Art feed

Curated by Exhibitionary

Isa Genzken
Isa Genzken
London - 23 Savile Row
until 02-05-2020

Isa Genzken – Window   ‘Window’ is an exhibition at our London gallery by Isa Genzken featuring a new and unseen body of work. Genzken’s immersive environment expands on the themes of travel, through elements of an aircraft cabin, and the window as a juncture between interior and exterior spaces. In this respect, it reveals the artist’s interest in architecture and light, a topic of enduring resonance in her work as seen in the landmark exhibition in Chicago in 1992, ‘Everybody Needs at Least One Window’.

Isa Genzken – Window   ‘Window’ is an exhibition at our London gallery by Isa Genzken featuring a new and unseen body of work. Genzken’s immersive environment expands on the themes of travel, through elements of an aircraft cabin, and the window as a juncture between interior and exterior spaces. In this respect, it reveals the artist’s interest in architecture and light, a topic of enduring resonance in her work as seen in the landmark exhibition in Chicago in 1992, ‘Everybody Needs at Least One Window’.
Harun Farocki, Hito Steyerl
Harun Farocki, Hito Steyerl
London - Ely House, 37 Dover Street
until 04-04-2020

Harun Farocki, Hito Steyerl  – Life Captured Still Revered as pioneers in the fields of documentary video and new media art across two generations, the artists' expansive films interrogate organisational power structures, divisions of labour, and the inescapable and shifting roles of the images that permeate contemporary society.

Harun Farocki, Hito Steyerl  – Life Captured Still Revered as pioneers in the fields of documentary video and new media art across two generations, the artists' expansive films interrogate organisational power structures, divisions of labour, and the inescapable and shifting roles of the images that permeate contemporary society.
Tam Ochiai
Tam Ochiai
London - 4 Herald Street
until 22-03-2020

Tam Ochiai – M.O. In a solo exhibition titled M.O., in reference to the Surrealist artist Meret Oppenheim, Tam Ochiai presents a new series of small assemblage paintings alongside a group of previously un-exhibited works on paper and two earlier paintings. This constellation of work from four separate but connected series’ traverse the artist’s ongoing interest in place and reaffirm an understanding that the seemingly arbitrary movement between locations can function as an index for geographical distance, temporality and a tracing of personal history and experience. Ochiai’s newest body of work, playfully displayed across the floor, finds its genesis in a once-lost gift Meret Oppenheim made for her then-lover Max Ernst titled Husch, Husch, der schöne Vokal entleert sich (1934). Rediscovered in a Parisian flea market forty years later by a French art dealer and then bought back and restored by the artist, the painting incorporates a golden metal chain that links a grey painted mass with six coloured shapes. This anecdotal narrative becomes a kind of score for the exhibition, while the process of incorporating found material in the formal construction of a painting in this way reaffirms and complicates Ochiai’s notion that place can be identified in a single object.

Tam Ochiai – M.O. In a solo exhibition titled M.O., in reference to the Surrealist artist Meret Oppenheim, Tam Ochiai presents a new series of small assemblage paintings alongside a group of previously un-exhibited works on paper and two earlier paintings. This constellation of work from four separate but connected series’ traverse the artist’s ongoing interest in place and reaffirm an understanding that the seemingly arbitrary movement between locations can function as an index for geographical distance, temporality and a tracing of personal history and experience. Ochiai’s newest body of work, playfully displayed across the floor, finds its genesis in a once-lost gift Meret Oppenheim made for her then-lover Max Ernst titled Husch, Husch, der schöne Vokal entleert sich (1934). Rediscovered in a Parisian flea market forty years later by a French art dealer and then bought back and restored by the artist, the painting incorporates a golden metal chain that links a grey painted mass with six coloured shapes. This anecdotal narrative becomes a kind of score for the exhibition, while the process of incorporating found material in the formal construction of a painting in this way reaffirms and complicates Ochiai’s notion that place can be identified in a single object.
Bram Bogart
Bram Bogart
London - 144-152 Bermondsey Street
until 07-03-2020

Bram Bogart In his expressive works, Bogart focused on paint as physical matter and explored the medium’s sculptural possibilities. Through a process of 'building' with a unique mixture of materials, he fused gesture with matter to create powerfully physical, three-dimensional paintings.

Bram Bogart In his expressive works, Bogart focused on paint as physical matter and explored the medium’s sculptural possibilities. Through a process of 'building' with a unique mixture of materials, he fused gesture with matter to create powerfully physical, three-dimensional paintings.
Alex Israel
Alex Israel
London - 20 Grosvenor Hill
until 14-03-2020

Alex Israel – Always on my mind  

Alex Israel – Always on my mind  
Leo Fitzmaurice
Leo Fitzmaurice
London - 117-119 South Lambeth Road
until 21-03-2020

Leo Fitzmaurice – Autosuggestions

Leo Fitzmaurice – Autosuggestions
Vivian Suter
Vivian Suter
London - Arkwright Road
until 05-04-2020

Vivian Suter – Tin Tin's Sofa

Vivian Suter – Tin Tin's Sofa
Richard Deacon
Richard Deacon
London - 67 Lisson Street
until 29-02-2020

Richard Deacon – Deep State Richard Deacon presents his eleventh exhibition with Lisson Gallery, showing works incorporating steel, ceramics, clay, bent wood and ink on paper that evoke different senses – from memory and touch, to sight and movement. This new collection of sculptures, reliefs and drawings also inhabit different planes – from verticality to horizontality – all while shifting between two and three dimensions and passing from porosity to solidity, suggesting their fluid possibilities as either sites for bodily experience or spaces for contemplation and, as the title suggests, for deep dives into each object.

Richard Deacon – Deep State Richard Deacon presents his eleventh exhibition with Lisson Gallery, showing works incorporating steel, ceramics, clay, bent wood and ink on paper that evoke different senses – from memory and touch, to sight and movement. This new collection of sculptures, reliefs and drawings also inhabit different planes – from verticality to horizontality – all while shifting between two and three dimensions and passing from porosity to solidity, suggesting their fluid possibilities as either sites for bodily experience or spaces for contemplation and, as the title suggests, for deep dives into each object.
Art & Language
Art & Language
London - 23 Heddon Street
until 13-03-2020

Art & Language – Picasso’s Guernica in the Style of Jackson Pollock (Essay II) Picasso’s Guernica in the Style of Jackson Pollock (Essay II), 1980-2019, is a large rectangular work on paper, where the powerful and dramatic painting by Picasso Guernica is disguised as a Pollock-like painting. The work was not produced by means of the ‘literal’ use of Pollock’s well known technique. It is rather a drawing in which drips and spatters are represented or depicted.

Art & Language – Picasso’s Guernica in the Style of Jackson Pollock (Essay II) Picasso’s Guernica in the Style of Jackson Pollock (Essay II), 1980-2019, is a large rectangular work on paper, where the powerful and dramatic painting by Picasso Guernica is disguised as a Pollock-like painting. The work was not produced by means of the ‘literal’ use of Pollock’s well known technique. It is rather a drawing in which drips and spatters are represented or depicted.
Louise Bonnet
Louise Bonnet
London - 41 Dover Street, 1st floor
until 29-02-2020

Louise Bonnet Galerie Max Hetzler is pleased to present new large-scale paintings by LA-based artist Louise Bonnet, in her first solo exhibition in the UK. Known for her portraits of voluminous bodies, Bonnet presents the weight of human stresses and emotions in physical form. In her paintings, the figures’ bodies swell and bloat to exaggerated proportions, as though heavy with the feelings of the mind.  Simple actions, like kneeling or hiding, stretch and bend the bodies into uncomfortable extremes, often bringing the figures to the edge of the canvas itself. Interested in the tension of limbs, muscles and the materials that cover them, Bonnet transforms the human form as we know it, all the while retaining a masterful sense of corporeality.  Treading a fine line between humour and discomfort, comedy and tragedy, the anonymous figures are staged in isolation often against diminished backgrounds, their physicality rendering them statuesque yet faceless. The figures are dramatically lit in settings that border the surreal, from sparse domestic rooms, to moonlit tables. Inspiration for Bonnet’s works derive from such multiple sources as Hitchcock film scenes, Cindy Sherman works, Lucas Cranach paintings, and Renaissance portraits. These references usually appear as distorted as the depicted bodies themselves. Louise Bonnet (*1970, Geneva) lives and works in Los Angeles. 

Louise Bonnet Galerie Max Hetzler is pleased to present new large-scale paintings by LA-based artist Louise Bonnet, in her first solo exhibition in the UK. Known for her portraits of voluminous bodies, Bonnet presents the weight of human stresses and emotions in physical form. In her paintings, the figures’ bodies swell and bloat to exaggerated proportions, as though heavy with the feelings of the mind.  Simple actions, like kneeling or hiding, stretch and bend the bodies into uncomfortable extremes, often bringing the figures to the edge of the canvas itself. Interested in the tension of limbs, muscles and the materials that cover them, Bonnet transforms the human form as we know it, all the while retaining a masterful sense of corporeality.  Treading a fine line between humour and discomfort, comedy and tragedy, the anonymous figures are staged in isolation often against diminished backgrounds, their physicality rendering them statuesque yet faceless. The figures are dramatically lit in settings that border the surreal, from sparse domestic rooms, to moonlit tables. Inspiration for Bonnet’s works derive from such multiple sources as Hitchcock film scenes, Cindy Sherman works, Lucas Cranach paintings, and Renaissance portraits. These references usually appear as distorted as the depicted bodies themselves. Louise Bonnet (*1970, Geneva) lives and works in Los Angeles. 
Lara Favaretto
Lara Favaretto
Miami - 2100 Collins Avenue
until 19-04-2020

Lara Favaretto – Blind Spot  Incorporating paintings, sculpture and interactive installations, Lara Favaretto: Blind Spot presents an arrangement of new and recent works alongside ongoing series from the artist’s practice. The exhibition also features a new, site-specific work commissioned for the museum’s permanent collection. Favaretto embraces the idea of constant change, creating works of art and situations that are in flux. Though often humorous and playful, her works address more serious matters such as decay, consumption and loss. Using elements like obsolete technologies to subtly refer to the passing of time, Favaretto incorporates found materials that are repurposed in her work. These upcycled materials – such as found paintings, discarded books and weathered construction materials – serve as commentary on the lifecycle of material detritus. Favaretto’s oeuvre highlights her interest in exploring ideas of the survival of certain objects over others, while contemplating their legitimacy in relation to the forgotten and exposing their inevitable destiny of wear, corrosion, erosion and breakage.

