceramics and paintings to lesser-known drawings and installations. Since his earliest works, Ruby has investigated the role of the artist as an outsider. Critiquing the structures of modernism and traditional institutions, Ruby addresses the repressed underpinnings of American culture and the coding of power and violence. Craft is central to his inquiry, as he explores traditions from Amish quilt-making to California’s radical ceramics tradition, shaped by his upbringing in Pennsylvania Dutch country.
Can It Really Be 20 Years Already?
Can It Really Be 20 Years Already?
Miami - 591 NW 27th Street
until 25-04-2020

Can It Really Be 20 Years Already? Art in Our Times, Contemporary Masters, and Philanthropy Magdalena Abakanowicz, Radcliffe Bailey, Eric Bainbridge, Domenico Bianchi, Gilles Barbier, Florian Baudrexel, William Beckman, John Beech, Jeff Brouws, Peter Buggenhout, Lawrence Carroll, John Chamberlain, Olafur Eliasson, Willem de Kooning, Donna Dennis, Nathalie Djurberg, Mark di Suvero, William Eggleston, Leandro Erlich, Kota Ezawa, Michael Heizer, Thomas Hirschhorn, Pieter Hugo, Anselm Kiefer, Justine Kurland, Sol LeWitt, Donald Lokuta, Emil Lukas, Danny Lyon, Chema Madoz, Ibrahim Mahama, Mark Manders, Barry McGee, Dave Muller, Wilhelm Mundt, Jackie Nickerson, Isamu Noguchi, Tony Oursler, Maurizio Pellegrin, Michelangelo Pistoletto, Pedro Cabrita Reis, Jason Rhoades, Nancy Rubins, George Segal, Richard Serra, Cindy Sherman, Shinique Smith, Kenneth Snelson, Jennifer Steinkamp, Frank Stella, Joel Sternfeld, Kishio Suga, William Tucker, Paolo Ventura, Eudora Welty, Franz West, Lois Weinberger The Margulies Collection at the Warehouse, a pioneering force in contemporary art in Miami, presents its 20th Year Anniversary of public exhibitions. Since it’s inauguration in 1999 the Warehouse has welcomed visitors from South Florida and all over the world. The Warehouse exhibitions showcase art of our times featuring 20th & 21st century sculpture, photography, video, painting and large-scale installations by international artists culled from the renowned collection of Martin Z. Margulies. With a stated mission of arts education, the Warehouse has produced hundreds of programs for the community including guest speakers, seminars, publications, internships and guided tours.

Can It Really Be 20 Years Already? Art in Our Times, Contemporary Masters, and Philanthropy Magdalena Abakanowicz, Radcliffe Bailey, Eric Bainbridge, Domenico Bianchi, Gilles Barbier, Florian Baudrexel, William Beckman, John Beech, Jeff Brouws, Peter Buggenhout, Lawrence Carroll, John Chamberlain, Olafur Eliasson, Willem de Kooning, Donna Dennis, Nathalie Djurberg, Mark di Suvero, William Eggleston, Leandro Erlich, Kota Ezawa, Michael Heizer, Thomas Hirschhorn, Pieter Hugo, Anselm Kiefer, Justine Kurland, Sol LeWitt, Donald Lokuta, Emil Lukas, Danny Lyon, Chema Madoz, Ibrahim Mahama, Mark Manders, Barry McGee, Dave Muller, Wilhelm Mundt, Jackie Nickerson, Isamu Noguchi, Tony Oursler, Maurizio Pellegrin, Michelangelo Pistoletto, Pedro Cabrita Reis, Jason Rhoades, Nancy Rubins, George Segal, Richard Serra, Cindy Sherman, Shinique Smith, Kenneth Snelson, Jennifer Steinkamp, Frank Stella, Joel Sternfeld, Kishio Suga, William Tucker, Paolo Ventura, Eudora Welty, Franz West, Lois Weinberger The Margulies Collection at the Warehouse, a pioneering force in contemporary art in Miami, presents its 20th Year Anniversary of public exhibitions. Since it’s inauguration in 1999 the Warehouse has welcomed visitors from South Florida and all over the world. The Warehouse exhibitions showcase art of our times featuring 20th & 21st century sculpture, photography, video, painting and large-scale installations by international artists culled from the renowned collection of Martin Z. Margulies. With a stated mission of arts education, the Warehouse has produced hundreds of programs for the community including guest speakers, seminars, publications, internships and guided tours.
Yayoi Kusama
Yayoi Kusama
Miami - 61 NE 41st Street
until 31-01-2020

Yayoi Kusama – All the Eternal Love I Have for the Pumpkins -> Free Admission every Thursday on a first come, first serve basis. Timed tickets will be available for Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays for $15. <- ICA Miami presents a special off-site exhibition of artist Yayoi Kusama’s All the Eternal Love I Have for the Pumpkins in the Miami Design District, marking the first time that one of Kusama’s signature “Infinity Mirror Rooms” will be on view in Miami. On view from October 12, 2019 through January 31, 2020, the work features a mesmerizing array of Kusama’s signature spotted pumpkins within a mirror-lined room illuminated with LED lighting. This special presentation is made possible with support from Inigo Philbrick Gallery. All proceeds benefit ICA Miami’s arts education programs. All the Eternal Love I Have for the Pumpkins (2016) showcases the artist’s singular approach to large-scale installation and incorporates one of the artist’s quintessential symbols: the spotted pumpkin. One of the first mirrored pumpkin rooms created by Kusama, the installation draws on several of the artists’ characteristic themes, including infinity, the sublime and obsessive repetition. Expanding on her seminal pumpkin room, Mirror Room (Pumpkin) (1991), originally commissioned for the Japanese Pavilion at the 1993 Venice Biennale, All the Eternal Love I Have for the Pumpkins (2016) focuses the reflective chamber on a series of acrylic yellow gourds covered in black polka dots, allowing viewers to fully immerse themselves in Kusama’s creation, becoming part of the art.

Yayoi Kusama – All the Eternal Love I Have for the Pumpkins -> Free Admission every Thursday on a first come, first serve basis. Timed tickets will be available for Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays for $15. <- ICA Miami presents a special off-site exhibition of artist Yayoi Kusama’s All the Eternal Love I Have for the Pumpkins in the Miami Design District, marking the first time that one of Kusama’s signature “Infinity Mirror Rooms” will be on view in Miami. On view from October 12, 2019 through January 31, 2020, the work features a mesmerizing array of Kusama’s signature spotted pumpkins within a mirror-lined room illuminated with LED lighting. This special presentation is made possible with support from Inigo Philbrick Gallery. All proceeds benefit ICA Miami’s arts education programs. All the Eternal Love I Have for the Pumpkins (2016) showcases the artist’s singular approach to large-scale installation and incorporates one of the artist’s quintessential symbols: the spotted pumpkin. One of the first mirrored pumpkin rooms created by Kusama, the installation draws on several of the artists’ characteristic themes, including infinity, the sublime and obsessive repetition. Expanding on her seminal pumpkin room, Mirror Room (Pumpkin) (1991), originally commissioned for the Japanese Pavilion at the 1993 Venice Biennale, All the Eternal Love I Have for the Pumpkins (2016) focuses the reflective chamber on a series of acrylic yellow gourds covered in black polka dots, allowing viewers to fully immerse themselves in Kusama’s creation, becoming part of the art.
Andrea Bowers
Andrea Bowers
New York - 22 Cortlandt Alley
until 15-02-2020

Andrea Bowers – Think of Our Future As our global freedoms decline, Andrea Bowers is trying to move from grief to hope by focusing on youth activists beginning with the new video, My Name Means Future.

Andrea Bowers – Think of Our Future As our global freedoms decline, Andrea Bowers is trying to move from grief to hope by focusing on youth activists beginning with the new video, My Name Means Future.
Salvo
Salvo
New York - 130 East 64th Street
until 29-02-2020

Salvo Gladstone Gallery is pleased to present an exhibition of paintings by Salvo (1947 – 2015). Focusing on the artist’s compositions of landscapes and cities, this show surveys more than 30 years of Salvo’s artistic practice and highlights his early conceptual art and his astounding aptitude for portraying the complexities of light and the passage of time. Organized in collaboration with Archivio Salvo, the works in this show solidify Salvo’s singular and ever explorative approach to artmaking and his lasting impact on Italian modernism.  Salvo, whose given name was Salvatore Mangione, was born in Leonforte, Sicily, in 1947. After permanently relocating to his adoptive city of Turin in 1968, he quickly became involved in the blossoming Arte Povera movement, which was born as a response to the social and political unrest in Italy throughout the 1960s. During this period, Salvo shared a studio with Alighiero Boetti, one of the pioneers of this radical movement. Salvo and Boetti had an ongoing relationship and reciprocally collaborative influence on each other’s practices; the combination of influences from Boetti and other artists of the time impacted Salvo’s own artmaking and understanding of the world around him. At this early stage in his career, Salvo employed conceptual strategies to meditate on the nature of artistic practice, and the role of the artist as both a preternaturally talented individual and a conduit to the past and the history of culture. An example of works from this period include a series of “self-portraits” - altered or staged photographs that depicted him as a baker, bartender, guerilla, saint, and the painter Raphael. By 1973, Salvo pivoted away from conceptual work and began to explore the radical and complex possibilities inherent to figurative painting. 

