Art feed

Curated by Exhibitionary

McDermott & McGough
McDermott & McGough
London - 1A Nelson's Row
until 28-04-2019

McDermott & McGough – The Oscar Wilde Temple Curated by Alison M. Gingeras    Twenty years in the making, The Oscar Wilde Temple is a wholly immersive work of art and secular space honouring one of the earliest forebears of gay liberation whilst commemorating contemporary LGBTQ+ martyrs and those lost to the AIDS crisis. This will be the first ever institutional exhibition of McDermott & McGough’s work in the UK and will provide audiences with an important opportunity to experience the artists’ groundbreaking work first-hand.

McDermott & McGough – The Oscar Wilde Temple Curated by Alison M. Gingeras    Twenty years in the making, The Oscar Wilde Temple is a wholly immersive work of art and secular space honouring one of the earliest forebears of gay liberation whilst commemorating contemporary LGBTQ+ martyrs and those lost to the AIDS crisis. This will be the first ever institutional exhibition of McDermott & McGough’s work in the UK and will provide audiences with an important opportunity to experience the artists’ groundbreaking work first-hand.
Tracey Emin
Tracey Emin
London - 144-152 Bermondsey Street
until 07-04-2019

Tracey Emin – A Fortnight of Tears Chronicling the most recent developments in Tracey Emin’s practice, ‘A Fortnight of Tears’ opens at White Cube Bermondsey. This major exhibition spans the entire gallery and brings together new painting, photography, large-scale sculpture, film and neon text, all stemming from the artist’s deeply personal memories and emotions ranging from loss, grief, longing and spiritual love. Three monumental, bronze sculptural figures, the largest Emin has produced to date, are shown alongside her lyrical and expressive paintings. Developed through a process of drawing, the paintings are then intensely reworked and added to, layer upon layer.  White Cube also debuts a new photographic series by Emin titled ‘Insomnia’. Selected from thousands of self-portraits taken by the artist on her iPhone over the last couple of years, these images spontaneously capture prolonged periods of restlessness and inner turmoil.

Tracey Emin – A Fortnight of Tears Chronicling the most recent developments in Tracey Emin’s practice, ‘A Fortnight of Tears’ opens at White Cube Bermondsey. This major exhibition spans the entire gallery and brings together new painting, photography, large-scale sculpture, film and neon text, all stemming from the artist’s deeply personal memories and emotions ranging from loss, grief, longing and spiritual love. Three monumental, bronze sculptural figures, the largest Emin has produced to date, are shown alongside her lyrical and expressive paintings. Developed through a process of drawing, the paintings are then intensely reworked and added to, layer upon layer.  White Cube also debuts a new photographic series by Emin titled ‘Insomnia’. Selected from thousands of self-portraits taken by the artist on her iPhone over the last couple of years, these images spontaneously capture prolonged periods of restlessness and inner turmoil.
Allan Sekula
Allan Sekula
London - 5-8 Lower John Street
until 18-05-2019

Allan Sekula – Photography, A Wonderfully Inadequate Medium Marian Goodman Gallery London is delighted to present an exhibition of works by the late American artist Allan Sekula (1951-2013), curated by Marie Muracciole. The presentation will bring together a selection of significant works, highlighting the formal and conceptual links between different periods of the artist’s practice, including photography, film and criticism.    

Allan Sekula – Photography, A Wonderfully Inadequate Medium Marian Goodman Gallery London is delighted to present an exhibition of works by the late American artist Allan Sekula (1951-2013), curated by Marie Muracciole. The presentation will bring together a selection of significant works, highlighting the formal and conceptual links between different periods of the artist’s practice, including photography, film and criticism.    
Morag Keil
Morag Keil
London - The Mall
until 14-04-2019

Morag Keil – Moarg Kiel Screening daily in Cinema 2 at 12:30 pm: Morag Keil and Georgie Nettell: Questionnaire, 2017/19 Moarg Kiel is the first major solo exhibition in the UK by Scottish, London-based artist, Morag Keil, featuring new and reconceived works that span the last eight years of her career. Together, these works offer insight into Keil’s investigations surrounding the impact of data-capitalism and digital technologies on contemporary subjectivities, while acknowledging how these are affected by the precarity of everyday realities.  Keil works across installation, film, painting and drawing, and often collaborates with fellow artists. Her work frequently adopts a lo-fi, pared-back aesthetic, incorporating everyday objects and found materials alongside digital innovations that affect domestic life, such as home automation.  Within many of the works in this exhibition, Keil appropriates and re-presents aspects of branding strategies from advertisements and social media platforms to investigate and expose pervasive techniques for influencing consumerist desire. She also foregrounds and subverts visual and aural strategies exploited in computer gaming or commercial environments in order to manipulate behaviour in ways premised on cliched notions of how gender is performed.  

Morag Keil – Moarg Kiel Screening daily in Cinema 2 at 12:30 pm: Morag Keil and Georgie Nettell: Questionnaire, 2017/19 Moarg Kiel is the first major solo exhibition in the UK by Scottish, London-based artist, Morag Keil, featuring new and reconceived works that span the last eight years of her career. Together, these works offer insight into Keil’s investigations surrounding the impact of data-capitalism and digital technologies on contemporary subjectivities, while acknowledging how these are affected by the precarity of everyday realities.  Keil works across installation, film, painting and drawing, and often collaborates with fellow artists. Her work frequently adopts a lo-fi, pared-back aesthetic, incorporating everyday objects and found materials alongside digital innovations that affect domestic life, such as home automation.  Within many of the works in this exhibition, Keil appropriates and re-presents aspects of branding strategies from advertisements and social media platforms to investigate and expose pervasive techniques for influencing consumerist desire. She also foregrounds and subverts visual and aural strategies exploited in computer gaming or commercial environments in order to manipulate behaviour in ways premised on cliched notions of how gender is performed.  
Franz West
Franz West
London - Bankside
until 02-06-2019

Franz West Ironic, irreverent, yet profoundly philosophical, Franz West was a key figure of European art in the late 20th century Franz West (1947–2012) brought a punk aesthetic into the pristine spaces of art galleries. His abstract sculptures, furniture, collages and large-scale works are direct, crude and unpretentious. Visitors to this major retrospective will be able to handle replicas of his Passstücke (Adaptives) – papier-mâché pieces made to be picked up and moved. They were a turning point in the relationship between art and its audience. He also created playful sculptures incorporating objects from everyday life such as a hat, a broom, or even a whisky bottle. In his final years he produced large, brightly coloured and absurd sculptures both for galleries and public spaces. Born and based in Vienna, West collaborated with numerous artists, musicians, writers and photographers. He has been a vast influence on younger artists – his friend and collaborator Sarah Lucas has contributed to design of the exhibition.

Franz West Ironic, irreverent, yet profoundly philosophical, Franz West was a key figure of European art in the late 20th century Franz West (1947–2012) brought a punk aesthetic into the pristine spaces of art galleries. His abstract sculptures, furniture, collages and large-scale works are direct, crude and unpretentious. Visitors to this major retrospective will be able to handle replicas of his Passstücke (Adaptives) – papier-mâché pieces made to be picked up and moved. They were a turning point in the relationship between art and its audience. He also created playful sculptures incorporating objects from everyday life such as a hat, a broom, or even a whisky bottle. In his final years he produced large, brightly coloured and absurd sculptures both for galleries and public spaces. Born and based in Vienna, West collaborated with numerous artists, musicians, writers and photographers. He has been a vast influence on younger artists – his friend and collaborator Sarah Lucas has contributed to design of the exhibition.
Günther Förg
Gnther Frg
London - 41 Dover Street, 1st floor
until 06-04-2019

Günther Förg – An Intimate Encounter: The Early Years Galerie Max Hetzler London is delighted to present early formative works by Günther Förg in the new London space. This follows the recent major survey exhibition "Günther Förg: A Fragile Beauty" at the Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam and the Dallas Museum of Art, Texas. Bringing together paintings, large-scale photographs, a wall relief and sculpture dating from 1977-1995, An Intimate Encounter: The Early Years highlights the tactile and ephemeral qualities of Förg's work across his multidisciplinary practice. Focusing on the materiality of Förg’s early works, this exhibition creates an environment in which to consider the human touch within his oeuvre.   Förg's energy and spontaneity in the act of making are revealed through the gestures and heavy mark-making visible in the surface of the torso sculpture and bronze wall relief, as well as the imprecise edges of the paintings and snapshot-like quality of his photographs. Strong protruding wooden shapes emerging from the yellow canvas of Untitled, 1988, and embedded grooves in a work from his rare series of paintings on copper, highlight the physical nature of Förg’s process. Contained within Förg's photographs is the notion of time's passage and the ephemerality of the lived experience. The artist became interested in photography in the early 1980s, presenting his works in a way that countered contemporary convention: large-scale, and in artist-built frames, they became architectural objects. The tall reflective glass surfaces engage the viewer in the present moment and through their sheer scale the works embed themselves in the built environment around them.  The photographs shown in this exhibition are intimate portraits of transient moments and spaces of temporary inhabitance. Pinakothek München, 1983, (Untitled) Treppenhaus, 1984, and Dach Casa Malaparte, 1984, each feature staircases, spaces of transition that physically capture the movement from one time and place to another. In Pinakothek München Förg recorded an intimate moment of light spilling through the museum windows. Installed at the gallery this motif is mirrored by the room's own architecture. Dach Casa Malaparte was taken whilst holidaying in the Italian modernist villa in Capri famed for its appearance in Jean-Luc Godard’s Le Mépris (1963). The exhibition also features early paintings whose strong block colours emphasize the notion of seriality, repetition, gesture and tactility. For Förg, the monochromatic shapes both challenge and complement the spaces in which they are installed, reflecting back a sense of how space can be divided and rearranged in a playful and intelligent manner. Showing intimate traces of the artist’s brushwork on their surfaces, these works reveal the contradictions Förg enjoyed bringing together. The neatly stacked painted aluminium panels of Untitled, 1977 call to mind Minimal Art. Yet they also deny the conventions of that movement in the highly visible, energetic brushstrokes. The coloured rows unite into what the artist referred to as a ‘floating form’, the work’s painterly components radiating a strong sense of weightlessness. Together with the bronze wall relief Untitled, 1988, the artist's direct contact with the material is evident and experimental, particularly in the depressions and elevations of the cast bronze.  Present in each of these works is the lived moment of their construction, the energy of their making still apparent in the brushstokes and captured stills. An Intimate Encounter: The Early Years provides a space for reflection on Förg's distinctive use of materials and the seamlessness of his body of work across mediums.  Günther Förg was born 1952 in Füssen and died 2013 in Freiburg.

Günther Förg – An Intimate Encounter: The Early Years Galerie Max Hetzler London is delighted to present early formative works by Günther Förg in the new London space. This follows the recent major survey exhibition "Günther Förg: A Fragile Beauty" at the Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam and the Dallas Museum of Art, Texas. Bringing together paintings, large-scale photographs, a wall relief and sculpture dating from 1977-1995, An Intimate Encounter: The Early Years highlights the tactile and ephemeral qualities of Förg's work across his multidisciplinary practice. Focusing on the materiality of Förg’s early works, this exhibition creates an environment in which to consider the human touch within his oeuvre.   Förg's energy and spontaneity in the act of making are revealed through the gestures and heavy mark-making visible in the surface of the torso sculpture and bronze wall relief, as well as the imprecise edges of the paintings and snapshot-like quality of his photographs. Strong protruding wooden shapes emerging from the yellow canvas of Untitled, 1988, and embedded grooves in a work from his rare series of paintings on copper, highlight the physical nature of Förg’s process. Contained within Förg's photographs is the notion of time's passage and the ephemerality of the lived experience. The artist became interested in photography in the early 1980s, presenting his works in a way that countered contemporary convention: large-scale, and in artist-built frames, they became architectural objects. The tall reflective glass surfaces engage the viewer in the present moment and through their sheer scale the works embed themselves in the built environment around them.  The photographs shown in this exhibition are intimate portraits of transient moments and spaces of temporary inhabitance. Pinakothek München, 1983, (Untitled) Treppenhaus, 1984, and Dach Casa Malaparte, 1984, each feature staircases, spaces of transition that physically capture the movement from one time and place to another. In Pinakothek München Förg recorded an intimate moment of light spilling through the museum windows. Installed at the gallery this motif is mirrored by the room's own architecture. Dach Casa Malaparte was taken whilst holidaying in the Italian modernist villa in Capri famed for its appearance in Jean-Luc Godard’s Le Mépris (1963). The exhibition also features early paintings whose strong block colours emphasize the notion of seriality, repetition, gesture and tactility. For Förg, the monochromatic shapes both challenge and complement the spaces in which they are installed, reflecting back a sense of how space can be divided and rearranged in a playful and intelligent manner. Showing intimate traces of the artist’s brushwork on their surfaces, these works reveal the contradictions Förg enjoyed bringing together. The neatly stacked painted aluminium panels of Untitled, 1977 call to mind Minimal Art. Yet they also deny the conventions of that movement in the highly visible, energetic brushstrokes. The coloured rows unite into what the artist referred to as a ‘floating form’, the work’s painterly components radiating a strong sense of weightlessness. Together with the bronze wall relief Untitled, 1988, the artist's direct contact with the material is evident and experimental, particularly in the depressions and elevations of the cast bronze.  Present in each of these works is the lived moment of their construction, the energy of their making still apparent in the brushstokes and captured stills. An Intimate Encounter: The Early Years provides a space for reflection on Förg's distinctive use of materials and the seamlessness of his body of work across mediums.  Günther Förg was born 1952 in Füssen and died 2013 in Freiburg.
Alighiero Boetti
Alighiero Boetti
London - 12 Brook's Mews
until 19-04-2019

Alighiero Boetti: Embroideries Including Mappas, Tuttos and a Rug Ben Brown Fine Arts is pleased to announce Alighiero Boetti: Embroideries Including Mappas, Tuttos and a Rug, an extensive survey of embroideries by Alighiero Boetti, one of the most important and influential Italian artists of the twentieth century.  Boetti used simple and often industrial materials, concentrating more on the creative conception of the work and leaving its execution to others. Between 1971 and 1979, Boetti travelled extensively to Afghanistan to work with Afghan artisans in Kabul on a series of projects, producing numerous embroideries that would become some of his most iconic works. The process of working with local craftspeople allowed Boetti to address several principal issues within his practice, namely collaboration, material, and time.

Alighiero Boetti: Embroideries Including Mappas, Tuttos and a Rug Ben Brown Fine Arts is pleased to announce Alighiero Boetti: Embroideries Including Mappas, Tuttos and a Rug, an extensive survey of embroideries by Alighiero Boetti, one of the most important and influential Italian artists of the twentieth century.  Boetti used simple and often industrial materials, concentrating more on the creative conception of the work and leaving its execution to others. Between 1971 and 1979, Boetti travelled extensively to Afghanistan to work with Afghan artisans in Kabul on a series of projects, producing numerous embroideries that would become some of his most iconic works. The process of working with local craftspeople allowed Boetti to address several principal issues within his practice, namely collaboration, material, and time.
Lewis Hammond
Lewis Hammond
London - 14 Brewer Street, First Floor
until 30-03-2019

Lewis Hammond – ?The Keep Instead of sounding himself as to his “being,” he does so concerning his place: “Where am I?” instead of “Who am I?” For the space that engrosses the deject, the excluded, is never one, nor homogeneous, nor totalizable, but essentially divisible, foldable, and catastrophic. – Julia Kristeva What becomes of the self in this space? – This is the question that the paintings of Lewis Hammond doggedly and arduously ask. They are visualisations of the many forces the body must undergo, the possibilities of what it could come between, or where it could – accidentally or not – end up. Incessantly interrogated and interrupted, the body is treated as a shock absorber, a mutable scapegoat for the antics of a poisoned and hostile world. It bears the violence of a homogenised and reductive space, one which wreaks havoc on the difference of the bodies entangled within it; a space which is seemingly at odds with the outcome. — Josephine Baker

Lewis Hammond – ?The Keep Instead of sounding himself as to his “being,” he does so concerning his place: “Where am I?” instead of “Who am I?” For the space that engrosses the deject, the excluded, is never one, nor homogeneous, nor totalizable, but essentially divisible, foldable, and catastrophic. – Julia Kristeva What becomes of the self in this space? – This is the question that the paintings of Lewis Hammond doggedly and arduously ask. They are visualisations of the many forces the body must undergo, the possibilities of what it could come between, or where it could – accidentally or not – end up. Incessantly interrogated and interrupted, the body is treated as a shock absorber, a mutable scapegoat for the antics of a poisoned and hostile world. It bears the violence of a homogenised and reductive space, one which wreaks havoc on the difference of the bodies entangled within it; a space which is seemingly at odds with the outcome. — Josephine Baker
Heman Chong
Heman Chong
London - 18 Brewer Street, 1st Floor
until 06-04-2019

Heman Chong – Foreign Affairs Foreign Affairs is a series of apparently banal photographs of embassy back doors. The systematic repetition of images simultaneously recalls a cinematic frame and the omnipresence of the surveillance camera that watches nothing and everything. As a literal and cumulative representation of embassy backdoors, each image of a backdoor can be read as infrastructural, making apparent the very form of the non-descript embassy backdoor and its component parts: greenery as camouflage, the solitary aspect of a strategically positioned surveillance camera, the additional lock or additional gates. These mundane representations are the threshold of the exceptional space of the embassy, which in and of itself is the physical manifestation of an agreement between two states of respective sovereignty. 

Heman Chong – Foreign Affairs Foreign Affairs is a series of apparently banal photographs of embassy back doors. The systematic repetition of images simultaneously recalls a cinematic frame and the omnipresence of the surveillance camera that watches nothing and everything. As a literal and cumulative representation of embassy backdoors, each image of a backdoor can be read as infrastructural, making apparent the very form of the non-descript embassy backdoor and its component parts: greenery as camouflage, the solitary aspect of a strategically positioned surveillance camera, the additional lock or additional gates. These mundane representations are the threshold of the exceptional space of the embassy, which in and of itself is the physical manifestation of an agreement between two states of respective sovereignty. 
Robert Grosvenor
Robert Grosvenor
Miami - 61 NE 41st Street
until 09-06-2019

Robert Grosvenor Using commonplace materials, monumental scale, and poetic form, Robert Grosvenor (b. 1937, New York) has produced some of the most radically unique sculptures of the postwar period. His works maintains a rich historical dialogue with Minimalism while transcending some of its limitations. Complex and allusive, the sculptures also engage site in unexpected ways, provoking profound aesthetic experiences. Grosvenor held his first exhibition in 1965 at Park Place Gallery, New York, which he founded with Mark di Suvero. Already at this time he was generating bold sculptures that challenged the limitations of the medium. At ICA Miami, Grosvenor will, for the first time in more than fifty years, recreate one of his most iconic early works, Untitled (1968). A folded plane made of steel and painted wood and suspended in space, Untitled hovers above the viewer like a giant, abstract architectural canopy, creating a vital tension between its monumental scale and heft and the lightness suggested by its suspension. Grovesnor lives and works in New York and the Florida Keys. His work has been included in seminal exhibitions worldwide, including “Primary Structures” at the Jewish Museum, New York, in 1966, and “Minimal Art” at Den Haag Gementemuseum in 1968. Solo exhibitions of his work have been held at the Kunsthalle Bern; Renaissance Society, Chicago; MoMA PS1, Long Island City, New York; and the Serralves Foundation, Porto. Grosvenor’s work is included in the collections of the Museum of Modern Art, New York; Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles; Walker Art Center, Minneapolis; Storm King Art Center, New Windsor, New York; Museum of Fine Arts, Houston; and the Serralves Museum, Porto, among many others.