Lara Favaretto – Blind Spot  Incorporating paintings, sculpture and interactive installations, Lara Favaretto: Blind Spot presents an arrangement of new and recent works alongside ongoing series from the artist’s practice. The exhibition also features a new, site-specific work commissioned for the museum’s permanent collection. Favaretto embraces the idea of constant change, creating works of art and situations that are in flux. Though often humorous and playful, her works address more serious matters such as decay, consumption and loss. Using elements like obsolete technologies to subtly refer to the passing of time, Favaretto incorporates found materials that are repurposed in her work. These upcycled materials – such as found paintings, discarded books and weathered construction materials – serve as commentary on the lifecycle of material detritus. Favaretto’s oeuvre highlights her interest in exploring ideas of the survival of certain objects over others, while contemplating their legitimacy in relation to the forgotten and exposing their inevitable destiny of wear, corrosion, erosion and breakage.
Wong Ping
Wong Ping
Miami - 61 NE 41st Street
until 26-04-2020

Wong Ping  With a signature style that is both psychedelic and provocative, and narratives that are richly symbolic, engaging and absurd, Wong Ping creates episodic cinematic tales that are profoundly universal, while often deeply psychological and personal. Wong’s animated videos and installations humorously allegorize contemporary issues of sexuality, culture, politics, and power. Often alluding to fable and fiction, adopting narrative forms such as the detective novel and creating anthropomorphic characters, Wong’s visual language exposes crude realities while offering a space for reflection through fantasy, humor and shared experience.

Wong Ping  With a signature style that is both psychedelic and provocative, and narratives that are richly symbolic, engaging and absurd, Wong Ping creates episodic cinematic tales that are profoundly universal, while often deeply psychological and personal. Wong’s animated videos and installations humorously allegorize contemporary issues of sexuality, culture, politics, and power. Often alluding to fable and fiction, adopting narrative forms such as the detective novel and creating anthropomorphic characters, Wong’s visual language exposes crude realities while offering a space for reflection through fantasy, humor and shared experience.
Mickalene Thomas
Mickalene Thomas
Miami - 2100 Collins Avenue
until 27-09-2020

Mickalene Thomas – Better Nights Inspired by the local New Jersey play ‘Put a Little Sugar in my Bowl’ organized and performed by the artists’ mother, friends, and family as well as the parties hosted by the artist’s mother in the late 1970s, Mickalene Thomas: Better Nights is an installation that will transform the galleries into an immersive art experience for the duration of the exhibition. The installation embodies an apartment environment, conceptually reconstructed according to the domestic aesthetic of the period, including faux wood paneling, wallpaper and custom seating reupholstered with the artist’s signature textiles. An extension of Thomas’ artistic universe, the installation incorporates both work by the artist and a curated selection by Thomas featuring work by emerging and prominent artists of color, with the prop-like tableau echoing the collage-like compositional style of Thomas’ paintings.

Mickalene Thomas – Better Nights Inspired by the local New Jersey play ‘Put a Little Sugar in my Bowl’ organized and performed by the artists’ mother, friends, and family as well as the parties hosted by the artist’s mother in the late 1970s, Mickalene Thomas: Better Nights is an installation that will transform the galleries into an immersive art experience for the duration of the exhibition. The installation embodies an apartment environment, conceptually reconstructed according to the domestic aesthetic of the period, including faux wood paneling, wallpaper and custom seating reupholstered with the artist’s signature textiles. An extension of Thomas’ artistic universe, the installation incorporates both work by the artist and a curated selection by Thomas featuring work by emerging and prominent artists of color, with the prop-like tableau echoing the collage-like compositional style of Thomas’ paintings.
Unparalleled Journey
Unparalleled Journey
Miami - 1100 NW 23 Street
until 28-03-2020

Unparalleled Journey through Contemporary Art of Past 50 Years The Rubell Museum announced that its new campus will open on December 4, 2019 with a museum-wide installation of works that chronicle key artists, moments, and movements in vital arts centers over the past 50 years, from the East Village to Beijing, Los Angeles to Leipzig, and São Paulo to Tokyo. The inaugural exhibition encompasses more than 300 works by 100 artists, providing one of the most far-ranging museum exhibitions of contemporary art ever presented. Drawn entirely from their expansive collection of over 7,200 works by more than 1,000 artists, the exhibition features defining and seminal works by artists whom the Rubells championed as they were first emerging (often becoming the first collectors to acquire their work) and those who had been overlooked. The new Rubell Museum is located in the Allapattah neighborhood of Miami, less than a mile from its original home in Wynwood. The new space is closer to downtown and readily accessible via public transportation.  Retracing the Rubells’ journeys to both major and emerging art centers around the world, the inaugural exhibition includes surveys of artists working in proximity to one another and deep dives into individual careers, tracing influences and revealing parallels among contemporaries and across generations. Installed within the museum’s 40 galleries and its public spaces, highlights from the installation include: 

Unparalleled Journey through Contemporary Art of Past 50 Years The Rubell Museum announced that its new campus will open on December 4, 2019 with a museum-wide installation of works that chronicle key artists, moments, and movements in vital arts centers over the past 50 years, from the East Village to Beijing, Los Angeles to Leipzig, and São Paulo to Tokyo. The inaugural exhibition encompasses more than 300 works by 100 artists, providing one of the most far-ranging museum exhibitions of contemporary art ever presented. Drawn entirely from their expansive collection of over 7,200 works by more than 1,000 artists, the exhibition features defining and seminal works by artists whom the Rubells championed as they were first emerging (often becoming the first collectors to acquire their work) and those who had been overlooked. The new Rubell Museum is located in the Allapattah neighborhood of Miami, less than a mile from its original home in Wynwood. The new space is closer to downtown and readily accessible via public transportation.  Retracing the Rubells’ journeys to both major and emerging art centers around the world, the inaugural exhibition includes surveys of artists working in proximity to one another and deep dives into individual careers, tracing influences and revealing parallels among contemporaries and across generations. Installed within the museum’s 40 galleries and its public spaces, highlights from the installation include: 
Can It Really Be 20 Years Already?
Can It Really Be 20 Years Already?
Miami - 591 NW 27th Street
until 25-04-2020

Can It Really Be 20 Years Already? Art in Our Times, Contemporary Masters, and Philanthropy Magdalena Abakanowicz, Radcliffe Bailey, Eric Bainbridge, Domenico Bianchi, Gilles Barbier, Florian Baudrexel, William Beckman, John Beech, Jeff Brouws, Peter Buggenhout, Lawrence Carroll, John Chamberlain, Olafur Eliasson, Willem de Kooning, Donna Dennis, Nathalie Djurberg, Mark di Suvero, William Eggleston, Leandro Erlich, Kota Ezawa, Michael Heizer, Thomas Hirschhorn, Pieter Hugo, Anselm Kiefer, Justine Kurland, Sol LeWitt, Donald Lokuta, Emil Lukas, Danny Lyon, Chema Madoz, Ibrahim Mahama, Mark Manders, Barry McGee, Dave Muller, Wilhelm Mundt, Jackie Nickerson, Isamu Noguchi, Tony Oursler, Maurizio Pellegrin, Michelangelo Pistoletto, Pedro Cabrita Reis, Jason Rhoades, Nancy Rubins, George Segal, Richard Serra, Cindy Sherman, Shinique Smith, Kenneth Snelson, Jennifer Steinkamp, Frank Stella, Joel Sternfeld, Kishio Suga, William Tucker, Paolo Ventura, Eudora Welty, Franz West, Lois Weinberger The Margulies Collection at the Warehouse, a pioneering force in contemporary art in Miami, presents its 20th Year Anniversary of public exhibitions. Since it’s inauguration in 1999 the Warehouse has welcomed visitors from South Florida and all over the world. The Warehouse exhibitions showcase art of our times featuring 20th & 21st century sculpture, photography, video, painting and large-scale installations by international artists culled from the renowned collection of Martin Z. Margulies. With a stated mission of arts education, the Warehouse has produced hundreds of programs for the community including guest speakers, seminars, publications, internships and guided tours.

Can It Really Be 20 Years Already? Art in Our Times, Contemporary Masters, and Philanthropy Magdalena Abakanowicz, Radcliffe Bailey, Eric Bainbridge, Domenico Bianchi, Gilles Barbier, Florian Baudrexel, William Beckman, John Beech, Jeff Brouws, Peter Buggenhout, Lawrence Carroll, John Chamberlain, Olafur Eliasson, Willem de Kooning, Donna Dennis, Nathalie Djurberg, Mark di Suvero, William Eggleston, Leandro Erlich, Kota Ezawa, Michael Heizer, Thomas Hirschhorn, Pieter Hugo, Anselm Kiefer, Justine Kurland, Sol LeWitt, Donald Lokuta, Emil Lukas, Danny Lyon, Chema Madoz, Ibrahim Mahama, Mark Manders, Barry McGee, Dave Muller, Wilhelm Mundt, Jackie Nickerson, Isamu Noguchi, Tony Oursler, Maurizio Pellegrin, Michelangelo Pistoletto, Pedro Cabrita Reis, Jason Rhoades, Nancy Rubins, George Segal, Richard Serra, Cindy Sherman, Shinique Smith, Kenneth Snelson, Jennifer Steinkamp, Frank Stella, Joel Sternfeld, Kishio Suga, William Tucker, Paolo Ventura, Eudora Welty, Franz West, Lois Weinberger The Margulies Collection at the Warehouse, a pioneering force in contemporary art in Miami, presents its 20th Year Anniversary of public exhibitions. Since it’s inauguration in 1999 the Warehouse has welcomed visitors from South Florida and all over the world. The Warehouse exhibitions showcase art of our times featuring 20th & 21st century sculpture, photography, video, painting and large-scale installations by international artists culled from the renowned collection of Martin Z. Margulies. With a stated mission of arts education, the Warehouse has produced hundreds of programs for the community including guest speakers, seminars, publications, internships and guided tours.
Jordan Casteel
Jordan Casteel
New York - 235 Bowery
until 24-05-2020

Jordan Casteel – Within Reach The first solo museum exhibition in New York of Jordan Casteel, “Within Reach” will feature works from Casteel’s celebrated series Visible Man (2013–14) and Nights in Harlem (2017), along with recent portraits of her students at Rutgers University-Newark.