Salvo Gladstone Gallery is pleased to present an exhibition of paintings by Salvo (1947 – 2015). Focusing on the artist’s compositions of landscapes and cities, this show surveys more than 30 years of Salvo’s artistic practice and highlights his early conceptual art and his astounding aptitude for portraying the complexities of light and the passage of time. Organized in collaboration with Archivio Salvo, the works in this show solidify Salvo’s singular and ever explorative approach to artmaking and his lasting impact on Italian modernism.  Salvo, whose given name was Salvatore Mangione, was born in Leonforte, Sicily, in 1947. After permanently relocating to his adoptive city of Turin in 1968, he quickly became involved in the blossoming Arte Povera movement, which was born as a response to the social and political unrest in Italy throughout the 1960s. During this period, Salvo shared a studio with Alighiero Boetti, one of the pioneers of this radical movement. Salvo and Boetti had an ongoing relationship and reciprocally collaborative influence on each other’s practices; the combination of influences from Boetti and other artists of the time impacted Salvo’s own artmaking and understanding of the world around him. At this early stage in his career, Salvo employed conceptual strategies to meditate on the nature of artistic practice, and the role of the artist as both a preternaturally talented individual and a conduit to the past and the history of culture. An example of works from this period include a series of “self-portraits” - altered or staged photographs that depicted him as a baker, bartender, guerilla, saint, and the painter Raphael. By 1973, Salvo pivoted away from conceptual work and began to explore the radical and complex possibilities inherent to figurative painting. 
Barry Le Va
Barry Le Va
New York - 534 West 22nd Street
until 15-02-2020

Barry Le Va – Sculptured Activities, 1987-89 Carolina Nitsch Project Room is pleased to present an exhibition of works on paper by Barry Le Va. The works in this show are from the late 80’s and early 90’s and relate to his Sculptured Activities series, which represent various conceptual possibilities related to his sculptural installations. The black and white drawings and collages are created in pencil, charcoal and ink, while the prints are multi-colored, layered woodblocks.

Barry Le Va – Sculptured Activities, 1987-89 Carolina Nitsch Project Room is pleased to present an exhibition of works on paper by Barry Le Va. The works in this show are from the late 80’s and early 90’s and relate to his Sculptured Activities series, which represent various conceptual possibilities related to his sculptural installations. The black and white drawings and collages are created in pencil, charcoal and ink, while the prints are multi-colored, layered woodblocks.
Rachel Feinstein
Rachel Feinstein
New York - 1109 5th Avenue at 92nd Street
until 22-03-2020

Rachel Feinstein – Maiden, Mother, Crone Rachel Feinstein: Maiden, Mother, Crone, the first survey of the New York-based artist in the United States, brings together three decades of Feinstein’s work in sculpture, installation, painting, drawing, and video, as well as a newly commissioned wall-relief, a panoramic wallpaper, and the artist’s sculptural maquettes.

Rachel Feinstein – Maiden, Mother, Crone Rachel Feinstein: Maiden, Mother, Crone, the first survey of the New York-based artist in the United States, brings together three decades of Feinstein’s work in sculpture, installation, painting, drawing, and video, as well as a newly commissioned wall-relief, a panoramic wallpaper, and the artist’s sculptural maquettes.
Ed Atkins
Ed Atkins
New York - 439 W 127 Street
until 19-01-2020

Ed Atkins – I like spit now 

Ed Atkins – I like spit now 
Mike Kelley
Mike Kelley
New York - 548 West 22nd Street
until 25-01-2020

Mike Kelley – Timeless Painting  ‘Mike Kelley. Timeless Painting’ contributes new perspectives to the discourse around the artist’s work, challenging conventional readings by exploring Kelley’s own meticulously documented intentions as a point of departure; resituating these works within the larger formal context of his oeuvre; and expanding traditional definitions of painting.

Mike Kelley – Timeless Painting  ‘Mike Kelley. Timeless Painting’ contributes new perspectives to the discourse around the artist’s work, challenging conventional readings by exploring Kelley’s own meticulously documented intentions as a point of departure; resituating these works within the larger formal context of his oeuvre; and expanding traditional definitions of painting.
Rashid Johnson
Rashid Johnson
New York - 548 West 22nd Street
until 25-01-2020

Rashid Johnson – The Hikers The exhibition brings together ceramic tile mosaics, collaged paintings, and a large-scale sculpture that address Johnson’s recurring interest in currents of anxiety and escapism created by the political and social turmoil felt across the United States and around the globe.

Rashid Johnson – The Hikers The exhibition brings together ceramic tile mosaics, collaged paintings, and a large-scale sculpture that address Johnson’s recurring interest in currents of anxiety and escapism created by the political and social turmoil felt across the United States and around the globe.
Pope.L
Pope.L
New York - 11 West 53 Street
until 01-02-2020

member: Pope.L, 1978–2001 "member: Pope.L, 1978–2001" is an exhibition of 13 landmark, career-defining performances by the multidisciplinary artist Pope.L, on view from October 21, 2019, through February 1, 2020. Pope.L (b. 1955) is a consummate trickster whose practice across multiple mediums—including performance, painting, drawing, installation, sculpture, theater, and video—utilizes abjection, humor, endurance, and absurdity to undermine rigid categories of difference. The performances included in this exhibition span from 1978 to 2001 and will be represented through a combination of videos, photographs, sculptural elements, ephemera, and live actions. 

member: Pope.L, 1978–2001 "member: Pope.L, 1978–2001" is an exhibition of 13 landmark, career-defining performances by the multidisciplinary artist Pope.L, on view from October 21, 2019, through February 1, 2020. Pope.L (b. 1955) is a consummate trickster whose practice across multiple mediums—including performance, painting, drawing, installation, sculpture, theater, and video—utilizes abjection, humor, endurance, and absurdity to undermine rigid categories of difference. The performances included in this exhibition span from 1978 to 2001 and will be represented through a combination of videos, photographs, sculptural elements, ephemera, and live actions. 
 Andreas Fogarasi
Andreas Fogarasi
Vienna - Treitlstrasse 2
until 02-02-2020

Andreas Fogarasi – Nine Buildings, Stripped Nine Buildings, Stripped exemplifies this focus on processes of urban transformation and their manifestation in surfaces. The wall-mounted and freestanding “material packages” are composed of original fragments of buildings that no longer exist and samples or parts of the visible exterior of the structures that replaced them or into which they were converted.

Andreas Fogarasi – Nine Buildings, Stripped Nine Buildings, Stripped exemplifies this focus on processes of urban transformation and their manifestation in surfaces. The wall-mounted and freestanding “material packages” are composed of original fragments of buildings that no longer exist and samples or parts of the visible exterior of the structures that replaced them or into which they were converted.
Reading Time in Space
Reading Time in Space
Vienna - Museumsplatz 1
until 13-04-2020

Reading Time in Space. Modernism at mumok 1910 to 1955 Giacomo Balla, Willi Baumeister, Max Ernst, Alberto Giacometti, Florence Henri, Josef Hofmann, Wassily Kandinsky, Paul Klee, Yves Klein, Oskar Kokoschka, František Kupka, René Magritte, Oskar Schlemmer, Max Oppenheimer, Madame d’Ora, Pablo Picasso, Felice Rix, Sophie Taeuber-Arp Is modernism an epoch? How did artists see this in the 1920s? Reading Time in Space answers these questions by referring to four exhibitions and book projects that constituted the first global presentations of modernism and raised key questions in their own time. These projects rested on new concepts of space and time. They include El Lissitzky’s und Hans Arp’s fictitious exhibition project of 1924 and Friedrich Kiesler’s legendary theater exhibition of the same year. In an installation by Nicole Six/Paul Petritsch, this mumok exhibition explores temporal and spatial coordinates whose parameters are constituted by elements of modernism. Referring to a time of upheaval in the arts, sciences, and society, the concept of modernism is an ongoing point of reference in the art history of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, as works by Werner Feiersinger, Andreas Fogarasi, and Ulrike Grossarth show.  

