Art feed

Curated by Exhibitionary

Heji Shin
Heji Shin
Zürich - Löwenbräu Areal, Limmatstrasse 270
until 03-02-2019

Heji Shin Heji Shin is a New York–based German-Korean photographer. She works commercially on projects such as fashion shoots as well as in the—no less commercial—art world. Shin became known, amongst others, for her images commissioned by the American fashion label Eckhaus Latta and for Make Love, a much-discussed sex education book for teenagers, as well as for the image series #lonelygirl and Babies.

Heji Shin Heji Shin is a New York–based German-Korean photographer. She works commercially on projects such as fashion shoots as well as in the—no less commercial—art world. Shin became known, amongst others, for her images commissioned by the American fashion label Eckhaus Latta and for Make Love, a much-discussed sex education book for teenagers, as well as for the image series #lonelygirl and Babies.
Maria Eichhorn
Maria Eichhorn
Zürich - Löwenbräu Areal, Limmatstrasse 270
until 03-02-2019

Maria Eichhorn – Zwölf Arbeiten / Twelve Works (1988–2018) Reduction, the hallmark of the oeuvre of the artist Maria Eichhorn (b. Bamberg, Germany, 1962), is also the defining characteristic of her exhibition at the Migros Museum für Gegenwartskunst. It is evident in the number of works selected for the show—twelve, dating from the past thirty years—and their specific formal idiom. The presentation pointedly disrupts habits of seeing and makes room for fresh thinking. Eichhorn’s practice prompts critical scrutiny of entrenched norms that regiment everyday life and art, with a particular focus on socioeconomic processes. The particular issues she raises spotlight questions of value, time, property, and ownership, categories whose agency the artist deliberately undermines. Based on wide-ranging research, her art charts new forms of political action. Several of the works on display, including the seminal 72 Bilder (72 Pictures, 1992/93), are in the Migros Museum für Gegenwartskunst’s collection. Maria Eichhorn rose to international renown with contributions to numerous biennials, including the Venice Biennale (1993, 2001, and 2015), Documenta11 (2002), and documenta 14 (2017). The book Κτ?ριο ως περιουσ?α ?νευ ιδιοκτ?τη / Building as Unowned Property will be released by JRP | Ringier in conjunction with the exhibition in 2019. Maria Eichhorn lives and works in Berlin and Zurich. Her oeuvre has been the subject of numerous solo exhibitions, including, most recently, at the Chisenhale Gallery, London (2016), the Morris and Helen Belkin Art Gallery, Vancouver (2015), and the Kunsthaus Bregenz (2014). Eichhorn participated in documenta 11, Kassel (2002), documenta 14 in Athens and Kassel (2017), the 45th and 56th Venice Biennales (1993, 2015), and the 4th and 9th Istanbul Biennales (1995, 2005).

Maria Eichhorn – Zwölf Arbeiten / Twelve Works (1988–2018) Reduction, the hallmark of the oeuvre of the artist Maria Eichhorn (b. Bamberg, Germany, 1962), is also the defining characteristic of her exhibition at the Migros Museum für Gegenwartskunst. It is evident in the number of works selected for the show—twelve, dating from the past thirty years—and their specific formal idiom. The presentation pointedly disrupts habits of seeing and makes room for fresh thinking. Eichhorn’s practice prompts critical scrutiny of entrenched norms that regiment everyday life and art, with a particular focus on socioeconomic processes. The particular issues she raises spotlight questions of value, time, property, and ownership, categories whose agency the artist deliberately undermines. Based on wide-ranging research, her art charts new forms of political action. Several of the works on display, including the seminal 72 Bilder (72 Pictures, 1992/93), are in the Migros Museum für Gegenwartskunst’s collection. Maria Eichhorn rose to international renown with contributions to numerous biennials, including the Venice Biennale (1993, 2001, and 2015), Documenta11 (2002), and documenta 14 (2017). The book Κτ?ριο ως περιουσ?α ?νευ ιδιοκτ?τη / Building as Unowned Property will be released by JRP | Ringier in conjunction with the exhibition in 2019. Maria Eichhorn lives and works in Berlin and Zurich. Her oeuvre has been the subject of numerous solo exhibitions, including, most recently, at the Chisenhale Gallery, London (2016), the Morris and Helen Belkin Art Gallery, Vancouver (2015), and the Kunsthaus Bregenz (2014). Eichhorn participated in documenta 11, Kassel (2002), documenta 14 in Athens and Kassel (2017), the 45th and 56th Venice Biennales (1993, 2015), and the 4th and 9th Istanbul Biennales (1995, 2005).
Schmaltz
Schmaltz
Vienna - Linke Wienzeile 36 / 1C
until 19-01-2019

Schmaltz   Eric Bainbridge, Martin Belou, Lorenzo Bernet, Massimiliano Bomba, Lupo Borgonovo, Aline Bouvy, Joanne Burke, Monster Chetwynd, Masaya Chiba, COBRA, June Crespo, Keren Cytter, Michele Di Menna, Thea Djordjadze, Melanie Ebenhoch, Carla Filipe, Alex Frost, Luisa Gardini, Thomas Geiger, Rob Halverson, Katharina Höglinger, Kenji Ide, Bleta Jahaj, Thomas Jeppe, Ken Kagami, Tan Kagami, Andrea Kvas, Joel Kyack, Sonja Câmara / LABAREDA, Adriana Lara, Kris Lemsalu, James Lewis, Candice Lin, f.marquespenteado, Paulo Mendes, Gijs Milius, Musa paradisiaca, Sarah Ortmeyer, Anastasia Pavlou, Oliver Payne, Georg Petermichl, Chadwick Rantanen, Roland Rauschmeier, Pepo Salazar, Toni Schmale, Philipp Schwalb, Robert Schwarz, Lisa Sitko, Teresa Solar, Life Sport, Zin Taylor, Lukas Thaler, Jos De Gruyter & Harald Thys, Gregor Titze, Urara Tsuchiya, Amalia Vekri, Astrid Wagner, Gregor Wright, Yui Yaegashi

Schmaltz   Eric Bainbridge, Martin Belou, Lorenzo Bernet, Massimiliano Bomba, Lupo Borgonovo, Aline Bouvy, Joanne Burke, Monster Chetwynd, Masaya Chiba, COBRA, June Crespo, Keren Cytter, Michele Di Menna, Thea Djordjadze, Melanie Ebenhoch, Carla Filipe, Alex Frost, Luisa Gardini, Thomas Geiger, Rob Halverson, Katharina Höglinger, Kenji Ide, Bleta Jahaj, Thomas Jeppe, Ken Kagami, Tan Kagami, Andrea Kvas, Joel Kyack, Sonja Câmara / LABAREDA, Adriana Lara, Kris Lemsalu, James Lewis, Candice Lin, f.marquespenteado, Paulo Mendes, Gijs Milius, Musa paradisiaca, Sarah Ortmeyer, Anastasia Pavlou, Oliver Payne, Georg Petermichl, Chadwick Rantanen, Roland Rauschmeier, Pepo Salazar, Toni Schmale, Philipp Schwalb, Robert Schwarz, Lisa Sitko, Teresa Solar, Life Sport, Zin Taylor, Lukas Thaler, Jos De Gruyter & Harald Thys, Gregor Titze, Urara Tsuchiya, Amalia Vekri, Astrid Wagner, Gregor Wright, Yui Yaegashi
Melanie Ebenhoch
Melanie Ebenhoch
Vienna - Volkertstraße 17
until 03-02-2019

Melanie Ebenhoch – Hotel  Melanie Ebenhoch (born 1985, lives and works in Vienna) recently had solo exhibitions at VIS, Hamburg, Galerie Tobias Naehring, Leipzig, and For Seasons, Zurich (all in 2018). Her work has been shown in group exhibitions at Guimaraes, Vienna (2018), Pina, Vienna (2018), Palazzio Lancia, Turin (2017), and MAUVE, Vienna (2016). In 2019, she will present a solo show at Galerie der Stadt Schwaz, Tyrol.   

Melanie Ebenhoch – Hotel  Melanie Ebenhoch (born 1985, lives and works in Vienna) recently had solo exhibitions at VIS, Hamburg, Galerie Tobias Naehring, Leipzig, and For Seasons, Zurich (all in 2018). Her work has been shown in group exhibitions at Guimaraes, Vienna (2018), Pina, Vienna (2018), Palazzio Lancia, Turin (2017), and MAUVE, Vienna (2016). In 2019, she will present a solo show at Galerie der Stadt Schwaz, Tyrol.   
Kris Lemsalu
Kris Lemsalu
Vienna - Friedrichstrasse 12
until 20-01-2019

Kris Lemsalu   The Estonian artist Kris Lemsalu creates sculptures, installations, and performances that fuse the animal kingdom with humankind, nature with the artificial, beauty with repulsion, lightness with gravity, life with death. She combines animal bodies and porcelain objects with found (natural) materials such as furs, leather, seashells, wool, or paper in theatrical installations that whisk us off into a world of the fantastic imagination. Endeavoring to erase any distance between herself and her objects, the artist also uses her installations as stages for performance pieces in her sculptures become an integral part of her attire.   Although Lemsalu’s work often broaches dark and raw themes, it feels fragile and delicate, incorporating references to ancient mythologies and rituals from various cultures. In addition to abstract sculptures, her art also includes self-portraits and photographs, many of which depict her as a creature with masculine as well as feminine traits. Combining fabrics, makeup, wigs, and other props, she creates short-lived exotic identities for herself.

Kris Lemsalu   The Estonian artist Kris Lemsalu creates sculptures, installations, and performances that fuse the animal kingdom with humankind, nature with the artificial, beauty with repulsion, lightness with gravity, life with death. She combines animal bodies and porcelain objects with found (natural) materials such as furs, leather, seashells, wool, or paper in theatrical installations that whisk us off into a world of the fantastic imagination. Endeavoring to erase any distance between herself and her objects, the artist also uses her installations as stages for performance pieces in her sculptures become an integral part of her attire.   Although Lemsalu’s work often broaches dark and raw themes, it feels fragile and delicate, incorporating references to ancient mythologies and rituals from various cultures. In addition to abstract sculptures, her art also includes self-portraits and photographs, many of which depict her as a creature with masculine as well as feminine traits. Combining fabrics, makeup, wigs, and other props, she creates short-lived exotic identities for herself.
Tomás Saraceno
Tomás Saraceno
Vienna - Kreuzherrengasse 1
until 02-11-2019

Tomás Saraceno – Aerocene Over the next twelve months an attraction of a very special kind awaits visitors to Vienna’s baroque Karlskirche [St Charles Church] on Karlsplatz. Two air-filled spheres with a diameter of over 10m and 7m respectively – will be floating within the cupola of this magnificent baroque building. The installation Aerocene by Argentine artist Tomás Saraceno is the first project by a contemporary artist to feature as part of Karlskirche Contemporary Arts, a programme launched in 2018. This new programme is organised and financed entirely through private means and intends to connect the baroque church building with contemporary art in a way that is unique worldwide.