Jordan Casteel – Within Reach The first solo museum exhibition in New York of Jordan Casteel, “Within Reach” will feature works from Casteel’s celebrated series Visible Man (2013–14) and Nights in Harlem (2017), along with recent portraits of her students at Rutgers University-Newark.
Adam Linder
Adam Linder
New York - 11 West 53 Street
until 08-03-2020

Adam Linder – Shelf Life Linder’s Shelf Life is a choreographic work for six dancers. Using a variety of dance vocabularies—as well as costumes, props, and their voices—the performers interpret three concepts that together form what Linder describes as a “nervous system of dance”: the barre where movement begins; the blood flow that propels the body; and the brain that reflects on the dancing body, its physical impulses as well as its rational calculations. The title Shelf Life alludes to the finite physical resources expended by the dancer’s body and how the virtuosity and ephemerality of performance is defined within the context of a museum.

Adam Linder – Shelf Life Linder’s Shelf Life is a choreographic work for six dancers. Using a variety of dance vocabularies—as well as costumes, props, and their voices—the performers interpret three concepts that together form what Linder describes as a “nervous system of dance”: the barre where movement begins; the blood flow that propels the body; and the brain that reflects on the dancing body, its physical impulses as well as its rational calculations. The title Shelf Life alludes to the finite physical resources expended by the dancer’s body and how the virtuosity and ephemerality of performance is defined within the context of a museum.
John Miller
John Miller
New York - 519 West 24th Street
until 14-03-2020

John Miller – The Collapse of Neoliberalism John Miller has been exploring notions of identity, economics, and social class throughout his forty-year practice. His latest exhibition at Metro Pictures concerns, among other things, a sense of everyday malaise and life's petty annoyances. It features a series of large-format photographs, two installations, and a video work titled Toll Free.

John Miller – The Collapse of Neoliberalism John Miller has been exploring notions of identity, economics, and social class throughout his forty-year practice. His latest exhibition at Metro Pictures concerns, among other things, a sense of everyday malaise and life's petty annoyances. It features a series of large-format photographs, two installations, and a video work titled Toll Free.
Mira Dancy
Mira Dancy
New York - 249 East Houston Street
until 04-04-2020

Mira Dancy – Supple As The Supplicant

Mira Dancy – Supple As The Supplicant
Teresa Margolles
Teresa Margolles
New York - 48 Walker Street
until 01-03-2020

Teresa Margolles – Forever My Lady Teresa Margolles investigates the social and aesthetic dimensions of conflict by infusing artwork with material traces of violence and loss. For this exhibition, she has created a new body of sculpture, photography, and installation that contends with the underlying causes of death and ongoing trauma on both sides of the Mexico-U.S. border.

Teresa Margolles – Forever My Lady Teresa Margolles investigates the social and aesthetic dimensions of conflict by infusing artwork with material traces of violence and loss. For this exhibition, she has created a new body of sculpture, photography, and installation that contends with the underlying causes of death and ongoing trauma on both sides of the Mexico-U.S. border.
Pope.L
Pope.L
New York - 99 Gansevoort Street
until 08-03-2020

Pope.L – Choir Utilizing both public and private spaces, the expansive presentation will address many elements of the artist’s oeuvre from singular early works, to a monumental new installation, and a new large-scale performative work inspired by the artist’s iconic crawl series on the streets of New York City.

Pope.L – Choir Utilizing both public and private spaces, the expansive presentation will address many elements of the artist’s oeuvre from singular early works, to a monumental new installation, and a new large-scale performative work inspired by the artist’s iconic crawl series on the streets of New York City.
Uri Aran
Uri Aran
New York - 439 W 127 Street
until 28-03-2020

Uri Aran – House Uri Aran’s artwork contends with and confounds rigid notions of meaning. He posits that an object or word’s legibility is not inherent, but rather conditional, its comprehensibility reliant on context. Rather than mediating our perception of meaning, he opens things up, allowing language to breathe, to bleed; the pictorial becomes material becomes linguistic, then cycles back again. Our encounters with his work are unstable and unpredictable, taking place within semantic cracks and deficiencies, failures of direct expression. 

Uri Aran – House Uri Aran’s artwork contends with and confounds rigid notions of meaning. He posits that an object or word’s legibility is not inherent, but rather conditional, its comprehensibility reliant on context. Rather than mediating our perception of meaning, he opens things up, allowing language to breathe, to bleed; the pictorial becomes material becomes linguistic, then cycles back again. Our encounters with his work are unstable and unpredictable, taking place within semantic cracks and deficiencies, failures of direct expression. 
Larry Bell
Larry Bell
New York - 548 West 22nd Street
until 11-04-2020

Larry Bell – Still Standing One of the most renowned and influential artists to emerge from the Los Angeles art scene of the 1960s, Larry Bell is known foremost for his refined surface treatment of glass and his explorations of light, reflection, and shadow. In search of solitude, Bell traveled from New York through the American Midwest, moving to Taos, New Mexico in 1973. His experimentations with commercial industrial processes with high-vacuum coating systems and his interests in the optical qualities of glass led him to make work that investigates multiple ways of using light as a material.

Larry Bell – Still Standing One of the most renowned and influential artists to emerge from the Los Angeles art scene of the 1960s, Larry Bell is known foremost for his refined surface treatment of glass and his explorations of light, reflection, and shadow. In search of solitude, Bell traveled from New York through the American Midwest, moving to Taos, New Mexico in 1973. His experimentations with commercial industrial processes with high-vacuum coating systems and his interests in the optical qualities of glass led him to make work that investigates multiple ways of using light as a material.
Salvo
Salvo
New York - 130 East 64th Street
until 29-02-2020

Salvo Gladstone Gallery is pleased to present an exhibition of paintings by Salvo (1947 – 2015). Focusing on the artist’s compositions of landscapes and cities, this show surveys more than 30 years of Salvo’s artistic practice and highlights his early conceptual art and his astounding aptitude for portraying the complexities of light and the passage of time. Organized in collaboration with Archivio Salvo, the works in this show solidify Salvo’s singular and ever explorative approach to artmaking and his lasting impact on Italian modernism.  Salvo, whose given name was Salvatore Mangione, was born in Leonforte, Sicily, in 1947. After permanently relocating to his adoptive city of Turin in 1968, he quickly became involved in the blossoming Arte Povera movement, which was born as a response to the social and political unrest in Italy throughout the 1960s. During this period, Salvo shared a studio with Alighiero Boetti, one of the pioneers of this radical movement. Salvo and Boetti had an ongoing relationship and reciprocally collaborative influence on each other’s practices; the combination of influences from Boetti and other artists of the time impacted Salvo’s own artmaking and understanding of the world around him. At this early stage in his career, Salvo employed conceptual strategies to meditate on the nature of artistic practice, and the role of the artist as both a preternaturally talented individual and a conduit to the past and the history of culture. An example of works from this period include a series of “self-portraits” - altered or staged photographs that depicted him as a baker, bartender, guerilla, saint, and the painter Raphael. By 1973, Salvo pivoted away from conceptual work and began to explore the radical and complex possibilities inherent to figurative painting. 

Salvo Gladstone Gallery is pleased to present an exhibition of paintings by Salvo (1947 – 2015). Focusing on the artist’s compositions of landscapes and cities, this show surveys more than 30 years of Salvo’s artistic practice and highlights his early conceptual art and his astounding aptitude for portraying the complexities of light and the passage of time. Organized in collaboration with Archivio Salvo, the works in this show solidify Salvo’s singular and ever explorative approach to artmaking and his lasting impact on Italian modernism.  Salvo, whose given name was Salvatore Mangione, was born in Leonforte, Sicily, in 1947. After permanently relocating to his adoptive city of Turin in 1968, he quickly became involved in the blossoming Arte Povera movement, which was born as a response to the social and political unrest in Italy throughout the 1960s. During this period, Salvo shared a studio with Alighiero Boetti, one of the pioneers of this radical movement. Salvo and Boetti had an ongoing relationship and reciprocally collaborative influence on each other’s practices; the combination of influences from Boetti and other artists of the time impacted Salvo’s own artmaking and understanding of the world around him. At this early stage in his career, Salvo employed conceptual strategies to meditate on the nature of artistic practice, and the role of the artist as both a preternaturally talented individual and a conduit to the past and the history of culture. An example of works from this period include a series of “self-portraits” - altered or staged photographs that depicted him as a baker, bartender, guerilla, saint, and the painter Raphael. By 1973, Salvo pivoted away from conceptual work and began to explore the radical and complex possibilities inherent to figurative painting. 
Good Luck
Good Luck
New York - 179 East Broadway
until 22-03-2020

Good Luck Derek Aylward, Mairikke Dau, Rafael Delacruz, Gerasimos Floratos, Sybil Gibson, Ralph Griffin, Bessie Harvey, Wayne Heller (MoonSign), Susan Te Kahurangi King, Alice Mackler, Eddie Martinez, Ike Morgan, Robert Nava, Helen Rae, Maja Ruznic, Jon Serl, Mose Tolliver, Timothy Wehrle Whether we subscribe to its existence or not, luck surrounds us at all times. We are wished ‘good luck’ by our parents on the first day of school, we indulge in rituals aimed at conjuring favorable outcomes such as crossing our fingers, knocking on wood and breaking wish bones. There are innumerable objects believed to help this magic find us– rabbit’s feet, a penny lying heads up, horseshoes, four leaf clovers. These symbols and actions are thought to bolster our chances of basking in the aura of good luck, and while it is completely subjective whether or not we believe in it as a phenomenon, it is safe to say that most of us move though life with the hope of not tempting fate.

Good Luck Derek Aylward, Mairikke Dau, Rafael Delacruz, Gerasimos Floratos, Sybil Gibson, Ralph Griffin, Bessie Harvey, Wayne Heller (MoonSign), Susan Te Kahurangi King, Alice Mackler, Eddie Martinez, Ike Morgan, Robert Nava, Helen Rae, Maja Ruznic, Jon Serl, Mose Tolliver, Timothy Wehrle Whether we subscribe to its existence or not, luck surrounds us at all times. We are wished ‘good luck’ by our parents on the first day of school, we indulge in rituals aimed at conjuring favorable outcomes such as crossing our fingers, knocking on wood and breaking wish bones. There are innumerable objects believed to help this magic find us– rabbit’s feet, a penny lying heads up, horseshoes, four leaf clovers. These symbols and actions are thought to bolster our chances of basking in the aura of good luck, and while it is completely subjective whether or not we believe in it as a phenomenon, it is safe to say that most of us move though life with the hope of not tempting fate.
Objects Recognized in Flashes
Objects Recognized in Flashes
Vienna - Museumsplatz 1
until 13-04-2020

Objects Recognized in Flashes Michele Abeles, Annette Kelm, Josephine Pryde, Eileen Quinlan Curated by Matthias Michalka Objects Recognized in Flashes is the title of a group exhibition focusing on surfaces of photographs, products, and bodies. The exhibition was developed by the curator in consultation with the artists Michele Abeles, Annette Kelm, Josephine Pryde, and Eileen Quinlan. It asks how our largely mediatized society deals with and relates analogue and digital images. How are relations between material and immateriality, body, screen and photographic surface constituted? In our contemporary consumer culture, products and questions of commodity aesthetics are becoming more and more significant. This is not without consequences for our use of photographic images. Ubiquitous advertising, marketing, and product presentation create imaginary visual standards that have now become a firm fixture of our self representations in photos on social media platforms. The works by the four artists in the exhibition respond both in respect to each other, and to this changing context.  