Reading Time in Space. Modernism at mumok 1910 to 1955 Giacomo Balla, Willi Baumeister, Max Ernst, Alberto Giacometti, Florence Henri, Josef Hofmann, Wassily Kandinsky, Paul Klee, Yves Klein, Oskar Kokoschka, František Kupka, René Magritte, Oskar Schlemmer, Max Oppenheimer, Madame d’Ora, Pablo Picasso, Felice Rix, Sophie Taeuber-Arp Is modernism an epoch? How did artists see this in the 1920s? Reading Time in Space answers these questions by referring to four exhibitions and book projects that constituted the first global presentations of modernism and raised key questions in their own time. These projects rested on new concepts of space and time. They include El Lissitzky’s und Hans Arp’s fictitious exhibition project of 1924 and Friedrich Kiesler’s legendary theater exhibition of the same year. In an installation by Nicole Six/Paul Petritsch, this mumok exhibition explores temporal and spatial coordinates whose parameters are constituted by elements of modernism. Referring to a time of upheaval in the arts, sciences, and society, the concept of modernism is an ongoing point of reference in the art history of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, as works by Werner Feiersinger, Andreas Fogarasi, and Ulrike Grossarth show.  
Eva Grubinger
Eva Grubinger
Vienna - Arsenalstrasse 1
until 13-04-2020

Eva Grubinger – Malady of the Infinite

Eva Grubinger – Malady of the Infinite
Ron Nagle
Ron Nagle
Vienna - Friedrichstrasse 12
until 09-02-2020

Ron Nagle – Nocturn Around

Ron Nagle – Nocturn Around
Haleh Redjaian
Haleh Redjaian
Vienna - Eschenbachgasse 9
until 29-02-2020

Haleh Redjaian – Points, Lines, Planes

Haleh Redjaian – Points, Lines, Planes
Wade Guyton
Wade Guyton
Cologne - Hein­rich-Böll-Platz
until 01-03-2020

Wade Guyton – Zwei Dekaden MCMX­CIX–MMX­IX  Born in 1972, the Amer­i­can artist Wade Guy­ton has cre­at­ed a con­sis­tent and dist­inct oeu­vre for more than two de­cades. He is best known for his large-scale can­vas paint­in­gs made with a con­ven­tio­n­al ink­jet prin­t­er, fea­tur­ing me­m­orable sub­jects such as flames, the let­ters X and U, and the New York Times web­site. Af­ter ac­quir­ing sev­er­al of the artist’s works for the col­lec­tion, the Mu­se­um Lud­wig is host­ing a ma­jor sur­vey ex­hi­bi­tion that will pre­sent his oeu­vre from the be­gin­n­ing of his ca­reer to his most re­cent works.

Wade Guyton – Zwei Dekaden MCMX­CIX–MMX­IX  Born in 1972, the Amer­i­can artist Wade Guy­ton has cre­at­ed a con­sis­tent and dist­inct oeu­vre for more than two de­cades. He is best known for his large-scale can­vas paint­in­gs made with a con­ven­tio­n­al ink­jet prin­t­er, fea­tur­ing me­m­orable sub­jects such as flames, the let­ters X and U, and the New York Times web­site. Af­ter ac­quir­ing sev­er­al of the artist’s works for the col­lec­tion, the Mu­se­um Lud­wig is host­ing a ma­jor sur­vey ex­hi­bi­tion that will pre­sent his oeu­vre from the be­gin­n­ing of his ca­reer to his most re­cent works.
Harald F. Müller
Harald F. Müller
Cologne - Erftstrasse 29
until 26-02-2020

Harald F. Müller – Back to Back

Harald F. Müller – Back to Back
Avery Singer
Avery Singer
Cologne - Hein­rich-Böll-Platz
until 04-10-2020

Schultze Projects #2 – Avery Singer For the se­cond edi­tion of the se­ries Schultze Pro­jects, the Amer­i­can artist Av­ery Singer has cre­at­ed a new, site-spe­cif­ic work for the stair­well at the Mu­se­um Lud­wig. The sev­en-part work is over sev­en­teen me­ters long and three and a half me­ters high. The name of the se­ries re­fers to Ber­nard Schultze and his wife Ur­su­la (Schultze-Bluhm), whose es­tate is ma­n­aged by the Mu­se­um Lud­wig, and in whose me­m­o­ry ev­ery two years since 2017 an artist has been in­vit­ed to cre­ate a ma­jor work for the pro­mi­nent front wall of the stair­well.

Schultze Projects #2 – Avery Singer For the se­cond edi­tion of the se­ries Schultze Pro­jects, the Amer­i­can artist Av­ery Singer has cre­at­ed a new, site-spe­cif­ic work for the stair­well at the Mu­se­um Lud­wig. The sev­en-part work is over sev­en­teen me­ters long and three and a half me­ters high. The name of the se­ries re­fers to Ber­nard Schultze and his wife Ur­su­la (Schultze-Bluhm), whose es­tate is ma­n­aged by the Mu­se­um Lud­wig, and in whose me­m­o­ry ev­ery two years since 2017 an artist has been in­vit­ed to cre­ate a ma­jor work for the pro­mi­nent front wall of the stair­well.
Antje Majewski
Antje Majewski
Berlin - Linienstrasse 155
until 15-02-2020

Antje Majewski – Der Wald (The Forest) neugerriemschneider is pleased to present our eighth solo exhibition with Antje Majewski, on view from December 14, 2019 to February 15, 2020. In Der Wald (The Forest), the artist shifts her often globally oriented focus to a more local ecosystem—one currently being threatened by human intervention. Serving as the points of departure for these new paintings and video works are the central European forests endangered by recent summers’ record high temperatures. The exhibition is closely intertwined with the artist’s family history and highlights the generation-spanning nature of the forest and its symbiotic relationship to humankind. The large-format painting Passagen (2019) showcases a magnified view of the delicately crafted, sinuous passageways that bark beetles burrow in the trees that they infest. Here, Majewski renders the illustrative passageways created by these aptly named insects—Ips typographus (Buckdrucker, or “book printer”) and Pityogenes chalcographus (Kupferstecher, or “copperplate engraver”)—in monumental landscape format, using painterly qualities to lend them a presence that deftly straddles the figurative and the abstract. Especially during the extended periods of drought experienced in recent years, monoculturally raised spruce trees can become weak, transforming them into veritable breeding grounds for these beetles. This, in turn, has drastic ecological and economic consequences. The bark beetle’s proliferation has become an indicator of for an imbalanced ecosystem and raises questions about biodiversity, sustainability, climate change and resilience. In the video work Der Wald (The Forest) (2019), Majewski navigates time and space by means of contemporary and historical imagery of forests set to music conceived for the film (composer: Katrin Vellrath, vocals: Vizma Zvaigzne, percussion: Daniel Eichholz). Photographs from the early twentieth century are interwoven with recent video of the heavily deforested Flechtingen Hills in Saxony-Anhalt and the forests around Tharandt, a town nestled in the Ore Mountains that run between Germany and Czech Republic. The photographs themselves were taken by Majewski’s great-grandfather forestry scientist Heinrich Krieger (1887-1966), who avidly photographed the forests in and around Tharandt. He was especially taken by the forest’s capacity as a dynamic system, projecting that the yield of a mixed woodland area would be far greater than that of monocultures. In Tharandt, Majewski follows in the footsteps of another ancestor, Karl Leberecht Krutzsch (1772-1852), who researched soil chemistry and the bark beetle at Germany’s first forestry university. His grandson Hermann Krutzsch (1819- 1896), a professor at this same academy, was instrumental in developing sustainable forestry practices. The documentary film U?ber den Borkenka?fer (2019) features the owner of a forest, a forester and a forestry scientist, as they elaborate on the widespread destruction that their forests are currently being subjected to. In parallel, Antje Majewski has initiated a project to transform sections of deforested areas into agroforests, creating wildlife feeding grounds and planting wild fruit trees. The work of Antje Majewski (b. 1968) has been the subject of international collaborative and solo exhibitions including How to talk with birds, trees, fish, shells, snakes, bulls and lions, Hamburger Bahnhof – Museum fu?r Gegenwart, Berlin (2018); Apple. An Introduction. (Over and over and once again), Galerie im Turm, Berlin, Kunsthalle Lingen, Museum Abteiberg, Mo?nchengladbach and Muzeum Sztuki, Lodz (2019, 2018, 2015, 2014); Miniaturen, Ravensbru?ck Memorial Museum, Fu?rstenberg/Havel (2014); Il giardino dei corpi with Piotr Nathan, Villa Romana, Florence (2012); The World of Gimel: How to Make Objects Talk, Kunsthaus Graz (2011); My Very Gestures, Salzburger Kunstverein, Salzburg (2008); Mal De Ojo and other works, Darat al-Funun, Amman (2007); and L’invitation au voyage, Kunsthalle Basel (2001). Majewski has been a professor of painting at the Muthesius University of Fine Arts and Design in Kiel since 2011. She lives and works between Berlin and Himmelpfort (Brandenburg), Germany. For further press information and imagery, please contact Alexia Timmermans at neugerriemschneider: +49 30 288 77277 or [email protected]  