Tomás Saraceno – Aerocene Over the next twelve months an attraction of a very special kind awaits visitors to Vienna’s baroque Karlskirche [St Charles Church] on Karlsplatz. Two air-filled spheres with a diameter of over 10m and 7m respectively – will be floating within the cupola of this magnificent baroque building. The installation Aerocene by Argentine artist Tomás Saraceno is the first project by a contemporary artist to feature as part of Karlskirche Contemporary Arts, a programme launched in 2018. This new programme is organised and financed entirely through private means and intends to connect the baroque church building with contemporary art in a way that is unique worldwide.
Anthony McCall
Anthony McCall
New York - 475 Tenth Avenue
until 26-01-2019

Anthony McCall – Split Second  Sean Kelly is delighted to announce Split Second, Anthony McCall’s sixth solo exhibition with the gallery. Occupying the entire space, the exhibition features two new ‘solid-light’ installations, McCall’s seminal horizontal work Doubling Back, 2003, and a curated selection of black and white photographs, a number of which will be exhibited in the US for the first time. There will be an opening reception on Thursday, December 13, 6-8pm. The artist will be present. Anthony McCall is widely recognized for his ‘solid-light’ installations, a series he began in 1973 with the ground-breaking Line Describing a Cone, in which a volumetric form composed of projected light slowly evolves in three-dimensional space. In Split Second, McCall further expands the development of this series, creating a dialogue between two new works, Split Second and Split Second (Mirror). Split Secondconsists of two separate points of light emanating from the top and bottom of the gallery’s back wall. The projections expand to reveal a flat blade and an elliptical cone, which combine to create a complex field of rotating, interpenetrating planes in space. Split Second (Mirror) is a single projection in which the “split” is created by interrupting the throw of light with a wall-sized mirror. The plane of light is reflected back onto itself, creating a shifting volumetric cone, which exists seamlessly both in real space and as a reflected object. 

Anthony McCall – Split Second  Sean Kelly is delighted to announce Split Second, Anthony McCall’s sixth solo exhibition with the gallery. Occupying the entire space, the exhibition features two new ‘solid-light’ installations, McCall’s seminal horizontal work Doubling Back, 2003, and a curated selection of black and white photographs, a number of which will be exhibited in the US for the first time. There will be an opening reception on Thursday, December 13, 6-8pm. The artist will be present. Anthony McCall is widely recognized for his ‘solid-light’ installations, a series he began in 1973 with the ground-breaking Line Describing a Cone, in which a volumetric form composed of projected light slowly evolves in three-dimensional space. In Split Second, McCall further expands the development of this series, creating a dialogue between two new works, Split Second and Split Second (Mirror). Split Secondconsists of two separate points of light emanating from the top and bottom of the gallery’s back wall. The projections expand to reveal a flat blade and an elliptical cone, which combine to create a complex field of rotating, interpenetrating planes in space. Split Second (Mirror) is a single projection in which the “split” is created by interrupting the throw of light with a wall-sized mirror. The plane of light is reflected back onto itself, creating a shifting volumetric cone, which exists seamlessly both in real space and as a reflected object. 
Richard Pettibone
Richard Pettibone
New York - 545 West 25th Street, 9th Floor
until 19-01-2019

Richard Pettibone – Endless Variation  The FLAG Art Foundation is pleased to present Richard Pettibone: Endless Variation. A prominent figure in the Pop, Post Pop, and Appropriation Art movements, Richard Pettibone creates small-scale replicas of iconic masterpieces by artists ranging from Marcel Duchamp to Roy Lichtenstein to Andy Warhol. The intimately-sized works, some as small as two by two inches, speak to themes of reproduction, originality, and authorship—ideas as relevant in today’s art world as when he began painting in the early 1960s. Pettibone’s work continues a line of questioning that began with Duchamp and ran through successive generations of artists: What does it mean to appropriate an image of an image of an image? The exhibition features work that spans 1964 to 2018, focusing on self-portraiture, seriality, and photorealism—three major themes within Pettibone’s oeuvre that the artist continually, and often humorously, critiques and reinterprets.  The artist’s facility with representation is particularly evident in his photorealistic paintings and “combine” works, which feature multiple canvases collaged together. Presented en masse, this rarely seen part of the artist’s practice sheds light onto Pettibone’s interest in the intersection of style, pastiche, and art history. Juxtaposed with fine art reproductions of the satin ballgowns from Jean-August Dominique Ingres’s Princess de Broglie, 1853, and the rigid geometry of Frank Stella’s Union Pacific, 1950, are testosterone-fueled images of dirt bikes, race cars, and playboy center-folds.

Richard Pettibone – Endless Variation  The FLAG Art Foundation is pleased to present Richard Pettibone: Endless Variation. A prominent figure in the Pop, Post Pop, and Appropriation Art movements, Richard Pettibone creates small-scale replicas of iconic masterpieces by artists ranging from Marcel Duchamp to Roy Lichtenstein to Andy Warhol. The intimately-sized works, some as small as two by two inches, speak to themes of reproduction, originality, and authorship—ideas as relevant in today’s art world as when he began painting in the early 1960s. Pettibone’s work continues a line of questioning that began with Duchamp and ran through successive generations of artists: What does it mean to appropriate an image of an image of an image? The exhibition features work that spans 1964 to 2018, focusing on self-portraiture, seriality, and photorealism—three major themes within Pettibone’s oeuvre that the artist continually, and often humorously, critiques and reinterprets.  The artist’s facility with representation is particularly evident in his photorealistic paintings and “combine” works, which feature multiple canvases collaged together. Presented en masse, this rarely seen part of the artist’s practice sheds light onto Pettibone’s interest in the intersection of style, pastiche, and art history. Juxtaposed with fine art reproductions of the satin ballgowns from Jean-August Dominique Ingres’s Princess de Broglie, 1853, and the rigid geometry of Frank Stella’s Union Pacific, 1950, are testosterone-fueled images of dirt bikes, race cars, and playboy center-folds.
Andy Warhol
Andy Warhol
New York - 99 Gansevoort Street
until 31-03-2019

Andy Warhol—From A to B and Back Again The exhibition positions Warhol's career as a continuum, demonstrating that he didn't slow down after surviving the assassination attempt that nearly took his life in 1968, but entered into a period of intense experimentation. The show illuminates the breadth, depth, and interconnectedness of the artist’s production: from his beginnings as a commercial illustrator in the 1950s, to his iconic Pop masterpieces of the early 1960s, to the experimental work in film and other mediums from the 1960s and 70s, to his innovative use of readymade abstraction and the painterly sublime in the 1980s. His repetitions, distortions, camouflaging, incongruous color, and recycling of his own imagery challenge our faith in images and the value of cultural icons, anticipating the profound effects and issues of the current digital age. This is the largest monographic exhibition to date at the Whitney's new location, with more than 350 works of art, many assembled together for the first time.   

Andy Warhol—From A to B and Back Again The exhibition positions Warhol's career as a continuum, demonstrating that he didn't slow down after surviving the assassination attempt that nearly took his life in 1968, but entered into a period of intense experimentation. The show illuminates the breadth, depth, and interconnectedness of the artist’s production: from his beginnings as a commercial illustrator in the 1950s, to his iconic Pop masterpieces of the early 1960s, to the experimental work in film and other mediums from the 1960s and 70s, to his innovative use of readymade abstraction and the painterly sublime in the 1980s. His repetitions, distortions, camouflaging, incongruous color, and recycling of his own imagery challenge our faith in images and the value of cultural icons, anticipating the profound effects and issues of the current digital age. This is the largest monographic exhibition to date at the Whitney's new location, with more than 350 works of art, many assembled together for the first time.   
Bruce Nauman
Bruce Nauman
New York - 22-25 Jackson Avenue
until 25-02-2019

Bruce Nauman – Disappearing Acts Schaulager, Basel, The Museum of Modern Art, and MoMA PS1 present the first comprehensive retrospective of American artist Bruce Nauman (b. 1941) in over 20 years. Opening at Schaulager in March 2018 and traveling to New York in October of that year, the exhibition expands upon the rich holdings of the organizing institutions. Spanning the artist’s entire career, from the mid-1960s to the present, Disappearing Acts provides a singular opportunity to experience his command of a wide range of mediums, from drawing, printmaking, photography, and sculpture to performance, film, neon, and large-scale installations. Disappearing Acts traces strategies of withdrawal in Nauman’s work—both literal and figurative incidents of removal, deflection, and concealment. Bodies are fragmented, centers are left empty, voices emanate from hidden speakers; the artist sculpts himself in absentia, appearing only as negative space. The installation proceeds chronologically (albeit with strategic pauses and breaks), granting ample space to the artist’s production across the decades. Nauman’s consummate skill as a draftsman, which has not been the focus of a retrospective since the mid-1980s, will be highlighted with a broad selection drawings, ranging from quick sketches to oversized, highly worked sheets.

Bruce Nauman – Disappearing Acts Schaulager, Basel, The Museum of Modern Art, and MoMA PS1 present the first comprehensive retrospective of American artist Bruce Nauman (b. 1941) in over 20 years. Opening at Schaulager in March 2018 and traveling to New York in October of that year, the exhibition expands upon the rich holdings of the organizing institutions. Spanning the artist’s entire career, from the mid-1960s to the present, Disappearing Acts provides a singular opportunity to experience his command of a wide range of mediums, from drawing, printmaking, photography, and sculpture to performance, film, neon, and large-scale installations. Disappearing Acts traces strategies of withdrawal in Nauman’s work—both literal and figurative incidents of removal, deflection, and concealment. Bodies are fragmented, centers are left empty, voices emanate from hidden speakers; the artist sculpts himself in absentia, appearing only as negative space. The installation proceeds chronologically (albeit with strategic pauses and breaks), granting ample space to the artist’s production across the decades. Nauman’s consummate skill as a draftsman, which has not been the focus of a retrospective since the mid-1980s, will be highlighted with a broad selection drawings, ranging from quick sketches to oversized, highly worked sheets.
Soul of a Nation
Soul of a Nation
New York - 200 Eastern Parkway
until 03-02-2019

Soul of a Nation: Art in the Age of Black Power   Soul of a Nation: Art in the Age of Black Power shines light on a broad spectrum of Black artistic practice from 1963 to 1983, one of the most politically, socially, and aesthetically revolutionary periods in American history. Black artists across the country worked in communities, in collectives, and individually to create a range of art responsive to the moment – including figurative and abstract painting, prints, and photography; assemblage and sculpture; and performance.

Soul of a Nation: Art in the Age of Black Power   Soul of a Nation: Art in the Age of Black Power shines light on a broad spectrum of Black artistic practice from 1963 to 1983, one of the most politically, socially, and aesthetically revolutionary periods in American history. Black artists across the country worked in communities, in collectives, and individually to create a range of art responsive to the moment – including figurative and abstract painting, prints, and photography; assemblage and sculpture; and performance.
Robert Janitz
Robert Janitz
New York - 333 Broome Street
until 20-01-2019

Robert Janitz – College Robert Janitz Robert Janitz’ seemingly simple shapes belie a meticulously built contemplation on painting. He generally begins with grounds of gradient color on stretched linen, which are then covered in strokes of semi-transparent paint whipped with flour. The contrasting opacities and transparencies of his marks create fissures of light. Sometimes the paintings feature torqued rectilinear boxes, or they are composed of fields of brushstrokes alone. While it seems possible that the paintings allude to expressionism, the paintings are in fact carefully delineated sets of “procedures” that provoke awareness rather than sensation. Janitz asks fundamental questions, such as what is a brush, paint, or even a surface; and how, via his hand, these tools and materials can generate a mark. He handles paint bluntly: the broad strokes are direct and unadorned. Janitz carefully considers and builds the different pictorial planes of each painting, contemplating the two-dimensional work and its ability to create three-dimensional illusion— how color and shadow operate with and against each other. The show at CANADA will include three benches made from cast concrete that are simultaneously zoomorphic dogs and/or modernist sculpture. Throughout his entire project, simulacra is at play with Janitz. All of his works have a source, either real or imagined, which is the root for the investigative nature of his practice. The way “things” in this body of work resemble things in the world, yet never seem to be direct representations, adds a degree of endlessness to the experience of viewing. The opportunity to spread paintings between two venues offers Janitz the chance to show central tenets of his practice side by side. At Anton Kern Gallery, he will mostly exhibit the paintings with twisted boxes; at CANADA, mostly the “field” paintings. They are all paintings that ask themselves questions, with titles that give only sly suggestions, and usually induce further inquiry. The space, light, and elements within each painting sum up to a sort of consciousness, an engagement with layers of color and material that conveys a sense of sublimation and heightened mental space. Robert Janitz lives in works in Queens, NY.