Robert Grosvenor Using commonplace materials, monumental scale, and poetic form, Robert Grosvenor (b. 1937, New York) has produced some of the most radically unique sculptures of the postwar period. His works maintains a rich historical dialogue with Minimalism while transcending some of its limitations. Complex and allusive, the sculptures also engage site in unexpected ways, provoking profound aesthetic experiences. Grosvenor held his first exhibition in 1965 at Park Place Gallery, New York, which he founded with Mark di Suvero. Already at this time he was generating bold sculptures that challenged the limitations of the medium. At ICA Miami, Grosvenor will, for the first time in more than fifty years, recreate one of his most iconic early works, Untitled (1968). A folded plane made of steel and painted wood and suspended in space, Untitled hovers above the viewer like a giant, abstract architectural canopy, creating a vital tension between its monumental scale and heft and the lightness suggested by its suspension. Grovesnor lives and works in New York and the Florida Keys. His work has been included in seminal exhibitions worldwide, including “Primary Structures” at the Jewish Museum, New York, in 1966, and “Minimal Art” at Den Haag Gementemuseum in 1968. Solo exhibitions of his work have been held at the Kunsthalle Bern; Renaissance Society, Chicago; MoMA PS1, Long Island City, New York; and the Serralves Foundation, Porto. Grosvenor’s work is included in the collections of the Museum of Modern Art, New York; Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles; Walker Art Center, Minneapolis; Storm King Art Center, New Windsor, New York; Museum of Fine Arts, Houston; and the Serralves Museum, Porto, among many others.
Purvis Young & New Acquisitions
Purvis Young & New Acquisitions
Miami - 95 NW 29th Street
until 29-06-2019

Purvis Young Purvis Young is a large-scale exhibition, encompassing the foundation's entire first floor, featuring over 100 paintings from this artist who spent the entirety of his life (1943—2010) working in Miami. Numerous universal themes within his paintings will be highlighted and presented in depth. A comprehensive catalog with an interview by Hans Ulrich Obrist and writings by Rashid Johnson, Gean Moreno, Franklin Sirmans, César Trasobares, and Barbara N. Young, will accompany the exhibition. New Acquisitions New Acquisitions presents paintings and sculptures acquired within the last two years. Each of the 20 artists will be represented by multiple works in their own room. The exhibition will include new large-scale paintings created by Jonathan Lyndon Chase during his 2018 off-site residency. Other artists includes Janiva Ellis, Tomm El-Saieh, Martha Jungwirth, Rudolf Polanszky and Tschabalala Self.

Purvis Young Purvis Young is a large-scale exhibition, encompassing the foundation's entire first floor, featuring over 100 paintings from this artist who spent the entirety of his life (1943—2010) working in Miami. Numerous universal themes within his paintings will be highlighted and presented in depth. A comprehensive catalog with an interview by Hans Ulrich Obrist and writings by Rashid Johnson, Gean Moreno, Franklin Sirmans, César Trasobares, and Barbara N. Young, will accompany the exhibition. New Acquisitions New Acquisitions presents paintings and sculptures acquired within the last two years. Each of the 20 artists will be represented by multiple works in their own room. The exhibition will include new large-scale paintings created by Jonathan Lyndon Chase during his 2018 off-site residency. Other artists includes Janiva Ellis, Tomm El-Saieh, Martha Jungwirth, Rudolf Polanszky and Tschabalala Self.
Arthur Jafa
Arthur Jafa
Miami - 1103 Biscayne Blvd
until 21-04-2019

Arthur Jafa – Love is the Message, the Message is Death Over the course of more than 30 years, Arthur Jafa (b. 1960, Tupelo, Mississippi; lives in New York) has examined prevailing assumptions about race and identity through an interdisciplinary practice that combines film, installation, sculpture, and performance. His much-celebrated 2016 video Love is the Message, the Message is Death (recently acquired by Pérez Art Museum Miami through the PAMM Collectors Council) captures the powerful emotions that underlie the African American experience, past and present. Encompassing scenes of heightened beauty and humor, as well as instances of horrific violence, the work testifies to the immense cultural achievements of African Americans while alluding to the pain and suffering that black people have endured throughout this country’s history. The artist set the video to the soaring, gospel-inspired 2016 song “Ultralight Beam” by Kanye West, the lyrics of which redouble the sense of hope, suffering, and transcendence that envelops Jafa’s landmark creation.  

Arthur Jafa – Love is the Message, the Message is Death Over the course of more than 30 years, Arthur Jafa (b. 1960, Tupelo, Mississippi; lives in New York) has examined prevailing assumptions about race and identity through an interdisciplinary practice that combines film, installation, sculpture, and performance. His much-celebrated 2016 video Love is the Message, the Message is Death (recently acquired by Pérez Art Museum Miami through the PAMM Collectors Council) captures the powerful emotions that underlie the African American experience, past and present. Encompassing scenes of heightened beauty and humor, as well as instances of horrific violence, the work testifies to the immense cultural achievements of African Americans while alluding to the pain and suffering that black people have endured throughout this country’s history. The artist set the video to the soaring, gospel-inspired 2016 song “Ultralight Beam” by Kanye West, the lyrics of which redouble the sense of hope, suffering, and transcendence that envelops Jafa’s landmark creation.  
Aaron Curry
Aaron Curry
Miami - 2100 Collins Avenue
until 21-04-2019

Aaron Curry – Tune Yer Head Tune Yer Head presents new and recent work by Texas born, LA-based artist, Aaron Curry. Though Curry gained early recognition as a sculptor, making a “return” to painting in 2015, his practice is deeply rooted in the painterly. The exhibition at The Bass surveys the diversity of his practice in terms of materiality and form, highlighting the interplay between painting, sculpture and collage. Curry’s work reads as a dialogue with the artists and creative producers that have influenced him throughout his life. From Modernist artists like Picasso, Picabia and Calder, to cartoonist Basil Wolverton, to BMX and skate culture, Curry draws inspiration from a wide array of sources, which manifest as an explosive mashup of color, texture, and scale on the gallery walls.

Aaron Curry – Tune Yer Head Tune Yer Head presents new and recent work by Texas born, LA-based artist, Aaron Curry. Though Curry gained early recognition as a sculptor, making a “return” to painting in 2015, his practice is deeply rooted in the painterly. The exhibition at The Bass surveys the diversity of his practice in terms of materiality and form, highlighting the interplay between painting, sculpture and collage. Curry’s work reads as a dialogue with the artists and creative producers that have influenced him throughout his life. From Modernist artists like Picasso, Picabia and Calder, to cartoonist Basil Wolverton, to BMX and skate culture, Curry draws inspiration from a wide array of sources, which manifest as an explosive mashup of color, texture, and scale on the gallery walls.
Lighting and Video
Lighting and Video
Miami - 591 NW 27th Street
until 29-06-2019

Lighting and Video Leandro Erlich, Yuichi Higashionna, Amar Kanwar, Barry McGee, Iván Navarro, Tony Oursler, Jennifer Steinkamp, and Keisuke Takahashi

Lighting and Video Leandro Erlich, Yuichi Higashionna, Amar Kanwar, Barry McGee, Iván Navarro, Tony Oursler, Jennifer Steinkamp, and Keisuke Takahashi
Matias Faldbakken
Matias Faldbakken
New York - 521 West 21st Street, 2nd floor
until 30-03-2019

Matias Faldbakken Paula Cooper Gallery is pleased to announce two presentations of work by Matias Faldbakken: a selection of sculptures from his Screen Overlaps series (2016) and FUEL SCULPTURES (2017) in the gallery’s second-floor exhibition space at 521 W 21st Street, and an installation of his earlier work THE INTERNET in the vitrine space below at 529 W 21st Street.  Working with a breadth of materials in painting, drawing, sculpture and video, Faldbakken’s art mines the tension between proposition and cancellation, aggression and retreat, and language and illegibility. His aesthetic of reticence and refusal functions as a universal solvent of culturally established meanings and anchors his work in a rebuke of neat binary oppositions.  

Matias Faldbakken Paula Cooper Gallery is pleased to announce two presentations of work by Matias Faldbakken: a selection of sculptures from his Screen Overlaps series (2016) and FUEL SCULPTURES (2017) in the gallery’s second-floor exhibition space at 521 W 21st Street, and an installation of his earlier work THE INTERNET in the vitrine space below at 529 W 21st Street.  Working with a breadth of materials in painting, drawing, sculpture and video, Faldbakken’s art mines the tension between proposition and cancellation, aggression and retreat, and language and illegibility. His aesthetic of reticence and refusal functions as a universal solvent of culturally established meanings and anchors his work in a rebuke of neat binary oppositions.  
Charlotte Posenenske
Charlotte Posenenske
New York - 3 Beekman Street
until 09-09-2019

Charlotte Posenenske – Work in Progress Charlotte Posenenske: Work in Progress, the first North American retrospective dedicated to the German artist, premieres this spring at Dia:Beacon in Beacon, New York. Marking the most comprehensive exploration of Charlotte Posenenske’s work since her death, the exhibition highlights the entirety of her intense twelve-year practice, before she turned away from the arts to pursue the study of labor.  Spanning her earliest experiments with mark making and drawing, to her transitional aluminum wall-reliefs, to her final modular sculptural projects, the exhibition includes both the original prototypes of these modular sculptures as well as newly fabricated elements. Embracing industrial fabrication, reductive geometry, and serial repetition, Posenenske developed a form of mass-produced Minimalism that pointedly addressed the pressing socioeconomic concerns of the decade, circumventing the art market and rejecting established formal and cultural hierarchies. While Posenenske exhibited widely during the years that she was active as an artist—alongside peers such as Hanne Darboven, Donald Judd, and Sol LeWitt—her contributions to the discourse of Minimal and Conceptual art remain largely overlooked. This retrospective recovers Posenenske’s legacy as a critical and prescient voice within contemporary art.

Charlotte Posenenske – Work in Progress Charlotte Posenenske: Work in Progress, the first North American retrospective dedicated to the German artist, premieres this spring at Dia:Beacon in Beacon, New York. Marking the most comprehensive exploration of Charlotte Posenenske’s work since her death, the exhibition highlights the entirety of her intense twelve-year practice, before she turned away from the arts to pursue the study of labor.  Spanning her earliest experiments with mark making and drawing, to her transitional aluminum wall-reliefs, to her final modular sculptural projects, the exhibition includes both the original prototypes of these modular sculptures as well as newly fabricated elements. Embracing industrial fabrication, reductive geometry, and serial repetition, Posenenske developed a form of mass-produced Minimalism that pointedly addressed the pressing socioeconomic concerns of the decade, circumventing the art market and rejecting established formal and cultural hierarchies. While Posenenske exhibited widely during the years that she was active as an artist—alongside peers such as Hanne Darboven, Donald Judd, and Sol LeWitt—her contributions to the discourse of Minimal and Conceptual art remain largely overlooked. This retrospective recovers Posenenske’s legacy as a critical and prescient voice within contemporary art.
Verne Dawson
Verne Dawson
New York - 39 Great Jones Street
until 21-04-2019

Verne Dawson – Paintings  

Verne Dawson – Paintings  
Elad Lassry
Elad Lassry
New York - 547 West 21st Street
until 06-04-2019

Elad Lassry A boundary-straddling artist whose work problematizing the notion of a picture has carved out new dimensions in photographic discourse, Lassry creates interruptions and tension in evaluating images and objects. Referring to his pictures as "units," his works establish and aggregate an archival syntax that pushes photographs into other things, a destabilization where each specific picture is both present and absent and simultaneously implicates other proposals.   For this exhibition, Lassry shows photographs and sculptures that alternate between flat experience and dimensionality. Black and white photographs of ski sets and boots bear signs of erasure or intervention, and outtakes from an imaginary fashion shoot are pieces of information suggesting systems much larger than themselves. In the center of the gallery, a line of discarded hollow air compressors with incongruous lids made of cushiony polyester fiber gestures toward a proposed space of meaning, where what is experienced and documented have shifted. They exist in the realm of suggestion, where every possibility of intersection is valid, where the ghost of one system posits the limitations of the next. To this effect, the photographs of boots in a different series of pictures are studded with steel and collide with categorical images of sea life. Large stacks of carpet function as stations of oscillation, interrupting sightlines for viewing the photographs while compressing their own existence in space.   Lassry's work questions whether a picture can have dimension, whether an object can be flat. In Photoshop, flattening an image is the final step before printing, a collapsing of layers into one plane. This counterintuitive gesture can be seen reclaimed in Lassry's work. As images have proliferated beyond comprehension, as doubt has been sown into the veracity of any picture, Lassry proposes that each layer suggests another layer, that images should become objects while reality and representation become more aleatory.   Elad Lassry was born in Tel Aviv, Israel and he lives and works in Los Angeles. 

Elad Lassry A boundary-straddling artist whose work problematizing the notion of a picture has carved out new dimensions in photographic discourse, Lassry creates interruptions and tension in evaluating images and objects. Referring to his pictures as "units," his works establish and aggregate an archival syntax that pushes photographs into other things, a destabilization where each specific picture is both present and absent and simultaneously implicates other proposals.   For this exhibition, Lassry shows photographs and sculptures that alternate between flat experience and dimensionality. Black and white photographs of ski sets and boots bear signs of erasure or intervention, and outtakes from an imaginary fashion shoot are pieces of information suggesting systems much larger than themselves. In the center of the gallery, a line of discarded hollow air compressors with incongruous lids made of cushiony polyester fiber gestures toward a proposed space of meaning, where what is experienced and documented have shifted. They exist in the realm of suggestion, where every possibility of intersection is valid, where the ghost of one system posits the limitations of the next. To this effect, the photographs of boots in a different series of pictures are studded with steel and collide with categorical images of sea life. Large stacks of carpet function as stations of oscillation, interrupting sightlines for viewing the photographs while compressing their own existence in space.   Lassry's work questions whether a picture can have dimension, whether an object can be flat. In Photoshop, flattening an image is the final step before printing, a collapsing of layers into one plane. This counterintuitive gesture can be seen reclaimed in Lassry's work. As images have proliferated beyond comprehension, as doubt has been sown into the veracity of any picture, Lassry proposes that each layer suggests another layer, that images should become objects while reality and representation become more aleatory.   Elad Lassry was born in Tel Aviv, Israel and he lives and works in Los Angeles. 
Philippe Parreno
Philippe Parreno
New York - 515 West 24th Street
until 13-04-2019

Philippe Parreno Gladstone Gallery and Gladstone 64 are pleased to present a new exhibition by Philippe Parreno spanning across its New York galleries. At Gladstone Gallery on 24th street, Parreno presents a new film, Anywhen In a Time Colored Space (2019). This work is a continuation of his work Anywhen (2016), filmed by renowned Iranian-French cinematographer Darius Khondji and featuring the voice of Nina Conti, actor, comedienne and ventriloquist. Performing the artist’s own writing integrated with fragments of James Joyce, the amalgamation of words read by Conti makes explicit Parreno’s interest in artificial, digital, and organic matter, and particularly how these forms of life communicate.

Philippe Parreno Gladstone Gallery and Gladstone 64 are pleased to present a new exhibition by Philippe Parreno spanning across its New York galleries. At Gladstone Gallery on 24th street, Parreno presents a new film, Anywhen In a Time Colored Space (2019). This work is a continuation of his work Anywhen (2016), filmed by renowned Iranian-French cinematographer Darius Khondji and featuring the voice of Nina Conti, actor, comedienne and ventriloquist. Performing the artist’s own writing integrated with fragments of James Joyce, the amalgamation of words read by Conti makes explicit Parreno’s interest in artificial, digital, and organic matter, and particularly how these forms of life communicate.
Nari Ward
Nari Ward
New York - 235 Bowery
until 26-05-2019

Nari Ward – We the People The New Museum will present the first museum survey in New York of the work of Nari Ward (b. 1963, St. Andrew, Jamaica). “Nari Ward: We the People” will feature over thirty sculptures, paintings, videos, and large-scale installations from throughout Ward’s twenty-five-year career, highlighting his status as one of the most important and influential sculptors working today. Since the early 1990s, Ward has produced his works by accumulating staggering amounts of humble materials and repurposing them in consistently surprising ways. His approach evokes a variety of folk traditions and creative acts of recycling from Jamaica, where he was born, as well as the material textures of Harlem, where he has lived and worked for the past twenty-five years. Yet Ward also relies on research into specific histories and sites to uncover connections among geographically and culturally disparate communities and to explore the tension between tradition and transformation. This presentation will highlight the continued importance of New York, and Harlem in particular, to the material and thematic content of Ward’s art. Many of his early sculptures were created with materials scavenged from buildings and streets in Harlem. These items—baby strollers, fire hoses, baseball bats, cooking trays, bottles, and shopping carts—were chosen for their connection to individual lives and stories within the neighborhood. The exhibition will include several key early works, such as the large-scale environments Amazing Grace and Hunger Cradle (both 1993), which Ward made and exhibited in an abandoned firehouse. That same year, Ward had his first institutional solo exhibition at the New Museum, where he exhibited a dramatic large sculpture, Carpet Angel (1992). In his more recent work, Ward directly addresses complex political and social realities that resonate on both a local and a national level, reflecting the profound changes gentrification has brought to Harlem and the increasingly fractured state of democracy in the United States. He uses language, architecture, and a variety of sculptural forms to reflect on racism and power, migration and national identity, and the layers of historical memory that comprise our sense of community and belonging. “Nari Ward: We the People” will bring together many of Ward’s most iconic sculptures alongside a number of works that have not been seen in New York since they were originally created. The exhibition will demonstrate Ward’s status as a key bridge between generations of American sculptors and a vital advocate for art’s capacity to address today’s most urgent issues.