Antje Majewski – Der Wald (The Forest) neugerriemschneider is pleased to present our eighth solo exhibition with Antje Majewski, on view from December 14, 2019 to February 15, 2020. In Der Wald (The Forest), the artist shifts her often globally oriented focus to a more local ecosystem—one currently being threatened by human intervention. Serving as the points of departure for these new paintings and video works are the central European forests endangered by recent summers’ record high temperatures. The exhibition is closely intertwined with the artist’s family history and highlights the generation-spanning nature of the forest and its symbiotic relationship to humankind. The large-format painting Passagen (2019) showcases a magnified view of the delicately crafted, sinuous passageways that bark beetles burrow in the trees that they infest. Here, Majewski renders the illustrative passageways created by these aptly named insects—Ips typographus (Buckdrucker, or “book printer”) and Pityogenes chalcographus (Kupferstecher, or “copperplate engraver”)—in monumental landscape format, using painterly qualities to lend them a presence that deftly straddles the figurative and the abstract. Especially during the extended periods of drought experienced in recent years, monoculturally raised spruce trees can become weak, transforming them into veritable breeding grounds for these beetles. This, in turn, has drastic ecological and economic consequences. The bark beetle’s proliferation has become an indicator of for an imbalanced ecosystem and raises questions about biodiversity, sustainability, climate change and resilience. In the video work Der Wald (The Forest) (2019), Majewski navigates time and space by means of contemporary and historical imagery of forests set to music conceived for the film (composer: Katrin Vellrath, vocals: Vizma Zvaigzne, percussion: Daniel Eichholz). Photographs from the early twentieth century are interwoven with recent video of the heavily deforested Flechtingen Hills in Saxony-Anhalt and the forests around Tharandt, a town nestled in the Ore Mountains that run between Germany and Czech Republic. The photographs themselves were taken by Majewski’s great-grandfather forestry scientist Heinrich Krieger (1887-1966), who avidly photographed the forests in and around Tharandt. He was especially taken by the forest’s capacity as a dynamic system, projecting that the yield of a mixed woodland area would be far greater than that of monocultures. In Tharandt, Majewski follows in the footsteps of another ancestor, Karl Leberecht Krutzsch (1772-1852), who researched soil chemistry and the bark beetle at Germany’s first forestry university. His grandson Hermann Krutzsch (1819- 1896), a professor at this same academy, was instrumental in developing sustainable forestry practices. The documentary film U?ber den Borkenka?fer (2019) features the owner of a forest, a forester and a forestry scientist, as they elaborate on the widespread destruction that their forests are currently being subjected to. In parallel, Antje Majewski has initiated a project to transform sections of deforested areas into agroforests, creating wildlife feeding grounds and planting wild fruit trees. The work of Antje Majewski (b. 1968) has been the subject of international collaborative and solo exhibitions including How to talk with birds, trees, fish, shells, snakes, bulls and lions, Hamburger Bahnhof – Museum fu?r Gegenwart, Berlin (2018); Apple. An Introduction. (Over and over and once again), Galerie im Turm, Berlin, Kunsthalle Lingen, Museum Abteiberg, Mo?nchengladbach and Muzeum Sztuki, Lodz (2019, 2018, 2015, 2014); Miniaturen, Ravensbru?ck Memorial Museum, Fu?rstenberg/Havel (2014); Il giardino dei corpi with Piotr Nathan, Villa Romana, Florence (2012); The World of Gimel: How to Make Objects Talk, Kunsthaus Graz (2011); My Very Gestures, Salzburger Kunstverein, Salzburg (2008); Mal De Ojo and other works, Darat al-Funun, Amman (2007); and L’invitation au voyage, Kunsthalle Basel (2001). Majewski has been a professor of painting at the Muthesius University of Fine Arts and Design in Kiel since 2011. She lives and works between Berlin and Himmelpfort (Brandenburg), Germany. For further press information and imagery, please contact Alexia Timmermans at neugerriemschneider: +49 30 288 77277 or [email protected]  
Hicham Berrada
Hicham Berrada
Berlin - Knesebeckstrasse 95
until 25-01-2020

Hicham Berrada – Enclosed Natures To have shapes and forms emerge and appear instead of exhibiting them – that is the principle of Enclosed Natures, Hicham Berrada’s second solo show at Wentrup. We get to see activated nature in a studio state: shapes that are not represented, but generated.  The two videos in the exhibition continue the ongoing series Présages was first created by the artist in 2007. Filmed in real time, they show a container with a circumference of 10 centimetres in which chemical components interact. The proportions are suspended, as are the lines between the organic and the mineral. We have the tendency to see the world of minerals as petrified, and to posit it in opposition to what is alive. We are not able to perceive the movements of minerals because their temporality exceeds ours. This chemically activated matter generates multiple worlds that can simultaneously represent forms of plant life, architecture, and surreal or familiar landscapes.  The two aquariums of the series Mancies modify a technique that was used for fortune-telling in the Middle Ages: a material that is heated to just before melting point, often wax (la kéromancie) or lead (la molybdomancie) is put into water, and the resulting shapes are used to tell people’s fortune: the bronze, brass, or pewter shapes melt into a sculpture. The similarity of the compound metals creates an electric tension that accelerates the corrosion of some components, which in turn is to the advantage of the other components, because they are better protected. The material, which usually is considered to be a fixed, inflexible matter, becomes perceptible before our eyes, materialising in spiral-shaped hazes that effuse and unfold into ethereal landscapes in the water.  The 3D-sculpture from the series Augures Mathématiques emerged from the interplay of various equations of morphogenesis. As a sculpture in a dynamic system, it is a hybrid of cloud formations, tree roots, and lichen. 3D printing makes it possible to materialise a virtual unit created on the basis of mathematical calculations. It could possibly even have developed without human intervention, because its growth is based on the laws of physics that determine our world. It expresses a possibility that exists, or perhaps will exist, at other times and in other spaces.   Hicham Berrada (born 1986 in Morocco) lives and works Roubaix (France).  

Hicham Berrada – Enclosed Natures To have shapes and forms emerge and appear instead of exhibiting them – that is the principle of Enclosed Natures, Hicham Berrada’s second solo show at Wentrup. We get to see activated nature in a studio state: shapes that are not represented, but generated.  The two videos in the exhibition continue the ongoing series Présages was first created by the artist in 2007. Filmed in real time, they show a container with a circumference of 10 centimetres in which chemical components interact. The proportions are suspended, as are the lines between the organic and the mineral. We have the tendency to see the world of minerals as petrified, and to posit it in opposition to what is alive. We are not able to perceive the movements of minerals because their temporality exceeds ours. This chemically activated matter generates multiple worlds that can simultaneously represent forms of plant life, architecture, and surreal or familiar landscapes.  The two aquariums of the series Mancies modify a technique that was used for fortune-telling in the Middle Ages: a material that is heated to just before melting point, often wax (la kéromancie) or lead (la molybdomancie) is put into water, and the resulting shapes are used to tell people’s fortune: the bronze, brass, or pewter shapes melt into a sculpture. The similarity of the compound metals creates an electric tension that accelerates the corrosion of some components, which in turn is to the advantage of the other components, because they are better protected. The material, which usually is considered to be a fixed, inflexible matter, becomes perceptible before our eyes, materialising in spiral-shaped hazes that effuse and unfold into ethereal landscapes in the water.  The 3D-sculpture from the series Augures Mathématiques emerged from the interplay of various equations of morphogenesis. As a sculpture in a dynamic system, it is a hybrid of cloud formations, tree roots, and lichen. 3D printing makes it possible to materialise a virtual unit created on the basis of mathematical calculations. It could possibly even have developed without human intervention, because its growth is based on the laws of physics that determine our world. It expresses a possibility that exists, or perhaps will exist, at other times and in other spaces.   Hicham Berrada (born 1986 in Morocco) lives and works Roubaix (France).  
León Ferrari
León Ferrari
Berlin - Lindenstrasse 35
until 03-02-2020

León Ferrari – Toasted Angels, Sounds of Steel Earthworms are making themselves at home in the White House. They wiggle their way into the Oval Office and the private apartments, dangle from the flagpole on the roof, smear the star-spangled banner with their slime. Yuck. Sweet. Our exhibition opens with the video Casa Blanca, created in 2005. The desecration of a proud symbol? The defilement of an icon? Blasphemy? Whatever was León Ferrari thinking? Ferrari did what he could. What he couldn’t do he didn’t. That sounds more banal than it is. For what Ferrari did was closely bound up with the political developments since the 1950s, for which he time and again found his own language, with the means at his disposal. A language—several languages—that breached the confines of the private sphere to go public and tell stories of war and tyranny, harassment, and freedom. Ferrari's artistic career began in 1955, the first year of the Vietnam War. For six decades, he traced the history of Western civilization as a history of globalized institutional violence. When León Ferrari died in his hometown of Buenos Aires in 2013 at the age of 93, he had long since become one of the great international voices of the Latin American continent. KOW presents a selective overview of his influential oeuvre, which has received too little attention in Germany. Even a cursory glance reveals that Ferrari had an axe to grind with the Catholic Church. His most famous and surely most controversial piece, La Civilización Occidental y Cristiana (1965), shows a painted-wood Jesus figure crucified to the replica of an American fighter jet from the Vietnam War. The work got him in trouble with the government, the Vatican, museums, but in the end it prevailed. We present previously unpublished collages from the 1980s which follow on from La Civilizacíon … The works from the cycle Relecturas de la Biblia may provoke strong feelings even today: Nazi terror meets Catholic propaganda, combat tanks and long-range missiles protected by angels, the clergy at the Vatican contemplating the Holocaust as though it were a Last Judgment with God’s blessing, regimes of military and religious power hand in hand in the same picture. A hell on earth—forged of steel tubes, cyanide, and glorioles.