Robert Janitz – College Robert Janitz Robert Janitz’ seemingly simple shapes belie a meticulously built contemplation on painting. He generally begins with grounds of gradient color on stretched linen, which are then covered in strokes of semi-transparent paint whipped with flour. The contrasting opacities and transparencies of his marks create fissures of light. Sometimes the paintings feature torqued rectilinear boxes, or they are composed of fields of brushstrokes alone. While it seems possible that the paintings allude to expressionism, the paintings are in fact carefully delineated sets of “procedures” that provoke awareness rather than sensation. Janitz asks fundamental questions, such as what is a brush, paint, or even a surface; and how, via his hand, these tools and materials can generate a mark. He handles paint bluntly: the broad strokes are direct and unadorned. Janitz carefully considers and builds the different pictorial planes of each painting, contemplating the two-dimensional work and its ability to create three-dimensional illusion— how color and shadow operate with and against each other. The show at CANADA will include three benches made from cast concrete that are simultaneously zoomorphic dogs and/or modernist sculpture. Throughout his entire project, simulacra is at play with Janitz. All of his works have a source, either real or imagined, which is the root for the investigative nature of his practice. The way “things” in this body of work resemble things in the world, yet never seem to be direct representations, adds a degree of endlessness to the experience of viewing. The opportunity to spread paintings between two venues offers Janitz the chance to show central tenets of his practice side by side. At Anton Kern Gallery, he will mostly exhibit the paintings with twisted boxes; at CANADA, mostly the “field” paintings. They are all paintings that ask themselves questions, with titles that give only sly suggestions, and usually induce further inquiry. The space, light, and elements within each painting sum up to a sort of consciousness, an engagement with layers of color and material that conveys a sense of sublimation and heightened mental space. Robert Janitz lives in works in Queens, NY.
Blinky Palermo
Blinky Palermo
New York - 535, 541, and 545 West 22nd Street
until 09-03-2019

Blinky Palermo – To the People of New York City  To the People of New York City is part of Blinky Palermo’s Metal Pictures series (or Metallbilder, in German), which he had started to develop while in New York City from 1973 to 1976. During this time, Palermo began to compose serialized groups of paintings on metal, using color and formal patterns to focus on progression. Consisting of fifteen parts—composed from forty painted aluminum panels arranged in various combinations of black, cadmium red, and cadmium yellow—the demarcated bands of color read as striking, didactic signs that may reference the hues of postwar abstract painting, the German flag, or Palermo’s interest in Native American visual culture. To the People of New York City, however, is distinguished by its prescriptive hanging style and its rhythmically changing formats, which owe much to the syncopation of jazz. New York City afforded Palermo the opportunity to experience live jazz, which may have informed the titular inscription on the back of each panel: “To the people of N.Y.C.” In addition to the paintings, this exhibition includes Palermo’s preparatory studies on which he recorded ideas about the singular arrangement of the painted panels. The final preparatory drawing, which illustrates each of the painted variations in sequential order, provides a codex of the immersive experience of viewing the work.

Blinky Palermo – To the People of New York City  To the People of New York City is part of Blinky Palermo’s Metal Pictures series (or Metallbilder, in German), which he had started to develop while in New York City from 1973 to 1976. During this time, Palermo began to compose serialized groups of paintings on metal, using color and formal patterns to focus on progression. Consisting of fifteen parts—composed from forty painted aluminum panels arranged in various combinations of black, cadmium red, and cadmium yellow—the demarcated bands of color read as striking, didactic signs that may reference the hues of postwar abstract painting, the German flag, or Palermo’s interest in Native American visual culture. To the People of New York City, however, is distinguished by its prescriptive hanging style and its rhythmically changing formats, which owe much to the syncopation of jazz. New York City afforded Palermo the opportunity to experience live jazz, which may have informed the titular inscription on the back of each panel: “To the people of N.Y.C.” In addition to the paintings, this exhibition includes Palermo’s preparatory studies on which he recorded ideas about the singular arrangement of the painted panels. The final preparatory drawing, which illustrates each of the painted variations in sequential order, provides a codex of the immersive experience of viewing the work.
Keith Sonnier
Keith Sonnier
New York - 23 Corwith Avenue
until 26-05-2019

Keith Sonnier – Dis-Play II Keith Sonnier’s Dis-Play II (1970) is an environmental installation of foam rubber, fluorescent powder, strobe light, black light, neon, plywood, and glass. Dis-Play II is shown with Film and Videos 1968–1977, a selection reflecting Sonnier’s decade-long exploration of sound and media work. Alongside peers such as Carl Andre, Dan Flavin, Eva Hesse, Bruce Nauman, and Jackie Winsor, Sonnier utilized nontraditional and specifically ephemeral materials in his production. In his own words, “we made art that was defined by its defiance of the traditional idea of what could be considered art.” First exhibited in Sonnier’s solo exhibition at the Castelli Warehouse in New York in 1970, Dis-Play II brings together his ongoing interest in film, light, and experiential art environments.  

Keith Sonnier – Dis-Play II Keith Sonnier’s Dis-Play II (1970) is an environmental installation of foam rubber, fluorescent powder, strobe light, black light, neon, plywood, and glass. Dis-Play II is shown with Film and Videos 1968–1977, a selection reflecting Sonnier’s decade-long exploration of sound and media work. Alongside peers such as Carl Andre, Dan Flavin, Eva Hesse, Bruce Nauman, and Jackie Winsor, Sonnier utilized nontraditional and specifically ephemeral materials in his production. In his own words, “we made art that was defined by its defiance of the traditional idea of what could be considered art.” First exhibited in Sonnier’s solo exhibition at the Castelli Warehouse in New York in 1970, Dis-Play II brings together his ongoing interest in film, light, and experiential art environments.  
Alex Katz
Alex Katz
Munich - Türkenstrasse 19
until 22-04-2019

Alex Katz   The Museum Brandhorst is delighted to present a major exhibition of works by celebrated American painter Alex Katz. A towering figure in contemporary painting best known for his iconic portraits of beautiful, stylish women, masterfully rendered in bold, vibrant colors, Katz has influenced and inspired generations of artists around the world. Featuring about ninety works—including some of the artist’s most important paintings—the exhibition will offer visitors a retrospective overview of this seminal artist’s oeuvre from the 1950s to today.   Alex Katz (born 1927, New York) emerged on the New York scene during the heyday of Abstract Expressionism and just prior to the explosion of Pop Art. Although he is often hailed as one of the precursors to Pop, his aesthetic is perhaps more closely aligned with such poets as Frank O’Hara and John Ashbery than with other painters of his generation. His unique oeuvre, which now spans some 70 years, is utterly devoted to the representation of the here and now and the immediacy of human perception—a commitment to what the artist has often described as “painting in the present tense.” Working variously en plein air, from photographic sources, and from his own sketches and preparatory drawings, he has focused his attention on subject matter from his immediate milieu: portraits of family (in particular his wife Ada) and friends, artistic collaborators and scenes of social interaction, landscapes and architectural scenes, and flowers. Throughout, Katz’s sensitivity for painterly surfaces unfolds in productive tension with the formal languages of film, fashion, and advertising.   The exhibition begins with works from the late 1950s and early 1960s, including portraits of the renowned choreographer and dancer Paul Taylor and his company, for which Katz designed many sets. A series of seminal single and group portraits from the 1960s establish Katz’s signature style as well as the social and artistic milieu of Downtown New York, both of which remain leitmotifs throughout his work and the exhibition. Two large galleries of landscapes show Katz playing at the edge of abstraction while at the same time recommitting himself to a decidedly modern form of realism.   The quality of light itself, whether direct, reflected, or diffused, becomes a central concern in these paintings. So, too, does the ability of an individual brushstroke to delimit multiple different types of form while also retaining its status as an autonomous mark.   Also on display will be a sizable collection of small oil paintings, sketches, and preparatory drawings. Often directly related to the large-scale paintings on view, these works will provide visitors with an expanded understanding of the artist’s multi-layered working process.   The exhibition draws on the Museum Brandhorst’s own extensive collection of works by the artist—including masterpieces from across his long career—supplemented by key works from other public and private collections, and provides an extended glimpse into the prolific production of this 91-year-old painter.

Alex Katz   The Museum Brandhorst is delighted to present a major exhibition of works by celebrated American painter Alex Katz. A towering figure in contemporary painting best known for his iconic portraits of beautiful, stylish women, masterfully rendered in bold, vibrant colors, Katz has influenced and inspired generations of artists around the world. Featuring about ninety works—including some of the artist’s most important paintings—the exhibition will offer visitors a retrospective overview of this seminal artist’s oeuvre from the 1950s to today.   Alex Katz (born 1927, New York) emerged on the New York scene during the heyday of Abstract Expressionism and just prior to the explosion of Pop Art. Although he is often hailed as one of the precursors to Pop, his aesthetic is perhaps more closely aligned with such poets as Frank O’Hara and John Ashbery than with other painters of his generation. His unique oeuvre, which now spans some 70 years, is utterly devoted to the representation of the here and now and the immediacy of human perception—a commitment to what the artist has often described as “painting in the present tense.” Working variously en plein air, from photographic sources, and from his own sketches and preparatory drawings, he has focused his attention on subject matter from his immediate milieu: portraits of family (in particular his wife Ada) and friends, artistic collaborators and scenes of social interaction, landscapes and architectural scenes, and flowers. Throughout, Katz’s sensitivity for painterly surfaces unfolds in productive tension with the formal languages of film, fashion, and advertising.   The exhibition begins with works from the late 1950s and early 1960s, including portraits of the renowned choreographer and dancer Paul Taylor and his company, for which Katz designed many sets. A series of seminal single and group portraits from the 1960s establish Katz’s signature style as well as the social and artistic milieu of Downtown New York, both of which remain leitmotifs throughout his work and the exhibition. Two large galleries of landscapes show Katz playing at the edge of abstraction while at the same time recommitting himself to a decidedly modern form of realism.   The quality of light itself, whether direct, reflected, or diffused, becomes a central concern in these paintings. So, too, does the ability of an individual brushstroke to delimit multiple different types of form while also retaining its status as an autonomous mark.   Also on display will be a sizable collection of small oil paintings, sketches, and preparatory drawings. Often directly related to the large-scale paintings on view, these works will provide visitors with an expanded understanding of the artist’s multi-layered working process.   The exhibition draws on the Museum Brandhorst’s own extensive collection of works by the artist—including masterpieces from across his long career—supplemented by key works from other public and private collections, and provides an extended glimpse into the prolific production of this 91-year-old painter.
Jonathan Meese
Jonathan Meese
Munich - Barer Strasse 40
until 03-03-2019

Jonathan Meese – Meese’s Odyssey   Jonathan Meese (b. 1970 in Tokyo and based in Berlin) is one of the most internationally renowned and polarising artists of his generation. His universal worldview and his reflections on mythology and the power of art are expressed not only through the mediums of painting, sculpture, installation, and performance, but also with words and language. Meese’s use of image and text, as playful as it is thoughtful, is the focal point of this show, which comprises works from the last 25 years. At the core of the exhibition, curated by Bernhart Schwenk and Swantje Grundler, are 17 paintings from the artist’s personal collection. Several of the paintings on display are being shown publicly for the first time. Complementing this selection is a number of works from the Goetz Collection, Munich, which have also never been exhibited before, as well as pieces from three German private collections. In addition, 24 spatial models and small sculptures, as well as 75 drawings, photo collages, and artist’s books will be on display. Meese’s spatial models—made in the mid-90s—will be exhibited as stand-alone objects for the very first time. Most of the drawings, realised between 1993 and 2000, will be making their public debut. Footage of one of the artist’s earliest performances, gathered from his personal archive, will also be shown. Looking back on these works, certain themes—which are central to the artist’s oeuvre, and which find their initial, multifaceted expression in his early works—become clear: gestures and insignias of power, male and female warriors, fairy-tale villains, night terrors in the children's room and the ambivalence of evil. The unexpected tenderness of the artist's visual cosmos then emerges in contrast to these themes. Jonathan Meese designed the carpet-diagram exclusively for the museum show in Munich: Meese’s Odyssey as a Gesamtkunstwerk [total work of art]. In the Greek epic poem the Odyssey, the hero Odysseus embarks on a series of dangerous adventures and faces mysterious challenges, and in the end, comes home a changed man. In this exhibition, Meese—like a modern-day Ulysses—navigates his way through an imaginary journey. The epic of the adventure story serves as a meta-narrative: a means of bringing together characters from both classical literature and popular, contemporary fiction to create his own narratives.