Nari Ward – We the People The New Museum will present the first museum survey in New York of the work of Nari Ward (b. 1963, St. Andrew, Jamaica). “Nari Ward: We the People” will feature over thirty sculptures, paintings, videos, and large-scale installations from throughout Ward’s twenty-five-year career, highlighting his status as one of the most important and influential sculptors working today. Since the early 1990s, Ward has produced his works by accumulating staggering amounts of humble materials and repurposing them in consistently surprising ways. His approach evokes a variety of folk traditions and creative acts of recycling from Jamaica, where he was born, as well as the material textures of Harlem, where he has lived and worked for the past twenty-five years. Yet Ward also relies on research into specific histories and sites to uncover connections among geographically and culturally disparate communities and to explore the tension between tradition and transformation. This presentation will highlight the continued importance of New York, and Harlem in particular, to the material and thematic content of Ward’s art. Many of his early sculptures were created with materials scavenged from buildings and streets in Harlem. These items—baby strollers, fire hoses, baseball bats, cooking trays, bottles, and shopping carts—were chosen for their connection to individual lives and stories within the neighborhood. The exhibition will include several key early works, such as the large-scale environments Amazing Grace and Hunger Cradle (both 1993), which Ward made and exhibited in an abandoned firehouse. That same year, Ward had his first institutional solo exhibition at the New Museum, where he exhibited a dramatic large sculpture, Carpet Angel (1992). In his more recent work, Ward directly addresses complex political and social realities that resonate on both a local and a national level, reflecting the profound changes gentrification has brought to Harlem and the increasingly fractured state of democracy in the United States. He uses language, architecture, and a variety of sculptural forms to reflect on racism and power, migration and national identity, and the layers of historical memory that comprise our sense of community and belonging. “Nari Ward: We the People” will bring together many of Ward’s most iconic sculptures alongside a number of works that have not been seen in New York since they were originally created. The exhibition will demonstrate Ward’s status as a key bridge between generations of American sculptors and a vital advocate for art’s capacity to address today’s most urgent issues.
Adam McEwen
Adam McEwen
New York - 390 Park Avenue
until 30-05-2019

Adam McEwen – 10, Feels Like 2 Lever House Art Collection is pleased to present 10, FEELS LIKE 2, a site-specific exhibition by New York-based artist Adam McEwen (b. 1965, London). The minimalist installation, which includes paintings and sculptures, explores ideas of memory and the uncanny within the context of modernist architecture. This subtly disorienting exhibition uses the connotations of cold temperature as a tool to freeze the viewer and space in a moment in time. The Lever House lobby floor is tiled in translucent white polyethylene, which unifies the clean architecture of the lobby to give it the appearance of being under a thin layer of ice. “I wanted to leave the space open as much as possible, so that you can see the architecture and so that it’s the architecture that determines what happens. It seemed like using the floor was the simplest way of separating the space from the rest of the world around it,” explains McEwen. Past and present are suspended in a refrigerator-like glass box, luring viewers to explore a series of objects that are detached from their former functional purpose but weighted with emotional and representational value. The works in the show represent various archetypes of Americana and daily life. Life-size graphite sculptures of objects—which McEwen has described as “three-dimensional drawings of the idea of a thing”—are arrayed throughout the space, each embodying a dubious relationship to their function. A large safe is imposing but empty, a vault that promises much but delivers and secures nothing; a payphone of the kind seen until recently on every American street corner, now an anachronism, connects to nowhere. The other objects—a pickaxe, for digging; a clock, for registering diminishing time; a blister pack of birth control medication; a barbecue hood—are each banal and familiar, verging on the outdated. They are nonetheless freighted—differently for each viewer—with a charge of recognition and association. The sponge paintings depict an embroidered patch of a hand in a V sign, a counterculture peace symbol from the 1970s and previously a V for Victory sign from World War II. In this frozen tundra, the peace sign sits in uncertain territory, and in an unclear relationship to its own declaration. 10, FEELS LIKE 2 explores the passage of time by dissecting McEwen’s fascination with form both in objects and architecture. Introspection sits at the heart of McEwen’s work. The installation explores the way that an artist searches for content, without neglecting the failures of that search. This installation, located within a physical manifestation of American optimism, a pinnacle of modernist architecture, asks the same questions of itself, and of the flash-frozen optimism of a window on Park Avenue. Adam McEwen was born in 1965 in London, England and lives in New York.  

Adam McEwen – 10, Feels Like 2 Lever House Art Collection is pleased to present 10, FEELS LIKE 2, a site-specific exhibition by New York-based artist Adam McEwen (b. 1965, London). The minimalist installation, which includes paintings and sculptures, explores ideas of memory and the uncanny within the context of modernist architecture. This subtly disorienting exhibition uses the connotations of cold temperature as a tool to freeze the viewer and space in a moment in time. The Lever House lobby floor is tiled in translucent white polyethylene, which unifies the clean architecture of the lobby to give it the appearance of being under a thin layer of ice. “I wanted to leave the space open as much as possible, so that you can see the architecture and so that it’s the architecture that determines what happens. It seemed like using the floor was the simplest way of separating the space from the rest of the world around it,” explains McEwen. Past and present are suspended in a refrigerator-like glass box, luring viewers to explore a series of objects that are detached from their former functional purpose but weighted with emotional and representational value. The works in the show represent various archetypes of Americana and daily life. Life-size graphite sculptures of objects—which McEwen has described as “three-dimensional drawings of the idea of a thing”—are arrayed throughout the space, each embodying a dubious relationship to their function. A large safe is imposing but empty, a vault that promises much but delivers and secures nothing; a payphone of the kind seen until recently on every American street corner, now an anachronism, connects to nowhere. The other objects—a pickaxe, for digging; a clock, for registering diminishing time; a blister pack of birth control medication; a barbecue hood—are each banal and familiar, verging on the outdated. They are nonetheless freighted—differently for each viewer—with a charge of recognition and association. The sponge paintings depict an embroidered patch of a hand in a V sign, a counterculture peace symbol from the 1970s and previously a V for Victory sign from World War II. In this frozen tundra, the peace sign sits in uncertain territory, and in an unclear relationship to its own declaration. 10, FEELS LIKE 2 explores the passage of time by dissecting McEwen’s fascination with form both in objects and architecture. Introspection sits at the heart of McEwen’s work. The installation explores the way that an artist searches for content, without neglecting the failures of that search. This installation, located within a physical manifestation of American optimism, a pinnacle of modernist architecture, asks the same questions of itself, and of the flash-frozen optimism of a window on Park Avenue. Adam McEwen was born in 1965 in London, England and lives in New York.  
Friedrich Kunath
Friedrich Kunath
New York - 191 Chrystie Street
until 14-04-2019

Friedrich Kunath – All Your Fears Trapped Inside Nestled into a corner of the gallery is a focused installation—sentimental objects collected by Kunath over the past twenty years arranged neatly into a small room that also includes a simple bed, shelving, a writing desk and a television. The shelves are lined with perfumes, Rod McKuen books, a small statuette of a boy that reads “I wish I could say what I feel”, car keys, tennis balls, photographs, and Hildegard Knef albums. Pinned to the wall are pages torn from magazines, sheet music to “I Just Don’t Know What to Do with Myself”, and various paintings made by Kunath since 2003. Above the bed hangs a painting by Kunath that reads “Never Liked You But Still Nostalgic” the sentiment of which is echoed in a neon just to the right of it that reads “Never Let It End”. Almost hidden beside the pillow of the bed is a book that reads “Alcoholics Anonymous” along the spine. On the desk rests an old photograph of a building in Cologne. On the ground floor of this building is a honey store where Joseph Beuys once bought all of the honey for his installation Honeypump at the Workplace, shown at Documenta VI in 1977. In the top left corner of the photograph perches a small window—Kunath’s first studio, where he worked from 1999 through 2003.  

Friedrich Kunath – All Your Fears Trapped Inside Nestled into a corner of the gallery is a focused installation—sentimental objects collected by Kunath over the past twenty years arranged neatly into a small room that also includes a simple bed, shelving, a writing desk and a television. The shelves are lined with perfumes, Rod McKuen books, a small statuette of a boy that reads “I wish I could say what I feel”, car keys, tennis balls, photographs, and Hildegard Knef albums. Pinned to the wall are pages torn from magazines, sheet music to “I Just Don’t Know What to Do with Myself”, and various paintings made by Kunath since 2003. Above the bed hangs a painting by Kunath that reads “Never Liked You But Still Nostalgic” the sentiment of which is echoed in a neon just to the right of it that reads “Never Let It End”. Almost hidden beside the pillow of the bed is a book that reads “Alcoholics Anonymous” along the spine. On the desk rests an old photograph of a building in Cologne. On the ground floor of this building is a honey store where Joseph Beuys once bought all of the honey for his installation Honeypump at the Workplace, shown at Documenta VI in 1977. In the top left corner of the photograph perches a small window—Kunath’s first studio, where he worked from 1999 through 2003.  
Andy Warhol
Andy Warhol
New York - 99 Gansevoort Street
until 31-03-2019

Andy Warhol—From A to B and Back Again The exhibition positions Warhol's career as a continuum, demonstrating that he didn't slow down after surviving the assassination attempt that nearly took his life in 1968, but entered into a period of intense experimentation. The show illuminates the breadth, depth, and interconnectedness of the artist’s production: from his beginnings as a commercial illustrator in the 1950s, to his iconic Pop masterpieces of the early 1960s, to the experimental work in film and other mediums from the 1960s and 70s, to his innovative use of readymade abstraction and the painterly sublime in the 1980s. His repetitions, distortions, camouflaging, incongruous color, and recycling of his own imagery challenge our faith in images and the value of cultural icons, anticipating the profound effects and issues of the current digital age. This is the largest monographic exhibition to date at the Whitney's new location, with more than 350 works of art, many assembled together for the first time.   

Andy Warhol—From A to B and Back Again The exhibition positions Warhol's career as a continuum, demonstrating that he didn't slow down after surviving the assassination attempt that nearly took his life in 1968, but entered into a period of intense experimentation. The show illuminates the breadth, depth, and interconnectedness of the artist’s production: from his beginnings as a commercial illustrator in the 1950s, to his iconic Pop masterpieces of the early 1960s, to the experimental work in film and other mediums from the 1960s and 70s, to his innovative use of readymade abstraction and the painterly sublime in the 1980s. His repetitions, distortions, camouflaging, incongruous color, and recycling of his own imagery challenge our faith in images and the value of cultural icons, anticipating the profound effects and issues of the current digital age. This is the largest monographic exhibition to date at the Whitney's new location, with more than 350 works of art, many assembled together for the first time.   
On the New
On the New
Vienna - Arsenalstrasse 1
until 02-06-2019

On the New. Young Scenes in Vienna  Sasha Auerbakh, Anna-Sophie Berger, Cäcilia Brown, Marc-Alexandre Dumoulin, Melanie Ebenhoch, Johannes Gierlinger, Birke Gorm, Maureen Kaegi, Barbara Kapusta, Angelika Loderer, Nana Mandl, Matthias Noggler, Lukas Posch, Lucia Elena Pr?ša, Rosa Rendl & Lonely Boys, Marina Sula, Philipp Timischl, Edin Zenun What are young artists who live and work in Vienna interested in? What subjects are in the air, what strategies do they use? The exhibition On the New. Young Scenes in Vienna is conceived as a stroll through local art communities: it brings together 18 individual artistic approaches as well as 12 independent exhibition spaces. In this show, specifically produced works are juxtaposed with specially arranged exhibitions within the exhibition; artistic and curatorial formats combine to create a dynamic entity that will change over the course of the show.

On the New. Young Scenes in Vienna  Sasha Auerbakh, Anna-Sophie Berger, Cäcilia Brown, Marc-Alexandre Dumoulin, Melanie Ebenhoch, Johannes Gierlinger, Birke Gorm, Maureen Kaegi, Barbara Kapusta, Angelika Loderer, Nana Mandl, Matthias Noggler, Lukas Posch, Lucia Elena Pr?ša, Rosa Rendl & Lonely Boys, Marina Sula, Philipp Timischl, Edin Zenun What are young artists who live and work in Vienna interested in? What subjects are in the air, what strategies do they use? The exhibition On the New. Young Scenes in Vienna is conceived as a stroll through local art communities: it brings together 18 individual artistic approaches as well as 12 independent exhibition spaces. In this show, specifically produced works are juxtaposed with specially arranged exhibitions within the exhibition; artistic and curatorial formats combine to create a dynamic entity that will change over the course of the show.
Hannahlisa Kunyik & Kilian Immervoll
Hannahlisa Kunyik & Kilian Immervoll
Vienna - Bartensteingasse 14
until 05-04-2019

Hannahlisa Kunyik in collaboration with Kilian Immervoll – Great Wall Something   For Jiankou, a section of the Great Wall near Beijing, the access is not permitted. However, this section of the wall is one of the most photographed touristic motifs of today’s China. It is framed by an impressive fraud industry that can lure even experienced travelers to remote places in order to demand to pay horrendous return costs. Anyone who manages to follow that route to Jiankou nevertheless, a trip that is recommended by some travel guides, will become a witness of one of the most breathtaking landscape interventions ever. During her BKA-Residency in Shanghai in 2016 Hannahlisa Kunyik made a trip through China that also brought her to Jiankou Village. She created a series of works - experiments and investigations, reflections on myths about borders and national sovereignty - based on the fascination for the place, the landscape, and the sculpturality of the wall, its history [its creation, its decay, and reconstruction] as well as the bodily engagement that is required when walking the Great Wall. The core of the exhibition is the work Great Wall Something (2019), a film in collaboration with Kilian Immervoll. 

Hannahlisa Kunyik in collaboration with Kilian Immervoll – Great Wall Something   For Jiankou, a section of the Great Wall near Beijing, the access is not permitted. However, this section of the wall is one of the most photographed touristic motifs of today’s China. It is framed by an impressive fraud industry that can lure even experienced travelers to remote places in order to demand to pay horrendous return costs. Anyone who manages to follow that route to Jiankou nevertheless, a trip that is recommended by some travel guides, will become a witness of one of the most breathtaking landscape interventions ever. During her BKA-Residency in Shanghai in 2016 Hannahlisa Kunyik made a trip through China that also brought her to Jiankou Village. She created a series of works - experiments and investigations, reflections on myths about borders and national sovereignty - based on the fascination for the place, the landscape, and the sculpturality of the wall, its history [its creation, its decay, and reconstruction] as well as the bodily engagement that is required when walking the Great Wall. The core of the exhibition is the work Great Wall Something (2019), a film in collaboration with Kilian Immervoll. 
Klara Lidén
Klara Lidn
Vienna - Friedrichstrasse 12
until 31-03-2019

Klara Lidén – Auf jeden Fall Since the early 2000s, the Swedish artist Klara Lidén has built a sizable oeuvre of installations, sculptures, performances, and videos. Her works respond to the built environment in which they are presented, reflecting on the urban context and the surrounding community’s way of life. Deviations from the norm—be it in terms of the use of materials or (community) spaces or with respect to conventions of behavior—and the possibilities they open up propel Lidén’s art. Her short films—lo-fi videos that resemble the length of YouTube-clips—document her spontaneous performative actions in urban settings. The artist brings her own body to bear in (anarchical) attempts to return the increasingly privatized urban fabric of metropolitan centers to public uses. For instance, she will mingle with the anonymous crowds flowing through such spaces but then deliberately act in maladaptive ways, moving at the wrong pace or startling those around her. Lidén’s interventions and outbursts of radical energy are calculated to disrupt and unsettle social conventions in order to call the routines of everyday life in question and undermine our habits of tacit coexistence. Seeking to uncover repressed aggressions and potentials for resistance, she takes inspiration from a long history of performative and conceptual artistic practices.  

Klara Lidén – Auf jeden Fall Since the early 2000s, the Swedish artist Klara Lidén has built a sizable oeuvre of installations, sculptures, performances, and videos. Her works respond to the built environment in which they are presented, reflecting on the urban context and the surrounding community’s way of life. Deviations from the norm—be it in terms of the use of materials or (community) spaces or with respect to conventions of behavior—and the possibilities they open up propel Lidén’s art. Her short films—lo-fi videos that resemble the length of YouTube-clips—document her spontaneous performative actions in urban settings. The artist brings her own body to bear in (anarchical) attempts to return the increasingly privatized urban fabric of metropolitan centers to public uses. For instance, she will mingle with the anonymous crowds flowing through such spaces but then deliberately act in maladaptive ways, moving at the wrong pace or startling those around her. Lidén’s interventions and outbursts of radical energy are calculated to disrupt and unsettle social conventions in order to call the routines of everyday life in question and undermine our habits of tacit coexistence. Seeking to uncover repressed aggressions and potentials for resistance, she takes inspiration from a long history of performative and conceptual artistic practices.  
Spitzmaus Mummy in a Coffin and other Treasures
Spitzmaus Mummy in a Coffin and other Treasures
Vienna - Maria-Theresien-Platz
until 28-04-2019

Spitzmaus Mummy in a Coffin and other Treasures   Curated by Wes Anderson & Juman Malouf    In 2012, the Kunsthistorisches Museum Vienna initiated a new series of exhibitions for which remarkable creative individuals are invited to present their own personal selections of objects drawn from the museum’s historical collections. The museum’s collections number more than four million objects, and span a period of five thousand years.  The third instalment of the series, opening on November 6, 2018, has been selected and curated by the filmmaker Wes Anderson and his partner, the writer and illustrator Juman Malouf. With assistance from the museum’s staff of curators and conservators, Anderson and Malouf have assembled more than 400 objects drawn from all 14 of the museum’s historical collections. Among them are Egyptian, Greek and Roman antiquities, Old Master paintings, selections from the Kunstkammer and the Imperial Treasury, items from the Imperial Armoury, Coin Collection, and Collection of Historic Musical Instruments, as well as pieces from the Theatermuseum, the Weltmuseum, the Imperial Carriage Museum, and Schloss Ambras Innsbruck. A handful of special guests from the Natural History Museum are also included. Particular attention was given to the museum’s storage: more than 350 of the objects have been brought from depots, with many of them on public display for the very first time. The result is titled Spitzmaus Mummy in a Coffin and other Treasures. The gathering and arrangement of these treasures—from the earliest, a necklace of ceramic beads strung together in Ancient Egypt, to the most recent, a wooden monkey carved in Indonesia almost 5,000 years later—suggest the spectacular breadth, depth, history and complexity of the Kunsthistorisches Museum’s collections.

Spitzmaus Mummy in a Coffin and other Treasures   Curated by Wes Anderson & Juman Malouf    In 2012, the Kunsthistorisches Museum Vienna initiated a new series of exhibitions for which remarkable creative individuals are invited to present their own personal selections of objects drawn from the museum’s historical collections. The museum’s collections number more than four million objects, and span a period of five thousand years.  The third instalment of the series, opening on November 6, 2018, has been selected and curated by the filmmaker Wes Anderson and his partner, the writer and illustrator Juman Malouf. With assistance from the museum’s staff of curators and conservators, Anderson and Malouf have assembled more than 400 objects drawn from all 14 of the museum’s historical collections. Among them are Egyptian, Greek and Roman antiquities, Old Master paintings, selections from the Kunstkammer and the Imperial Treasury, items from the Imperial Armoury, Coin Collection, and Collection of Historic Musical Instruments, as well as pieces from the Theatermuseum, the Weltmuseum, the Imperial Carriage Museum, and Schloss Ambras Innsbruck. A handful of special guests from the Natural History Museum are also included. Particular attention was given to the museum’s storage: more than 350 of the objects have been brought from depots, with many of them on public display for the very first time. The result is titled Spitzmaus Mummy in a Coffin and other Treasures. The gathering and arrangement of these treasures—from the earliest, a necklace of ceramic beads strung together in Ancient Egypt, to the most recent, a wooden monkey carved in Indonesia almost 5,000 years later—suggest the spectacular breadth, depth, history and complexity of the Kunsthistorisches Museum’s collections.
Nil Yalter
Nil Yalter
Cologne - Heinrich-Bll-Platz
until 02-06-2019

Nil Yalter – Exile Is a Hard Job Since the 1970s, Nil Yalter has worked as a pioneer of socially engaged and technically advanced art. With her first survey exhibition in Germany, we are presenting the diversity of her work, including previously little-known paintings from her early work and video installations from the early 1970s to multimedia installations in which she combines photography, video, drawings, and sculpture into collages.  Nil Yalter’s works emerge from current political situations such as the sentencing to death of a Turkish activist, daily life in a women’s prison, or the living conditions of illiterate “guest workers.” Language plays an important role for her, along with cultural influences from the Middle East, Turkey, and Western Europe. She sensitively integrates the voices of the people depicted in her works. Using a quasi-anthropological methodology, she reflects the life situation of these individuals and makes marginalized groups of people visible. Already in the 1970s, the artist began dealing with feminist issues, including migrant and queer perspectives. This makes her work seem more relevant than ever today.