Objects Recognized in Flashes Michele Abeles, Annette Kelm, Josephine Pryde, Eileen Quinlan Curated by Matthias Michalka Objects Recognized in Flashes is the title of a group exhibition focusing on surfaces of photographs, products, and bodies. The exhibition was developed by the curator in consultation with the artists Michele Abeles, Annette Kelm, Josephine Pryde, and Eileen Quinlan. It asks how our largely mediatized society deals with and relates analogue and digital images. How are relations between material and immateriality, body, screen and photographic surface constituted? In our contemporary consumer culture, products and questions of commodity aesthetics are becoming more and more significant. This is not without consequences for our use of photographic images. Ubiquitous advertising, marketing, and product presentation create imaginary visual standards that have now become a firm fixture of our self representations in photos on social media platforms. The works by the four artists in the exhibition respond both in respect to each other, and to this changing context.  
The Cindy Sherman Effect
The Cindy Sherman Effect
Vienna - Freyung 8
until 21-06-2020

The Cindy Sherman Effect. Identity and Transformation in Contemporary Art The exhibition addresses one of the key issues in art: the preoccupation with themes of identity, its construction, forms of transformation and fiction are hot topics in the face of a world that is in constant flux through increasing globalisation. At the same time, new technologies such as the Internet, gene manipulation and cloning give cause for us to consider the concept of identity in terms of subject generation and definition. Cindy Sherman’s work is counted among the classics of performance photography and artistic role play; starting out from this base, the exhibition will cast light on these relevant questions pertaining to the theme of Identity. Sherman’s photographic works – developed out of 1970s performance art and her specific interest in ever-changing identities – has never ceased to be a formative stylistic influence down to the immediate present.

The Cindy Sherman Effect. Identity and Transformation in Contemporary Art The exhibition addresses one of the key issues in art: the preoccupation with themes of identity, its construction, forms of transformation and fiction are hot topics in the face of a world that is in constant flux through increasing globalisation. At the same time, new technologies such as the Internet, gene manipulation and cloning give cause for us to consider the concept of identity in terms of subject generation and definition. Cindy Sherman’s work is counted among the classics of performance photography and artistic role play; starting out from this base, the exhibition will cast light on these relevant questions pertaining to the theme of Identity. Sherman’s photographic works – developed out of 1970s performance art and her specific interest in ever-changing identities – has never ceased to be a formative stylistic influence down to the immediate present.
Herbert Brandl
Herbert Brandl
Vienna - Arsenalstrasse 1
until 24-05-2020

Herbert Brandl – Exposed to Painting. Die letzten zwanzig Jahre

Herbert Brandl – Exposed to Painting. Die letzten zwanzig Jahre
Alessandro Balteo-Yazbeck
Alessandro Balteo-Yazbeck
Vienna - Eschenbachgasse 11
until 29-02-2020

Alessandro Balteo-Yazbeck – All the lands from sunrise to sunset  

Alessandro Balteo-Yazbeck – All the lands from sunrise to sunset  
Nicolas Ceccaldi
Nicolas Ceccaldi
Vienna - Eschenbachgasse 9
until 07-03-2020

Boltenstern.Raum: Nicolas Ceccaldi – Knock knock Knock Knock Knock knock is an exhibition by Nicolas Ceccaldi about Joker, a 2019 American psychological thriller film directed and produced by Todd Phillips and starring Joaquin Phoenix. Set in early-1980s Gotham City, the film provides an origin story for Batman’s infamous arch nemesis never seen before on the big screen, following Arthur Fleck (Joaquin Phoenix), a social outcast and aspiring stand-up comedian who lives alone with his mother and who suffers from many mental illnesses including one which causes him to laugh uncontrollably when he is nervous. The film embarks us in Arthur’s descent into insanity and nihilism, inspiring a downward spiral of crime and violence, setting off a revolutionary uprising in the decaying metropolis; a path which brings him face-to-face with his alter-ego: the Joker. Joker is not only a gritty character study, but also a broader cautionary tale. The film and its main character are treated figuratively and metaphorically as subject matter, making the exhibition both an homage and a commentary. Every artwork takes various themes, narrative tropes, or visual elements from the film, and references them either in the form of personal interpretations or direct quotation. The exhibition title references the opening of a popular joke format (“knock knock - who’s there?”) a variation of which is delivered by Arthur Fleck in his Joker make-up during an awkward appearance on a talk show hosted by Murray Franklin (Robert De Niro), a TV presenter he idolizes. Despite having repeatedly rehearsed this moment in his living room and in his fantasies, Joker’s timing is off and after tediously rummaging through his “joke book”, he finally delivers the opening line “knock knock” prompting the host to quip “and you had to look that up?” Everything must go is an aluminum copy with added wings of a coroplast sign held by Arthur Fleck outside a shop dressed as a clown-for-hire in the opening scene of the film. A group of youths subsequently steals the sign and break it over his head. His boss not only doesn’t believe his story, but demands Arthur pay for the missing sign: an injustice that confirms Arthur’s impression that the world really is out to get him. All I Have are Negative Thoughts is an oil portrait of Joaquin Phoenix as Arthur Fleck in a scene in where his social service worker asks him if he ever has any negative thoughts to which he answers “all I have are negative thoughts.” Make obzervashins about audieense, is the abstract rendition of a clown face, with the foam nose held up by iron wires shaped into the outline of a face. The title is a quote taken from Arthur’s notebook, in a list of things he should be doing in order to succeed as a stand-up comedian. Besides making “observations about [the] audience” he also lists “dressing casual but nice” “making eye contact” or “slick hair.” Always make funny obzervashins is a title taken from the same list. This piece is a store-bought print modified with cut-and-paste letters to spell out one of the film’s memorable quotes, “I just hope that my death makes more cents than my life.” This pun, authored by the aspiring comedian, is read out loud by Arthur’s visibly concerned social worker as she flips through his notebook. On his way out of his workplace after being fired, Arthur stops halfway down the stairs beneath a sign that reads “Don’t Forget To Smile.” He then reaches out with a black marker and crosses the words “forget to” only leaving “Don’t Smile.” Werk The Croud is a “combine-painting” where a clown face is seen smiling while a plastic toy gun is pointed to its head, against a mustard background. The misspelt title is another quote from Arthur’s notes while the piece is an allegory of the concept of tragicomedy, a dramatic genre that blends aspects of tragedy and comedy. 1980s credits displays the Warner Communications logo used in the 1970s and early 1980s, in tune with the film's 1981 vintage aesthetic.  The logo covers an urban landscape meant to represent Gotham, approximating Joker’s opening credits. Disclaimer is made of a laminated card floating across a dark green background. It is assumed that Arthur carries such a card on him at all time to clarify the situation in case he suddenly bursts into a fit of laughter. The card explains that he suffers from a condition akin to what is known as Pseudobulbar affect (PBA), a type of emotional disturbance characterized by episodes of laughter or crying without an apparent motivating stimulus. Video recordings of such symptoms were studied by Joaquin Phoenix in preparation for his role. Nicolas Ceccaldi (b. 1983, Montreal, Canada) lives and works in New York.

Boltenstern.Raum: Nicolas Ceccaldi – Knock knock Knock Knock Knock knock is an exhibition by Nicolas Ceccaldi about Joker, a 2019 American psychological thriller film directed and produced by Todd Phillips and starring Joaquin Phoenix. Set in early-1980s Gotham City, the film provides an origin story for Batman’s infamous arch nemesis never seen before on the big screen, following Arthur Fleck (Joaquin Phoenix), a social outcast and aspiring stand-up comedian who lives alone with his mother and who suffers from many mental illnesses including one which causes him to laugh uncontrollably when he is nervous. The film embarks us in Arthur’s descent into insanity and nihilism, inspiring a downward spiral of crime and violence, setting off a revolutionary uprising in the decaying metropolis; a path which brings him face-to-face with his alter-ego: the Joker. Joker is not only a gritty character study, but also a broader cautionary tale. The film and its main character are treated figuratively and metaphorically as subject matter, making the exhibition both an homage and a commentary. Every artwork takes various themes, narrative tropes, or visual elements from the film, and references them either in the form of personal interpretations or direct quotation. The exhibition title references the opening of a popular joke format (“knock knock - who’s there?”) a variation of which is delivered by Arthur Fleck in his Joker make-up during an awkward appearance on a talk show hosted by Murray Franklin (Robert De Niro), a TV presenter he idolizes. Despite having repeatedly rehearsed this moment in his living room and in his fantasies, Joker’s timing is off and after tediously rummaging through his “joke book”, he finally delivers the opening line “knock knock” prompting the host to quip “and you had to look that up?” Everything must go is an aluminum copy with added wings of a coroplast sign held by Arthur Fleck outside a shop dressed as a clown-for-hire in the opening scene of the film. A group of youths subsequently steals the sign and break it over his head. His boss not only doesn’t believe his story, but demands Arthur pay for the missing sign: an injustice that confirms Arthur’s impression that the world really is out to get him. All I Have are Negative Thoughts is an oil portrait of Joaquin Phoenix as Arthur Fleck in a scene in where his social service worker asks him if he ever has any negative thoughts to which he answers “all I have are negative thoughts.” Make obzervashins about audieense, is the abstract rendition of a clown face, with the foam nose held up by iron wires shaped into the outline of a face. The title is a quote taken from Arthur’s notebook, in a list of things he should be doing in order to succeed as a stand-up comedian. Besides making “observations about [the] audience” he also lists “dressing casual but nice” “making eye contact” or “slick hair.” Always make funny obzervashins is a title taken from the same list. This piece is a store-bought print modified with cut-and-paste letters to spell out one of the film’s memorable quotes, “I just hope that my death makes more cents than my life.” This pun, authored by the aspiring comedian, is read out loud by Arthur’s visibly concerned social worker as she flips through his notebook. On his way out of his workplace after being fired, Arthur stops halfway down the stairs beneath a sign that reads “Don’t Forget To Smile.” He then reaches out with a black marker and crosses the words “forget to” only leaving “Don’t Smile.” Werk The Croud is a “combine-painting” where a clown face is seen smiling while a plastic toy gun is pointed to its head, against a mustard background. The misspelt title is another quote from Arthur’s notes while the piece is an allegory of the concept of tragicomedy, a dramatic genre that blends aspects of tragedy and comedy. 1980s credits displays the Warner Communications logo used in the 1970s and early 1980s, in tune with the film's 1981 vintage aesthetic.  The logo covers an urban landscape meant to represent Gotham, approximating Joker’s opening credits. Disclaimer is made of a laminated card floating across a dark green background. It is assumed that Arthur carries such a card on him at all time to clarify the situation in case he suddenly bursts into a fit of laughter. The card explains that he suffers from a condition akin to what is known as Pseudobulbar affect (PBA), a type of emotional disturbance characterized by episodes of laughter or crying without an apparent motivating stimulus. Video recordings of such symptoms were studied by Joaquin Phoenix in preparation for his role. Nicolas Ceccaldi (b. 1983, Montreal, Canada) lives and works in New York.
Ulla Wiggen
Ulla Wiggen
Cologne - Neven-Du Mont-Strasse 17
until 04-04-2020