Jonathan Meese – Meese’s Odyssey   Jonathan Meese (b. 1970 in Tokyo and based in Berlin) is one of the most internationally renowned and polarising artists of his generation. His universal worldview and his reflections on mythology and the power of art are expressed not only through the mediums of painting, sculpture, installation, and performance, but also with words and language. Meese’s use of image and text, as playful as it is thoughtful, is the focal point of this show, which comprises works from the last 25 years. At the core of the exhibition, curated by Bernhart Schwenk and Swantje Grundler, are 17 paintings from the artist’s personal collection. Several of the paintings on display are being shown publicly for the first time. Complementing this selection is a number of works from the Goetz Collection, Munich, which have also never been exhibited before, as well as pieces from three German private collections. In addition, 24 spatial models and small sculptures, as well as 75 drawings, photo collages, and artist’s books will be on display. Meese’s spatial models—made in the mid-90s—will be exhibited as stand-alone objects for the very first time. Most of the drawings, realised between 1993 and 2000, will be making their public debut. Footage of one of the artist’s earliest performances, gathered from his personal archive, will also be shown. Looking back on these works, certain themes—which are central to the artist’s oeuvre, and which find their initial, multifaceted expression in his early works—become clear: gestures and insignias of power, male and female warriors, fairy-tale villains, night terrors in the children's room and the ambivalence of evil. The unexpected tenderness of the artist's visual cosmos then emerges in contrast to these themes. Jonathan Meese designed the carpet-diagram exclusively for the museum show in Munich: Meese’s Odyssey as a Gesamtkunstwerk [total work of art]. In the Greek epic poem the Odyssey, the hero Odysseus embarks on a series of dangerous adventures and faces mysterious challenges, and in the end, comes home a changed man. In this exhibition, Meese—like a modern-day Ulysses—navigates his way through an imaginary journey. The epic of the adventure story serves as a meta-narrative: a means of bringing together characters from both classical literature and popular, contemporary fiction to create his own narratives.
Thomas Zipp
Thomas Zipp
Munich - Amalienstrasse 41
until 02-02-2019

Thomas Zipp – A Frozen Fountain (the family of pills)  Thomas Zipp is known for his complex spatial installations and laboratories, which he increasingly presents in connection with performances. And his installation “A Primer of Higher Space (The Family of Man revisited)", recently realized at Kunsthalle Gießen, not only calls into question our society’s norms in an apocalyptic and at the same time everyday scenario, it also lets the visitors themselves slip into the role of performer and become part of this empirical research. Thomas Zipp retrospectively investigates art, science, and literature to link them with the present; what’s past is pushed into the present to reinterrogate human action on the basis of ostensible facts. Psychology and society are his central themes; existing value systems are constantly explored and re-explored by Thomas Zipp, opening up new ways of questioning the here and now. A Professor of Painting at the Berlin University of the Arts, Thomas Zipp entirely avoids the art of painting—one of the pivotal means of expression in his oeuvre—in the aforementioned exhibition. Often, however, it is precisely his paintings that manage to decipher central thought processes and facts. In terms of composition, Zipp’s idiosyncratic handwriting serves as an important stylistic device. Letters arranged in a certain way point to the literature he consulted; he often quotes entire passages as part of the composition. The initials in the works’ titles refer to the person depicted, who often appears as a stand-alone portrait next to the painting. The paintings can be read as manuals for the underlying ideas. Humans are always at the center of his “analytical” paintings, which always also include motifs from the darker reaches of the unconscious. After the previous large-scale spatial installations at Galerie Rüdiger Schöttle, Hier (Futuristic Mess) (2007) and Aids To Theater Technique (2010), Thomas Zipp places his subtly conceived paintings and sculptures in his current exhibition “A Frozen Fountain (the family of pills)” in the focus of his social investigations. (IL)

Thomas Zipp – A Frozen Fountain (the family of pills)  Thomas Zipp is known for his complex spatial installations and laboratories, which he increasingly presents in connection with performances. And his installation “A Primer of Higher Space (The Family of Man revisited)", recently realized at Kunsthalle Gießen, not only calls into question our society’s norms in an apocalyptic and at the same time everyday scenario, it also lets the visitors themselves slip into the role of performer and become part of this empirical research. Thomas Zipp retrospectively investigates art, science, and literature to link them with the present; what’s past is pushed into the present to reinterrogate human action on the basis of ostensible facts. Psychology and society are his central themes; existing value systems are constantly explored and re-explored by Thomas Zipp, opening up new ways of questioning the here and now. A Professor of Painting at the Berlin University of the Arts, Thomas Zipp entirely avoids the art of painting—one of the pivotal means of expression in his oeuvre—in the aforementioned exhibition. Often, however, it is precisely his paintings that manage to decipher central thought processes and facts. In terms of composition, Zipp’s idiosyncratic handwriting serves as an important stylistic device. Letters arranged in a certain way point to the literature he consulted; he often quotes entire passages as part of the composition. The initials in the works’ titles refer to the person depicted, who often appears as a stand-alone portrait next to the painting. The paintings can be read as manuals for the underlying ideas. Humans are always at the center of his “analytical” paintings, which always also include motifs from the darker reaches of the unconscious. After the previous large-scale spatial installations at Galerie Rüdiger Schöttle, Hier (Futuristic Mess) (2007) and Aids To Theater Technique (2010), Thomas Zipp places his subtly conceived paintings and sculptures in his current exhibition “A Frozen Fountain (the family of pills)” in the focus of his social investigations. (IL)
Sophie Calle
Sophie Calle
Munich - Maximilianstrasse 2a
until 24-02-2019

Sophie Calle – L'Hotel / Voir la Mer. Works from the Collection For its sixth exhibition as part of the Fondation Louis Vuitton’s “Hors-les-murs” programme, the Espace Louis Vuitton München is pleased to present two seminal series from French artist Sophie Calle’s oeuvre. This programme, showcasing previously unseen works from the Collection at the Espaces Louis Vuitton in Tokyo, Munich, Venice and Beijing, carries out the Fondation’s intent to realize international projects and make them accessible to a broader public. Sophie Calle is one of today’s leading artists, incorporating writing, photography, philosophy and visual arts. A self-taught artist, she is critically acclaimed for her serial artworks in photography, video and text. Her 40-year practice sits on the border of fiction and autobiography with an undertone of playful humor and unapologetic voyeurism. Her practice is defined by the lives of strangers and her forensic obsession to construct a psyche and storyline for her anonymous protagonists. They lead her to quotidian activities (walking, sleeping, talking, travelling) in a hybrid of public and private spaces (hotel room in Venice, cemetery in New York, beach in Istanbul) to address the topoi of absence, longing and desire. Lacking in ambition to be explicitly psychological or therapeutic, Calle’s artistic mission is best described in her simple declaration: “Je raconte l’histoire”—“I tell stories”. This exhibition presents eight video works (Voir la mer, 2011) and six photographic pieces (L’Hôtel, 1981-1983), bearing witness to Calle’s defining work, ranging from self-investigative encounters of the 1980s to the altruistic investigations of recent years. Through these two series, Calle invites the viewer as a witness to her creative sojourns, unwittingly converting one from an innocent bystander into a complicit voyeur and intimate collaborator. Demolishing the boundaries between performance and adventure, the anonymous and the intimate, the permitted and the forbidden, she offers a safe place to reflect on one’s habitual practices, material possessions and own purpose. Sophie Calle was born in Paris in 1953. After many years abroad, she now lives and works in Malakoff, France. Key exhibitions include a retrospective at the Centre Pompidou, Paris, France (2003), the French Pavilion at the 52nd Venice Biennale (2007) and solo shows at Hara Museum of Contemporary Art, Tokyo, Japan (2013), Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, Humlebæk, Denmark (2010), Castello di Rivoli, Turin, Italy (2014), Musée d’Art contemporain de Montréal, Canada (2015) and Musée de la Chasse et de la Nature, Paris, France (2017/18). Her works appear in the permanent collections of MoMA and Guggenheim in New York, USA, Musée d'Art moderne de la Ville de Paris and Centre Pompidou, France, Tate Modern in London, United Kingdom, and many more. She received the Hasselblad Prize for the body of her work in 2010. Part of Various Others, a cooperative project of joint openings and events between Munich galleries, off-spaces and museums.  p.p1 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 12.0px 'Helvetica Neue'; color: #454545} span.s1 {text-decoration: underline ; color: #e4af0a}

Sophie Calle – L'Hotel / Voir la Mer. Works from the Collection For its sixth exhibition as part of the Fondation Louis Vuitton’s “Hors-les-murs” programme, the Espace Louis Vuitton München is pleased to present two seminal series from French artist Sophie Calle’s oeuvre. This programme, showcasing previously unseen works from the Collection at the Espaces Louis Vuitton in Tokyo, Munich, Venice and Beijing, carries out the Fondation’s intent to realize international projects and make them accessible to a broader public. Sophie Calle is one of today’s leading artists, incorporating writing, photography, philosophy and visual arts. A self-taught artist, she is critically acclaimed for her serial artworks in photography, video and text. Her 40-year practice sits on the border of fiction and autobiography with an undertone of playful humor and unapologetic voyeurism. Her practice is defined by the lives of strangers and her forensic obsession to construct a psyche and storyline for her anonymous protagonists. They lead her to quotidian activities (walking, sleeping, talking, travelling) in a hybrid of public and private spaces (hotel room in Venice, cemetery in New York, beach in Istanbul) to address the topoi of absence, longing and desire. Lacking in ambition to be explicitly psychological or therapeutic, Calle’s artistic mission is best described in her simple declaration: “Je raconte l’histoire”—“I tell stories”. This exhibition presents eight video works (Voir la mer, 2011) and six photographic pieces (L’Hôtel, 1981-1983), bearing witness to Calle’s defining work, ranging from self-investigative encounters of the 1980s to the altruistic investigations of recent years. Through these two series, Calle invites the viewer as a witness to her creative sojourns, unwittingly converting one from an innocent bystander into a complicit voyeur and intimate collaborator. Demolishing the boundaries between performance and adventure, the anonymous and the intimate, the permitted and the forbidden, she offers a safe place to reflect on one’s habitual practices, material possessions and own purpose. Sophie Calle was born in Paris in 1953. After many years abroad, she now lives and works in Malakoff, France. Key exhibitions include a retrospective at the Centre Pompidou, Paris, France (2003), the French Pavilion at the 52nd Venice Biennale (2007) and solo shows at Hara Museum of Contemporary Art, Tokyo, Japan (2013), Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, Humlebæk, Denmark (2010), Castello di Rivoli, Turin, Italy (2014), Musée d’Art contemporain de Montréal, Canada (2015) and Musée de la Chasse et de la Nature, Paris, France (2017/18). Her works appear in the permanent collections of MoMA and Guggenheim in New York, USA, Musée d'Art moderne de la Ville de Paris and Centre Pompidou, France, Tate Modern in London, United Kingdom, and many more. She received the Hasselblad Prize for the body of her work in 2010. Part of Various Others, a cooperative project of joint openings and events between Munich galleries, off-spaces and museums.  p.p1 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 12.0px 'Helvetica Neue'; color: #454545} span.s1 {text-decoration: underline ; color: #e4af0a}
Larry Bell
Larry Bell
Miami - 61 NE 41st Street
until 10-03-2019

Larry Bell – Time Machines “Larry Bell: Time Machines” is the first comprehensive American museum survey of the artist’s work in nearly two decades. The exhibition features major bodies of Bell’s work, from the his early Cube series to his large-scale color-glass installations. At ICA Miami, “Larry Bell: Time Machines” focuses attention on Bell’s innovative explorations of experiences generated by architectural space, as well as his little-known engagement with audiovisual media, including video and photography. One of the most significant artists of his generation, Larry Bell (b. 1939, Chicago) is an important representative of a West Coast minimalism that married matter-of-fact materials and forms with intense sensorial experiences. Bell is most commonly known for his Minimalist sculptures—transparent cubes that thrive on the interplay of shape, light, and environment—that champion the ideas of the Light and Space Movement of the 1960s. Although he had early success with Abstract Expressionist painting, a side job at a frame shop led him to experiment with excess scraps of glass, thus beginning his fascination with the material’s interaction with light. Bell’s first series of cubes combined three-dimensional glass forms with transmitted light, creating illusions of perspective through angles, ellipses, and mirrors. His later purchase of industrial plating equipment allowed him to create sculptures with metallic-coated glass and, eventually, drawings on Mylar-coated paper.  