Nil Yalter – Exile Is a Hard Job Since the 1970s, Nil Yalter has worked as a pioneer of socially engaged and technically advanced art. With her first survey exhibition in Germany, we are presenting the diversity of her work, including previously little-known paintings from her early work and video installations from the early 1970s to multimedia installations in which she combines photography, video, drawings, and sculpture into collages.  Nil Yalter’s works emerge from current political situations such as the sentencing to death of a Turkish activist, daily life in a women’s prison, or the living conditions of illiterate “guest workers.” Language plays an important role for her, along with cultural influences from the Middle East, Turkey, and Western Europe. She sensitively integrates the voices of the people depicted in her works. Using a quasi-anthropological methodology, she reflects the life situation of these individuals and makes marginalized groups of people visible. Already in the 1970s, the artist began dealing with feminist issues, including migrant and queer perspectives. This makes her work seem more relevant than ever today.
Bea Feitler
Bea Feitler
Cologne - Hahnenstrasse 6
until 31-03-2019

Power of Print – The Work and Life of Bea Feitler An exhibition in collaboration with Marte Eknæs and Nicolau Vergueiro Power of Print is a comprehensive survey of the revolutionary work, and life, of the late Brazilian art director and designer Bea Feitler (1938–1982). The exhibition features original magazines, books, video documentation and reproductions from Feitler’s meteoric career, spanning from the late 1950s until her death, and personal photos and artifacts that document her life and circle of friends, collaborators and peers. Best known for her work in Harper’s Bazaar, Ms., Rolling Stone and the modern Vanity Fair, Feitler left an indelible mark upon the face of American graphic design by offering a new approach to the magazine experience. Feitler’s expressive freedom, evidenced by shifting standards to a female gaze, allowed her to renegotiate the commercial representation of women and to use the magazine as a mass vehicle to address social issues through her vibrant aesthetic. Power of Print threads some of her work’s recurrent themes – the human silhouette, centerfold as compositional device, collaging, innovative use of typography, solarisation and duotone, through which she reimagined the relationship between body, text and graphic design in both layout and sensorial terms. “A magazine should flow. It should have rhythm. You can’t look at one page alone- you have to visualize what comes before and after.”

Power of Print – The Work and Life of Bea Feitler An exhibition in collaboration with Marte Eknæs and Nicolau Vergueiro Power of Print is a comprehensive survey of the revolutionary work, and life, of the late Brazilian art director and designer Bea Feitler (1938–1982). The exhibition features original magazines, books, video documentation and reproductions from Feitler’s meteoric career, spanning from the late 1950s until her death, and personal photos and artifacts that document her life and circle of friends, collaborators and peers. Best known for her work in Harper’s Bazaar, Ms., Rolling Stone and the modern Vanity Fair, Feitler left an indelible mark upon the face of American graphic design by offering a new approach to the magazine experience. Feitler’s expressive freedom, evidenced by shifting standards to a female gaze, allowed her to renegotiate the commercial representation of women and to use the magazine as a mass vehicle to address social issues through her vibrant aesthetic. Power of Print threads some of her work’s recurrent themes – the human silhouette, centerfold as compositional device, collaging, innovative use of typography, solarisation and duotone, through which she reimagined the relationship between body, text and graphic design in both layout and sensorial terms. “A magazine should flow. It should have rhythm. You can’t look at one page alone- you have to visualize what comes before and after.”
John Stezaker
John Stezaker
Cologne - St. Apern Strasse 26
until 30-03-2019

John Stezaker – She  

John Stezaker – She  
Joseph Zehrer
Joseph Zehrer
Cologne - Bismarckstrasse 50 (Courtyard)
until 30-03-2019

Joseph Zehrer – Park  

Joseph Zehrer – Park  
Olaf Metzel
Olaf Metzel
Berlin - Knesebeckstrasse 95
until 13-04-2019

Olaf Metzel Galerie Wentrup is pleased to inaugurate its new gallery space in Berlin-Charlottenburg with an exhibition of works by the sculptor Olaf Metzel. The gallery has moved to a listed brick building, constructed in 1928 in the style of New Objectivity; the space was formerly occupied by the post office. The German designer Sebastian Herkner was responsible for the design of the gallery’s new space.    Olaf Metzel (born in 1952 in Berlin) lives and works in Munich, Germany. In addition to numerous solo exhibitions both in Germany and abroad, he participated in dcocumenta 8 and Skulptur-Projekte Münster in 1987 and 1997. In 1984 and 1990, he participated in the Sydney Biennale, in 1995 and 2015 in the Istanbul Biennale, and in 2001 in the São Paulo Biennale. In addition, Olaf Metzel has received numerous prizes and awards, for example the Arnold-Bode Preis (Kassel 1994), the Wilhelm-Loth-Preis (Darmstadt 1997), the Lichtwar-Preis (Hamburg 2010), and the Jerg-Ratgeb-Preis (2018). Olaf Metzel’s sculptures in public spaces are to be found in Germany, other European countries, and Asia.   

Olaf Metzel Galerie Wentrup is pleased to inaugurate its new gallery space in Berlin-Charlottenburg with an exhibition of works by the sculptor Olaf Metzel. The gallery has moved to a listed brick building, constructed in 1928 in the style of New Objectivity; the space was formerly occupied by the post office. The German designer Sebastian Herkner was responsible for the design of the gallery’s new space.    Olaf Metzel (born in 1952 in Berlin) lives and works in Munich, Germany. In addition to numerous solo exhibitions both in Germany and abroad, he participated in dcocumenta 8 and Skulptur-Projekte Münster in 1987 and 1997. In 1984 and 1990, he participated in the Sydney Biennale, in 1995 and 2015 in the Istanbul Biennale, and in 2001 in the São Paulo Biennale. In addition, Olaf Metzel has received numerous prizes and awards, for example the Arnold-Bode Preis (Kassel 1994), the Wilhelm-Loth-Preis (Darmstadt 1997), the Lichtwar-Preis (Hamburg 2010), and the Jerg-Ratgeb-Preis (2018). Olaf Metzel’s sculptures in public spaces are to be found in Germany, other European countries, and Asia.   
bauhaus imaginista
bauhaus imaginista
Berlin - John-Foster-Dulles-Allee 10
until 10-06-2019

bauhaus imaginista Anni Albers, Gertrud Arndt, Kader Attia, Lena Bergner, Nandalal Bose, Ahmed Cherkaoui, Alice Creischer, Zvi Efrat, Luca Frei, Walter Gropius, Doreen Mende, Hannes Meyer, Takehiko Mizutani, László Moholy-Nagy, Wendelien van Oldenborgh, Hélio Oiticica, The Otolith Group, Lygia Pape, Paulo Tavares, Iwao Yamawaki and many more bauhaus imaginista narrates the international histories of the Bauhaus. Since its foundation in 1919, the school was in contact with other avant-garde movements worldwide. bauhaus imaginista proposes a rereading of the Bauhaus as a cosmopolitan project with global resonances: A major exhibition and two conferences trace transnational relations, correspondences, and narratives of migration, going beyond the years the Bauhaus was active as a school (until 1933). For the first time, the project tracks the translation of Bauhaus concepts into different political and geographical contexts. The title bauhaus imaginista hints at the imaginative possibilities which were opened up by the Bauhaus, and the multilayered interpretations that the term still denotes today. Between archival findings and contemporary contributions, the project translates the historical perspective into a set of contemporary questions: How, in the spirit of the Bauhaus, might culture be reimagined as a social project today? What kinds of institutions would such a project need? And in what ways does the Bauhaus still stimulate visionary practices and discourses today? The exhibition places the Bauhaus in context with like-minded schools in other parts of the world. It reflects the artistic exploration of craft techniques, materials, and practices; examines how Bauhaus concepts on socially integrated design were transformed, adjusted, and challenged; and uncovers how the innovative use of media at the Bauhaus influences art and pop culture even today. Since March 2018, exhibitions, symposia, and workshops in Rabat, Hangzhou, New York, Kyoto, and Tokyo, Moscow, Sao Paulo, Lagos, and Delhi have been realized in collaboration with the Goethe-Institutes and local partners. Now bauhaus imaginista culminates with an expanded overview at HKW. Curated by Marion von Osten and Grant Watson in collaboration with a team of international researchers and artists.

bauhaus imaginista Anni Albers, Gertrud Arndt, Kader Attia, Lena Bergner, Nandalal Bose, Ahmed Cherkaoui, Alice Creischer, Zvi Efrat, Luca Frei, Walter Gropius, Doreen Mende, Hannes Meyer, Takehiko Mizutani, László Moholy-Nagy, Wendelien van Oldenborgh, Hélio Oiticica, The Otolith Group, Lygia Pape, Paulo Tavares, Iwao Yamawaki and many more bauhaus imaginista narrates the international histories of the Bauhaus. Since its foundation in 1919, the school was in contact with other avant-garde movements worldwide. bauhaus imaginista proposes a rereading of the Bauhaus as a cosmopolitan project with global resonances: A major exhibition and two conferences trace transnational relations, correspondences, and narratives of migration, going beyond the years the Bauhaus was active as a school (until 1933). For the first time, the project tracks the translation of Bauhaus concepts into different political and geographical contexts. The title bauhaus imaginista hints at the imaginative possibilities which were opened up by the Bauhaus, and the multilayered interpretations that the term still denotes today. Between archival findings and contemporary contributions, the project translates the historical perspective into a set of contemporary questions: How, in the spirit of the Bauhaus, might culture be reimagined as a social project today? What kinds of institutions would such a project need? And in what ways does the Bauhaus still stimulate visionary practices and discourses today? The exhibition places the Bauhaus in context with like-minded schools in other parts of the world. It reflects the artistic exploration of craft techniques, materials, and practices; examines how Bauhaus concepts on socially integrated design were transformed, adjusted, and challenged; and uncovers how the innovative use of media at the Bauhaus influences art and pop culture even today. Since March 2018, exhibitions, symposia, and workshops in Rabat, Hangzhou, New York, Kyoto, and Tokyo, Moscow, Sao Paulo, Lagos, and Delhi have been realized in collaboration with the Goethe-Institutes and local partners. Now bauhaus imaginista culminates with an expanded overview at HKW. Curated by Marion von Osten and Grant Watson in collaboration with a team of international researchers and artists.
Heji Shin
Heji Shin
Berlin - Fasanenstrasse 30
until 20-04-2019

Heji Shin – Kanye  

Heji Shin – Kanye  
Florian Auer
Florian Auer
Berlin - Kohlfurter Strasse 41/43
until 18-04-2019

Florian Auer – Spiritual Reality  For his fourth exhibition at the gallery, Auer will present a series of works inspired by early Land Art. Auer is interested in the immediate experience of art and reality, as well as in contemporary understandings of the spiritual. Through an overlap of images and sculptural elements in the gallery space, the artist looks for an extended perception of space and time. Lightning as a natural phenomenon is used as a frame of reference in order to shift from the virtual to the physical realm. By lending strategies from virtual reality and rendering images into objects, Auer challenges the viewer’s perceptional expectations. This constant flicker between digital image and the physical object reveal the laws that rule artificially created realms, as opposed to those ruling nature.

Florian Auer – Spiritual Reality  For his fourth exhibition at the gallery, Auer will present a series of works inspired by early Land Art. Auer is interested in the immediate experience of art and reality, as well as in contemporary understandings of the spiritual. Through an overlap of images and sculptural elements in the gallery space, the artist looks for an extended perception of space and time. Lightning as a natural phenomenon is used as a frame of reference in order to shift from the virtual to the physical realm. By lending strategies from virtual reality and rendering images into objects, Auer challenges the viewer’s perceptional expectations. This constant flicker between digital image and the physical object reveal the laws that rule artificially created realms, as opposed to those ruling nature.
Saâdane Afif
Sadane Afif
Berlin - Bleibtreustrasse 41 / Entrance Mommsenstrasse
until 30-03-2019

Pièce Unique II – Saâdane Afif – Her Ghost Friend: 3 Tokyo Sessions, 2016  

Pièce Unique II – Saâdane Afif – Her Ghost Friend: 3 Tokyo Sessions, 2016  
Jonathan Monk
Jonathan Monk
Berlin - Am Sudhaus 2
until 21-07-2019

Jonathan Monk – Exhibit Model Four – plus invited guests Under the title "Exhibit Model Four – plus invited guests," the British artist Jonathan Monk is continuing his exhibition series, which has been shown since 2016 in various locations in modified forms, and which he has now conceptually expanded for the KINDL – Centre for Contemporary Art. Exhibit Model Four is an installation consisting of walls covered in photographic wallpaper throughout the exhibition space M1 in the Maschinenhaus at the KINDL. The photographs, mostly in black and white, show Monk’s works from the past twenty years in various exhibition contexts and spatial situations. By integrating these excerpts with the existing architecture of M1, the artist develops a completely new, complex spatial structure. The installation views have the appearance of compiled archival materials and are distilled into a place that demands a sharpened perception and specific orientation.

Jonathan Monk – Exhibit Model Four – plus invited guests Under the title "Exhibit Model Four – plus invited guests," the British artist Jonathan Monk is continuing his exhibition series, which has been shown since 2016 in various locations in modified forms, and which he has now conceptually expanded for the KINDL – Centre for Contemporary Art. Exhibit Model Four is an installation consisting of walls covered in photographic wallpaper throughout the exhibition space M1 in the Maschinenhaus at the KINDL. The photographs, mostly in black and white, show Monk’s works from the past twenty years in various exhibition contexts and spatial situations. By integrating these excerpts with the existing architecture of M1, the artist develops a completely new, complex spatial structure. The installation views have the appearance of compiled archival materials and are distilled into a place that demands a sharpened perception and specific orientation.
Bernard Piffaretti
Bernard Piffaretti
Berlin - Prinzessinnenstrasse 29
until 18-04-2019

Bernard Piffaretti – Kontinuum

Bernard Piffaretti – Kontinuum
Henrike Naumann
Henrike Naumann
Berlin - Brunnenstrasse 9
until 06-04-2019

Henrike Naumann – Ostalgie Henrike Naumann’s first solo exhibition at KOW—it is also the gallery’s farewell show after ten years in the rooms at Brunnenstraße 9—explores the historical dimensions of a particular flavor of nostalgia: Ostalgie, the wistful yearning for life in socialist East Germany. As it happens, a nostalgic gesture is built into the exhibition venue itself: preserving the gap in the row of houses lining the street—it can still be seen on Google Street View—and transforming it into KOW’s showrooms, the 2009 structure by Arno Brandlhuber is a nod to a Berlin-Mitte that is no longer. Next door, a multimillionaire celebrated the twentieth anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall by having the words “Dieses Haus stand früher in einem anderen Land” (“This building once stood in a different country”) written on its façade in large letters, a cynical and almost hostile appropriation of historical memory. Like any other sentiment in capitalism, Ostalgie has been merchandised. Henrike Naumann’s new video Die Monotonie des Yeah Yeah Yeah (the title quotes Walter Ulbricht), embedded in the original furnishings of a 1990s shoe store in Brandenburg, examines the nexus between the marketization of memories and the construction of a new East German identity. The piece focuses on the birth of today’s East Germans from the beat of dedicated Ostalgie club nights. In retrospect, Ralf Heckel, who invented the format, interprets the inaugural party on New Year’s Eve in 1994 as an ecstatic ritual of community formation that opened the door to “true spiritual freedom” for East Germans. Ostalgie products are the artefacts of this long-ago departure for a new world as well as mementos of an allegedly magical instant: “Not only were we allowed to say what we wanted, we were even free to sing what nobody wanted to hear.” (Ralf Heckel) Ostalgie may be read as an individual and collective longing: as the projection, loaded with positive emotions, of a fictional East German society, an imagination cobbled together from media discourses and selective snippets of memory. This sentiment is at odds with the communist philosophy of history known as historical materialism. In the logic of history’s necessary progression, the past could not possibly have been better than the future. With the collapse of communism, the authoritarian rollback around the world, and the onset of global warming, however, the future has lost its allure as a social vision. On the other hand, Ostalgie is also a form of resistance, a “counter-memory” (Daphne Berdahl) that defies a hegemonic culture of memory and commemoration as much as the colonialization of East German lived realities. The linear sequence of stages envisioned by the Marxist model of social development and the capitalist growth paradigms share a positive point of reference: the primordial hunter-gatherer society as a projection of the human foundations of sociality. In the gallery’s ground-floor showroom, Naumann’s new installation Ostalgie (Urgesellschaft) turns the spotlight on the materiality of anthropological narratives and reactionary social models. East German everyday objects mingle with cartoonish furniture for a Flintstonesque “neo-Paleolithic” (Markues). Naumann’s work inquires into the abiding appeal of utopias that promise to reduce the complexity of contemporary life and beckon with the construction of an ostensibly simple past. Sexual, racial, and social structures that are unmistakably steeped in violence and raw power are the intellectual constants of this imaginary “retrotopia” (Zygmunt Bauman). The ground that no longer holds firm becomes the wall Mass unemployment, the devaluation of people’s achievements, flexibilization, and the disintegration of social bonds were the landmarks of an East Germany that looked like a jungle; until 1995, West German public officials who volunteered to chart it were paid what was known as the outback bonus. Only in this “land before our time” (Littlefoot) did the “East Germans” come into being as an identifiable demographic recognized as such by both its members and outsiders. Ostalgic feelings, products, and practices are the immaterial and material expressions of the active making of cultural difference. Probing the sediments of the past, Martin Hoop is a mine shaft leading down into the cryptic semiotic systems of the years after the fall of the Wall. 2000, an ensemble on view in the downstairs gallery, combines recent and earlier sound and video pieces to trace the genesis of the challenges of Germany today. This is the soil in which Ostalgie struck deep roots. Unemployed miners, dangerous far-right crackpots, a fanatical fundamentalist, and the hard-boiled executive Birgit Breuel, who led the privatization of East Germany’s industries and was commissioner general of the 2000 world’s fair in Hanover: they are the protagonists who put their stamps on the post-socialist crash and redevelopment. Furniture, rugs, and TV sets anchor the recollection of a future frozen in an infinitely distant yet recent past. – Clemens Villinger