Ulla Wiggen – Visualities

Ulla Wiggen – Visualities
Philip Hinge
Philip Hinge
Cologne - Ebertplatz 14, U-Bahnhof Ebertplatz, Exit Turiner Strasse / Eigelstein
until 06-03-2020

Philip Hinge – Sad and Stüpid

Philip Hinge – Sad and Stüpid
Whitney Claflin
Whitney Claflin
Cologne - Jülicher Strasse 14
until 04-04-2020

Whitney Claflin – By all means, you can have two halloweens

Whitney Claflin – By all means, you can have two halloweens
Wade Guyton
Wade Guyton
Cologne - Hein­rich-Böll-Platz
until 01-03-2020

Wade Guyton – Zwei Dekaden MCMX­CIX–MMX­IX  Born in 1972, the Amer­i­can artist Wade Guy­ton has cre­at­ed a con­sis­tent and dist­inct oeu­vre for more than two de­cades. He is best known for his large-scale can­vas paint­in­gs made with a con­ven­tio­n­al ink­jet prin­t­er, fea­tur­ing me­m­orable sub­jects such as flames, the let­ters X and U, and the New York Times web­site. Af­ter ac­quir­ing sev­er­al of the artist’s works for the col­lec­tion, the Mu­se­um Lud­wig is host­ing a ma­jor sur­vey ex­hi­bi­tion that will pre­sent his oeu­vre from the be­gin­n­ing of his ca­reer to his most re­cent works.

Wade Guyton – Zwei Dekaden MCMX­CIX–MMX­IX  Born in 1972, the Amer­i­can artist Wade Guy­ton has cre­at­ed a con­sis­tent and dist­inct oeu­vre for more than two de­cades. He is best known for his large-scale can­vas paint­in­gs made with a con­ven­tio­n­al ink­jet prin­t­er, fea­tur­ing me­m­orable sub­jects such as flames, the let­ters X and U, and the New York Times web­site. Af­ter ac­quir­ing sev­er­al of the artist’s works for the col­lec­tion, the Mu­se­um Lud­wig is host­ing a ma­jor sur­vey ex­hi­bi­tion that will pre­sent his oeu­vre from the be­gin­n­ing of his ca­reer to his most re­cent works.
Blinky Palermo
Blinky Palermo
Cologne - Hein­rich-Böll-Platz
until 03-05-2020

Blinky Palermo – The Com­plete Edi­tions Peter Heis­terkamp, whose artist’s name was tak­en from the ma­fio­so Frank “Blinky” Paler­mo, is known for his large fab­ric and me­t­al pic­tures as well as his ob­jects and in­s­tal­la­tions.

Blinky Palermo – The Com­plete Edi­tions Peter Heis­terkamp, whose artist’s name was tak­en from the ma­fio­so Frank “Blinky” Paler­mo, is known for his large fab­ric and me­t­al pic­tures as well as his ob­jects and in­s­tal­la­tions.
A Year Without the Southern Sun
A Year Without the Southern Sun
Berlin - Potsdamer Strasse 81B
until 04-04-2020

A Year Without the Southern Sun Agnes Denes, Gordon Matta-Clark, Kevin Blinderman, Mathieu Kleyebe Abonnenc, Nadia Kaabi-Linke, Neda Saeedi, Rafael Domenech, Trevor Paglen, Yalda Afsah Curated by Justin Polera “A Year Without the Southern Sun” has gathered 9 artists to investigate the relationship between decolonization and climate change. At the core of the exhibition is the ambivalence that surrounds the Anthropocene – the confrontation of nature and human-made creations, which can be both violent and beautiful. The title is based on the climate catastrophe in 1816, when an eruption in the Dutch East Indies (now Indonesia) caused a volcanic winter across the globe. Volcanic dust and fallout caused atmospheric opacity that blocked out the sun. Although the crisis was an agricultural disaster in Western Europe, it still led to the creation of several masterpieces in art and literature including the sunsets in J. M. W. Turner paintings and writings of Mary Shelley, Percy Bysshe Shelley, Lord Byron. However, art history has largely neglected artworks made in the Global South during this year. “A Year Without the Southern Sun” brings together a multitude of post-war and contemporary art works that reflect the diversity of artists from around the world. The works are subtle and enigmatic propositions, never simply addressing the past or present but often shedding light on possible futures. Many of the artists, such as Nadia Kaabi-Linke, Mathieu Kleyebe Abonnenc, Neda Saeedi and Rafael Domenech, look at their family histories and relationship to colonization and neo-colonization. Others, such as Trevor Paglen and Kevin Blinderman, seek to use the very technologies of the state to unveil the current military-industrial complex and security systems that surround us. An emblematic work in relation to social crises is Gordon Matta-Clark’s film Day’s End (1974). It follows the artist as he cuts an elliptical hole in the river-facing wall of Manhattan’s derelict Pier 52. In part a performance, his actions are also a form of recycling and space intervention. Meanwhile, Agnes Denes presents photographic documents in her seminal 1982 work Wheatfield: A Confrontation. Denes planted and harvested a wheat field in a landfill in Lower Manhattan’s Battery Park by hand. The wheat field was consciously grown at the foot of the World Trade Center – an early eco-feminist commentary that poignantly connects immigration, world hunger and waste with economic mismanagement and international trade.  “A Year Without the Southern Sun” presents artistic reflections on the exploitation of natural resources and the impending global consequences it causes. Through both reconstruction and destruction, the works in this exhibition mold the material of social reality into new forms.

A Year Without the Southern Sun Agnes Denes, Gordon Matta-Clark, Kevin Blinderman, Mathieu Kleyebe Abonnenc, Nadia Kaabi-Linke, Neda Saeedi, Rafael Domenech, Trevor Paglen, Yalda Afsah Curated by Justin Polera “A Year Without the Southern Sun” has gathered 9 artists to investigate the relationship between decolonization and climate change. At the core of the exhibition is the ambivalence that surrounds the Anthropocene – the confrontation of nature and human-made creations, which can be both violent and beautiful. The title is based on the climate catastrophe in 1816, when an eruption in the Dutch East Indies (now Indonesia) caused a volcanic winter across the globe. Volcanic dust and fallout caused atmospheric opacity that blocked out the sun. Although the crisis was an agricultural disaster in Western Europe, it still led to the creation of several masterpieces in art and literature including the sunsets in J. M. W. Turner paintings and writings of Mary Shelley, Percy Bysshe Shelley, Lord Byron. However, art history has largely neglected artworks made in the Global South during this year. “A Year Without the Southern Sun” brings together a multitude of post-war and contemporary art works that reflect the diversity of artists from around the world. The works are subtle and enigmatic propositions, never simply addressing the past or present but often shedding light on possible futures. Many of the artists, such as Nadia Kaabi-Linke, Mathieu Kleyebe Abonnenc, Neda Saeedi and Rafael Domenech, look at their family histories and relationship to colonization and neo-colonization. Others, such as Trevor Paglen and Kevin Blinderman, seek to use the very technologies of the state to unveil the current military-industrial complex and security systems that surround us. An emblematic work in relation to social crises is Gordon Matta-Clark’s film Day’s End (1974). It follows the artist as he cuts an elliptical hole in the river-facing wall of Manhattan’s derelict Pier 52. In part a performance, his actions are also a form of recycling and space intervention. Meanwhile, Agnes Denes presents photographic documents in her seminal 1982 work Wheatfield: A Confrontation. Denes planted and harvested a wheat field in a landfill in Lower Manhattan’s Battery Park by hand. The wheat field was consciously grown at the foot of the World Trade Center – an early eco-feminist commentary that poignantly connects immigration, world hunger and waste with economic mismanagement and international trade.  “A Year Without the Southern Sun” presents artistic reflections on the exploitation of natural resources and the impending global consequences it causes. Through both reconstruction and destruction, the works in this exhibition mold the material of social reality into new forms.
Albrecht Fuchs
Albrecht Fuchs
Berlin - Weydingerstrasse 2/4
until 07-03-2020

Albrecht Fuchs – Zwei 

Albrecht Fuchs – Zwei 
Umbo
Umbo
Berlin - Alte Jakobstrasse 124?128
until 25-05-2020

Umbo. Photographer. Works 1926 – 1956 Umbo (Otto Umbehr, 1902 – 1980) symbolises a kind of “big bang” in modern photography of 1920s – as art historian Herbert Moldering put it during his retrospective of the artist in 1995.