León Ferrari – Toasted Angels, Sounds of Steel Earthworms are making themselves at home in the White House. They wiggle their way into the Oval Office and the private apartments, dangle from the flagpole on the roof, smear the star-spangled banner with their slime. Yuck. Sweet. Our exhibition opens with the video Casa Blanca, created in 2005. The desecration of a proud symbol? The defilement of an icon? Blasphemy? Whatever was León Ferrari thinking? Ferrari did what he could. What he couldn’t do he didn’t. That sounds more banal than it is. For what Ferrari did was closely bound up with the political developments since the 1950s, for which he time and again found his own language, with the means at his disposal. A language—several languages—that breached the confines of the private sphere to go public and tell stories of war and tyranny, harassment, and freedom. Ferrari's artistic career began in 1955, the first year of the Vietnam War. For six decades, he traced the history of Western civilization as a history of globalized institutional violence. When León Ferrari died in his hometown of Buenos Aires in 2013 at the age of 93, he had long since become one of the great international voices of the Latin American continent. KOW presents a selective overview of his influential oeuvre, which has received too little attention in Germany. Even a cursory glance reveals that Ferrari had an axe to grind with the Catholic Church. His most famous and surely most controversial piece, La Civilización Occidental y Cristiana (1965), shows a painted-wood Jesus figure crucified to the replica of an American fighter jet from the Vietnam War. The work got him in trouble with the government, the Vatican, museums, but in the end it prevailed. We present previously unpublished collages from the 1980s which follow on from La Civilizacíon … The works from the cycle Relecturas de la Biblia may provoke strong feelings even today: Nazi terror meets Catholic propaganda, combat tanks and long-range missiles protected by angels, the clergy at the Vatican contemplating the Holocaust as though it were a Last Judgment with God’s blessing, regimes of military and religious power hand in hand in the same picture. A hell on earth—forged of steel tubes, cyanide, and glorioles.
Christopher Williams
Christopher Williams
Berlin - Hardenbergstrasse 22?24
until 29-02-2020

Christopher Williams Rooted in the medium of photography, Christopher Williams examines the use and agency of images as they function within the industrial culture of the late capitalist era, investigating its systems of meaning and classification.

Christopher Williams Rooted in the medium of photography, Christopher Williams examines the use and agency of images as they function within the industrial culture of the late capitalist era, investigating its systems of meaning and classification.
Pablo Picasso x Thomas Scheibitz
Pablo Picasso x Thomas Scheibitz
Berlin - Schlossstrasse 1
until 02-02-2020

Pablo Picasso x Thomas Scheibitz – Zeichen Bühne Lexikon Thomas Scheibitz (b. 1968 in Radeberg near Dresden) is one of few contemporary artists to work so diversely with variable elements and references derived equally from everyday life and the pool of art history. His dense, often brightly coloured paintings and schematic, often puristic sculptures can be understood as montages of a freely interpreted reality. The works manifest themselves as complex caches of images or objects into which everyday visual culture has been inscribed and highly condensed by Scheibitz’s formal vocabulary. Pablo Picasso and Cubism’s influence on the artist is unmistakable. » Of all the great ‘isms’ of the 20th century«, explains Thomas Scheibitz, »Cubism is the most radical and has remained the most influential.« In this exhibition, the Museum Berggruen, dedicated to the art of Picasso and his time, spans an arc from classical Modernism to the art of the present. Each of the some 45 objects shows that even though Picasso and Scheibitz aren’t using the same motifs, they do share a very similar approach to art. Both artists understand their work as an open process that incessantly leads to new variations and developments building on previously found solutions. Nothing stays static. Both artists also adhere to the fundamental premises of painting and sculpture. The exhibition is conceived as a direct juxtaposition of >PicassoScheibitz<, as an open parcours through the Museum Berggruen. The underlying differences in daily life that are also reflected in each work—of Paris as it used to be and Berlin today—could hardly be greater. All the more striking are the formal and content-related parallels as well as each artist’s struggle for credibility or validity—in the context of a fragile, unstable world (which existed in Picasso’s time as well).

Pablo Picasso x Thomas Scheibitz – Zeichen Bühne Lexikon Thomas Scheibitz (b. 1968 in Radeberg near Dresden) is one of few contemporary artists to work so diversely with variable elements and references derived equally from everyday life and the pool of art history. His dense, often brightly coloured paintings and schematic, often puristic sculptures can be understood as montages of a freely interpreted reality. The works manifest themselves as complex caches of images or objects into which everyday visual culture has been inscribed and highly condensed by Scheibitz’s formal vocabulary. Pablo Picasso and Cubism’s influence on the artist is unmistakable. » Of all the great ‘isms’ of the 20th century«, explains Thomas Scheibitz, »Cubism is the most radical and has remained the most influential.« In this exhibition, the Museum Berggruen, dedicated to the art of Picasso and his time, spans an arc from classical Modernism to the art of the present. Each of the some 45 objects shows that even though Picasso and Scheibitz aren’t using the same motifs, they do share a very similar approach to art. Both artists understand their work as an open process that incessantly leads to new variations and developments building on previously found solutions. Nothing stays static. Both artists also adhere to the fundamental premises of painting and sculpture. The exhibition is conceived as a direct juxtaposition of >PicassoScheibitz<, as an open parcours through the Museum Berggruen. The underlying differences in daily life that are also reflected in each work—of Paris as it used to be and Berlin today—could hardly be greater. All the more striking are the formal and content-related parallels as well as each artist’s struggle for credibility or validity—in the context of a fragile, unstable world (which existed in Picasso’s time as well).
Stan Douglas
Stan Douglas
Berlin - Leipziger Str. 60, entrance: Jerusalemer Str.
until 01-03-2020

Stan Douglas – Splicing Block The exhibition SPLICING BLOCK examines the relationship between music and society, and is at the same time a reflection on the media of film and photography. The works reconstruct and imagine the 1960s and 70s–an era distinguished by (de-)colonization and migration, but one equally permeated by jazz, underground disco, and Afrobeat.

Stan Douglas – Splicing Block The exhibition SPLICING BLOCK examines the relationship between music and society, and is at the same time a reflection on the media of film and photography. The works reconstruct and imagine the 1960s and 70s–an era distinguished by (de-)colonization and migration, but one equally permeated by jazz, underground disco, and Afrobeat.
Anthony Caro
Anthony Caro
Berlin - Matthäikirchplatz
until 12-07-2020

Anthony Caro – The Last Judgement Sculpture from the Würth Collection Together with the Würth Collection, in the central hall of the Gemäldegalerie, the Staatliche Museen zu Berlin is presenting The Last Judgement Sculpture, a major work by the British artist Anthony Caro (1924–2013). Right next door to the Old Masters, this monumental 25-part installation forms a sweeping ensemble of forms united by the overarching theme of the Last Judgement.  Since the mid-17th century, the theme of the Last Judgement has rarely been addressed in the visual arts. Numerous paintings, sculptures and reliefs from the Middle Ages into the early modern period, however, bear testament to the popularity this subject matter once enjoyed. The striking artistic sophistication that these depictions achieved can be observed in the Gemäldegalerie, which boasts a range of outstanding painterly visions conceived by the Old Masters. Right next door to these works, from 20 December 2019, The Last Judgement Sculpture provides visitors with the chance to jump forward through the history of art: in the central hall, they can discover British sculptor Anthony Caro’s unique take on the theme of the Last Judgement.