Henrike Naumann – Ostalgie Henrike Naumann’s first solo exhibition at KOW—it is also the gallery’s farewell show after ten years in the rooms at Brunnenstraße 9—explores the historical dimensions of a particular flavor of nostalgia: Ostalgie, the wistful yearning for life in socialist East Germany. As it happens, a nostalgic gesture is built into the exhibition venue itself: preserving the gap in the row of houses lining the street—it can still be seen on Google Street View—and transforming it into KOW’s showrooms, the 2009 structure by Arno Brandlhuber is a nod to a Berlin-Mitte that is no longer. Next door, a multimillionaire celebrated the twentieth anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall by having the words “Dieses Haus stand früher in einem anderen Land” (“This building once stood in a different country”) written on its façade in large letters, a cynical and almost hostile appropriation of historical memory. Like any other sentiment in capitalism, Ostalgie has been merchandised. Henrike Naumann’s new video Die Monotonie des Yeah Yeah Yeah (the title quotes Walter Ulbricht), embedded in the original furnishings of a 1990s shoe store in Brandenburg, examines the nexus between the marketization of memories and the construction of a new East German identity. The piece focuses on the birth of today’s East Germans from the beat of dedicated Ostalgie club nights. In retrospect, Ralf Heckel, who invented the format, interprets the inaugural party on New Year’s Eve in 1994 as an ecstatic ritual of community formation that opened the door to “true spiritual freedom” for East Germans. Ostalgie products are the artefacts of this long-ago departure for a new world as well as mementos of an allegedly magical instant: “Not only were we allowed to say what we wanted, we were even free to sing what nobody wanted to hear.” (Ralf Heckel) Ostalgie may be read as an individual and collective longing: as the projection, loaded with positive emotions, of a fictional East German society, an imagination cobbled together from media discourses and selective snippets of memory. This sentiment is at odds with the communist philosophy of history known as historical materialism. In the logic of history’s necessary progression, the past could not possibly have been better than the future. With the collapse of communism, the authoritarian rollback around the world, and the onset of global warming, however, the future has lost its allure as a social vision. On the other hand, Ostalgie is also a form of resistance, a “counter-memory” (Daphne Berdahl) that defies a hegemonic culture of memory and commemoration as much as the colonialization of East German lived realities. The linear sequence of stages envisioned by the Marxist model of social development and the capitalist growth paradigms share a positive point of reference: the primordial hunter-gatherer society as a projection of the human foundations of sociality. In the gallery’s ground-floor showroom, Naumann’s new installation Ostalgie (Urgesellschaft) turns the spotlight on the materiality of anthropological narratives and reactionary social models. East German everyday objects mingle with cartoonish furniture for a Flintstonesque “neo-Paleolithic” (Markues). Naumann’s work inquires into the abiding appeal of utopias that promise to reduce the complexity of contemporary life and beckon with the construction of an ostensibly simple past. Sexual, racial, and social structures that are unmistakably steeped in violence and raw power are the intellectual constants of this imaginary “retrotopia” (Zygmunt Bauman). The ground that no longer holds firm becomes the wall Mass unemployment, the devaluation of people’s achievements, flexibilization, and the disintegration of social bonds were the landmarks of an East Germany that looked like a jungle; until 1995, West German public officials who volunteered to chart it were paid what was known as the outback bonus. Only in this “land before our time” (Littlefoot) did the “East Germans” come into being as an identifiable demographic recognized as such by both its members and outsiders. Ostalgic feelings, products, and practices are the immaterial and material expressions of the active making of cultural difference. Probing the sediments of the past, Martin Hoop is a mine shaft leading down into the cryptic semiotic systems of the years after the fall of the Wall. 2000, an ensemble on view in the downstairs gallery, combines recent and earlier sound and video pieces to trace the genesis of the challenges of Germany today. This is the soil in which Ostalgie struck deep roots. Unemployed miners, dangerous far-right crackpots, a fanatical fundamentalist, and the hard-boiled executive Birgit Breuel, who led the privatization of East Germany’s industries and was commissioner general of the 2000 world’s fair in Hanover: they are the protagonists who put their stamps on the post-socialist crash and redevelopment. Furniture, rugs, and TV sets anchor the recollection of a future frozen in an infinitely distant yet recent past. – Clemens Villinger
Holz, Metall, Gewebe, Farbe, Glas, Ton, Stein
Holz, Metall, Gewebe, Farbe, Glas, Ton, Stein
Berlin - Linienstrasse 155
until 06-04-2019

Holz, Metall, Gewebe, Farbe, Glas, Ton, Stein? Ai Weiwei, James Benning, Olafur Eliasson, Andreas Eriksson, Noa Eshkol, Mario Garci?a Torres, Isa Genzken, Sharon Lockhart, Renata Lucas, Michel Majerus, Antje Majewski, Jorge Pardo, Tobias Rehberger, Simon Starling, Pae White We are pleased to announce Holz, Metall, Gewebe, Farbe, Glas, Ton, Stein, an exhibition dedicated to a philosophy and art school that has shaped art, design and architecture over the past 100 years. Expressed today through an experimental reverence for the building, a fusing of disciplines and an elevation of crafts- manship, the Bauhaus and its legacies are paid tribute to in this exhibition in artworks from the past 40 years by Ai Weiwei, James Benning, Olafur Eliasson, Andreas Eriksson, Noa Eshkol, Mario Garci?a Torres, Isa Genzken, Sharon Lockhart, Renata Lucas, Michel Majerus, Antje Majewski, Jorge Pardo, Tobias Rehberger, Simon Starling and Pae White. In the founding manifesto Programm des Staatlichen Bauhauses in Weimar published by Walter Gropius in 1919, he called for the removal of the hierarchies, divisions and ‘complacent isolation’ that he saw within and between disciplines. ‘The ultimate goal of all art is the building! ... Architects, painters and sculptors must learn a new way of seeing and understanding the composite character of the building, both as a totality and in terms of its parts.’ The utopia of building becomes the subject for the works on view by Isa Genzken, Renata Lucas and Ai Weiwei. Genkzen’s New Buildings for Berlin II (2013) and Architekturcollage (2001) reflect at once her provisional and experimental view of the city. An artist critical of the architecture of Post-war Germany, post-wall Berlin and even the New York of the Bauhaus e?migre?s (as seen in Fuck the Bauhaus: New Buildings for New York, 2000), her omnivorous work proposes other solutions. For Renata Lucas, who lives and works in Sa?o Paulo, Homeless tectonics (2016) and Folding tectonics (2017) imitate the politicised layers of the city. A blanket ascribed to a dispossessed person or an unsettling newspaper cutting are swallowed by a tile floor and allude to urban socio- economic ills. Ai Weiwei’s Model for Fountain of Light (2012), meanwhile, reimagines Tatlin’s Monument to the Third International (1919–20). Today itself a monument to the ideals of Constructivism, it was born out of values shared by the Bauhaus – particularly the holistic, interdisciplinary attitude to construction and embracing of the modern, industrialized world. To reach the ultimate goal of the building Walter Gropius urged ‘Architects, sculptors, painters—we all must return to craftsmanship! For there is no such thing as “art by profession”. There is no essential difference bet- ween the artist and the artisan. The artist is an exalted artisan.’ Exemplifying this approach was the Bauhaus course structure as laid out in an iconic diagram by Gropius in 1922. Following the studies of nature, repre- sentation, composition and construction progressed to the seven pillars of textile, color, glass, clay, stone, wood and metal. The reverence and validation of materials once associated with artisanship is widely seen in the works on view. Textile is a special focus in the compositions by Olafur Eliasson, Andreas Eriksson, Jorge Pardo and Noa Eshkol, while the artisan herself or himself is paid tribute to in the work by James Benning, Sharon Lockhart, Tobias Rehberger and Simon Starling. Benning’s textile After Gee’s Bend (2013) honors the making of quilts from material offcuts at Gee’s Bend on the Alabama River. Begun by enslaved women to keep themselves and families warm on the Pettway plantation, this particular quilt refers to one made by Missouri Pettway in 1942 in memory of her late husband. Sharon Lockhart’s photography Models of Orbits in the System of Reference, Eshkol-Wachman Movement Notation System (2011) originates from a body of work devoted to the models in wire and mesh made by choreographer, dancer, professor and artist Noa Eshkol. Noa Eshkol’s own Squares (Homage to Klee) (circa 1980s) takes unwanted offcuts of material she was donated and places them into a humble, sewn composition in the mode of Bauhaus teacher Paul Klee. A photograph by Simon Starling cracked teapot (wagenfeld) (2005) illustrates the ambiguous relics of Bauhaus design pieces. While Tobias Rehberger’s josef albers (1994) is one of group of works that recreates the furniture used at documenta I (1955), documenta II (1959) and documenta III (1964) to regard modernist and Bauhaus artworks – forbidden under the Nazi regime. Together the works on view represent the fusing of once-distinct disciplines and new material approaches that have unfolded over the past century. Their work underlines the broad manifestations of this ultimately influential school in contemporary art. As Mies van der Rohe, the third and last Director of the Bauhaus said, ‘You can’t achieve that kind of resonance with either organization or propaganda. Only an idea has the power to spread so widely.’ For further press information and imagery, please contact Sophie Furse at neugerriemschneider: +49 30 288 77277 or [email protected]

Holz, Metall, Gewebe, Farbe, Glas, Ton, Stein? Ai Weiwei, James Benning, Olafur Eliasson, Andreas Eriksson, Noa Eshkol, Mario Garci?a Torres, Isa Genzken, Sharon Lockhart, Renata Lucas, Michel Majerus, Antje Majewski, Jorge Pardo, Tobias Rehberger, Simon Starling, Pae White We are pleased to announce Holz, Metall, Gewebe, Farbe, Glas, Ton, Stein, an exhibition dedicated to a philosophy and art school that has shaped art, design and architecture over the past 100 years. Expressed today through an experimental reverence for the building, a fusing of disciplines and an elevation of crafts- manship, the Bauhaus and its legacies are paid tribute to in this exhibition in artworks from the past 40 years by Ai Weiwei, James Benning, Olafur Eliasson, Andreas Eriksson, Noa Eshkol, Mario Garci?a Torres, Isa Genzken, Sharon Lockhart, Renata Lucas, Michel Majerus, Antje Majewski, Jorge Pardo, Tobias Rehberger, Simon Starling and Pae White. In the founding manifesto Programm des Staatlichen Bauhauses in Weimar published by Walter Gropius in 1919, he called for the removal of the hierarchies, divisions and ‘complacent isolation’ that he saw within and between disciplines. ‘The ultimate goal of all art is the building! ... Architects, painters and sculptors must learn a new way of seeing and understanding the composite character of the building, both as a totality and in terms of its parts.’ The utopia of building becomes the subject for the works on view by Isa Genzken, Renata Lucas and Ai Weiwei. Genkzen’s New Buildings for Berlin II (2013) and Architekturcollage (2001) reflect at once her provisional and experimental view of the city. An artist critical of the architecture of Post-war Germany, post-wall Berlin and even the New York of the Bauhaus e?migre?s (as seen in Fuck the Bauhaus: New Buildings for New York, 2000), her omnivorous work proposes other solutions. For Renata Lucas, who lives and works in Sa?o Paulo, Homeless tectonics (2016) and Folding tectonics (2017) imitate the politicised layers of the city. A blanket ascribed to a dispossessed person or an unsettling newspaper cutting are swallowed by a tile floor and allude to urban socio- economic ills. Ai Weiwei’s Model for Fountain of Light (2012), meanwhile, reimagines Tatlin’s Monument to the Third International (1919–20). Today itself a monument to the ideals of Constructivism, it was born out of values shared by the Bauhaus – particularly the holistic, interdisciplinary attitude to construction and embracing of the modern, industrialized world. To reach the ultimate goal of the building Walter Gropius urged ‘Architects, sculptors, painters—we all must return to craftsmanship! For there is no such thing as “art by profession”. There is no essential difference bet- ween the artist and the artisan. The artist is an exalted artisan.’ Exemplifying this approach was the Bauhaus course structure as laid out in an iconic diagram by Gropius in 1922. Following the studies of nature, repre- sentation, composition and construction progressed to the seven pillars of textile, color, glass, clay, stone, wood and metal. The reverence and validation of materials once associated with artisanship is widely seen in the works on view. Textile is a special focus in the compositions by Olafur Eliasson, Andreas Eriksson, Jorge Pardo and Noa Eshkol, while the artisan herself or himself is paid tribute to in the work by James Benning, Sharon Lockhart, Tobias Rehberger and Simon Starling. Benning’s textile After Gee’s Bend (2013) honors the making of quilts from material offcuts at Gee’s Bend on the Alabama River. Begun by enslaved women to keep themselves and families warm on the Pettway plantation, this particular quilt refers to one made by Missouri Pettway in 1942 in memory of her late husband. Sharon Lockhart’s photography Models of Orbits in the System of Reference, Eshkol-Wachman Movement Notation System (2011) originates from a body of work devoted to the models in wire and mesh made by choreographer, dancer, professor and artist Noa Eshkol. Noa Eshkol’s own Squares (Homage to Klee) (circa 1980s) takes unwanted offcuts of material she was donated and places them into a humble, sewn composition in the mode of Bauhaus teacher Paul Klee. A photograph by Simon Starling cracked teapot (wagenfeld) (2005) illustrates the ambiguous relics of Bauhaus design pieces. While Tobias Rehberger’s josef albers (1994) is one of group of works that recreates the furniture used at documenta I (1955), documenta II (1959) and documenta III (1964) to regard modernist and Bauhaus artworks – forbidden under the Nazi regime. Together the works on view represent the fusing of once-distinct disciplines and new material approaches that have unfolded over the past century. Their work underlines the broad manifestations of this ultimately influential school in contemporary art. As Mies van der Rohe, the third and last Director of the Bauhaus said, ‘You can’t achieve that kind of resonance with either organization or propaganda. Only an idea has the power to spread so widely.’ For further press information and imagery, please contact Sophie Furse at neugerriemschneider: +49 30 288 77277 or [email protected]
David Wojnarowicz
David Wojnarowicz
Berlin - Auguststrasse 69
until 05-05-2019

David Wojnarowicz – Photography & Film 1978–1992 David Wojnarowicz (1954–1992) came into prominence in the East Village art world of the 1980s, actively embracing all media and forging an expansive range of work both fiercely political and highly personal. Although largely self-taught, he worked as an artist and writer to merge a sophisticated combination of found and discarded material with an uncanny understanding of literary influences. First displayed in rough storefront galleries, his work already gained national prominence at the very moment. Diagnosed with HIV in the late 1980s his work became resolutely and fervently political at a time where the AIDS epidemic was cutting down a generation of artists. From the late 1970s until his death in 1992, Wojnarowicz produced a body of work that was as conceptually rigorous as it was stylistically diverse. KW Institute for Contemporary Art is pleased to present the exhibition Photography & Film 1978–1992 that will be the first to solely concentrate on Wojnarowicz’s photographic and filmic work. It will present over 150 works including photographs, test prints, silkscreens, 16mm and super-8 film, and collaborative video works. Afterwards the exhibition will travel to the Morris and Helen Belkin Art Gallery in Vancouver (CA).

David Wojnarowicz – Photography & Film 1978–1992 David Wojnarowicz (1954–1992) came into prominence in the East Village art world of the 1980s, actively embracing all media and forging an expansive range of work both fiercely political and highly personal. Although largely self-taught, he worked as an artist and writer to merge a sophisticated combination of found and discarded material with an uncanny understanding of literary influences. First displayed in rough storefront galleries, his work already gained national prominence at the very moment. Diagnosed with HIV in the late 1980s his work became resolutely and fervently political at a time where the AIDS epidemic was cutting down a generation of artists. From the late 1970s until his death in 1992, Wojnarowicz produced a body of work that was as conceptually rigorous as it was stylistically diverse. KW Institute for Contemporary Art is pleased to present the exhibition Photography & Film 1978–1992 that will be the first to solely concentrate on Wojnarowicz’s photographic and filmic work. It will present over 150 works including photographs, test prints, silkscreens, 16mm and super-8 film, and collaborative video works. Afterwards the exhibition will travel to the Morris and Helen Belkin Art Gallery in Vancouver (CA).
Doug Aitken
Doug Aitken
Beijing - 2 Jiuxuanquao Road
until 04-08-2019

Doug Aitken   Faurschou Foundation is pleased to present a solo exhibition of American artist, Doug Aitken, at Faurschou Beijing. It is the first solo exhibition of the artist in mainland China.   Aitken has developed a multimedia oeuvre that spans a wide array of mediums, integrating film, sound, photography, sculpture, performance, happenings, and site-specific installations. This exhibition features three installations including the video work NEW ERA.   Aitken’s body of artwork takes the viewer into a different world, which explores ideas and takes you places that language cannot fully articulate. Through image, forms, and sound, the artworks conceptualize the idea of a current world that is completely kinetic and synchronized, yet at other times a landscape that is vastly isolating.   Entering the first room of the gallery, NEW ERA creates a hexagonal space of alternating mirrors and projections, which take the 1973 invention of the very first cellular telephone by Martin Cooper as a starting idea. The narrative within this work disintegrates and abstracts, mirroring how the diametrically opposed notions of connectivity and freedom have been underlined in this paradigm-shifting moment in history.   In the second room, the viewer steps directly into 3 Modern Figures (don’t forget to breathe), an installation of three human figures resting on a raw wooden floor. These are not heroic figures but a candid snapshot of modern individuals frozen as if time had stopped. In the empty core of the sculptures, light emanates and pulses.    In the third darkened room stands a 12-foot rock and concrete sculpture with visual parallels to a brutalist monument, titled Crossing the Border. The slab of stone and concrete is cut in the shape of a silhouetted image of Gandhi. Echoing in the large room, we hear patterns of dripping water, the water appearing out of openings in the rock figure.   Connecting three works in the sequence of three rooms, this exhibition starts with the invention of the cellular phone, reflects the way humans are both in and out of sync in this age of technology and ends with Crossing the Border. The exhibition creates a fragmented narrative of today’s digital contemporary landscape. In this landscape, Aitken's works are signposts, making the viewer pause, stop and evaluate their surroundings.

Doug Aitken   Faurschou Foundation is pleased to present a solo exhibition of American artist, Doug Aitken, at Faurschou Beijing. It is the first solo exhibition of the artist in mainland China.   Aitken has developed a multimedia oeuvre that spans a wide array of mediums, integrating film, sound, photography, sculpture, performance, happenings, and site-specific installations. This exhibition features three installations including the video work NEW ERA.   Aitken’s body of artwork takes the viewer into a different world, which explores ideas and takes you places that language cannot fully articulate. Through image, forms, and sound, the artworks conceptualize the idea of a current world that is completely kinetic and synchronized, yet at other times a landscape that is vastly isolating.   Entering the first room of the gallery, NEW ERA creates a hexagonal space of alternating mirrors and projections, which take the 1973 invention of the very first cellular telephone by Martin Cooper as a starting idea. The narrative within this work disintegrates and abstracts, mirroring how the diametrically opposed notions of connectivity and freedom have been underlined in this paradigm-shifting moment in history.   In the second room, the viewer steps directly into 3 Modern Figures (don’t forget to breathe), an installation of three human figures resting on a raw wooden floor. These are not heroic figures but a candid snapshot of modern individuals frozen as if time had stopped. In the empty core of the sculptures, light emanates and pulses.    In the third darkened room stands a 12-foot rock and concrete sculpture with visual parallels to a brutalist monument, titled Crossing the Border. The slab of stone and concrete is cut in the shape of a silhouetted image of Gandhi. Echoing in the large room, we hear patterns of dripping water, the water appearing out of openings in the rock figure.   Connecting three works in the sequence of three rooms, this exhibition starts with the invention of the cellular phone, reflects the way humans are both in and out of sync in this age of technology and ends with Crossing the Border. The exhibition creates a fragmented narrative of today’s digital contemporary landscape. In this landscape, Aitken's works are signposts, making the viewer pause, stop and evaluate their surroundings.
Rituals of Signs and Metamorphosis
Rituals of Signs and Metamorphosis
Beijing - Shunbai Road
until 07-04-2019

Rituals of Signs and Metamorphosis   Ho Tzu Nyen, Hu Xiaoyuan, Jawshing Arthur Liou, Anish Kapoor, Tomoko Kashiki, Taus Makhacheva, Park Chan-Kyong, Walid Raad, Chai Siris, Apichatpong Weerasethakul   The exhibition situates the works of these visionary artists between historical and contemporary systems of thinking, which allows the unexpected, the unknown and the mysterious to appear. The works are displayed along an imagined ritual path of concepts and forms, materials and mediums, gestures and actions, and they explore different registers of metamorphoses. This poetic journey leads us to question the certainty of narratives, provokes reflections and ideas, and sparks the desire to seek out divinatory signs. Rituals of Signs and Metamorphosis aims to create a collective dialogue in a space where various critical and methodological approaches converge to shift rigid patterns of perception and induce intuitive ones. The exhibition sheds light on the concepts behind the aesthetics, offering both a rich visual and reflective experience. It signals various aesthetic and epistemological structures that suggest that nothing is constant in the universe and everything is always changing in form and essence. Rituals of Signs and Metamorphosis touches on our connection with nature and summons ghosts, spirits, dreams, hallucinations, and psychospiritual dynamics. In our hyper-consumerist contemporary world, the works of these artists show their desire to re-enchant it, proposing unlimited possibilities for the future.