Larry Bell – Time Machines “Larry Bell: Time Machines” is the first comprehensive American museum survey of the artist’s work in nearly two decades. The exhibition features major bodies of Bell’s work, from the his early Cube series to his large-scale color-glass installations. At ICA Miami, “Larry Bell: Time Machines” focuses attention on Bell’s innovative explorations of experiences generated by architectural space, as well as his little-known engagement with audiovisual media, including video and photography. One of the most significant artists of his generation, Larry Bell (b. 1939, Chicago) is an important representative of a West Coast minimalism that married matter-of-fact materials and forms with intense sensorial experiences. Bell is most commonly known for his Minimalist sculptures—transparent cubes that thrive on the interplay of shape, light, and environment—that champion the ideas of the Light and Space Movement of the 1960s. Although he had early success with Abstract Expressionist painting, a side job at a frame shop led him to experiment with excess scraps of glass, thus beginning his fascination with the material’s interaction with light. Bell’s first series of cubes combined three-dimensional glass forms with transmitted light, creating illusions of perspective through angles, ellipses, and mirrors. His later purchase of industrial plating equipment allowed him to create sculptures with metallic-coated glass and, eventually, drawings on Mylar-coated paper.  
Robert Gober
Robert Gober
Miami - 61 NE 41st Street
until 24-02-2019

Robert Gober: 1978–2000 This presentation of work by Robert Gober features the iconic sculpture Untitled (1993–94) and a portfolio of significant photographs, 1978–2000 (1978–2000). In Untitled, a pale male body is installed below the floor, his heart replaced by a drain over which water gently laps. Photography is an important and ongoing but typically unseen part of Gober’s practice. 1978–2000 features twenty-two photographs that place Gober’s iconic sculptures within their contexts and reinforce the artist’s interest in sociology and cultural history. Shot over the course of two trips—a 1978 drive from Manhattan to Jones Beach, Long Island, and an encounter with detritus on the beach near his studio in Peconic, Long Island, some twenty-two years later—the photographs witness the convergence of a seaside landscape scene with traumatic, topical newspaper headlines and images of Americana. Over the last three decades, Rober Gober (b. 1954, Wallingford, Connecticut) has innovated through his surreal and topical recreations of common, domestic forms. Since the mid-1980s he has created sculptures that incorporate plumbing elements, including oversize body-like sinks and drains installed in unlikely places. These works are at once mundane, familiar, and provocative, invoking the intimate bodily processes of personal hygiene and the systems that regulate them. Gober made his debut museum presentation in 1988 at the Art Institute of Chicago and since that time has presented his works internationally, at the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis (2012); five presentations of the Whitney Biennial; and the Venice Biennale (2001), among many others. Solo presentations include a major retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art, New York (2014–15).  

Robert Gober: 1978–2000 This presentation of work by Robert Gober features the iconic sculpture Untitled (1993–94) and a portfolio of significant photographs, 1978–2000 (1978–2000). In Untitled, a pale male body is installed below the floor, his heart replaced by a drain over which water gently laps. Photography is an important and ongoing but typically unseen part of Gober’s practice. 1978–2000 features twenty-two photographs that place Gober’s iconic sculptures within their contexts and reinforce the artist’s interest in sociology and cultural history. Shot over the course of two trips—a 1978 drive from Manhattan to Jones Beach, Long Island, and an encounter with detritus on the beach near his studio in Peconic, Long Island, some twenty-two years later—the photographs witness the convergence of a seaside landscape scene with traumatic, topical newspaper headlines and images of Americana. Over the last three decades, Rober Gober (b. 1954, Wallingford, Connecticut) has innovated through his surreal and topical recreations of common, domestic forms. Since the mid-1980s he has created sculptures that incorporate plumbing elements, including oversize body-like sinks and drains installed in unlikely places. These works are at once mundane, familiar, and provocative, invoking the intimate bodily processes of personal hygiene and the systems that regulate them. Gober made his debut museum presentation in 1988 at the Art Institute of Chicago and since that time has presented his works internationally, at the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis (2012); five presentations of the Whitney Biennial; and the Venice Biennale (2001), among many others. Solo presentations include a major retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art, New York (2014–15).  
Aaron Curry
Aaron Curry
Miami - 2100 Collins Avenue
until 21-04-2019

Aaron Curry – Tune Yer Head Tune Yer Head presents new and recent work by Texas born, LA-based artist, Aaron Curry. Though Curry gained early recognition as a sculptor, making a “return” to painting in 2015, his practice is deeply rooted in the painterly. The exhibition at The Bass surveys the diversity of his practice in terms of materiality and form, highlighting the interplay between painting, sculpture and collage. Curry’s work reads as a dialogue with the artists and creative producers that have influenced him throughout his life. From Modernist artists like Picasso, Picabia and Calder, to cartoonist Basil Wolverton, to BMX and skate culture, Curry draws inspiration from a wide array of sources, which manifest as an explosive mashup of color, texture, and scale on the gallery walls.

Aaron Curry – Tune Yer Head Tune Yer Head presents new and recent work by Texas born, LA-based artist, Aaron Curry. Though Curry gained early recognition as a sculptor, making a “return” to painting in 2015, his practice is deeply rooted in the painterly. The exhibition at The Bass surveys the diversity of his practice in terms of materiality and form, highlighting the interplay between painting, sculpture and collage. Curry’s work reads as a dialogue with the artists and creative producers that have influenced him throughout his life. From Modernist artists like Picasso, Picabia and Calder, to cartoonist Basil Wolverton, to BMX and skate culture, Curry draws inspiration from a wide array of sources, which manifest as an explosive mashup of color, texture, and scale on the gallery walls.
Arthur Jafa
Arthur Jafa
Miami - 1103 Biscayne Blvd
until 21-04-2019

Arthur Jafa – Love is the Message, the Message is Death Over the course of more than 30 years, Arthur Jafa (b. 1960, Tupelo, Mississippi; lives in New York) has examined prevailing assumptions about race and identity through an interdisciplinary practice that combines film, installation, sculpture, and performance. His much-celebrated 2016 video Love is the Message, the Message is Death (recently acquired by Pérez Art Museum Miami through the PAMM Collectors Council) captures the powerful emotions that underlie the African American experience, past and present. Encompassing scenes of heightened beauty and humor, as well as instances of horrific violence, the work testifies to the immense cultural achievements of African Americans while alluding to the pain and suffering that black people have endured throughout this country’s history. The artist set the video to the soaring, gospel-inspired 2016 song “Ultralight Beam” by Kanye West, the lyrics of which redouble the sense of hope, suffering, and transcendence that envelops Jafa’s landmark creation.  

Arthur Jafa – Love is the Message, the Message is Death Over the course of more than 30 years, Arthur Jafa (b. 1960, Tupelo, Mississippi; lives in New York) has examined prevailing assumptions about race and identity through an interdisciplinary practice that combines film, installation, sculpture, and performance. His much-celebrated 2016 video Love is the Message, the Message is Death (recently acquired by Pérez Art Museum Miami through the PAMM Collectors Council) captures the powerful emotions that underlie the African American experience, past and present. Encompassing scenes of heightened beauty and humor, as well as instances of horrific violence, the work testifies to the immense cultural achievements of African Americans while alluding to the pain and suffering that black people have endured throughout this country’s history. The artist set the video to the soaring, gospel-inspired 2016 song “Ultralight Beam” by Kanye West, the lyrics of which redouble the sense of hope, suffering, and transcendence that envelops Jafa’s landmark creation.  
Paola Pivi
Paola Pivi
Miami - 2100 Collins Avenue
until 10-03-2019

Paola Pivi – Art with a View Paola Pivi’s artistic practice is diverse and enigmatic. Her oeuvre appears to have been formed through multiple creative minds. Art with a view at The Bass presents new work by the artist, as well as Pivi’s anthropomorphic, feather-covered polar bears; canvases of cascading pearls; video showing fish in flight on a passenger jet; and a 65-foot inflatable ladder. Each piece poses questions and is defined by its openness to interpretation, through the appropriation of cultural symbols. In 1997, as a student, Paola Pivi placed a truck on its side as part of the exhibition Fuori Uso (Pescara, Italy). Two years later, she installed an upside-down G-91 fighter jet in the Venice Biennale’s Arsenale, helping Italy win the coveted Golden Lion award for best national pavilion. In subsequent years, she has invited horses to the Eiffel Tower and a leopard to roam amongst cappuccino cups—documenting the experience through photography. Such ambitious and spectacular acts have come to define her art. These gestures are about freedom. They deliver unexpected visuals, which surprisingly also appear to be familiar. Nomadic by nature, Paola Pivi has lived in many unexpected places in the world, including the remote island of Alicudi in southern Italy, India, and Anchorage, Alaska. Pivi first exhibited at Viafarini in Milan in 1995, the same year she enrolled in the Brera Academy of Art in Milan. In 2012, the artist was commissioned to create two original public artworks in New York City: “How I roll”, a project by Public Art Fund, a Piper Seneca airplane lifted on its wingtips and constantly rotating forward, installed near Central Park at Doris C. Freedman Plaza, and Untitled (zebras), a striking image of zebras on a snow-covered mountaintop on the 25-by-75-foot High Line Billboard at West 18th Street. Like all of her photographs, this image is a live-action still, presented without digital intervention. Another of her photographs, Untitled (donkey), shows a lonely donkey on a boat floating in the Mediterranean Sea. Pivi is included in the permanent collections of The Guggenheim Museum and the Centre Pompidou.