Umbo. Photographer. Works 1926 – 1956 Umbo (Otto Umbehr, 1902 – 1980) symbolises a kind of “big bang” in modern photography of 1920s – as art historian Herbert Moldering put it during his retrospective of the artist in 1995.
Moyra Davey & Peter Hujar
Moyra Davey & Peter Hujar
Berlin - Fasanenstrasse 30
until 11-04-2020

Moyra Davey & Peter Hujar  

Moyra Davey & Peter Hujar  
How beautiful you are!
How beautiful you are!
Berlin - Am Sudhaus 2
until 08-03-2020

How beautiful you are! Sonja Alhäuser, BIEST, Marc Bijl, Norbert Bisky, Kirstin Burckhardt, Yvon Chabrowski, Sandra Dresp, Martin Eder, Thomas Eller, Moritz Frei, Isabella Fürnkäs, Gonzalez Haase AAS, Mathilde ter Heijne, Jens Heller, Vera Kox, Via Lewandowsky, Lina Migic, Frank Nitsche, Nik Nowak feat. Isis Scott, Omsk Social Club, Kerstin Schröder, Sorgen International, Jonny Star, Moritz Stumm, Saralisa Volm, Albert Weis Kosmetiksalon Babette as a guest at the KINDL? With the group exhibition How beautiful you are!, for two weeks the Maschinenhaus M0 at the KINDL – Centre for Contemporary Art will host Kosmetiksalon Babette. In various forms of artistic expression, the exhibition examines the concept of beauty in the art world and directs its focus toward art and artists in equal measure.   How beautiful you are! does not treat beauty as an evaluative category, and instead takes the term as the point of departure for experiments, commenting on it from various perspectives: with a work by Gonzalez Haase AAS relating to architecture and design, sportswear by Sandra Dresp, tattoos by Lina Migic, and a work on the topic of advertising by Sorgen International. The paintings include works by Martin Eder, Norbert Bisky, Jens Heller, and Frank Nitsche, among others. Mixed-media works by Nik Nowak feat. Isis Scott and Jonny Star encounter body-related, performative works by Yvon Chabrowski and Kirstin Burckhardt as well as sculptural works by Vera Kox and Albert Weis. Following in the tradition of the legendary Bar Babette, How Beautiful You Are! envisions itself as a network exhibition in which a multiplicity of artistic positions gives rise to the characteristic tension. A highlight of the accompanying programme for the exhibition is the fashion show by BIEST in the Sudhaus at the KINDL.   

How beautiful you are! Sonja Alhäuser, BIEST, Marc Bijl, Norbert Bisky, Kirstin Burckhardt, Yvon Chabrowski, Sandra Dresp, Martin Eder, Thomas Eller, Moritz Frei, Isabella Fürnkäs, Gonzalez Haase AAS, Mathilde ter Heijne, Jens Heller, Vera Kox, Via Lewandowsky, Lina Migic, Frank Nitsche, Nik Nowak feat. Isis Scott, Omsk Social Club, Kerstin Schröder, Sorgen International, Jonny Star, Moritz Stumm, Saralisa Volm, Albert Weis Kosmetiksalon Babette as a guest at the KINDL? With the group exhibition How beautiful you are!, for two weeks the Maschinenhaus M0 at the KINDL – Centre for Contemporary Art will host Kosmetiksalon Babette. In various forms of artistic expression, the exhibition examines the concept of beauty in the art world and directs its focus toward art and artists in equal measure.   How beautiful you are! does not treat beauty as an evaluative category, and instead takes the term as the point of departure for experiments, commenting on it from various perspectives: with a work by Gonzalez Haase AAS relating to architecture and design, sportswear by Sandra Dresp, tattoos by Lina Migic, and a work on the topic of advertising by Sorgen International. The paintings include works by Martin Eder, Norbert Bisky, Jens Heller, and Frank Nitsche, among others. Mixed-media works by Nik Nowak feat. Isis Scott and Jonny Star encounter body-related, performative works by Yvon Chabrowski and Kirstin Burckhardt as well as sculptural works by Vera Kox and Albert Weis. Following in the tradition of the legendary Bar Babette, How Beautiful You Are! envisions itself as a network exhibition in which a multiplicity of artistic positions gives rise to the characteristic tension. A highlight of the accompanying programme for the exhibition is the fashion show by BIEST in the Sudhaus at the KINDL.   
Alexander Iskin
Alexander Iskin
Berlin - Streustrasse 90
until 20-03-2020

Alexander Iskin In this artistic experiment of an "exhibition preparation performance" the idea of a finished exhibition gives way to the production process. In this, a reference to the work of Joseph Beuys can be seen such as in the involvement of the audience and visitors.

Alexander Iskin In this artistic experiment of an "exhibition preparation performance" the idea of a finished exhibition gives way to the production process. In this, a reference to the work of Joseph Beuys can be seen such as in the involvement of the audience and visitors.
Danica Barboza
Danica Barboza
Berlin - Oberwallstrasse 1
until 07-03-2020

Danica Barboza – Advanced Pair Bonding International icon David Bowie has played a significant role in the artistic life of Danica Barboza (*1988, New York, USA) since a young age. Over the past two decades, the androgynous singer has become the pivotal subject of Barboza’s practice as the central protagonist of her highly personal, autobiographical Artistic Mythology. With a fundamental devotion towards human gestures, interpersonal interaction and desires, Barboza explores through texts, sculptures and assemblages, the elemental basis of spiritual, psychological and humanistic impetus and concerns. In Advanced Pair Bonding, Danica Barboza’s first institutional solo exhibition, the relationship between Barboza and her muse takes central expression and focus. Upon the plateau of a room-size indoor bassin, life-sized sculptures of clay, papier-mâché and wood fuse the faces of Bowie and Barboza into fragmented chimeras. A digital clock submerged in the water, a running countdown and the sensual element of water become symbols of the coveted union. The absence of Bowie exposes the fulfillment of Barboza’s longing as a phantasm. Instead, the pop idol is stylized into an object of desire, upon which, emotional and physical intimacy is lastly projected. In her tableau of alter-like sculptures and elements of arranged hyper-realism, along with ready-made objects and portraiture, Barboza alludes to human loss and psychological fragmentation, critically questioning contemporary popular culture.

Danica Barboza – Advanced Pair Bonding International icon David Bowie has played a significant role in the artistic life of Danica Barboza (*1988, New York, USA) since a young age. Over the past two decades, the androgynous singer has become the pivotal subject of Barboza’s practice as the central protagonist of her highly personal, autobiographical Artistic Mythology. With a fundamental devotion towards human gestures, interpersonal interaction and desires, Barboza explores through texts, sculptures and assemblages, the elemental basis of spiritual, psychological and humanistic impetus and concerns. In Advanced Pair Bonding, Danica Barboza’s first institutional solo exhibition, the relationship between Barboza and her muse takes central expression and focus. Upon the plateau of a room-size indoor bassin, life-sized sculptures of clay, papier-mâché and wood fuse the faces of Bowie and Barboza into fragmented chimeras. A digital clock submerged in the water, a running countdown and the sensual element of water become symbols of the coveted union. The absence of Bowie exposes the fulfillment of Barboza’s longing as a phantasm. Instead, the pop idol is stylized into an object of desire, upon which, emotional and physical intimacy is lastly projected. In her tableau of alter-like sculptures and elements of arranged hyper-realism, along with ready-made objects and portraiture, Barboza alludes to human loss and psychological fragmentation, critically questioning contemporary popular culture.
Stan Douglas
Stan Douglas
Berlin - Leipziger Str. 60, entrance: Jerusalemer Str.
until 29-02-2020

Stan Douglas – Splicing Block The exhibition SPLICING BLOCK examines the relationship between music and society, and is at the same time a reflection on the media of film and photography. The works reconstruct and imagine the 1960s and 70s–an era distinguished by (de-)colonization and migration, but one equally permeated by jazz, underground disco, and Afrobeat.

Stan Douglas – Splicing Block The exhibition SPLICING BLOCK examines the relationship between music and society, and is at the same time a reflection on the media of film and photography. The works reconstruct and imagine the 1960s and 70s–an era distinguished by (de-)colonization and migration, but one equally permeated by jazz, underground disco, and Afrobeat.
Body Performance
Body Performance
Berlin - Jebensstrasse 2
until 19-03-2020

Body Performance Vanessa Beecroft, Yang Fudong, Inez & Vinoodh, Jürgen Klauke, Robert Longo, Robert Mapplethorpe, Helmut Newton, Barbara Probst, Viviane Sassen, Cindy Sherman, Bernd Uhlig, Erwin Wurm This group exhibition brings together photo sequences whose origins lie in performance art, dance, and other staged events, complemented by conceptual photography series. With their common focus on the human body, the images document or interpret performances, which in many cases have also been initiated by the photographers themselves.

Body Performance Vanessa Beecroft, Yang Fudong, Inez & Vinoodh, Jürgen Klauke, Robert Longo, Robert Mapplethorpe, Helmut Newton, Barbara Probst, Viviane Sassen, Cindy Sherman, Bernd Uhlig, Erwin Wurm This group exhibition brings together photo sequences whose origins lie in performance art, dance, and other staged events, complemented by conceptual photography series. With their common focus on the human body, the images document or interpret performances, which in many cases have also been initiated by the photographers themselves.
Constantin Thun
Constantin Thun
Berlin - Kottbusser Damm 7
until 29-02-2020

Constantin Thun – Cabin

Constantin Thun – Cabin
Rirkrit Tiravanija
Rirkrit Tiravanija
Basel - Drahtzugstrasse 67
until 31-05-2020

Rirkrit Tiravanija – The Odious Smell of Truth This is the second work of a ten-year programme of public installations produced by Beat Raeber, Galerie at Drahtzugstrasse 67 in Basel. Rirkrit Tiravanija's work is characterised by great versatility and a constant involvement of the viewer – exchange and freedom of interpretation are essential components of his practice. Since the late 1980s, he has been experimenting with open, sometimes surprising formats that question how the classical conceptions of art can be extended, how the boundaries of an exhibition space broadened, and its limiting barriers circumvented. Creating spaces for relationships, encounters and reactions forms the basis of his works. He works with different cultural contexts, linking them and using them as references. As a modern nomad – the Thai artist was born in Buenos Aires and lives between New York, Berlin and Chiang Mai – he uses the distinctive and connecting aspects of Western and Eastern ways of life and philosophies and integrates them into his work. Further influences come from literature, pop and news culture. Exploiting the mechanisms of propaganda or advertising, utilising their effect patterns, such as the oscillation between promises, deception, and applied truths, are key part of his work.  