Rituals of Signs and Metamorphosis   Ho Tzu Nyen, Hu Xiaoyuan, Jawshing Arthur Liou, Anish Kapoor, Tomoko Kashiki, Taus Makhacheva, Park Chan-Kyong, Walid Raad, Chai Siris, Apichatpong Weerasethakul   The exhibition situates the works of these visionary artists between historical and contemporary systems of thinking, which allows the unexpected, the unknown and the mysterious to appear. The works are displayed along an imagined ritual path of concepts and forms, materials and mediums, gestures and actions, and they explore different registers of metamorphoses. This poetic journey leads us to question the certainty of narratives, provokes reflections and ideas, and sparks the desire to seek out divinatory signs. Rituals of Signs and Metamorphosis aims to create a collective dialogue in a space where various critical and methodological approaches converge to shift rigid patterns of perception and induce intuitive ones. The exhibition sheds light on the concepts behind the aesthetics, offering both a rich visual and reflective experience. It signals various aesthetic and epistemological structures that suggest that nothing is constant in the universe and everything is always changing in form and essence. Rituals of Signs and Metamorphosis touches on our connection with nature and summons ghosts, spirits, dreams, hallucinations, and psychospiritual dynamics. In our hyper-consumerist contemporary world, the works of these artists show their desire to re-enchant it, proposing unlimited possibilities for the future.
Yu Honglei
Yu Honglei
Beijing - Jiuxianqiao Road
until 14-04-2019

New Directions: Yu Honglei For the latest installment of the “New Directions” series of solo shows by emerging artists from throughout greater China, UCCA presents a new series of sculptures and film by Yu Honglei (b. 1984, Inner Mongolia, lives and works in Beijing). These artworks are born in an era where the internet and movie, television, and computer screens offer us constant distraction; they both imitate, and respond to, these phenomena. By giving viewers a stream of homogenous, emotionless, and face-paced images, Yu simulates human temporality, caught in a vortex of information, giving a sense of how lived realities can alter the very nature of the visual. In 15’36”, the film at the center of the exhibition, Yu creates a rich narrative. The film’s title refers to its fifteen-and-a-half-minute duration. It begins with a throbbing sound paired with footage of a horse submerged in water. Next is the sound of muffled breathingalongside the image of a swimmer, eyes closed. Throughout the film, these couplingsbecome more and more frenzied: a high-pitched whining, punctuated by explosions, runs in tandem with a clip of a man sinking a strange device into marshland; a Max Richter song plays as motorboats and ATVs take off across wetland and snow. Halfway through the film, several different sonic tracks fold together. Coughing, cymbals, and drumrolls are accompanied by clips of drones in the sky and beasts of burden; an oceanic din by images of a beekeeper and his bees; the twang of stringed instruments by footage of a car crash. The finale of the film doubles as its summation: a snatch of psychedelic trance music plays alongside a series of silent, American GIs, faces smeared with camouflage paint, who gaze out at the viewer. Their hypnotic stares transition suddenly to a close-up of a bird, beak open, pecking at the camera. It then cuts to black to the sound of a pile of objects collapsing. These repetitive, pulsating special effects cut time into distinct units, adding a tense rhythm to the artwork, and dissolving the original referents of the images and sounds. 15’36” forms an intertextual relationship with the metal sculptures in the exhibition. Some sculptures are miniature busts of heads, eyes open or closed to various degrees: some bulge widely, while others stare calmly out, shut tightly, or grimace in pain, reminiscent ofpeople who have been blinded by intense light. The artworks I#5, I#6, as well as I#3 and I#4, on the other hand, are shaped like floor lamps, evoking the image of legs in motion, as if making linear the limitless space of consciousness.

New Directions: Yu Honglei For the latest installment of the “New Directions” series of solo shows by emerging artists from throughout greater China, UCCA presents a new series of sculptures and film by Yu Honglei (b. 1984, Inner Mongolia, lives and works in Beijing). These artworks are born in an era where the internet and movie, television, and computer screens offer us constant distraction; they both imitate, and respond to, these phenomena. By giving viewers a stream of homogenous, emotionless, and face-paced images, Yu simulates human temporality, caught in a vortex of information, giving a sense of how lived realities can alter the very nature of the visual. In 15’36”, the film at the center of the exhibition, Yu creates a rich narrative. The film’s title refers to its fifteen-and-a-half-minute duration. It begins with a throbbing sound paired with footage of a horse submerged in water. Next is the sound of muffled breathingalongside the image of a swimmer, eyes closed. Throughout the film, these couplingsbecome more and more frenzied: a high-pitched whining, punctuated by explosions, runs in tandem with a clip of a man sinking a strange device into marshland; a Max Richter song plays as motorboats and ATVs take off across wetland and snow. Halfway through the film, several different sonic tracks fold together. Coughing, cymbals, and drumrolls are accompanied by clips of drones in the sky and beasts of burden; an oceanic din by images of a beekeeper and his bees; the twang of stringed instruments by footage of a car crash. The finale of the film doubles as its summation: a snatch of psychedelic trance music plays alongside a series of silent, American GIs, faces smeared with camouflage paint, who gaze out at the viewer. Their hypnotic stares transition suddenly to a close-up of a bird, beak open, pecking at the camera. It then cuts to black to the sound of a pile of objects collapsing. These repetitive, pulsating special effects cut time into distinct units, adding a tense rhythm to the artwork, and dissolving the original referents of the images and sounds. 15’36” forms an intertextual relationship with the metal sculptures in the exhibition. Some sculptures are miniature busts of heads, eyes open or closed to various degrees: some bulge widely, while others stare calmly out, shut tightly, or grimace in pain, reminiscent ofpeople who have been blinded by intense light. The artworks I#5, I#6, as well as I#3 and I#4, on the other hand, are shaped like floor lamps, evoking the image of legs in motion, as if making linear the limitless space of consciousness.
Producing Futures
Producing Futures
Zrich - Lwenbru Areal, Limmatstrasse 270
until 12-05-2019

Producing Futures – An Exhibition on Post-Cyber-Feminisms Cao Fei, Cécile B. Evans, Lynn Hershman Leeson, Juliana Huxtable, Guan Xiao, MALAXA, Mary Maggic, Shana Moulton, Tabita Rezaire, Gavin Rayna Russom, Frances Stark, Wu Tsang, Anna Uddenberg, VNS Matrix, Anicka Yi In the group show Producing Futures—An Exhibition on Post-Cyber-Feminisms, the Migros Museum für Gegenwartskunst surveys the causes championed by feminists in the post-internet era. Our virtual and real lives are almost inextricably interwoven today. Yet contrary to the heady proclamations of the cyberfeminists of the 1990s, cyberspace has not evolved into a realm of unclouded liberation and self-empowerment; it has also served to reinforce existing hierarchies and power structures. Opening with a new work by the artists’ collective VNS Matrix, which coined the term cyberfeminism, the presentation revisits the movement’s historic aspirations and visions, contrasts them with the contemporary situation, and inquires into ways in which its ideas may still be productive. The exhibition undertakes a critical engagement with different feminist approaches that put the spotlight on the tension between body and technology and on discriminatory gender norms. The contributing artists reflect on and defamiliarize the offerings of various online platforms in order to further blur the boundaries between virtual and real, online and offline, and the genders. Many of the works pursue a holistic view, drawing on (medical) science, the occult, and other fields to stimulate a more comprehensive discussion and generate ideas for a livable future of emancipation, gender justice, and social equality.

Producing Futures – An Exhibition on Post-Cyber-Feminisms Cao Fei, Cécile B. Evans, Lynn Hershman Leeson, Juliana Huxtable, Guan Xiao, MALAXA, Mary Maggic, Shana Moulton, Tabita Rezaire, Gavin Rayna Russom, Frances Stark, Wu Tsang, Anna Uddenberg, VNS Matrix, Anicka Yi In the group show Producing Futures—An Exhibition on Post-Cyber-Feminisms, the Migros Museum für Gegenwartskunst surveys the causes championed by feminists in the post-internet era. Our virtual and real lives are almost inextricably interwoven today. Yet contrary to the heady proclamations of the cyberfeminists of the 1990s, cyberspace has not evolved into a realm of unclouded liberation and self-empowerment; it has also served to reinforce existing hierarchies and power structures. Opening with a new work by the artists’ collective VNS Matrix, which coined the term cyberfeminism, the presentation revisits the movement’s historic aspirations and visions, contrasts them with the contemporary situation, and inquires into ways in which its ideas may still be productive. The exhibition undertakes a critical engagement with different feminist approaches that put the spotlight on the tension between body and technology and on discriminatory gender norms. The contributing artists reflect on and defamiliarize the offerings of various online platforms in order to further blur the boundaries between virtual and real, online and offline, and the genders. Many of the works pursue a holistic view, drawing on (medical) science, the occult, and other fields to stimulate a more comprehensive discussion and generate ideas for a livable future of emancipation, gender justice, and social equality.
Precious Okoyomon
Precious Okoyomon
Zrich - Lwenbru Areal, Limmatstrasse 270
until 21-04-2019

Precious Okoyomon – A Drop of Sun Under The Earth schwarzescafé at Luma Westbau, in collaboration with Serpentine Galleries, presents the first institutional exhibition of works by Precious Okoyomon entitled A Drop of Sun Under The Earth, curated by Fredi Fischli and Niels Olsen.  Precious Okoyomon is a poet, artist, writer and performer living in New York. Her work was included in the 13th Baltic Triennial, and in a two-person exhibition with Hannah Black at Real Fine Arts, NY and at Current Projects in Miami. Okoyomon has read at The Kitchen, New York, Artist’s Space, New York, and The Serpentine Galleries. Her first book Ajebota (2016) was published by Bottlecap Press, and her second book But Did U Die? is forthcoming from Birds LLC.

Precious Okoyomon – A Drop of Sun Under The Earth schwarzescafé at Luma Westbau, in collaboration with Serpentine Galleries, presents the first institutional exhibition of works by Precious Okoyomon entitled A Drop of Sun Under The Earth, curated by Fredi Fischli and Niels Olsen.  Precious Okoyomon is a poet, artist, writer and performer living in New York. Her work was included in the 13th Baltic Triennial, and in a two-person exhibition with Hannah Black at Real Fine Arts, NY and at Current Projects in Miami. Okoyomon has read at The Kitchen, New York, Artist’s Space, New York, and The Serpentine Galleries. Her first book Ajebota (2016) was published by Bottlecap Press, and her second book But Did U Die? is forthcoming from Birds LLC.
Genoveva Filipovic
Genoveva Filipovic
Zrich - Lwenbru Areal, Limmatstrasse 270
until 26-05-2019

Genoveva Filipovic – Shiva 2019 ? New York-based, German-Croatian artist Genoveva Filipovic' newest work runs under the title Shiva 2019 ?. Her art seems enigmatic, but light; it is hermetic, yet open, serious, yet oblique. It is an afterthought and an over-archiver, and never fishes for compliments. It is painting after the proclaimed end of painting that famously was never reached, except perhaps in the heads of art historians and art critics. Nevertheless, the suggestion was a powerful one – perhaps more so for male painters than female painters. The discourse centered on formalism, the idea that form in its essence is free and autonomous, with artworks wide open to interpretation and prone to long accompanying explanatory texts. This idea, pure form as a gateway to freedom, was eventually questioned by postcolonialist and feminist theorists, who pointed out that autonomy comes with a price and no form exists outside of context. This meant trouble for abstraction, the chief discipline of formalism in art. As abstraction was ideologically exposed, the figure, previously cast aside as reactionary, received a cautionary reevaluation and new standing. 

Genoveva Filipovic – Shiva 2019 ? New York-based, German-Croatian artist Genoveva Filipovic' newest work runs under the title Shiva 2019 ?. Her art seems enigmatic, but light; it is hermetic, yet open, serious, yet oblique. It is an afterthought and an over-archiver, and never fishes for compliments. It is painting after the proclaimed end of painting that famously was never reached, except perhaps in the heads of art historians and art critics. Nevertheless, the suggestion was a powerful one – perhaps more so for male painters than female painters. The discourse centered on formalism, the idea that form in its essence is free and autonomous, with artworks wide open to interpretation and prone to long accompanying explanatory texts. This idea, pure form as a gateway to freedom, was eventually questioned by postcolonialist and feminist theorists, who pointed out that autonomy comes with a price and no form exists outside of context. This meant trouble for abstraction, the chief discipline of formalism in art. As abstraction was ideologically exposed, the figure, previously cast aside as reactionary, received a cautionary reevaluation and new standing. 
Concrete Contemporary
Concrete Contemporary
Zrich - ewz-Unterwerk Selnau, Selnaustrasse 25
until 05-05-2019

Concrete Contemporary Now is always also a little of yesterday and tomorrow? Sâadane Afif, Otto Berchem, Otto Berchem & Amalia Pica, Andrew Bick, Vanessa Billy, Stefan Burger, Valentin Carron, Chris Cornish, Jose Dávila, Philippe Decrauzat, Svenja Deininger, Lara Favaretto, Fernanda Gomes, Clare Goodwin, Diango Hernández, Herbert Hinteregger, Wyatt Kahn, Jan Kiefer, Alicja Kwade, Haroon Mirza, Timo Nasseri, Michael Riedel, Walid Raad, Bernd Ribbeck, Karin Schwarzbek, Daniel Steegmann Mangrané, David Renggli, Martin Soto Climent, Esther Stocker, Katja Strunz, SUPERFLEX, Sofie Thorsen, Thomas Vinson, Werner von Mutzenbecher Under the title Concrete Contemporary – Now is always also a little of yesterday and tomorrow on all four floors of Museum Haus Konstruktiv, works by over 30 artists from Switzerland and abroad are on display. Set out as a route, on which threads from art history are incorporated, combined and extended, Concrete Contemporary is to be seen as a snapshot of constructivist-concrete and conceptual work with a currency that is asserting itself today in an extremely multifaceted and lively way.

Concrete Contemporary Now is always also a little of yesterday and tomorrow? Sâadane Afif, Otto Berchem, Otto Berchem & Amalia Pica, Andrew Bick, Vanessa Billy, Stefan Burger, Valentin Carron, Chris Cornish, Jose Dávila, Philippe Decrauzat, Svenja Deininger, Lara Favaretto, Fernanda Gomes, Clare Goodwin, Diango Hernández, Herbert Hinteregger, Wyatt Kahn, Jan Kiefer, Alicja Kwade, Haroon Mirza, Timo Nasseri, Michael Riedel, Walid Raad, Bernd Ribbeck, Karin Schwarzbek, Daniel Steegmann Mangrané, David Renggli, Martin Soto Climent, Esther Stocker, Katja Strunz, SUPERFLEX, Sofie Thorsen, Thomas Vinson, Werner von Mutzenbecher Under the title Concrete Contemporary – Now is always also a little of yesterday and tomorrow on all four floors of Museum Haus Konstruktiv, works by over 30 artists from Switzerland and abroad are on display. Set out as a route, on which threads from art history are incorporated, combined and extended, Concrete Contemporary is to be seen as a snapshot of constructivist-concrete and conceptual work with a currency that is asserting itself today in an extremely multifaceted and lively way.
Cyprien Gaillard
Cyprien Gaillard
Basel - Paul Sacher-Anlage 2
until 05-05-2019

Cyprien Gaillard – Roots Canal With his films, photographs, and sculptures, Cyprien Gaillard (b. 1980, Paris) describes the imminence of a transformation and evokes the perpetual destruction, preservation, and reconstruction of urban spaces. He films archaeological ruins invaded by nature and exotic birds flying over a mutating European city, or describes the slow erosion of modernist utopias by recording the demolition of major architectural ensembles. Different realities and temporalities interlock in his work, giving rise to a harmonious ensemble of a singular beauty. Roots Canal centres on an installation of excavator shovels. These items of heavy equipment, familiar from construction sites, stand facing each other like a double row of soldiers. Brought to a standstill in a museum setting, the silent giants are transformed into mighty sculptures and take us on a journey back and forth between prehistory and the present. In this installation, as in his oeuvre as a whole, Gaillard stresses that construction and destruction are not contradictory concepts. Instead, they are two sides of the same process, closely linked in time. The construction of the new always involves the destruction of what went before. This train of thought is pursued and extended by Sober City (2015). This series mirror the continual (excavator-driven) metamorphosis of the city in its state of perpetual tension between the preservation of architectural heritage and the construction of new buildings. A city that cannot escape the phenomenon of entropy, the disorder of matter during unavoidable processes of decay. Gaillard sheds light on this slow transition from one state to another and the resulting tensions—physical, aesthetic, social, political—between renewal and destruction. Nightlife (2015) invites visitors to immerse themselves in a hypnotic, trance-like atmosphere. The 3D-film, a mosaic of scenes with no apparent connection, transports the viewer to a brightly coloured urban night. The footage leads from Auguste Rodin’s sculpture The Thinker outside the Cleveland Museum of Art via a hallucinatory ballet of juniper trees in Los Angeles and a spectacular firework display above Berlin’s Olympic Stadium, back to Cleveland to an oak tree presented to multiple Olympic medal winner Jesse Owens by the Nazis in 1936. Rendered sculptural by the larger-than-life-size projection, these images offer the disturbing and beguiling experience of a heightened perception. As in the other works in the exhibition, Gaillard creates a new narrative out of disparate, even contrary fragments. In this new narrative, anecdotes mix with history, while city, nature and people coexist in a shared non-linear space-time structure.