Paola Pivi – Art with a View Paola Pivi’s artistic practice is diverse and enigmatic. Her oeuvre appears to have been formed through multiple creative minds. Art with a view at The Bass presents new work by the artist, as well as Pivi’s anthropomorphic, feather-covered polar bears; canvases of cascading pearls; video showing fish in flight on a passenger jet; and a 65-foot inflatable ladder. Each piece poses questions and is defined by its openness to interpretation, through the appropriation of cultural symbols. In 1997, as a student, Paola Pivi placed a truck on its side as part of the exhibition Fuori Uso (Pescara, Italy). Two years later, she installed an upside-down G-91 fighter jet in the Venice Biennale’s Arsenale, helping Italy win the coveted Golden Lion award for best national pavilion. In subsequent years, she has invited horses to the Eiffel Tower and a leopard to roam amongst cappuccino cups—documenting the experience through photography. Such ambitious and spectacular acts have come to define her art. These gestures are about freedom. They deliver unexpected visuals, which surprisingly also appear to be familiar. Nomadic by nature, Paola Pivi has lived in many unexpected places in the world, including the remote island of Alicudi in southern Italy, India, and Anchorage, Alaska. Pivi first exhibited at Viafarini in Milan in 1995, the same year she enrolled in the Brera Academy of Art in Milan. In 2012, the artist was commissioned to create two original public artworks in New York City: “How I roll”, a project by Public Art Fund, a Piper Seneca airplane lifted on its wingtips and constantly rotating forward, installed near Central Park at Doris C. Freedman Plaza, and Untitled (zebras), a striking image of zebras on a snow-covered mountaintop on the 25-by-75-foot High Line Billboard at West 18th Street. Like all of her photographs, this image is a live-action still, presented without digital intervention. Another of her photographs, Untitled (donkey), shows a lonely donkey on a boat floating in the Mediterranean Sea. Pivi is included in the permanent collections of The Guggenheim Museum and the Centre Pompidou.
Kris Lemsalu
Kris Lemsalu
London - St. James?, New Cross
until 03-02-2019

Kris Lemsalu – 4LIFE In what will be Estonian artist Kris Lemsalu’s first solo exhibition in London, the artist presents new works across the top floor of the gallery. Lemsalu’s sculptural installations are assembled from a palette of seemingly visceral materials including porcelain, animal parts and pelts, fur, wool, leather, fabric and shells, alongside bought and found objects. Often performing within her works by inhabiting sculptures as costumes, she plays with the line between human, creature and object. Through her specific style of humorous and absurd storytelling, Lemsalu poses earnest questions about the hierarchies we set up between life and death, beauty and revulsion, merit and mediocrity. Kris Lemsalu was born in 1985 in Tallinn, Estonia, and lives and works between Vienna and Tallin. 

Kris Lemsalu – 4LIFE In what will be Estonian artist Kris Lemsalu’s first solo exhibition in London, the artist presents new works across the top floor of the gallery. Lemsalu’s sculptural installations are assembled from a palette of seemingly visceral materials including porcelain, animal parts and pelts, fur, wool, leather, fabric and shells, alongside bought and found objects. Often performing within her works by inhabiting sculptures as costumes, she plays with the line between human, creature and object. Through her specific style of humorous and absurd storytelling, Lemsalu poses earnest questions about the hierarchies we set up between life and death, beauty and revulsion, merit and mediocrity. Kris Lemsalu was born in 1985 in Tallinn, Estonia, and lives and works between Vienna and Tallin. 
Tania Bruguera
Tania Bruguera
London - Bankside
until 24-02-2019

Tania Bruguera – 10,143,270   The acclaimed Cuban artist and activist Tania Bruguera has created a series of subtle interventions in and around Tate Modern. The work’s title is an ever-increasing figure: the number of people who migrated from one country to another last year added to the number of migrant deaths recorded so far this year – to indicate the sheer scale of mass migration and the risks involved. Bruguera has brought together a group of 21 people who live or work in the same postcode as Tate Modern. Called Tate Neighbours, they will explore how the museum can learn from and adapt to its local community. They have decided to rename Tate Modern’s Boiler­ House for a year in honour of local activist Natalie Bell. The Tate Neighbours have also written a manifesto which appears when you sign in to the free WiFi. In the Turbine Hall is a large heat-sensitive floor. By using your body heat and working together with other visitors, you can reveal a hidden portrait of Yousef, a young man who left Syria to come to London. Meanwhile, a low-frequency sound fills the space with an unsettling energy. In a small room nearby, an organic compound in the air induces tears and provokes what the artist describes as ‘forced empathy’.

Tania Bruguera – 10,143,270   The acclaimed Cuban artist and activist Tania Bruguera has created a series of subtle interventions in and around Tate Modern. The work’s title is an ever-increasing figure: the number of people who migrated from one country to another last year added to the number of migrant deaths recorded so far this year – to indicate the sheer scale of mass migration and the risks involved. Bruguera has brought together a group of 21 people who live or work in the same postcode as Tate Modern. Called Tate Neighbours, they will explore how the museum can learn from and adapt to its local community. They have decided to rename Tate Modern’s Boiler­ House for a year in honour of local activist Natalie Bell. The Tate Neighbours have also written a manifesto which appears when you sign in to the free WiFi. In the Turbine Hall is a large heat-sensitive floor. By using your body heat and working together with other visitors, you can reveal a hidden portrait of Yousef, a young man who left Syria to come to London. Meanwhile, a low-frequency sound fills the space with an unsettling energy. In a small room nearby, an organic compound in the air induces tears and provokes what the artist describes as ‘forced empathy’.
Chris Burden
Chris Burden
London - 6-24 Britannia Street
until 26-01-2019

Chris Burden – Measured   Gagosian is pleased to present Measured, an exhibition of two large-scale works by Chris Burden: 1 Ton Crane Truck (2009) and Porsche with Meteorite (2013). With a series of startling actions in the early 1970s, Burden challenged his own mental and physical limitations, and with them the boundaries of art and performance. Shut inside a locker for five days (Five Day Locker Piece, 1971), shot in the arm (Shoot, 1971), and nailed through the palms of his hands to the roof of his Volkswagen (Trans-fixed, 1974), he sought to reflect the violence that defined American politics, society, and media. Over the course of his career, the daring spirit of these early performances evolved into compelling large-scale sculptures that embody technical feats on an imposing scale. Burden used toys (figurines, train sets, Erector parts) as the building blocks for expansive scale models of skyscrapers, dystopic cities, and battlefields; conversely, he deployed actual vehicles (ships, trucks, and cars) in surreal and gravity-defying ways.

Chris Burden – Measured   Gagosian is pleased to present Measured, an exhibition of two large-scale works by Chris Burden: 1 Ton Crane Truck (2009) and Porsche with Meteorite (2013). With a series of startling actions in the early 1970s, Burden challenged his own mental and physical limitations, and with them the boundaries of art and performance. Shut inside a locker for five days (Five Day Locker Piece, 1971), shot in the arm (Shoot, 1971), and nailed through the palms of his hands to the roof of his Volkswagen (Trans-fixed, 1974), he sought to reflect the violence that defined American politics, society, and media. Over the course of his career, the daring spirit of these early performances evolved into compelling large-scale sculptures that embody technical feats on an imposing scale. Burden used toys (figurines, train sets, Erector parts) as the building blocks for expansive scale models of skyscrapers, dystopic cities, and battlefields; conversely, he deployed actual vehicles (ships, trucks, and cars) in surreal and gravity-defying ways.
Pierre Huyghe
Pierre Huyghe
London - Kensington Gardens
until 10-02-2019

Pierre Huyghe Pierre Huyghe, known for creating complex, immersive ecosystems, presents a major new exhibition in which mental images, captured in the human brain, have been decoded and reconstructed by a deep neural network. Once exhibited, contingent conditions will endlessly modify their plasticity. Throughout the gallery, large LED screens will present images which began in the mind of a human. The brain activity is captured as a person imagines a specific situation that the subject has been prompted to think of. One by one, each thought is reconstructed by a deep neural network and the images created are exhibited in the gallery, where they will be in a constant process of reconstruction, endlessly modified by external factors – light, temperature and humidity levels, the presence of insects, and the gaze of visitors. The Serpentine Gallery building will be subtly altered, affecting the conditions of the exhibition’s environment. Sanding the walls, dust from the paint of previous exhibitions will lie on the floor. The central gallery, transformed into an incubator, will birth thousands of flies that migrate towards the centre of the dome. Born in Paris in 1962 and based in New York, Pierre Huyghe works on situations that are often based on speculative models. The environments he creates are complex systems in which interdependent agents, biotic and abiotic, real and symbolic, are self-organising, co-evolving in a dynamic and unstable mesh. Crucially, the different modes of existence and intelligence involved are often imperceptible to the visitors who encounter them. This new exhibition for the Serpentine follows Huyghe’s recent acclaimed projects, including After ALife Ahead for Skulptur Projekte Münster, 2017; Untilled at dOCUMENTA(13), 2012; and The Host and the Cloud in 2010.

Pierre Huyghe Pierre Huyghe, known for creating complex, immersive ecosystems, presents a major new exhibition in which mental images, captured in the human brain, have been decoded and reconstructed by a deep neural network. Once exhibited, contingent conditions will endlessly modify their plasticity. Throughout the gallery, large LED screens will present images which began in the mind of a human. The brain activity is captured as a person imagines a specific situation that the subject has been prompted to think of. One by one, each thought is reconstructed by a deep neural network and the images created are exhibited in the gallery, where they will be in a constant process of reconstruction, endlessly modified by external factors – light, temperature and humidity levels, the presence of insects, and the gaze of visitors. The Serpentine Gallery building will be subtly altered, affecting the conditions of the exhibition’s environment. Sanding the walls, dust from the paint of previous exhibitions will lie on the floor. The central gallery, transformed into an incubator, will birth thousands of flies that migrate towards the centre of the dome. Born in Paris in 1962 and based in New York, Pierre Huyghe works on situations that are often based on speculative models. The environments he creates are complex systems in which interdependent agents, biotic and abiotic, real and symbolic, are self-organising, co-evolving in a dynamic and unstable mesh. Crucially, the different modes of existence and intelligence involved are often imperceptible to the visitors who encounter them. This new exhibition for the Serpentine follows Huyghe’s recent acclaimed projects, including After ALife Ahead for Skulptur Projekte Münster, 2017; Untilled at dOCUMENTA(13), 2012; and The Host and the Cloud in 2010.
Wong Ping
Wong Ping
Düsseldorf - Ackerstrasse 26
until 26-01-2019

Wong Ping – Who's the Daddy?

Wong Ping – Who's the Daddy?
Isabella Fürnkäs
Isabella Fürnkäs
Berlin - Leipziger Strasse 61
until 09-02-2019

Isabella Fürnkäs – The Loop 

Isabella Fürnkäs – The Loop 
Natalie Czech & Mirjam Thomann
Natalie Czech & Mirjam Thomann
Berlin - Im Köllnischen Park
until 20-01-2019

Natalie Czech & Mirjam Thomann – ?Meeting With the Other as Such, but Still   Marking the end of the current exhibition programme, ›meeting with the other as such, but still‹ follows possible lines of flight. A paradox, it seems, considering that a multitude of border mechanisms separate the exhibition site from the outside world and the Bärenzwinger's individual areas from each other. The artists Natalie Czech and Mirjam Thomann, alternatively search for the hidden spaces within a space. The kind that only unfold in the encounter with the other as an experience of difference.

Natalie Czech & Mirjam Thomann – ?Meeting With the Other as Such, but Still   Marking the end of the current exhibition programme, ›meeting with the other as such, but still‹ follows possible lines of flight. A paradox, it seems, considering that a multitude of border mechanisms separate the exhibition site from the outside world and the Bärenzwinger's individual areas from each other. The artists Natalie Czech and Mirjam Thomann, alternatively search for the hidden spaces within a space. The kind that only unfold in the encounter with the other as an experience of difference.
Raphaela Vogel
Raphaela Vogel
Berlin - Alte Jakobstrasse 124?128
until 11-03-2019

Raphaela Vogel – ?Son of a Witch In her expansive video sculptures, Raphaela Vogel addresses her own feminine corporeality and an often male-influenced technique in ever new ways and not without humor. In her post-apocalyptic, Frankensteinian worlds, everything is turned inside out, twisted, transformed, deconstructed, and reinterpreted in a refreshingly irreverent manner: the Dixi urinal and the hay crane, high-voltage insulators, projection technology, and camera drones become eerie and strangely archaic monsters with an ominously independent existence, populating both her films and the exhibition, which Vogel stands up to in her fragility and vulnerability in a seemingly hopeless struggle. Son of a Witch is Vogel’s first institutional solo presentation in Berlin.