Anthony Caro – The Last Judgement Sculpture from the Würth Collection Together with the Würth Collection, in the central hall of the Gemäldegalerie, the Staatliche Museen zu Berlin is presenting The Last Judgement Sculpture, a major work by the British artist Anthony Caro (1924–2013). Right next door to the Old Masters, this monumental 25-part installation forms a sweeping ensemble of forms united by the overarching theme of the Last Judgement.  Since the mid-17th century, the theme of the Last Judgement has rarely been addressed in the visual arts. Numerous paintings, sculptures and reliefs from the Middle Ages into the early modern period, however, bear testament to the popularity this subject matter once enjoyed. The striking artistic sophistication that these depictions achieved can be observed in the Gemäldegalerie, which boasts a range of outstanding painterly visions conceived by the Old Masters. Right next door to these works, from 20 December 2019, The Last Judgement Sculpture provides visitors with the chance to jump forward through the history of art: in the central hall, they can discover British sculptor Anthony Caro’s unique take on the theme of the Last Judgement.
Body Performance
Body Performance
Berlin - Jebensstrasse 2
until 19-03-2020

Body Performance Vanessa Beecroft, Yang Fudong, Inez & Vinoodh, Jürgen Klauke, Robert Longo, Robert Mapplethorpe, Helmut Newton, Barbara Probst, Viviane Sassen, Cindy Sherman, Bernd Uhlig, Erwin Wurm This group exhibition brings together photo sequences whose origins lie in performance art, dance, and other staged events, complemented by conceptual photography series. With their common focus on the human body, the images document or interpret performances, which in many cases have also been initiated by the photographers themselves.

Body Performance Vanessa Beecroft, Yang Fudong, Inez & Vinoodh, Jürgen Klauke, Robert Longo, Robert Mapplethorpe, Helmut Newton, Barbara Probst, Viviane Sassen, Cindy Sherman, Bernd Uhlig, Erwin Wurm This group exhibition brings together photo sequences whose origins lie in performance art, dance, and other staged events, complemented by conceptual photography series. With their common focus on the human body, the images document or interpret performances, which in many cases have also been initiated by the photographers themselves.
Micro Era
Micro Era
Berlin - Matthäikirchplatz 6
until 26-01-2020

Micro Era. ?Media Art from China Cao Fei, Lu Yang, Fang Di, Zhang Peili Curated by Anna-Catharina Gebbers with Victor Wang, and Yang Beichen / Curatorial Advisor: Pi Li From documentary film pictures, and the adapted use of classic film language to the aesthetics of Japanese anime, the works of art in this exhibition focus on and explore relationships between mind, body and technology, with installations and single-channel-videos ranging from the 1980s to the present. Historically, within a Euro-American context, video art is often regarded as a democratising art form – through the rapid circulation of information and global events by fast-access technologies. The artists participating in the exhibition, Cao Fei (*1978), Fang Di (*1987), Lu Yang (*1984) and Zhang Peili (*1957), scrutinise this thesis of democratisation by reflecting in their visual language the mass production of goods as well as how images and virtual subjectivities are produced and consumed, and how we understand our world through imaging technology.  

Micro Era. ?Media Art from China Cao Fei, Lu Yang, Fang Di, Zhang Peili Curated by Anna-Catharina Gebbers with Victor Wang, and Yang Beichen / Curatorial Advisor: Pi Li From documentary film pictures, and the adapted use of classic film language to the aesthetics of Japanese anime, the works of art in this exhibition focus on and explore relationships between mind, body and technology, with installations and single-channel-videos ranging from the 1980s to the present. Historically, within a Euro-American context, video art is often regarded as a democratising art form – through the rapid circulation of information and global events by fast-access technologies. The artists participating in the exhibition, Cao Fei (*1978), Fang Di (*1987), Lu Yang (*1984) and Zhang Peili (*1957), scrutinise this thesis of democratisation by reflecting in their visual language the mass production of goods as well as how images and virtual subjectivities are produced and consumed, and how we understand our world through imaging technology.  
Original Bauhaus
Original Bauhaus
Berlin - Alte Jakobstrasse 124?128
until 27-01-2020

Original Bauhaus The Bauhaus existed for only 14 years in Germany, but for 100 years its ideas have now been passed on and its products relaunched, imitated and further developed. Marking the centenary of the Bauhaus’s founding, the Bauhaus-Archiv / Museum für Gestaltung’s exhibition at the Ber-linische Galerie is presenting famous, familiar and forgotten Bauhaus originals and recounting the history behind the objects. Around 1,000 exhibits will be on display: art and design from the Bau-haus-Archiv’s collection, exceptional loans from international collections and artistic positions which take a new look at the Bauhaus legacy. On the basis of 14 key objects, the exhibition will develop 14 case histories: How did the woman sitting on the tubular-steel chair become the most famous anonymous figure from the Bauhaus? Does the Haus am Horn in Weimar have a secret twin? Why have Marianne Brandt’s tea infusers which were created as prototypes for industrial production always remained one-of-a-kind pieces? “original bauhaus” sheds light on how unique work and series, remake and original are inseparably linked in the history of the Bauhaus. This is because Bauhaus artists did not see art and technology as opposed to each other. Instead, they used technical innovations to create exceptional works of art, and they took serial production into account from the moment they began drafting their de-signs. Today there have been almost 100 years of responses to the Bauhaus, as compared to 14 years of Bauhaus production. Reproductions, re-editions and remakes have made the Bauhaus the 20th century’s most influential school of architecture, design and art.

Original Bauhaus The Bauhaus existed for only 14 years in Germany, but for 100 years its ideas have now been passed on and its products relaunched, imitated and further developed. Marking the centenary of the Bauhaus’s founding, the Bauhaus-Archiv / Museum für Gestaltung’s exhibition at the Ber-linische Galerie is presenting famous, familiar and forgotten Bauhaus originals and recounting the history behind the objects. Around 1,000 exhibits will be on display: art and design from the Bau-haus-Archiv’s collection, exceptional loans from international collections and artistic positions which take a new look at the Bauhaus legacy. On the basis of 14 key objects, the exhibition will develop 14 case histories: How did the woman sitting on the tubular-steel chair become the most famous anonymous figure from the Bauhaus? Does the Haus am Horn in Weimar have a secret twin? Why have Marianne Brandt’s tea infusers which were created as prototypes for industrial production always remained one-of-a-kind pieces? “original bauhaus” sheds light on how unique work and series, remake and original are inseparably linked in the history of the Bauhaus. This is because Bauhaus artists did not see art and technology as opposed to each other. Instead, they used technical innovations to create exceptional works of art, and they took serial production into account from the moment they began drafting their de-signs. Today there have been almost 100 years of responses to the Bauhaus, as compared to 14 years of Bauhaus production. Reproductions, re-editions and remakes have made the Bauhaus the 20th century’s most influential school of architecture, design and art.
Resonating Spaces
Resonating Spaces
Basel - Baselstrasse 101
until 26-01-2020

Resonating Spaces Leonor Antunes, Silvia Bächli, Toba Khedoori, Susan Philipsz, Rachel Whiteread "Resonating Spaces" is the title of the exhibition at Fondation Beyeler at the end of this year. The artists featured in the exhibition are Leonor Antunes, Silvia Bächli, Toba Khedoori, Susan Philipsz and Rachel Whiteread. Instead of making a comprehensive group show with numerous works, the exhibition will present exemplary works by a few internationally renowned contemporary artists.

Resonating Spaces Leonor Antunes, Silvia Bächli, Toba Khedoori, Susan Philipsz, Rachel Whiteread "Resonating Spaces" is the title of the exhibition at Fondation Beyeler at the end of this year. The artists featured in the exhibition are Leonor Antunes, Silvia Bächli, Toba Khedoori, Susan Philipsz and Rachel Whiteread. Instead of making a comprehensive group show with numerous works, the exhibition will present exemplary works by a few internationally renowned contemporary artists.
Rirkrit Tiravanija
Rirkrit Tiravanija
Basel - Drahtzugstrasse 67
until 31-05-2020

Rirkrit Tiravanija – The Odious Smell of Truth This is the second work of a ten-year programme of public installations produced by Beat Raeber, Galerie at Drahtzugstrasse 67 in Basel. Rirkrit Tiravanija's work is characterised by great versatility and a constant involvement of the viewer – exchange and freedom of interpretation are essential components of his practice. Since the late 1980s, he has been experimenting with open, sometimes surprising formats that question how the classical conceptions of art can be extended, how the boundaries of an exhibition space broadened, and its limiting barriers circumvented. Creating spaces for relationships, encounters and reactions forms the basis of his works. He works with different cultural contexts, linking them and using them as references. As a modern nomad – the Thai artist was born in Buenos Aires and lives between New York, Berlin and Chiang Mai – he uses the distinctive and connecting aspects of Western and Eastern ways of life and philosophies and integrates them into his work. Further influences come from literature, pop and news culture. Exploiting the mechanisms of propaganda or advertising, utilising their effect patterns, such as the oscillation between promises, deception, and applied truths, are key part of his work.  