Rirkrit Tiravanija – The Odious Smell of Truth This is the second work of a ten-year programme of public installations produced by Beat Raeber, Galerie at Drahtzugstrasse 67 in Basel. Rirkrit Tiravanija's work is characterised by great versatility and a constant involvement of the viewer – exchange and freedom of interpretation are essential components of his practice. Since the late 1980s, he has been experimenting with open, sometimes surprising formats that question how the classical conceptions of art can be extended, how the boundaries of an exhibition space broadened, and its limiting barriers circumvented. Creating spaces for relationships, encounters and reactions forms the basis of his works. He works with different cultural contexts, linking them and using them as references. As a modern nomad – the Thai artist was born in Buenos Aires and lives between New York, Berlin and Chiang Mai – he uses the distinctive and connecting aspects of Western and Eastern ways of life and philosophies and integrates them into his work. Further influences come from literature, pop and news culture. Exploiting the mechanisms of propaganda or advertising, utilising their effect patterns, such as the oscillation between promises, deception, and applied truths, are key part of his work.  
Pablo Picasso. The War Years 1939–1945
Pablo Picasso. The War Years 1939?1945
Düsseldorf - Grabbeplatz 5
until 14-06-2020

Pablo Picasso. The War Years 1939–1945 The exhibition at K20 (from 14 Feb) provides insight into the artist’s work during the Second World War. Paintings, sculptures, drawings, and documents from the years 1939 to 1945 tell of Picasso the man and the contradictions of everyday life during these times. Picasso fled from Paris to southern France immediately before the outbreak of the war on September 3, 1939 but returned to the German-occupied capital in August 1940. After the liberation of Paris by the Allie Forces in August 1944, he was celebrated as a survivor. An exhibition organised by the Musée de Grenoble in coproduction with the Kunstsammlung Nordrhein-Westfalen, Düsseldorf. The exhibition is organised in collaboration with the Musée national Picasso-Paris. The project is under the patronage of Prime Minister Armin Laschet, Plenipotentiary of the Federal Republic of Germany for Cultural Affairs under the Treaty on Franco-German Cooperation.

Pablo Picasso. The War Years 1939–1945 The exhibition at K20 (from 14 Feb) provides insight into the artist’s work during the Second World War. Paintings, sculptures, drawings, and documents from the years 1939 to 1945 tell of Picasso the man and the contradictions of everyday life during these times. Picasso fled from Paris to southern France immediately before the outbreak of the war on September 3, 1939 but returned to the German-occupied capital in August 1940. After the liberation of Paris by the Allie Forces in August 1944, he was celebrated as a survivor. An exhibition organised by the Musée de Grenoble in coproduction with the Kunstsammlung Nordrhein-Westfalen, Düsseldorf. The exhibition is organised in collaboration with the Musée national Picasso-Paris. The project is under the patronage of Prime Minister Armin Laschet, Plenipotentiary of the Federal Republic of Germany for Cultural Affairs under the Treaty on Franco-German Cooperation.
In order of appearance
In order of appearance
Düsseldorf - Ständehausstrasse 1
until 08-03-2020

In order of appearance. Graduates of the Düsseldorf Academy of Arts 2019 For the second time, the Kunstsammlung at K21 is featuring current works by graduates of the Düsseldorf Art Academy. All 77 participating artists completed their studies in 2019 and now, roughly one year later, are presenting new works of art in a museum. The exhibition reveals the young artists’ preoccupation with the topics of our time and brings together works from the entire spectrum of artistic media: paintings, sculptures, installations, photographs, prints, videos, and performances. The exhibition’s title is borrowed from the world of cinema, i.e. the convention in film credits of listing the participating actors  in order of appearance. Accordingly, the exhibition is based on a non-hierarchical principle: all of the past year’s graduates have been invited to propose new pieces for the presentation. The resultant works – all selected by a curatorial team of the Kunstsammlung in close collaboration with the artists – will occupy the entire lower level of the K21.

In order of appearance. Graduates of the Düsseldorf Academy of Arts 2019 For the second time, the Kunstsammlung at K21 is featuring current works by graduates of the Düsseldorf Art Academy. All 77 participating artists completed their studies in 2019 and now, roughly one year later, are presenting new works of art in a museum. The exhibition reveals the young artists’ preoccupation with the topics of our time and brings together works from the entire spectrum of artistic media: paintings, sculptures, installations, photographs, prints, videos, and performances. The exhibition’s title is borrowed from the world of cinema, i.e. the convention in film credits of listing the participating actors  in order of appearance. Accordingly, the exhibition is based on a non-hierarchical principle: all of the past year’s graduates have been invited to propose new pieces for the presentation. The resultant works – all selected by a curatorial team of the Kunstsammlung in close collaboration with the artists – will occupy the entire lower level of the K21.
Strand
Strand
Düsseldorf - Poststrasse 2+3
until 07-03-2020

Strand Isa Genzken, Blinky Palermo, Sigmar Polke, Gerhard Richter, Thomas Schütte In the current exhibition STRAND, Sies + Ho?ke shows small-format drawings, watercolours and sculptures by Blinky Palermo, Gerhard Richter, Thomas Schu?tte, Isa Genzken and Sigmar Polke. One of the works shows the nude upper body of a recumbent woman. Her head is cut off by the left edge of the picture. She seems to have fallen asleep and dropped her book by her side. This delicate pencil-drawing by Gerhard Richter was created in 1985 and is remarkable in that there are few similar works in the artists’ oeuvre. The woman is not recognizable, but the intimacy of the drawing suggests that it depicts Isa Genzken, his wife at the time, who is calmly asleep before the artist. The contours of her body softly merge with the lines with which Richter depicts the surroundings – probably a coastal landscape. Gerhard Richter was 51, Isa Genzken was 37 when this drawing was made. They had married three years previously.

Strand Isa Genzken, Blinky Palermo, Sigmar Polke, Gerhard Richter, Thomas Schütte In the current exhibition STRAND, Sies + Ho?ke shows small-format drawings, watercolours and sculptures by Blinky Palermo, Gerhard Richter, Thomas Schu?tte, Isa Genzken and Sigmar Polke. One of the works shows the nude upper body of a recumbent woman. Her head is cut off by the left edge of the picture. She seems to have fallen asleep and dropped her book by her side. This delicate pencil-drawing by Gerhard Richter was created in 1985 and is remarkable in that there are few similar works in the artists’ oeuvre. The woman is not recognizable, but the intimacy of the drawing suggests that it depicts Isa Genzken, his wife at the time, who is calmly asleep before the artist. The contours of her body softly merge with the lines with which Richter depicts the surroundings – probably a coastal landscape. Gerhard Richter was 51, Isa Genzken was 37 when this drawing was made. They had married three years previously.
Gabriele Beveridge, Erika Hock, Rita Mcbride
Gabriele Beveridge, Erika Hock, Rita Mcbride
Düsseldorf - Flurstrasse 57
until 06-03-2020

Gabriele Beveridge, Erika Hock, Rita Mcbride – Affected by Objects A recurring motif in the three artists’ sculptural practice and their works is the reference to architectural phenomena, although they each have a different perspective; this becomes visible through their individual artistic strategies.

Gabriele Beveridge, Erika Hock, Rita Mcbride – Affected by Objects A recurring motif in the three artists’ sculptural practice and their works is the reference to architectural phenomena, although they each have a different perspective; this becomes visible through their individual artistic strategies.
Carroll Dunham & Albert Oehlen
Carroll Dunham & Albert Oehlen
Düsseldorf - Grabbeplatz 4
until 01-03-2020

Carroll Dunham & Albert Oehlen – Bäume / Trees The world-renowned painters Carroll Dunham (*1949 in New Haven, Connecticut, lives there and in New York) and Albert Oehlen (*1954 in Krefeld, lives in Gais, Switzerland), who are enormously influential especially for a younger generation of artists, will be featured together in an exhibition for the first time. Both artists are known for their extremely independent and complex oeuvre. At the very moment when Albert Oehlen shifted from figurative “Bad Painting” toward abstraction in the late 1980s, Carroll Dunham went in the opposite direction, developing from his early organic abstract work into a surreal figuration in which different characters shape entire blocks of work, which in turn build on each other with an almost conceptual rigor. While Dunham introduced a figure with a phallic nose wearing a hat in his work beginning in the 1990s, which years later was replaced with female “bathers” with sometimes grotesquely exaggerated sexual organs, Oehlen proclaimed his “post-non-figurative” painting and was one the first artists to work with digital techniques. Both share the fact that within their self-imposed parameters they continually test the possibilities of painting, tirelessly create signs, and cover up their tracks, while experimenting with techniques, surfaces, and structures in an extremely independent manner. Nowhere is this more evident than in the subject of trees, which both artists have repeatedly included in their work and interpreted in their own ways. While Albert Oehlen’s trees are bare and leafless, with roots that sometimes dominate the scene and become the figurative impetus in abstract pictures, in Carroll Dunham’s work they are shown blooming, whipped by the wind, or freshly felled and dead. The combination of Dunham and Oehlen, each of whom sees the other as “probably the world’s best painter of trees,” suggests countless philosophical, theological, sociological, ecological, and of course art-historical views based on the subject of the tree. From the biblical Tree of Knowledge and thus the place of the Fall of Man to the favorite subject of the Romantics, and from Piet Mondrian’s radical modernist fragmentation to Joseph Beuys’s planting of 7,000 oaks, the tree has long been a central subject of our religious, intellectual, and cultural history. When Carroll Dunham and Albert Oehlen continually declare trees their central subject, they are of course aware of all these cultural- and art-historical references. And yet, for them trees are an opportunity for pure painting, a place for tireless experimentation, a test case for the untapped potential of an ancient analogue medium. Ultimately it is about the question of the abstraction of the world, and thus for Dunham and Oehlen nothing less than the visual meaning of life in art.