Raphaela Vogel – ?Son of a Witch In her expansive video sculptures, Raphaela Vogel addresses her own feminine corporeality and an often male-influenced technique in ever new ways and not without humor. In her post-apocalyptic, Frankensteinian worlds, everything is turned inside out, twisted, transformed, deconstructed, and reinterpreted in a refreshingly irreverent manner: the Dixi urinal and the hay crane, high-voltage insulators, projection technology, and camera drones become eerie and strangely archaic monsters with an ominously independent existence, populating both her films and the exhibition, which Vogel stands up to in her fragility and vulnerability in a seemingly hopeless struggle. Son of a Witch is Vogel’s first institutional solo presentation in Berlin.
How to talk with birds, trees, fish, shells, snakes, bulls and lions
How to talk with birds, trees, fish, shells, snakes, bulls and lions
Berlin - Invalidenstrasse 50/51
until 12-05-2019

How to talk with birds, trees, fish, shells, snakes, bulls and lions Antje Majewski with Agnieszka Brze?a?ska & Ewa Ciepielewska, Carolina Caycedo, Pawe? Freisler, Olivier Guesselé-Garai, Tamás Kaszás, Paulo Nazareth, Guarani-Kaiowa & Luciana de Oliveira, Issa Samb, Xu Tan, Hervé Yamguen# Can a shell sing to me? Can a human being be a snake? Can a tree be my mother or father? Can I converse with a river? Can a chicken help to communicate with my ancestors? Are there human beings that know how to sing like birds? Can my apple tree call for my help? Can animals in the forest show me how to survive? Can I listen to the insects in a fallow in the middle of the city? Collaborative and trans-disciplinary artist Antje Majewski (born 1968 in Marl, Germany) has opened an ongoing dialogue with colleagues from Brazil, Cameroon, China, Colombia, France, Hungary, Poland, and Senegal, and invited them to contribute works exploring the reciprocal relationships between human and beyond-human beings in a poetic way. The exhibition at Hamburger Bahnhof – Museum für Gegenwart – Berlin stems from this conversation between the participating artists and their interactions with others. The project and its title emerged from a conversation between Senegalese painter, sculptor, performance artist, playwright and poet Issa Samb and Antje Majewski under the trees in his courtyard in Dakar. Sadly, both Issa Samb and the trees are gone today, but the discussion set a process, a laboratory in motion. It was the start of meetings, travels, and conversations between Majewski and the invited artists. How to talk with birds, trees, fish, shells, snakes, bulls and lions takes artists’ interactions with endangered places, societies and environments as points of departure. The presented works often focus on specific places that have been destroyed, altered, or are seriously imperiled by encroaching capitalism, colonialism, and other detrimental human influences. Videos, large-scale installations, sculptures, manifestos, poems, photographs, drawings, and paintings address delicate socio-ecological systems, of which human beings are always a part. The artists speak from personal positions of dissidence to today’s dominant modes of interaction with the environment—whether feminist, decolonizing, situational, and by proposing radically non-capitalist ways of interacting with humans, other living beings, and matter.  

How to talk with birds, trees, fish, shells, snakes, bulls and lions Antje Majewski with Agnieszka Brze?a?ska & Ewa Ciepielewska, Carolina Caycedo, Pawe? Freisler, Olivier Guesselé-Garai, Tamás Kaszás, Paulo Nazareth, Guarani-Kaiowa & Luciana de Oliveira, Issa Samb, Xu Tan, Hervé Yamguen# Can a shell sing to me? Can a human being be a snake? Can a tree be my mother or father? Can I converse with a river? Can a chicken help to communicate with my ancestors? Are there human beings that know how to sing like birds? Can my apple tree call for my help? Can animals in the forest show me how to survive? Can I listen to the insects in a fallow in the middle of the city? Collaborative and trans-disciplinary artist Antje Majewski (born 1968 in Marl, Germany) has opened an ongoing dialogue with colleagues from Brazil, Cameroon, China, Colombia, France, Hungary, Poland, and Senegal, and invited them to contribute works exploring the reciprocal relationships between human and beyond-human beings in a poetic way. The exhibition at Hamburger Bahnhof – Museum für Gegenwart – Berlin stems from this conversation between the participating artists and their interactions with others. The project and its title emerged from a conversation between Senegalese painter, sculptor, performance artist, playwright and poet Issa Samb and Antje Majewski under the trees in his courtyard in Dakar. Sadly, both Issa Samb and the trees are gone today, but the discussion set a process, a laboratory in motion. It was the start of meetings, travels, and conversations between Majewski and the invited artists. How to talk with birds, trees, fish, shells, snakes, bulls and lions takes artists’ interactions with endangered places, societies and environments as points of departure. The presented works often focus on specific places that have been destroyed, altered, or are seriously imperiled by encroaching capitalism, colonialism, and other detrimental human influences. Videos, large-scale installations, sculptures, manifestos, poems, photographs, drawings, and paintings address delicate socio-ecological systems, of which human beings are always a part. The artists speak from personal positions of dissidence to today’s dominant modes of interaction with the environment—whether feminist, decolonizing, situational, and by proposing radically non-capitalist ways of interacting with humans, other living beings, and matter.  
Julian Charrière
Julian Charrière
Berlin - Alte Jakobstrasse 124?128
until 08-04-2019

Julian Charrière – As We Used to Float GASAG Art Prize 2018 As the recipient of the GASAG Art Prize 2018, Julian Charrière will create a multimedia spatial installation for the Berlinische Galerie that takes visitors underwater in the Pacific Ocean. Seventy years after the United States began testing thermonuclear weapons at Bikini Atoll, the artist set off on an expedition to an area rendered permanently uninhabitable for human life as a result of the environmental contamination. As we used to float is a physical, three-dimensional experience that reveals the legacy of those atomic tests both above and below sea level. These unintentional monuments symbolise the interaction between anthropogenic and natural transformations. For Julian Charrière, they also mark the point in history when humans became one of the biggest factors influencing biological, geological and atmospheric processes on Earth. Julian Charrière was born in Morges in French-speaking Switzerland in 1987. He began studying art in Switzerland in 2006, and in 2007 transferred to the University of the Arts in Berlin, where he finished his studies in 2013 under Olafur Eliasson at the Institut für Raumexperimente. His work has been shown in many countries, including at the main exhibition of the Venice Biennale in 2017. This event at the Berlinische Galerie will be his first solo show at an institution in Berlin.

Julian Charrière – As We Used to Float GASAG Art Prize 2018 As the recipient of the GASAG Art Prize 2018, Julian Charrière will create a multimedia spatial installation for the Berlinische Galerie that takes visitors underwater in the Pacific Ocean. Seventy years after the United States began testing thermonuclear weapons at Bikini Atoll, the artist set off on an expedition to an area rendered permanently uninhabitable for human life as a result of the environmental contamination. As we used to float is a physical, three-dimensional experience that reveals the legacy of those atomic tests both above and below sea level. These unintentional monuments symbolise the interaction between anthropogenic and natural transformations. For Julian Charrière, they also mark the point in history when humans became one of the biggest factors influencing biological, geological and atmospheric processes on Earth. Julian Charrière was born in Morges in French-speaking Switzerland in 1987. He began studying art in Switzerland in 2006, and in 2007 transferred to the University of the Arts in Berlin, where he finished his studies in 2013 under Olafur Eliasson at the Institut für Raumexperimente. His work has been shown in many countries, including at the main exhibition of the Venice Biennale in 2017. This event at the Berlinische Galerie will be his first solo show at an institution in Berlin.
Isa Genzken
Isa Genzken
Berlin - Fasanenstrasse 30
until 26-01-2019

Isa Genzken – ?Außenprojekte

Isa Genzken – ?Außenprojekte
Mat Collishaw
Mat Collishaw
Berlin - Potsdamer Strasse 77?87
until 26-01-2019

Mat Collishaw – The Grinders Cease Mat Collishaw’s first exhibition at our Berlin gallery comprises new and recent works reflecting the artist’s preoccupation with the Vanitas theme, which serves to remind viewers of the transience of life and the impermanence of worldly pleasures.

Mat Collishaw – The Grinders Cease Mat Collishaw’s first exhibition at our Berlin gallery comprises new and recent works reflecting the artist’s preoccupation with the Vanitas theme, which serves to remind viewers of the transience of life and the impermanence of worldly pleasures.
Boros Collection / Bunker #3
Boros Collection / Bunker #3
Berlin - Reinhardtstrasse 20
until 31-12-2019

Boros Collection / Bunker #3 Martin Boyce, Andreas Eriksson, Guan Xiao, He Xiangyu, Uwe Henneken, Yngve Holen, Sergej Jensen, Daniel Josefsohn, Friedrich Kunath, Michel Majerus, Fabian Marti, Kris Martin, Justin Matherly, Paulo Nazareth, Peter Piller, Katja Novitskova, Pamela Rosenkranz, Avery Singer, Johannes Wohnseifer The Boros Collection is a private collection of contemporary art. It comprises groups of works by international artists dating from 1990 to the present. Different facets of the collection are on public display in a converted bunker, with 3000 sqm exhibition space. The new presentation of the Boros Collection presents newly purchased and site specific works in combination with works from the 1990s and 2000. Since 2008, when the inaugural exhibition opened in the converted bunker, more than 300,000 people have visited the historic building dating from 1941 in Berlin’s Mitte district.

Boros Collection / Bunker #3 Martin Boyce, Andreas Eriksson, Guan Xiao, He Xiangyu, Uwe Henneken, Yngve Holen, Sergej Jensen, Daniel Josefsohn, Friedrich Kunath, Michel Majerus, Fabian Marti, Kris Martin, Justin Matherly, Paulo Nazareth, Peter Piller, Katja Novitskova, Pamela Rosenkranz, Avery Singer, Johannes Wohnseifer The Boros Collection is a private collection of contemporary art. It comprises groups of works by international artists dating from 1990 to the present. Different facets of the collection are on public display in a converted bunker, with 3000 sqm exhibition space. The new presentation of the Boros Collection presents newly purchased and site specific works in combination with works from the 1990s and 2000. Since 2008, when the inaugural exhibition opened in the converted bunker, more than 300,000 people have visited the historic building dating from 1941 in Berlin’s Mitte district.
Tony Cragg
Tony Cragg
Berlin - Charlottenstrasse 13
until 26-01-2019