Rirkrit Tiravanija – The Odious Smell of Truth This is the second work of a ten-year programme of public installations produced by Beat Raeber, Galerie at Drahtzugstrasse 67 in Basel. Rirkrit Tiravanija's work is characterised by great versatility and a constant involvement of the viewer – exchange and freedom of interpretation are essential components of his practice. Since the late 1980s, he has been experimenting with open, sometimes surprising formats that question how the classical conceptions of art can be extended, how the boundaries of an exhibition space broadened, and its limiting barriers circumvented. Creating spaces for relationships, encounters and reactions forms the basis of his works. He works with different cultural contexts, linking them and using them as references. As a modern nomad – the Thai artist was born in Buenos Aires and lives between New York, Berlin and Chiang Mai – he uses the distinctive and connecting aspects of Western and Eastern ways of life and philosophies and integrates them into his work. Further influences come from literature, pop and news culture. Exploiting the mechanisms of propaganda or advertising, utilising their effect patterns, such as the oscillation between promises, deception, and applied truths, are key part of his work.  
Carroll Dunham & Albert Oehlen
Carroll Dunham & Albert Oehlen
Düsseldorf - Grabbeplatz 4
until 01-03-2020

Carroll Dunham & Albert Oehlen – Bäume / Trees The world-renowned painters Carroll Dunham (*1949 in New Haven, Connecticut, lives there and in New York) and Albert Oehlen (*1954 in Krefeld, lives in Gais, Switzerland), who are enormously influential especially for a younger generation of artists, will be featured together in an exhibition for the first time. Both artists are known for their extremely independent and complex oeuvre. At the very moment when Albert Oehlen shifted from figurative “Bad Painting” toward abstraction in the late 1980s, Carroll Dunham went in the opposite direction, developing from his early organic abstract work into a surreal figuration in which different characters shape entire blocks of work, which in turn build on each other with an almost conceptual rigor. While Dunham introduced a figure with a phallic nose wearing a hat in his work beginning in the 1990s, which years later was replaced with female “bathers” with sometimes grotesquely exaggerated sexual organs, Oehlen proclaimed his “post-non-figurative” painting and was one the first artists to work with digital techniques. Both share the fact that within their self-imposed parameters they continually test the possibilities of painting, tirelessly create signs, and cover up their tracks, while experimenting with techniques, surfaces, and structures in an extremely independent manner. Nowhere is this more evident than in the subject of trees, which both artists have repeatedly included in their work and interpreted in their own ways. While Albert Oehlen’s trees are bare and leafless, with roots that sometimes dominate the scene and become the figurative impetus in abstract pictures, in Carroll Dunham’s work they are shown blooming, whipped by the wind, or freshly felled and dead. The combination of Dunham and Oehlen, each of whom sees the other as “probably the world’s best painter of trees,” suggests countless philosophical, theological, sociological, ecological, and of course art-historical views based on the subject of the tree. From the biblical Tree of Knowledge and thus the place of the Fall of Man to the favorite subject of the Romantics, and from Piet Mondrian’s radical modernist fragmentation to Joseph Beuys’s planting of 7,000 oaks, the tree has long been a central subject of our religious, intellectual, and cultural history. When Carroll Dunham and Albert Oehlen continually declare trees their central subject, they are of course aware of all these cultural- and art-historical references. And yet, for them trees are an opportunity for pure painting, a place for tireless experimentation, a test case for the untapped potential of an ancient analogue medium. Ultimately it is about the question of the abstraction of the world, and thus for Dunham and Oehlen nothing less than the visual meaning of life in art.

Carroll Dunham & Albert Oehlen – Bäume / Trees The world-renowned painters Carroll Dunham (*1949 in New Haven, Connecticut, lives there and in New York) and Albert Oehlen (*1954 in Krefeld, lives in Gais, Switzerland), who are enormously influential especially for a younger generation of artists, will be featured together in an exhibition for the first time. Both artists are known for their extremely independent and complex oeuvre. At the very moment when Albert Oehlen shifted from figurative “Bad Painting” toward abstraction in the late 1980s, Carroll Dunham went in the opposite direction, developing from his early organic abstract work into a surreal figuration in which different characters shape entire blocks of work, which in turn build on each other with an almost conceptual rigor. While Dunham introduced a figure with a phallic nose wearing a hat in his work beginning in the 1990s, which years later was replaced with female “bathers” with sometimes grotesquely exaggerated sexual organs, Oehlen proclaimed his “post-non-figurative” painting and was one the first artists to work with digital techniques. Both share the fact that within their self-imposed parameters they continually test the possibilities of painting, tirelessly create signs, and cover up their tracks, while experimenting with techniques, surfaces, and structures in an extremely independent manner. Nowhere is this more evident than in the subject of trees, which both artists have repeatedly included in their work and interpreted in their own ways. While Albert Oehlen’s trees are bare and leafless, with roots that sometimes dominate the scene and become the figurative impetus in abstract pictures, in Carroll Dunham’s work they are shown blooming, whipped by the wind, or freshly felled and dead. The combination of Dunham and Oehlen, each of whom sees the other as “probably the world’s best painter of trees,” suggests countless philosophical, theological, sociological, ecological, and of course art-historical views based on the subject of the tree. From the biblical Tree of Knowledge and thus the place of the Fall of Man to the favorite subject of the Romantics, and from Piet Mondrian’s radical modernist fragmentation to Joseph Beuys’s planting of 7,000 oaks, the tree has long been a central subject of our religious, intellectual, and cultural history. When Carroll Dunham and Albert Oehlen continually declare trees their central subject, they are of course aware of all these cultural- and art-historical references. And yet, for them trees are an opportunity for pure painting, a place for tireless experimentation, a test case for the untapped potential of an ancient analogue medium. Ultimately it is about the question of the abstraction of the world, and thus for Dunham and Oehlen nothing less than the visual meaning of life in art.
Carsten Nicolai
Carsten Nicolai
Düsseldorf - Ständehausstrasse 1
until 19-01-2020

Carsten Nicolai – Parallax Symmetry The exhibition provides an overview of the work of the artist and musician Carsten Nicolai, who has been working at the interface of visual art, music, and science since the early 1990s. As a musician under the pseudonym Alva Noto, Nicolai is one of the best-known representatives of contemporary electronic music of his generation. Since his participation in documenta X (1997), his visual artworks have also been exhibited worldwide.  Using electronic sound and light, Nicolai creates minimalist installations, sound performances, and visualizations of physical phenomena that reflect systems and structures of the media world. In K21, Nicolai will organize the expansive space on the lower floor as an open, dually laid out set for the presentation of roughly forty multimedia works, many of which are designed for interaction.

Carsten Nicolai – Parallax Symmetry The exhibition provides an overview of the work of the artist and musician Carsten Nicolai, who has been working at the interface of visual art, music, and science since the early 1990s. As a musician under the pseudonym Alva Noto, Nicolai is one of the best-known representatives of contemporary electronic music of his generation. Since his participation in documenta X (1997), his visual artworks have also been exhibited worldwide.  Using electronic sound and light, Nicolai creates minimalist installations, sound performances, and visualizations of physical phenomena that reflect systems and structures of the media world. In K21, Nicolai will organize the expansive space on the lower floor as an open, dually laid out set for the presentation of roughly forty multimedia works, many of which are designed for interaction.
Alex Wissel
Alex Wissel
Düsseldorf - Grabbeplatz 4
until 09-02-2020

Alex Wissel – Die Pest  In his solo exhibition entitled with Die Pest (The Plague), Alex Wissel developed a site-specific installation of drawings, sculptures and text, based on his research on historical artist festivals in Düsseldorf and the history of the Grabbeplatz.

Alex Wissel – Die Pest  In his solo exhibition entitled with Die Pest (The Plague), Alex Wissel developed a site-specific installation of drawings, sculptures and text, based on his research on historical artist festivals in Düsseldorf and the history of the Grabbeplatz.
Hedda Schattanik & Roman Szczesny
Hedda Schattanik & Roman Szczesny
Düsseldorf - Grabbeplatz 4
until 09-02-2020

Hedda Schattanik & Roman Szczesny – Unterhaltung auf Kosten eines Traurigen Together with Roman Szczesny, Hedda Schattanik presents video works as well as sculptures and photographs exclusively produced on the occasion of Unterhaltung auf Kosten eines Traurigen (Conversation at the Expense of a Sad One).

Hedda Schattanik & Roman Szczesny – Unterhaltung auf Kosten eines Traurigen Together with Roman Szczesny, Hedda Schattanik presents video works as well as sculptures and photographs exclusively produced on the occasion of Unterhaltung auf Kosten eines Traurigen (Conversation at the Expense of a Sad One).
In the Spotlight of the Night
In the Spotlight of the Night
Düsseldorf - Kaistrasse 10
until 09-02-2020

In the Spotlight of the Night – Cities never Sleep Andreas Bunte, Fort, Matthias Lahme, Klara Lidén, Ann Lislegaard, Claus Richter, Alona Rodeh, Norbert Schwontkowski, Tobias Zielony The exhibition In the Spotlight of the Night – Cities never Sleep follows various protagonists roaming through the city by night. Before the backdrop of a persistent commercialization of all aspects of life, failing to spare even one’s sleep, the exhibition project seeks out the more marginalized areas of society, the parallel worlds, where one still finds an uncontrollable nocturnal space as a counterfort to daytime.