Cyprien Gaillard – Roots Canal With his films, photographs, and sculptures, Cyprien Gaillard (b. 1980, Paris) describes the imminence of a transformation and evokes the perpetual destruction, preservation, and reconstruction of urban spaces. He films archaeological ruins invaded by nature and exotic birds flying over a mutating European city, or describes the slow erosion of modernist utopias by recording the demolition of major architectural ensembles. Different realities and temporalities interlock in his work, giving rise to a harmonious ensemble of a singular beauty. Roots Canal centres on an installation of excavator shovels. These items of heavy equipment, familiar from construction sites, stand facing each other like a double row of soldiers. Brought to a standstill in a museum setting, the silent giants are transformed into mighty sculptures and take us on a journey back and forth between prehistory and the present. In this installation, as in his oeuvre as a whole, Gaillard stresses that construction and destruction are not contradictory concepts. Instead, they are two sides of the same process, closely linked in time. The construction of the new always involves the destruction of what went before. This train of thought is pursued and extended by Sober City (2015). This series mirror the continual (excavator-driven) metamorphosis of the city in its state of perpetual tension between the preservation of architectural heritage and the construction of new buildings. A city that cannot escape the phenomenon of entropy, the disorder of matter during unavoidable processes of decay. Gaillard sheds light on this slow transition from one state to another and the resulting tensions—physical, aesthetic, social, political—between renewal and destruction. Nightlife (2015) invites visitors to immerse themselves in a hypnotic, trance-like atmosphere. The 3D-film, a mosaic of scenes with no apparent connection, transports the viewer to a brightly coloured urban night. The footage leads from Auguste Rodin’s sculpture The Thinker outside the Cleveland Museum of Art via a hallucinatory ballet of juniper trees in Los Angeles and a spectacular firework display above Berlin’s Olympic Stadium, back to Cleveland to an oak tree presented to multiple Olympic medal winner Jesse Owens by the Nazis in 1936. Rendered sculptural by the larger-than-life-size projection, these images offer the disturbing and beguiling experience of a heightened perception. As in the other works in the exhibition, Gaillard creates a new narrative out of disparate, even contrary fragments. In this new narrative, anecdotes mix with history, while city, nature and people coexist in a shared non-linear space-time structure.
Wong Ping
Wong Ping
Basel - Steinenberg 7
until 05-05-2019

Wong Ping – Golden Shower An incongruous combination of dry humor, graphically explicit themes, and candy-hued, child-like forms seemingly built from the simple geometries of early video games pervades the digital animations of Wong Ping (*1984). For his first large-scale institutional solo show, the Hong Kong-based artist presents newly commissioned and recent videos, each within a new, specially conceived sculptural installation. They speak of our contemporary urban condition and its pathologies—whether they arrive in the form of alienation, misogyny, or self-loathing—unraveling some of the starkest realities of our own dark age with a touch as mordant as it is humorous.

Wong Ping – Golden Shower An incongruous combination of dry humor, graphically explicit themes, and candy-hued, child-like forms seemingly built from the simple geometries of early video games pervades the digital animations of Wong Ping (*1984). For his first large-scale institutional solo show, the Hong Kong-based artist presents newly commissioned and recent videos, each within a new, specially conceived sculptural installation. They speak of our contemporary urban condition and its pathologies—whether they arrive in the form of alienation, misogyny, or self-loathing—unraveling some of the starkest realities of our own dark age with a touch as mordant as it is humorous.
The Young Picasso - Blue and Rose Periods
The Young Picasso - Blue and Rose Periods
Basel - Baselstrasse 101
until 26-05-2019

The Young Picasso – Blue and Rose Periods This exhibition, the most ambitious ever staged by the Fondation Beyeler, is devoted to the paintings and sculptures of the young Pablo Picasso from the so-called Blue and Rose periods, between 1901 and 1906. For the first time in Europe, the masterpieces of these crucial years, every one of them a milestone on Picasso’s path to preeminence as the twentieth century’s most famous artist, are presented together, in a concentration and quality that are unparalleled. Picasso’s pictures from this phase of creative ferment are some of the finest and most emotionally compelling examples of modern painting, and are counted among the most valuable and sought-after works in the entire history of art. It is unlikely that they will be seen again in such a selection in a single place. At the age of just twenty, the rising genius Picasso (1881–1973) embarked on a quest for new themes and forms of expression, which he immediately refined to a pitch of perfection. One artistic revolution followed another, in a rapid succession of changing styles and visual worlds. The focus of the exhibition is on the Blue and Rose periods, and thus on the six years in the life of the young Picasso that can be considered central to his entire oeuvre, paving the way for the epochal emergence of Cubism, which developed from Picasso’s previous work, in 1907. Here, the exhibition converges with the Fondation Beyeler’s permanent collection, whose earliest picture by Picasso is a study, dating from this pivotal year, for the Demoiselles d’Avignon.

The Young Picasso – Blue and Rose Periods This exhibition, the most ambitious ever staged by the Fondation Beyeler, is devoted to the paintings and sculptures of the young Pablo Picasso from the so-called Blue and Rose periods, between 1901 and 1906. For the first time in Europe, the masterpieces of these crucial years, every one of them a milestone on Picasso’s path to preeminence as the twentieth century’s most famous artist, are presented together, in a concentration and quality that are unparalleled. Picasso’s pictures from this phase of creative ferment are some of the finest and most emotionally compelling examples of modern painting, and are counted among the most valuable and sought-after works in the entire history of art. It is unlikely that they will be seen again in such a selection in a single place. At the age of just twenty, the rising genius Picasso (1881–1973) embarked on a quest for new themes and forms of expression, which he immediately refined to a pitch of perfection. One artistic revolution followed another, in a rapid succession of changing styles and visual worlds. The focus of the exhibition is on the Blue and Rose periods, and thus on the six years in the life of the young Picasso that can be considered central to his entire oeuvre, paving the way for the epochal emergence of Cubism, which developed from Picasso’s previous work, in 1907. Here, the exhibition converges with the Fondation Beyeler’s permanent collection, whose earliest picture by Picasso is a study, dating from this pivotal year, for the Demoiselles d’Avignon.
Tina Braegger
Tina Braegger
Basel - Rebgasse 27
until 30-03-2019

Tina Braegger – Zu Besuch bei den Träuschlingsverwandten 

Tina Braegger – Zu Besuch bei den Träuschlingsverwandten 
Lake Verea
Lake Verea
Basel - Charles-Eames-Strasse 2
until 07-07-2019

Lake Verea: Paparazza Moderna Mexican artists Francisca Rivero-Lake and Carla Verea take paparazzi-like pictures of iconic buildings by modern architects. At the opening of their exhibition at the Vitra Design Museum Gallery, they will introduce their work and share experiences and anecdotes gathered on their quest for traces of Marcel Breuer, Walter Gropius, and other heroes of the modern era.  

Lake Verea: Paparazza Moderna Mexican artists Francisca Rivero-Lake and Carla Verea take paparazzi-like pictures of iconic buildings by modern architects. At the opening of their exhibition at the Vitra Design Museum Gallery, they will introduce their work and share experiences and anecdotes gathered on their quest for traces of Marcel Breuer, Walter Gropius, and other heroes of the modern era.  
Ed Atkins
Ed Atkins
Dsseldorf - Stndehausstrasse 1
until 16-06-2019

Ed Atkins – Ye Olde Food The British artist Ed Atkins (*1982, Oxford) is considered as a pioneer among a younger generation of artists whose members reflect upon the far-reaching transformations of everyday reality effected by the  rapid development of digital media. Atkins became known in particular for a series of computer-animated videos through which he interrogates the promise, potential, and ideologies of the technologies he employs. A crucial point of departure for his projects is the capacity of digital image production to reproduce the material world realistically in a radically dematerialized fashion. On the one hand, the motion capture animated protagonists of his videos manifest a total artificiality, while on the other suggesting a disconcerting degree of lifelikeness: they are brought to the point of tears, look into our eyes, or address us verbally. Atkins investigates the impact of virtual worlds on the physically palpable reality of the beholder, impelling us to ponder the status of emotionality and corporeality in an increasingly digitalized world, along with the possibilities and limits of language. In his solo exhibition at the K21, he presents current video and textual works which have been acquired for the collection, restaging them together with additional works in the spaces of the Bel Etage.

Ed Atkins – Ye Olde Food The British artist Ed Atkins (*1982, Oxford) is considered as a pioneer among a younger generation of artists whose members reflect upon the far-reaching transformations of everyday reality effected by the  rapid development of digital media. Atkins became known in particular for a series of computer-animated videos through which he interrogates the promise, potential, and ideologies of the technologies he employs. A crucial point of departure for his projects is the capacity of digital image production to reproduce the material world realistically in a radically dematerialized fashion. On the one hand, the motion capture animated protagonists of his videos manifest a total artificiality, while on the other suggesting a disconcerting degree of lifelikeness: they are brought to the point of tears, look into our eyes, or address us verbally. Atkins investigates the impact of virtual worlds on the physically palpable reality of the beholder, impelling us to ponder the status of emotionality and corporeality in an increasingly digitalized world, along with the possibilities and limits of language. In his solo exhibition at the K21, he presents current video and textual works which have been acquired for the collection, restaging them together with additional works in the spaces of the Bel Etage.
Body in Pieces
Body in Pieces
Dsseldorf - Kaistrasse 10
until 12-05-2019

Body in Pieces Monica Bonvicini, Leda Bourgogne, Mariechen Danz, Nadira Husain, Jens Pecho, Lili Reynaud-dewar, Ryan Trecartin Curated by  Julia Höner In the works of the seven international artists of the exhibition, the human body repeatedly appears in fragmented form. One of the most pressing issues today concerning the technological, social and ethical conditions of the human is the perceived loss of physical wholeness. For it is the body where some of the central contradictions of our present time manifest themselves; as a fabric deeply interwoven with external interests, its boundaries have become porous, both in a literal and an emblematic sense. At the same time, the body still represents the fascinating organic basis of our wishes and desires.

Body in Pieces Monica Bonvicini, Leda Bourgogne, Mariechen Danz, Nadira Husain, Jens Pecho, Lili Reynaud-dewar, Ryan Trecartin Curated by  Julia Höner In the works of the seven international artists of the exhibition, the human body repeatedly appears in fragmented form. One of the most pressing issues today concerning the technological, social and ethical conditions of the human is the perceived loss of physical wholeness. For it is the body where some of the central contradictions of our present time manifest themselves; as a fabric deeply interwoven with external interests, its boundaries have become porous, both in a literal and an emblematic sense. At the same time, the body still represents the fascinating organic basis of our wishes and desires.
Bea Schlingelhoff
Bea Schlingelhoff
Dsseldorf - Worringer Strasse 64
until 27-04-2019

Bea Schlingelhoff – Assimilation

Bea Schlingelhoff – Assimilation
d-polytop
d-polytop
Dsseldorf - Grabbeplatz 4
until 28-04-2019

d-polytop. Art from Düsseldorf Chris­ti­ne Er­hard, An­dre­as Fi­scher, Bi­an­ca C. Grü­ger, Heinz Haus­mann, Ul­rich Hen­sel, Ga­brie­le Horn­dasch, Jörg Paul Jan­ka, Ro­bin Mer­kisch, Jo­seph Sapp­ler, Mi­chel Sau­er, Stra­fe Für Re­bel­li­on, Magda­le­na von Ru­dy, Ralf Wer­ner Cu­ra­ted by Da­na Berg­mann, Gre­gor Jan­sen, Ra­pha­el No­cken, and Jörg Schlür­scheid The Kunst­hal­le Düs­sel­dorf has al­ways be­en con­cei­ved as a ve­nue for in­ter­na­tio­nal and up-and-co­ming ar­tists, for a wi­de va­rie­ty of ex­hi­bi­ti­ons, in which the mo­dern and the avant-gar­de ha­ve their place. From the be­gin­ning, sin­ce its ope­ning on Grab­beplatz in April 1967, it has be­en an in­sti­tu­ti­on wi­th rough edges, open to the la­test de­ve­lop­ments and trends. The Kunst­hal­le Düs­sel­dorf has of­ten pro­ven to be a cor­rec­tive and has shown po­si­ti­ons from outside the fo­cus of pu­blic at­ten­ti­on. It has thus ac­ted as a ca­ta­lyst for the Rhi­ne­land art sce­ne.

d-polytop. Art from Düsseldorf Chris­ti­ne Er­hard, An­dre­as Fi­scher, Bi­an­ca C. Grü­ger, Heinz Haus­mann, Ul­rich Hen­sel, Ga­brie­le Horn­dasch, Jörg Paul Jan­ka, Ro­bin Mer­kisch, Jo­seph Sapp­ler, Mi­chel Sau­er, Stra­fe Für Re­bel­li­on, Magda­le­na von Ru­dy, Ralf Wer­ner Cu­ra­ted by Da­na Berg­mann, Gre­gor Jan­sen, Ra­pha­el No­cken, and Jörg Schlür­scheid The Kunst­hal­le Düs­sel­dorf has al­ways be­en con­cei­ved as a ve­nue for in­ter­na­tio­nal and up-and-co­ming ar­tists, for a wi­de va­rie­ty of ex­hi­bi­ti­ons, in which the mo­dern and the avant-gar­de ha­ve their place. From the be­gin­ning, sin­ce its ope­ning on Grab­beplatz in April 1967, it has be­en an in­sti­tu­ti­on wi­th rough edges, open to the la­test de­ve­lop­ments and trends. The Kunst­hal­le Düs­sel­dorf has of­ten pro­ven to be a cor­rec­tive and has shown po­si­ti­ons from outside the fo­cus of pu­blic at­ten­ti­on. It has thus ac­ted as a ca­ta­lyst for the Rhi­ne­land art sce­ne.
Jana Schröder
Jana Schrder
Los Angeles - 7277 Santa Monica Boulevard
until 27-04-2019

Jana Schröder – Kadlites Nino Mier Gallery is pleased to present the second solo exhibition of new works by Jana Schröder. The present exhibition, Kadlites, is a continuation of the artist’s work in this series: bright, yellow canvases which find their individuality in Schröder’s frenetic gestures of lead and paint, ultimately creating unique handwritten landscapes of abstraction. This continuation is a reference to the work itself: Schröder’s practice is a meditation on process and repetition, refusing the need to derive or represent intellectual meaning solely for the sake of being meaningful. Thus the meaning, if one must define it, is not born from an individual piece, a final destination, or a simple theory. Rather, the exhibition works as a whole to represent repetitious attempts to solve artistic problems and a seemingly infinite discovery of what lines are capable of.  

Jana Schröder – Kadlites Nino Mier Gallery is pleased to present the second solo exhibition of new works by Jana Schröder. The present exhibition, Kadlites, is a continuation of the artist’s work in this series: bright, yellow canvases which find their individuality in Schröder’s frenetic gestures of lead and paint, ultimately creating unique handwritten landscapes of abstraction. This continuation is a reference to the work itself: Schröder’s practice is a meditation on process and repetition, refusing the need to derive or represent intellectual meaning solely for the sake of being meaningful. Thus the meaning, if one must define it, is not born from an individual piece, a final destination, or a simple theory. Rather, the exhibition works as a whole to represent repetitious attempts to solve artistic problems and a seemingly infinite discovery of what lines are capable of.  
Takashi Murakami
Takashi Murakami
Los Angeles - 456 North Camden Drive
until 13-04-2019

Takashi Murakami – GYATEI² Gagosian is pleased to present GYATEI², new works by Takashi Murakami, as the 2019 “Oscars show,” a much-anticipated annual fixture on the Los Angeles cultural calendar. Drawing from traditional Japanese painting, sci-fi, anime, and pop culture, Murakami’s oeuvre comprises paintings, sculptures, films, and a stream of commercial products populated by mutating characters of his own creation. His iconoclastic individualism continues the nonconformist legacy of the Edo Eccentrics, a group of eighteenth-century Japanese artists who constructed a powerfully imaginative world filled with bizarre and emotive imagery. The exhibition title comes from the Buddhist Hannya Shingyo (Heart Sutra), a popular sutra in Mahayana Buddhism. The incantation is often chanted by Zen groups before or after a meditation. At the conclusion of the sutra, the Avalokiteshvara, a popular and recognizable bodhisattva, turns and recites a mysterious mantra to one of the disciples. The mantra is often roughly translated as “gone, gone, gone beyond, gone completely beyond, enlightenment, sv?h?.” This articulation has been diversely interpreted as a call to “go” attain enlightenment, as the cry of a baby reborn into an eternal true world, and as a curse.  

Takashi Murakami – GYATEI² Gagosian is pleased to present GYATEI², new works by Takashi Murakami, as the 2019 “Oscars show,” a much-anticipated annual fixture on the Los Angeles cultural calendar. Drawing from traditional Japanese painting, sci-fi, anime, and pop culture, Murakami’s oeuvre comprises paintings, sculptures, films, and a stream of commercial products populated by mutating characters of his own creation. His iconoclastic individualism continues the nonconformist legacy of the Edo Eccentrics, a group of eighteenth-century Japanese artists who constructed a powerfully imaginative world filled with bizarre and emotive imagery. The exhibition title comes from the Buddhist Hannya Shingyo (Heart Sutra), a popular sutra in Mahayana Buddhism. The incantation is often chanted by Zen groups before or after a meditation. At the conclusion of the sutra, the Avalokiteshvara, a popular and recognizable bodhisattva, turns and recites a mysterious mantra to one of the disciples. The mantra is often roughly translated as “gone, gone, gone beyond, gone completely beyond, enlightenment, sv?h?.” This articulation has been diversely interpreted as a call to “go” attain enlightenment, as the cry of a baby reborn into an eternal true world, and as a curse.  
Material Girls
Material Girls
Los Angeles - The Bendix Building, 1206 Maple Avenue, 5th floor, #523
until 07-04-2019

Material Girls – Palms MATERIAL GIRLS is pleased to present Palms, the collective’s first show in LA featuring small sculptures by 15 artists. It is an established social contract that one is permitted to “look but not touch” art objects. Palms invites visitors to temporarily transgress this boundary- allowing them to touch, hold, and move the objects within the context of the exhibition. The works rest on a large curvilinear plywood platform that re-directs the automatic choreography of art viewership. Instead of left to right, front to back, viewers will be encouraged to slowly wind through space. With this direct tactile understanding of the work, and a constantly changing “curation” depending on interaction, visitors are entrusted with an art viewing experience that is both fluid and communal.

Material Girls – Palms MATERIAL GIRLS is pleased to present Palms, the collective’s first show in LA featuring small sculptures by 15 artists. It is an established social contract that one is permitted to “look but not touch” art objects. Palms invites visitors to temporarily transgress this boundary- allowing them to touch, hold, and move the objects within the context of the exhibition. The works rest on a large curvilinear plywood platform that re-directs the automatic choreography of art viewership. Instead of left to right, front to back, viewers will be encouraged to slowly wind through space. With this direct tactile understanding of the work, and a constantly changing “curation” depending on interaction, visitors are entrusted with an art viewing experience that is both fluid and communal.
Tschabalala Self
Tschabalala Self
Los Angeles - 10899 Wilshire Boulevard
until 28-04-2019

Hammer Projects: Tschabalala Self Self's project Bodega Run examines the neighborhood convenience store as both a gathering place for community and a microcosm of how current economic and political issues are impacting people’s lives. Working across a range of mediums, including painting, print-making, sculpture, collage, sewing, and installation, Tschabalala Self often depicts ample, powerful, and self-contained figures to explore cultural attitudes toward race and gender. Simultaneously embracing and rejecting stereotypes and fantasies that revolve around black women’s bodies in particular, her lively and spirited portrayals propose new forms of representation that are empowered and celebratory. For her Hammer Project, Self presents the fifth, and final, iteration of her project Bodega Run, which examines the neighborhood convenience store as both a gathering place for community and a microcosm of how current economic and political issues are impacting people’s lives. Presented in the Hammer’s lobby gallery as a vibrant corner store, the installation includes wallpaper made from Self’s simple line drawings of foods commonly available on market shelves, a tiled linoleum floor, paintings of customers shopping amongst colorful patterns of products, and freestanding sculptures portraying silhouetted animals and a shopkeeper, as well as electronic LED signs in the window emblematic of the various economies that operate in these settings. Bodegas are commonplace in Harlem, where Self was born and continues to reside, and the Bodega Run series traces some of the changes of ownership and demographics associated with these small stores and how they reflect the shifting identities of urban neighborhoods.