Tony Cragg Buchmann Galerie is delighted to announce an exhibition featuring new sculptures and drawings by Tony Cragg. In the front exhibition space, a monumental sculpture from the new work group Skulls, measuring 240 x 227 x 172 cm, makes a powerful impression with its complex interlock of internal and external spaces. The entire volume of this work constructed from layered plywood is permeated by innumerable close-lying and in some cases interlaced, tube-like forms. They open up a surprising insight into the sculpture's internal depths. Resembling foam and yet conveying solidity, the work evokes organic forms, the innermost part of which generates the exterior. Tony Cragg explains: "There exists a real psychological pressure and need for the viewer to see beyond the surface and that all the forms we see provide a connection to the greater and more fundamental external and internal forces that make them." The group of work Hedges, inspired by Tony Cragg's childhood memories of landscapes with hedges in his English home region, comprises filigree leaf- and blade-like forms. The organic configurations rouse associations with a hedge or tumbleweed. The red-brown, matt shimmering patina of the steel contributes to these natural associations. However, looking more closely, it becomes clear that the forms, in their buoyancy and arrangement, are artificial – they are man-made. Like a mobile, the formations seem to float in a perfectly balanced state, as if their shape could alter at any given moment. Conversion, made from aluminium, adopts the leaf-like structure of the Hedges but transposes it into a floral setting, which in turn seems to explode the limitations of abstraction with its camouflage finish. Tony Cragg is an artist who has always utilized a study of natural science in order to challenge nature. The absolute loyalty to his materials that Peter Schjeldahl attests to the artist (1) meets with a will to form in Tony Cragg's work that is not exhausted in the work itself but wrestles with nature. "I am an extreme materialist" the artist maintains repeatedly. And Peter Schjeldahl adds that it is from this alone that the fantastic spectrum of material and formal freedom can emerge, which characterizes this great sculptor's extensive oeuvre. In the Buchmann Box we are showing a collection of recent sculptures and drawings, which exemplify the artist's work as it continues to unfold in an almost encyclopaedic manner. The sculptor's outstanding significance was recognized impressively in 2007, when he received the Praemium Imperiale for Sculpture. In the last two years several important solo presentations of Tony Cragg's work have taken place, including in the Hermitage in St. Petersburg, Tehran Museum of Contemporary Art, Mudam Luxembourg, and the comprehensive retrospective "Parts of the World" in the Von der Heydt-Museum, Wuppertal, in 2016. A Rare Category of Objects in the Yorkshire Sculpture Park, UK, was one of the most extensive outdoor exhibitions of his art seen to date. A five volume monographic publication examining Tony Cragg's work is currently being issued by the Verlag der Buchhandlung Walther König, Cologne. Besides a volume about his drawings and prints, it comprises three volumes on his sculptures since the late 1970s, as well as a volume of the artist's own writing. Three of these volumes are already available. 1.) Peter Schjeldahl, Cragg's Big Bang, in: Anthony Cragg, Parts of the World, Cologne 2016, pp. 155-166

Tony Cragg Buchmann Galerie is delighted to announce an exhibition featuring new sculptures and drawings by Tony Cragg. In the front exhibition space, a monumental sculpture from the new work group Skulls, measuring 240 x 227 x 172 cm, makes a powerful impression with its complex interlock of internal and external spaces. The entire volume of this work constructed from layered plywood is permeated by innumerable close-lying and in some cases interlaced, tube-like forms. They open up a surprising insight into the sculpture's internal depths. Resembling foam and yet conveying solidity, the work evokes organic forms, the innermost part of which generates the exterior. Tony Cragg explains: "There exists a real psychological pressure and need for the viewer to see beyond the surface and that all the forms we see provide a connection to the greater and more fundamental external and internal forces that make them." The group of work Hedges, inspired by Tony Cragg's childhood memories of landscapes with hedges in his English home region, comprises filigree leaf- and blade-like forms. The organic configurations rouse associations with a hedge or tumbleweed. The red-brown, matt shimmering patina of the steel contributes to these natural associations. However, looking more closely, it becomes clear that the forms, in their buoyancy and arrangement, are artificial – they are man-made. Like a mobile, the formations seem to float in a perfectly balanced state, as if their shape could alter at any given moment. Conversion, made from aluminium, adopts the leaf-like structure of the Hedges but transposes it into a floral setting, which in turn seems to explode the limitations of abstraction with its camouflage finish. Tony Cragg is an artist who has always utilized a study of natural science in order to challenge nature. The absolute loyalty to his materials that Peter Schjeldahl attests to the artist (1) meets with a will to form in Tony Cragg's work that is not exhausted in the work itself but wrestles with nature. "I am an extreme materialist" the artist maintains repeatedly. And Peter Schjeldahl adds that it is from this alone that the fantastic spectrum of material and formal freedom can emerge, which characterizes this great sculptor's extensive oeuvre. In the Buchmann Box we are showing a collection of recent sculptures and drawings, which exemplify the artist's work as it continues to unfold in an almost encyclopaedic manner. The sculptor's outstanding significance was recognized impressively in 2007, when he received the Praemium Imperiale for Sculpture. In the last two years several important solo presentations of Tony Cragg's work have taken place, including in the Hermitage in St. Petersburg, Tehran Museum of Contemporary Art, Mudam Luxembourg, and the comprehensive retrospective "Parts of the World" in the Von der Heydt-Museum, Wuppertal, in 2016. A Rare Category of Objects in the Yorkshire Sculpture Park, UK, was one of the most extensive outdoor exhibitions of his art seen to date. A five volume monographic publication examining Tony Cragg's work is currently being issued by the Verlag der Buchhandlung Walther König, Cologne. Besides a volume about his drawings and prints, it comprises three volumes on his sculptures since the late 1970s, as well as a volume of the artist's own writing. Three of these volumes are already available. 1.) Peter Schjeldahl, Cragg's Big Bang, in: Anthony Cragg, Parts of the World, Cologne 2016, pp. 155-166
Julia Scher
Julia Scher
Berlin - Potsdamer Strasse 81E
until 09-02-2019

Julia Scher – Wonderland Esther Schipper is pleased to announce Wonderland, Julia Scher’s fifth solo exhibition with the gallery since her first participation in a 1991 group exhibition at Esther Schipper, Cologne.   Twenty years after its first iteration, Scher reenacts her historical environment, Wonderland, 1998. The work was originally conceived—in a smaller scale—for the group exhibition Performance Anxiety at the MCA, Chicago, 1997, but was first presented in its final design in New York a year later, at Andrea Rosen Gallery. The installation subsequently travelled to various institutions such as the CAPC–Musée d’art contemporain in Bordeaux, where it was included in the infamously censored group exhibition Présumés innocents [Presumed Innocents], 2000.    Immersed in the gallery’s theatrical pink and purple light atmosphere, Scher’s Wonderland is a multimedia environment where visitors are welcomed by the sound of the artist’s authoritative yet soothing voice: ‘Attention. There are live cameras here in Wonderland, recording you… Warning. Your size may change, here in Wonderland. Thank you for coming!’ At the center of the space are two semi-circular child-sized desks arrayed with complex technical equipment and cabling, vintage computer monitors with live surveillance footage, various ephemera—such as bags of White Rabbit Creamy Candy—and Scher’s signature pink guard caps and customized uniforms with embroidered patches reading ‘Security by Julia’. These elements form both the nervous system and the metaphorical rabbit hole of a dystopian vision of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, a reference underlined by the intro notes of Jefferson Airplane’s 1967 song White Rabbit that Scher incorporates in the environment’s soundtrack.   On the walls, complementing the central assemblage of technological apparatuses and associative materials, large-scale Duratrans prints depict children—among them American actress and director Lena Dunham aged 10—dressed in the same pink uniforms and caps that are neatly folded on the desks. The children, carrying police sticks and other technical equipment which relate to surveillance and supposed security, playfully embody the authority invested in security guards and police officers. On the facing wall, an alignment of convex, concave, and curved mirrors—reminiscent of a Fun House—reflects and distorts the enlarged photographs of the child-guards, contributing to the surreal atmosphere of the room. The interactive installation was conceived for children. By placing them in a position of control and authority, Scher reverses the traditional roles adults/children, protectors/protected, while blurring the line between the ideas of surveillance, security, and threat.   In an adjacent room, an ensemble of small framed photographs from the series of Wonderland prints completes the presentation. Each photograph portrays one of the children, wearing the same pink guard outfit and carrying various surveillance and security gears.   The final part of the exhibition space provides a counterpoint to Wonderland, as well as an intimate setting for Scher’s seminal video work Serious Discipline Masters, in which the artist attempts to preserve her understanding of her life history. In this 11-hour stream of consciousness narrative, Scher recounts her childhood memories, often with details changed or omitted, recalling how her mother became a voyeuristic presence, more sexualized and menacing rather than protective or maternal. The tape Serious Discipline Masters, recorded in the artist’s studio in August 1988, constituted a cathartic retelling of these childhood/adolescent experiences which were a subsequent source for Scher's preoccupation with notions of surveillance, a sexualized and controlling gaze. Less than a year later, the artist created her first pink guard uniforms for the 1989 installation Security by Julia II at the Artists Space, New York. Drawing on the juxtaposition of the color’s playful and a uniform’s menacing connotations, Scher combined the analysis of control mechanisms with feminist critique.   The gallery is grateful to Prof. Dr. Hans Dieter Huber for sharing his expertise in the preparation of this exhibition.   Julia Scher was born in 1954 in Hollywood, California. The artist currently lives and works in Cologne.

Julia Scher – Wonderland Esther Schipper is pleased to announce Wonderland, Julia Scher’s fifth solo exhibition with the gallery since her first participation in a 1991 group exhibition at Esther Schipper, Cologne.   Twenty years after its first iteration, Scher reenacts her historical environment, Wonderland, 1998. The work was originally conceived—in a smaller scale—for the group exhibition Performance Anxiety at the MCA, Chicago, 1997, but was first presented in its final design in New York a year later, at Andrea Rosen Gallery. The installation subsequently travelled to various institutions such as the CAPC–Musée d’art contemporain in Bordeaux, where it was included in the infamously censored group exhibition Présumés innocents [Presumed Innocents], 2000.    Immersed in the gallery’s theatrical pink and purple light atmosphere, Scher’s Wonderland is a multimedia environment where visitors are welcomed by the sound of the artist’s authoritative yet soothing voice: ‘Attention. There are live cameras here in Wonderland, recording you… Warning. Your size may change, here in Wonderland. Thank you for coming!’ At the center of the space are two semi-circular child-sized desks arrayed with complex technical equipment and cabling, vintage computer monitors with live surveillance footage, various ephemera—such as bags of White Rabbit Creamy Candy—and Scher’s signature pink guard caps and customized uniforms with embroidered patches reading ‘Security by Julia’. These elements form both the nervous system and the metaphorical rabbit hole of a dystopian vision of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, a reference underlined by the intro notes of Jefferson Airplane’s 1967 song White Rabbit that Scher incorporates in the environment’s soundtrack.   On the walls, complementing the central assemblage of technological apparatuses and associative materials, large-scale Duratrans prints depict children—among them American actress and director Lena Dunham aged 10—dressed in the same pink uniforms and caps that are neatly folded on the desks. The children, carrying police sticks and other technical equipment which relate to surveillance and supposed security, playfully embody the authority invested in security guards and police officers. On the facing wall, an alignment of convex, concave, and curved mirrors—reminiscent of a Fun House—reflects and distorts the enlarged photographs of the child-guards, contributing to the surreal atmosphere of the room. The interactive installation was conceived for children. By placing them in a position of control and authority, Scher reverses the traditional roles adults/children, protectors/protected, while blurring the line between the ideas of surveillance, security, and threat.   In an adjacent room, an ensemble of small framed photographs from the series of Wonderland prints completes the presentation. Each photograph portrays one of the children, wearing the same pink guard outfit and carrying various surveillance and security gears.   The final part of the exhibition space provides a counterpoint to Wonderland, as well as an intimate setting for Scher’s seminal video work Serious Discipline Masters, in which the artist attempts to preserve her understanding of her life history. In this 11-hour stream of consciousness narrative, Scher recounts her childhood memories, often with details changed or omitted, recalling how her mother became a voyeuristic presence, more sexualized and menacing rather than protective or maternal. The tape Serious Discipline Masters, recorded in the artist’s studio in August 1988, constituted a cathartic retelling of these childhood/adolescent experiences which were a subsequent source for Scher's preoccupation with notions of surveillance, a sexualized and controlling gaze. Less than a year later, the artist created her first pink guard uniforms for the 1989 installation Security by Julia II at the Artists Space, New York. Drawing on the juxtaposition of the color’s playful and a uniform’s menacing connotations, Scher combined the analysis of control mechanisms with feminist critique.   The gallery is grateful to Prof. Dr. Hans Dieter Huber for sharing his expertise in the preparation of this exhibition.   Julia Scher was born in 1954 in Hollywood, California. The artist currently lives and works in Cologne.