Carroll Dunham & Albert Oehlen – Bäume / Trees The world-renowned painters Carroll Dunham (*1949 in New Haven, Connecticut, lives there and in New York) and Albert Oehlen (*1954 in Krefeld, lives in Gais, Switzerland), who are enormously influential especially for a younger generation of artists, will be featured together in an exhibition for the first time. Both artists are known for their extremely independent and complex oeuvre. At the very moment when Albert Oehlen shifted from figurative “Bad Painting” toward abstraction in the late 1980s, Carroll Dunham went in the opposite direction, developing from his early organic abstract work into a surreal figuration in which different characters shape entire blocks of work, which in turn build on each other with an almost conceptual rigor. While Dunham introduced a figure with a phallic nose wearing a hat in his work beginning in the 1990s, which years later was replaced with female “bathers” with sometimes grotesquely exaggerated sexual organs, Oehlen proclaimed his “post-non-figurative” painting and was one the first artists to work with digital techniques. Both share the fact that within their self-imposed parameters they continually test the possibilities of painting, tirelessly create signs, and cover up their tracks, while experimenting with techniques, surfaces, and structures in an extremely independent manner. Nowhere is this more evident than in the subject of trees, which both artists have repeatedly included in their work and interpreted in their own ways. While Albert Oehlen’s trees are bare and leafless, with roots that sometimes dominate the scene and become the figurative impetus in abstract pictures, in Carroll Dunham’s work they are shown blooming, whipped by the wind, or freshly felled and dead. The combination of Dunham and Oehlen, each of whom sees the other as “probably the world’s best painter of trees,” suggests countless philosophical, theological, sociological, ecological, and of course art-historical views based on the subject of the tree. From the biblical Tree of Knowledge and thus the place of the Fall of Man to the favorite subject of the Romantics, and from Piet Mondrian’s radical modernist fragmentation to Joseph Beuys’s planting of 7,000 oaks, the tree has long been a central subject of our religious, intellectual, and cultural history. When Carroll Dunham and Albert Oehlen continually declare trees their central subject, they are of course aware of all these cultural- and art-historical references. And yet, for them trees are an opportunity for pure painting, a place for tireless experimentation, a test case for the untapped potential of an ancient analogue medium. Ultimately it is about the question of the abstraction of the world, and thus for Dunham and Oehlen nothing less than the visual meaning of life in art.
Christopher Wool
Christopher Wool
Los Angeles - 221 South Grand Avenue
until 31-12-2020

Christopher Wool In celebration of The Broad's fifth anniversary, the museum will dedicate its first and third floor galleries to a series of free exhibitions and in-depth, single-artist presentations in a unique, rolling sequence beginning February 8 until early 2021 that includes deep dives into the work of icons of American postwar art and 1960s pop, key artists of the 1980s New York and Los Angeles art scenes, and works by important figures of the 1990s to the present day. An in-depth installation featuring 16 works by Christopher Wool (13 of which are on view for the first time at The Broad).

Christopher Wool In celebration of The Broad's fifth anniversary, the museum will dedicate its first and third floor galleries to a series of free exhibitions and in-depth, single-artist presentations in a unique, rolling sequence beginning February 8 until early 2021 that includes deep dives into the work of icons of American postwar art and 1960s pop, key artists of the 1980s New York and Los Angeles art scenes, and works by important figures of the 1990s to the present day. An in-depth installation featuring 16 works by Christopher Wool (13 of which are on view for the first time at The Broad).
Katharina Fritsch
Katharina Fritsch
Los Angeles - 1062 North Orange Grove
until 02-05-2020

Katharina Fritsch Presenting three new sculptures, it is the artist’s first one-person exhibition in Los Angeles. At the center of the gallery, standing more than thirteen feet tall, is Hahn/Cock (all works 2019), a sculpture of a bright blue rooster atop a vivid green circular pedestal. Accompanying it, and painted the same bright blue, is Zwei Männer/Two Men. Fritsch has said, “Men have women as their models, so obviously I have men as my models. They are my muses.” Like the rooster, these two men are sculpted in exacting detail, from their shoes to the smartphones in their hands, yet they are anonymous enough to stand in for a gender and a type. Completing the installation is Stern/Star, an eight-foot painted-aluminum star mounted on the wall.

Katharina Fritsch Presenting three new sculptures, it is the artist’s first one-person exhibition in Los Angeles. At the center of the gallery, standing more than thirteen feet tall, is Hahn/Cock (all works 2019), a sculpture of a bright blue rooster atop a vivid green circular pedestal. Accompanying it, and painted the same bright blue, is Zwei Männer/Two Men. Fritsch has said, “Men have women as their models, so obviously I have men as my models. They are my muses.” Like the rooster, these two men are sculpted in exacting detail, from their shoes to the smartphones in their hands, yet they are anonymous enough to stand in for a gender and a type. Completing the installation is Stern/Star, an eight-foot painted-aluminum star mounted on the wall.
Richard Prince
Richard Prince
Los Angeles - 456 North Camden Drive
until 21-03-2020

Richard Prince – New Portraits In 1984 I took some portraits. The way I did it was different. The way had nothing to do with the tradition of portraiture. If you wanted me to do your portrait, you would give me at least five photographs that had already been taken of yourself, that were in your possession (you owned them, they were yours), and more importantly . . . that you were already happy with. You would give me the five you liked and I would pick the one I liked. I would rephotograph the one I liked and that would be your portrait. Simple. Direct. To the point . . . Foolproof.

Richard Prince – New Portraits In 1984 I took some portraits. The way I did it was different. The way had nothing to do with the tradition of portraiture. If you wanted me to do your portrait, you would give me at least five photographs that had already been taken of yourself, that were in your possession (you owned them, they were yours), and more importantly . . . that you were already happy with. You would give me the five you liked and I would pick the one I liked. I would rephotograph the one I liked and that would be your portrait. Simple. Direct. To the point . . . Foolproof.
Parker Ito
Parker Ito
Los Angeles - 1206 Maple Avenue, Suite 1030
until 04-04-2020

Parker Ito – Longevity Buns  

Parker Ito – Longevity Buns  
Cyprien Gaillard
Cyprien Gaillard
Los Angeles - 5900 Wilshire Boulevard
until 21-03-2020

Cyprien Gaillard – Reefs to Rigs Reefs to Rigs is an exhibition of new sculptures and photographs by Cyprien Gaillard, as well as his most recent film, in a presentation that connects with the Los Angeles gallery’s particular site above a future LA Metro station and across from the La Brea Tar Pits. At this intersection of urban infrastructure and prehistoric matter, Gaillard’s works emphasize the cyclical, era-spanning interactions between nature and human industry, made visible and palpable through materials encountered across the world. On the ground floor of Sprüth Magers, Los Angeles, large wall-based sculptures circumscribe the gallery space, composed of impossibly thin limestone panels atop honeycomb aluminum structures. Swirling constellations of fossils are embedded within each panel, as is the cryptic logo of the New Jersey Transit commuter rail line (with its interlocking “N” and “J”) that connects the state’s cities and towns with the New York City metroplex. The works’ thick aluminum substrates, which protrude from the wall, lay bare the industrial, fabricated nature of each sculpture, as do inlaid screws, whose placement across one of the stone panels recreates—on a one-to-one scale—those found around the windows of a New York MTA subway car. This same arrangement is materialized in pink coral inlay in several other panels.

Cyprien Gaillard – Reefs to Rigs Reefs to Rigs is an exhibition of new sculptures and photographs by Cyprien Gaillard, as well as his most recent film, in a presentation that connects with the Los Angeles gallery’s particular site above a future LA Metro station and across from the La Brea Tar Pits. At this intersection of urban infrastructure and prehistoric matter, Gaillard’s works emphasize the cyclical, era-spanning interactions between nature and human industry, made visible and palpable through materials encountered across the world. On the ground floor of Sprüth Magers, Los Angeles, large wall-based sculptures circumscribe the gallery space, composed of impossibly thin limestone panels atop honeycomb aluminum structures. Swirling constellations of fossils are embedded within each panel, as is the cryptic logo of the New Jersey Transit commuter rail line (with its interlocking “N” and “J”) that connects the state’s cities and towns with the New York City metroplex. The works’ thick aluminum substrates, which protrude from the wall, lay bare the industrial, fabricated nature of each sculpture, as do inlaid screws, whose placement across one of the stone panels recreates—on a one-to-one scale—those found around the windows of a New York MTA subway car. This same arrangement is materialized in pink coral inlay in several other panels.
Forever Young
Forever Young
Munich - Türkenstrasse 19
until 26-04-2020

Forever Young: 10 Years Museum Brandhorst A lot has happened at the Museum Brandhorst since it opened in May 2009. Along with numerous exhibitions, the Brandhorst Collection has grown dramatically—from 700 to more than 1,200 artworks. It now ranks among the most important museum collections of contemporary art in Europe. The museum’s tenth birthday in May 2019 is the occasion for a large-scale exhibition drawn entirely from this expanded collection. Forever Young—10 Years Museum Brandhorst traces an arc ranging from the 1960s to the present day. Alongside renowned and popular highlights from the collection, a particular focus is placed on acquisitions from recent years—including major works by Charline von Heyl, Louise Lawler, Amy Sillman, Seth Price, Wolfgang Tillmans, Arthur Jafa, Alexandra Bircken, and Monika Baer, among others—many of which have never been shown in Munich. The exhibition includes some 250 works by 45 artists and has three main themes, each of which can stand alone and yet also make reference to one another. The first focuses on Andy Warhol and the ongoing legacy of Pop art, especially its often overlooked political and socio-critical dimensions. Unconventional lifestyles, the experience of marginalization due to skin color and sexual orientation, interventions in public space, and the intersection of art, fashion, and music all emerge as central concerns. The second strand concentrates on the controversial topic of subjectivity in contemporary society—and therefore also on the effects of late capitalism on identity formation. The third section presents a short history of painting since the 1960s, and specifically how this traditional artistic genre has expanded and adapted itself in recent decades through an engagement with emerging digital technologies and media dissemination, developments that have also been examined in a series of recent exhibitions at the museum, including Painting 2.0: Expression in the Information Age, Wade Guyton – The New York Studio, Kerstin Brätsch: Innovation and Jutta Koether – Tour de Madame.

Forever Young: 10 Years Museum Brandhorst A lot has happened at the Museum Brandhorst since it opened in May 2009. Along with numerous exhibitions, the Brandhorst Collection has grown dramatically—from 700 to more than 1,200 artworks. It now ranks among the most important museum collections of contemporary art in Europe. The museum’s tenth birthday in May 2019 is the occasion for a large-scale exhibition drawn entirely from this expanded collection. Forever Young—10 Years Museum Brandhorst traces an arc ranging from the 1960s to the present day. Alongside renowned and popular highlights from the collection, a particular focus is placed on acquisitions from recent years—including major works by Charline von Heyl, Louise Lawler, Amy Sillman, Seth Price, Wolfgang Tillmans, Arthur Jafa, Alexandra Bircken, and Monika Baer, among others—many of which have never been shown in Munich. The exhibition includes some 250 works by 45 artists and has three main themes, each of which can stand alone and yet also make reference to one another. The first focuses on Andy Warhol and the ongoing legacy of Pop art, especially its often overlooked political and socio-critical dimensions. Unconventional lifestyles, the experience of marginalization due to skin color and sexual orientation, interventions in public space, and the intersection of art, fashion, and music all emerge as central concerns. The second strand concentrates on the controversial topic of subjectivity in contemporary society—and therefore also on the effects of late capitalism on identity formation. The third section presents a short history of painting since the 1960s, and specifically how this traditional artistic genre has expanded and adapted itself in recent decades through an engagement with emerging digital technologies and media dissemination, developments that have also been examined in a series of recent exhibitions at the museum, including Painting 2.0: Expression in the Information Age, Wade Guyton – The New York Studio, Kerstin Brätsch: Innovation and Jutta Koether – Tour de Madame.