In the Spotlight of the Night – Cities never Sleep Andreas Bunte, Fort, Matthias Lahme, Klara Lidén, Ann Lislegaard, Claus Richter, Alona Rodeh, Norbert Schwontkowski, Tobias Zielony The exhibition In the Spotlight of the Night – Cities never Sleep follows various protagonists roaming through the city by night. Before the backdrop of a persistent commercialization of all aspects of life, failing to spare even one’s sleep, the exhibition project seeks out the more marginalized areas of society, the parallel worlds, where one still finds an uncontrollable nocturnal space as a counterfort to daytime.
Gilbert & George
Gilbert & George
Los Angeles - 5900 Wilshire Boulevard
until 20-01-2020

Gilbert & George – The Paradisical Pictures Gilbert & George have created art together as one visionary, artistic entity since 1967, when they met at Saint Martins School of Art in London. Recognized by institutions and collections worldwide for their groundbreaking, fiercely independent and influential art across diverse mediums, they continue to produce confrontational, richly emotive and thought-provoking art that, more than fifty years later, pushes into ever-new territory. Sprüth Magers is honored to début Gilbert & George’s PARADISICAL PICTURES, a new group of thirty-five major pictures that mark the artists’ first solo exhibition in Los Angeles in nearly two decades. In these dense, richly colored vistas, references emanate from disparate eras of cultural history, including nineteenth-century Romanticism and the pop milieu of science fiction and comic books. No object is necessarily as it seems in the PARADISICAL PICTURES’ strange, mind-altering scenes. 

Gilbert & George – The Paradisical Pictures Gilbert & George have created art together as one visionary, artistic entity since 1967, when they met at Saint Martins School of Art in London. Recognized by institutions and collections worldwide for their groundbreaking, fiercely independent and influential art across diverse mediums, they continue to produce confrontational, richly emotive and thought-provoking art that, more than fifty years later, pushes into ever-new territory. Sprüth Magers is honored to début Gilbert & George’s PARADISICAL PICTURES, a new group of thirty-five major pictures that mark the artists’ first solo exhibition in Los Angeles in nearly two decades. In these dense, richly colored vistas, references emanate from disparate eras of cultural history, including nineteenth-century Romanticism and the pop milieu of science fiction and comic books. No object is necessarily as it seems in the PARADISICAL PICTURES’ strange, mind-altering scenes. 
Markus Oehlen
Markus Oehlen
Los Angeles - 4619 West Washington Boulevard
until 24-02-2020

Markus Oehlen – Celtic Funk Etcetera

Markus Oehlen – Celtic Funk Etcetera
Shirin Neshat
Shirin Neshat
Los Angeles - 221 South Grand Avenue
until 16-02-2020

Shirin Neshat – I Will Greet the Sun Again "Shirin Neshat: I Will Greet the Sun Again" is the largest exhibition to date of internationally acclaimed artist Shirin Neshat’s approximately 30-year career. Taking its title from a poem by Iranian poet Forugh Farrokhzad, the exhibition (which presents approximately 230 photographs and eight video works) offers a rare glimpse into the evolution of Neshat’s artistic journey as she explores topics of exile, displacement, and identity with beauty, dynamic formal invention, and poetic grace. Beginning with her early photograph series, Women of Allah, the exhibition also features iconic video works such as Rapture, Turbulent, and Passage, monumental photography installations including The Book of Kings and The Home of My Eyes, and Land of Dreams, a new, ambitious work encompassing a body of photographs and two immersive videos that will make its global debut in the exhibition.

Shirin Neshat – I Will Greet the Sun Again "Shirin Neshat: I Will Greet the Sun Again" is the largest exhibition to date of internationally acclaimed artist Shirin Neshat’s approximately 30-year career. Taking its title from a poem by Iranian poet Forugh Farrokhzad, the exhibition (which presents approximately 230 photographs and eight video works) offers a rare glimpse into the evolution of Neshat’s artistic journey as she explores topics of exile, displacement, and identity with beauty, dynamic formal invention, and poetic grace. Beginning with her early photograph series, Women of Allah, the exhibition also features iconic video works such as Rapture, Turbulent, and Passage, monumental photography installations including The Book of Kings and The Home of My Eyes, and Land of Dreams, a new, ambitious work encompassing a body of photographs and two immersive videos that will make its global debut in the exhibition.
Julie Mehretu
Julie Mehretu
Los Angeles - 5905 Wilshire Boulevard
until 22-03-2020

Julie Mehretu The first-ever comprehensive retrospective of Mehretu’s career, it covers over two decades of her examination of history, colonialism, capitalism, geopolitics, war, global uprising, diaspora, and displacement through the artistic strategies of abstraction, architecture, landscape, movement, and, most recently, figuration. Mehretu’s play with scale, as evident in her intimate drawings and large canvases and complex techniques in printmaking, will be explored in depth.

Julie Mehretu The first-ever comprehensive retrospective of Mehretu’s career, it covers over two decades of her examination of history, colonialism, capitalism, geopolitics, war, global uprising, diaspora, and displacement through the artistic strategies of abstraction, architecture, landscape, movement, and, most recently, figuration. Mehretu’s play with scale, as evident in her intimate drawings and large canvases and complex techniques in printmaking, will be explored in depth.
Forever Young
Forever Young
Munich - Türkenstrasse 19
until 26-04-2020

Forever Young: 10 Years Museum Brandhorst A lot has happened at the Museum Brandhorst since it opened in May 2009. Along with numerous exhibitions, the Brandhorst Collection has grown dramatically—from 700 to more than 1,200 artworks. It now ranks among the most important museum collections of contemporary art in Europe. The museum’s tenth birthday in May 2019 is the occasion for a large-scale exhibition drawn entirely from this expanded collection. Forever Young—10 Years Museum Brandhorst traces an arc ranging from the 1960s to the present day. Alongside renowned and popular highlights from the collection, a particular focus is placed on acquisitions from recent years—including major works by Charline von Heyl, Louise Lawler, Amy Sillman, Seth Price, Wolfgang Tillmans, Arthur Jafa, Alexandra Bircken, and Monika Baer, among others—many of which have never been shown in Munich. The exhibition includes some 250 works by 45 artists and has three main themes, each of which can stand alone and yet also make reference to one another. The first focuses on Andy Warhol and the ongoing legacy of Pop art, especially its often overlooked political and socio-critical dimensions. Unconventional lifestyles, the experience of marginalization due to skin color and sexual orientation, interventions in public space, and the intersection of art, fashion, and music all emerge as central concerns. The second strand concentrates on the controversial topic of subjectivity in contemporary society—and therefore also on the effects of late capitalism on identity formation. The third section presents a short history of painting since the 1960s, and specifically how this traditional artistic genre has expanded and adapted itself in recent decades through an engagement with emerging digital technologies and media dissemination, developments that have also been examined in a series of recent exhibitions at the museum, including Painting 2.0: Expression in the Information Age, Wade Guyton – The New York Studio, Kerstin Brätsch: Innovation and Jutta Koether – Tour de Madame.

Forever Young: 10 Years Museum Brandhorst A lot has happened at the Museum Brandhorst since it opened in May 2009. Along with numerous exhibitions, the Brandhorst Collection has grown dramatically—from 700 to more than 1,200 artworks. It now ranks among the most important museum collections of contemporary art in Europe. The museum’s tenth birthday in May 2019 is the occasion for a large-scale exhibition drawn entirely from this expanded collection. Forever Young—10 Years Museum Brandhorst traces an arc ranging from the 1960s to the present day. Alongside renowned and popular highlights from the collection, a particular focus is placed on acquisitions from recent years—including major works by Charline von Heyl, Louise Lawler, Amy Sillman, Seth Price, Wolfgang Tillmans, Arthur Jafa, Alexandra Bircken, and Monika Baer, among others—many of which have never been shown in Munich. The exhibition includes some 250 works by 45 artists and has three main themes, each of which can stand alone and yet also make reference to one another. The first focuses on Andy Warhol and the ongoing legacy of Pop art, especially its often overlooked political and socio-critical dimensions. Unconventional lifestyles, the experience of marginalization due to skin color and sexual orientation, interventions in public space, and the intersection of art, fashion, and music all emerge as central concerns. The second strand concentrates on the controversial topic of subjectivity in contemporary society—and therefore also on the effects of late capitalism on identity formation. The third section presents a short history of painting since the 1960s, and specifically how this traditional artistic genre has expanded and adapted itself in recent decades through an engagement with emerging digital technologies and media dissemination, developments that have also been examined in a series of recent exhibitions at the museum, including Painting 2.0: Expression in the Information Age, Wade Guyton – The New York Studio, Kerstin Brätsch: Innovation and Jutta Koether – Tour de Madame.