Hammer Projects: Tschabalala Self Self's project Bodega Run examines the neighborhood convenience store as both a gathering place for community and a microcosm of how current economic and political issues are impacting people’s lives. Working across a range of mediums, including painting, print-making, sculpture, collage, sewing, and installation, Tschabalala Self often depicts ample, powerful, and self-contained figures to explore cultural attitudes toward race and gender. Simultaneously embracing and rejecting stereotypes and fantasies that revolve around black women’s bodies in particular, her lively and spirited portrayals propose new forms of representation that are empowered and celebratory. For her Hammer Project, Self presents the fifth, and final, iteration of her project Bodega Run, which examines the neighborhood convenience store as both a gathering place for community and a microcosm of how current economic and political issues are impacting people’s lives. Presented in the Hammer’s lobby gallery as a vibrant corner store, the installation includes wallpaper made from Self’s simple line drawings of foods commonly available on market shelves, a tiled linoleum floor, paintings of customers shopping amongst colorful patterns of products, and freestanding sculptures portraying silhouetted animals and a shopkeeper, as well as electronic LED signs in the window emblematic of the various economies that operate in these settings. Bodegas are commonplace in Harlem, where Self was born and continues to reside, and the Bodega Run series traces some of the changes of ownership and demographics associated with these small stores and how they reflect the shifting identities of urban neighborhoods.
Haim Steinbach
Haim Steinbach
Los Angeles - 1010 North Highland Avenue
until 18-05-2019

Haim Steinbach – appear to use Tanya Bonakdar Gallery is pleased to announce appear to use, a solo exhibition of Haim Steinbach. For his first solo exhibition in Los Angeles in over a decade, Steinbach will present a new body of work including objects, sculptures, site-specific installations, wall paintings and language-based work.

Haim Steinbach – appear to use Tanya Bonakdar Gallery is pleased to announce appear to use, a solo exhibition of Haim Steinbach. For his first solo exhibition in Los Angeles in over a decade, Steinbach will present a new body of work including objects, sculptures, site-specific installations, wall paintings and language-based work.
Glenn Ligon
Glenn Ligon
Los Angeles - 4357 Wilshire Boulevard
until 05-05-2019

Glenn Ligon. Selections from the Mactiano Collection Throughout his lifetime, American artist Glenn Ligon (b. 1960) has pursued an incisive exploration of American history, literature, and society across a body of work that builds critically on the legacies of modern painting and conceptual art. Curated by the artist, this exhibition will include a selection of works from the permanent collection that span Ligon's career. 

Glenn Ligon. Selections from the Mactiano Collection Throughout his lifetime, American artist Glenn Ligon (b. 1960) has pursued an incisive exploration of American history, literature, and society across a body of work that builds critically on the legacies of modern painting and conceptual art. Curated by the artist, this exhibition will include a selection of works from the permanent collection that span Ligon's career. 
People
People
Los Angeles - 925 North Orange Drive
until 06-04-2019

People Rebecca Ackroyd, John Ahearn, Pawel Althamer, David Altmejd, Vanessa Beecroft, Frank Benson, Ashley Bickerton, Nick Cave, Monster Chetwynd, Liz Craft, Karon Davis, Raúl De Nieves, Rachel Feinstein, Urs Fischer, Luis Flores, Isa Genzken, Vanessa German, Katie Grinnan, Duane Hanson, Evan Holloway, Christian Holstad, Thomas Houseago, Alex Israel, Elizabeth Jaeger, Renaud Jerez, Josh Kline, Jeff Koons, Austin Lee, Tau Lewis, Sarah Lucas, Tony Matelli, Paul McCarthy, Barry McGee, Matthew Monahan, Narcissister, Ruby Neri, Simphiwe Nzube, Rob Pruitt, Alison Saar, Kiki Smith, Hajime Sorayama, Katie Stout, Rigoberto Torres, Anna Uddenberg, Stewart Uoo, Fred Wilson? More than fifty standing, sitting and hanging figurative sculptures will fill Jeffrey Deitch’s new Los Angeles gallery. The artists in the show span several generations from the 1980s to the present, with an emphasis on emerging talent. All of the works in the exhibition reflect a contemporary approach to sculpture inspired by the innovations of Dada, Surrealism, Assemblage and by the influence of non- or meta- art sources like department store mannequins. Only one work in the show is carved or modeled in the traditional way. Some are made from body casts, others are constructed with found objects and only a few use conventional sculptural materials like bronze. The works in the exhibition reflect the diversity of the artists who created them and the diversity of the people who the sculptures represent. The styles range from hyperrealism to allegory. The subjects range from ordinary individuals to creatures of fantasy. The works explore the uncanny confrontation of the artificial and the real while simultaneously responding to the multiple approaches to human identity in the contemporary world. Many of the works in the show have a performative quality and one of the featured works, Narcissister’s Totem, will be activated with live performance during the opening week. In keeping with the aesthetic direction of the show, it is unclear which of the figures in her Totem are live and which are not.  

People Rebecca Ackroyd, John Ahearn, Pawel Althamer, David Altmejd, Vanessa Beecroft, Frank Benson, Ashley Bickerton, Nick Cave, Monster Chetwynd, Liz Craft, Karon Davis, Raúl De Nieves, Rachel Feinstein, Urs Fischer, Luis Flores, Isa Genzken, Vanessa German, Katie Grinnan, Duane Hanson, Evan Holloway, Christian Holstad, Thomas Houseago, Alex Israel, Elizabeth Jaeger, Renaud Jerez, Josh Kline, Jeff Koons, Austin Lee, Tau Lewis, Sarah Lucas, Tony Matelli, Paul McCarthy, Barry McGee, Matthew Monahan, Narcissister, Ruby Neri, Simphiwe Nzube, Rob Pruitt, Alison Saar, Kiki Smith, Hajime Sorayama, Katie Stout, Rigoberto Torres, Anna Uddenberg, Stewart Uoo, Fred Wilson? More than fifty standing, sitting and hanging figurative sculptures will fill Jeffrey Deitch’s new Los Angeles gallery. The artists in the show span several generations from the 1980s to the present, with an emphasis on emerging talent. All of the works in the exhibition reflect a contemporary approach to sculpture inspired by the innovations of Dada, Surrealism, Assemblage and by the influence of non- or meta- art sources like department store mannequins. Only one work in the show is carved or modeled in the traditional way. Some are made from body casts, others are constructed with found objects and only a few use conventional sculptural materials like bronze. The works in the exhibition reflect the diversity of the artists who created them and the diversity of the people who the sculptures represent. The styles range from hyperrealism to allegory. The subjects range from ordinary individuals to creatures of fantasy. The works explore the uncanny confrontation of the artificial and the real while simultaneously responding to the multiple approaches to human identity in the contemporary world. Many of the works in the show have a performative quality and one of the featured works, Narcissister’s Totem, will be activated with live performance during the opening week. In keeping with the aesthetic direction of the show, it is unclear which of the figures in her Totem are live and which are not.  
Charles White
Charles White
Los Angeles - 5905 Wilshire Boulevard
until 09-06-2019

Charles White – A Retrospective The first major 21st-century museum retrospective on this famed mid-century artist, Charles White: A Retrospective traces White’s career and impact in the cities he called home: Chicago, his birthplace; New York, where he joined social causes and gained acclaim; and Los Angeles, where he developed his mature art and became a civil rights activist. The exhibition includes approximately 100 drawings and prints along with lesser-known oil paintings. A superb draftsman, White focused on images of both historical and contemporary African Americans, depicted in ideal portraits and everyday scenes. He extolled their dignity, humanity, and heroism in the face of the country’s long history of racial injustice and encouraged his viewers and fellow artists of color to project their own self-worth. White created non-violent images despite escalating racial tensions; only in the mid-1960s did he become frustrated with the slow progress and begin to infuse his work with allusions to the continuing violence, poverty, and disparity of educational, housing, employment, and voting opportunities.  

Charles White – A Retrospective The first major 21st-century museum retrospective on this famed mid-century artist, Charles White: A Retrospective traces White’s career and impact in the cities he called home: Chicago, his birthplace; New York, where he joined social causes and gained acclaim; and Los Angeles, where he developed his mature art and became a civil rights activist. The exhibition includes approximately 100 drawings and prints along with lesser-known oil paintings. A superb draftsman, White focused on images of both historical and contemporary African Americans, depicted in ideal portraits and everyday scenes. He extolled their dignity, humanity, and heroism in the face of the country’s long history of racial injustice and encouraged his viewers and fellow artists of color to project their own self-worth. White created non-violent images despite escalating racial tensions; only in the mid-1960s did he become frustrated with the slow progress and begin to infuse his work with allusions to the continuing violence, poverty, and disparity of educational, housing, employment, and voting opportunities.  
El Anatsui
El Anatsui
Munich - Prinzregentenstrasse 1
until 28-07-2019

El Anatsui – Triumphant Scale El Anatsui: Triumphant Scale is a major survey of the work of the acclaimed artist El Anatsui (*1944, Anyako, Ghana), perhaps Africa’s most prominent living artist. This survey — the largest ever mounted on Anatsui’s work —will occupy the museum’s entire East Wing and encompass every media in the artist’s prodigious fifty-year career. As the exhibition title suggests, the survey will focus on the triumphant and monumental quality of Anatsui’s sculptures, with the signature bottle-cap series developed over the last two decades situated at the core of the presentation. Along with these ambitious works, with their imposing physical presence and dazzling colors, the exhibition will also include wood sculptures and wall reliefs spanning the mid-1970s to the late 1990s; ceramic sculptures of the late 1970s; as well as drawings, prints, and books. In addition, Anatsui will create several new sculptures responding to the sweeping scale of the museum’s galleries, including a grand outdoor work on the building’s monumental façade.  

El Anatsui – Triumphant Scale El Anatsui: Triumphant Scale is a major survey of the work of the acclaimed artist El Anatsui (*1944, Anyako, Ghana), perhaps Africa’s most prominent living artist. This survey — the largest ever mounted on Anatsui’s work —will occupy the museum’s entire East Wing and encompass every media in the artist’s prodigious fifty-year career. As the exhibition title suggests, the survey will focus on the triumphant and monumental quality of Anatsui’s sculptures, with the signature bottle-cap series developed over the last two decades situated at the core of the presentation. Along with these ambitious works, with their imposing physical presence and dazzling colors, the exhibition will also include wood sculptures and wall reliefs spanning the mid-1970s to the late 1990s; ceramic sculptures of the late 1970s; as well as drawings, prints, and books. In addition, Anatsui will create several new sculptures responding to the sweeping scale of the museum’s galleries, including a grand outdoor work on the building’s monumental façade.  
Shannon Finley
Shannon Finley
Munich - Schellingstrasse 48
until 20-04-2019

Shannon Finley – Convergence Finley's works consist of several partially translucid layers of color, which he applies onto canvas during an intensive process. He divides the picture's surface into prismatic appearing geometric shapes. While at the beginning his compositions were mostly symmetrical, the most recent paintings captivate the viewer through a freer, almost playful, dynamic three-dimensionality. In the exhibition, black-and-white works, in which colorful under-paintings are set as subtle accents, are complemented by bright neon colored paintings that have dark primers which insinuate depth.  Additionally, we will be showing Finley's monumental, 260 cm high, matte black stainless-steel sculpture 'Mutation 7 Devolver'.  

Shannon Finley – Convergence Finley's works consist of several partially translucid layers of color, which he applies onto canvas during an intensive process. He divides the picture's surface into prismatic appearing geometric shapes. While at the beginning his compositions were mostly symmetrical, the most recent paintings captivate the viewer through a freer, almost playful, dynamic three-dimensionality. In the exhibition, black-and-white works, in which colorful under-paintings are set as subtle accents, are complemented by bright neon colored paintings that have dark primers which insinuate depth.  Additionally, we will be showing Finley's monumental, 260 cm high, matte black stainless-steel sculpture 'Mutation 7 Devolver'.  
Eva Fàbregas
Eva Fbregas
Munich - Galeriestrasse 4
until 05-05-2019

Eva Fàbregas – Those things that your fingers can tell A solo exhibition comprised of new sculptures and installations by Eva Fàbregas.  Fàbregas’ practice concerns forms of somatic experimentation, exploring the eroticism of consumer objects, the social engineering of desire, and cultures of wellness, therapy, and heightened sensation. Her recent work investigates all those objects, tools, and instruments that are used with, for, and on our bodies, either to produce sensorial effects (pleasure, relaxation, therapy, euphoria, etc.), to correct our posture, discipline our bodies, or even to become part of them. As a visual glossary for this research, Fàbregas presents a massive drawing on three walls, populated by forms alluding to a wide variety of therapeutic, prosthetic, ergonomic, and erotic instruments that have stimulating effects. Each of these forms refer to products that shape—and are shaped by—the body, implicating how our bodies, desires, experiences, and affects are formed and deformed by the politics of industrial design. By classifying this cosmology of objects and reducing their representations to amorphous symbols, the artist illustrates a genealogy of affective objects through their morphological affinities, while equally proposing the possibility for transformation. 

Eva Fàbregas – Those things that your fingers can tell A solo exhibition comprised of new sculptures and installations by Eva Fàbregas.  Fàbregas’ practice concerns forms of somatic experimentation, exploring the eroticism of consumer objects, the social engineering of desire, and cultures of wellness, therapy, and heightened sensation. Her recent work investigates all those objects, tools, and instruments that are used with, for, and on our bodies, either to produce sensorial effects (pleasure, relaxation, therapy, euphoria, etc.), to correct our posture, discipline our bodies, or even to become part of them. As a visual glossary for this research, Fàbregas presents a massive drawing on three walls, populated by forms alluding to a wide variety of therapeutic, prosthetic, ergonomic, and erotic instruments that have stimulating effects. Each of these forms refer to products that shape—and are shaped by—the body, implicating how our bodies, desires, experiences, and affects are formed and deformed by the politics of industrial design. By classifying this cosmology of objects and reducing their representations to amorphous symbols, the artist illustrates a genealogy of affective objects through their morphological affinities, while equally proposing the possibility for transformation. 
Michael Sailstorfer
Michael Sailstorfer
Munich - Ungererstrasse 158
until 12-04-2019

Michael Sailstorfer Under the title SPACE IS THE PLACE the current exhibition cycle 2018-2019 at BNKR conceived by Berlin-based curator Lukas Feireiss is dedicated to the artistic exploration of space. In line with the curatorial concept, Michael Sailstorfer (1979) seizes the space for his upcoming solo exhibition at BNKR in a manner typical of the artist. The first solo exhibition of the internationally renown artist in Munich in more than a decade encompasses exiting works such as Tränen (2015), Bulb (2010) and Lohma (2008) as well as a specially conceived new work, that relates directly to the BNKR venue, a former air-raid shelter. For Sailstorfer’s sculptural and dramaturgically charged works, the artists often uses everyday or technical materials, that through decontextualization and reconfiguration, undergo an equally subversive and poetic conversion of meaning. Sailstorfer thereby often challenges the general attributes and physical boundaries of objects and spaces. His equally precise and humorous works stand out due to their conceptual and formal complexity and artistic virtuosity.

Michael Sailstorfer Under the title SPACE IS THE PLACE the current exhibition cycle 2018-2019 at BNKR conceived by Berlin-based curator Lukas Feireiss is dedicated to the artistic exploration of space. In line with the curatorial concept, Michael Sailstorfer (1979) seizes the space for his upcoming solo exhibition at BNKR in a manner typical of the artist. The first solo exhibition of the internationally renown artist in Munich in more than a decade encompasses exiting works such as Tränen (2015), Bulb (2010) and Lohma (2008) as well as a specially conceived new work, that relates directly to the BNKR venue, a former air-raid shelter. For Sailstorfer’s sculptural and dramaturgically charged works, the artists often uses everyday or technical materials, that through decontextualization and reconfiguration, undergo an equally subversive and poetic conversion of meaning. Sailstorfer thereby often challenges the general attributes and physical boundaries of objects and spaces. His equally precise and humorous works stand out due to their conceptual and formal complexity and artistic virtuosity.
Alex Katz
Alex Katz
Munich - Trkenstrasse 19
until 22-04-2019

Alex Katz   The Museum Brandhorst is delighted to present a major exhibition of works by celebrated American painter Alex Katz. A towering figure in contemporary painting best known for his iconic portraits of beautiful, stylish women, masterfully rendered in bold, vibrant colors, Katz has influenced and inspired generations of artists around the world. Featuring about ninety works—including some of the artist’s most important paintings—the exhibition will offer visitors a retrospective overview of this seminal artist’s oeuvre from the 1950s to today.   Alex Katz (born 1927, New York) emerged on the New York scene during the heyday of Abstract Expressionism and just prior to the explosion of Pop Art. Although he is often hailed as one of the precursors to Pop, his aesthetic is perhaps more closely aligned with such poets as Frank O’Hara and John Ashbery than with other painters of his generation. His unique oeuvre, which now spans some 70 years, is utterly devoted to the representation of the here and now and the immediacy of human perception—a commitment to what the artist has often described as “painting in the present tense.” Working variously en plein air, from photographic sources, and from his own sketches and preparatory drawings, he has focused his attention on subject matter from his immediate milieu: portraits of family (in particular his wife Ada) and friends, artistic collaborators and scenes of social interaction, landscapes and architectural scenes, and flowers. Throughout, Katz’s sensitivity for painterly surfaces unfolds in productive tension with the formal languages of film, fashion, and advertising.   The exhibition begins with works from the late 1950s and early 1960s, including portraits of the renowned choreographer and dancer Paul Taylor and his company, for which Katz designed many sets. A series of seminal single and group portraits from the 1960s establish Katz’s signature style as well as the social and artistic milieu of Downtown New York, both of which remain leitmotifs throughout his work and the exhibition. Two large galleries of landscapes show Katz playing at the edge of abstraction while at the same time recommitting himself to a decidedly modern form of realism.   The quality of light itself, whether direct, reflected, or diffused, becomes a central concern in these paintings. So, too, does the ability of an individual brushstroke to delimit multiple different types of form while also retaining its status as an autonomous mark.   Also on display will be a sizable collection of small oil paintings, sketches, and preparatory drawings. Often directly related to the large-scale paintings on view, these works will provide visitors with an expanded understanding of the artist’s multi-layered working process.   The exhibition draws on the Museum Brandhorst’s own extensive collection of works by the artist—including masterpieces from across his long career—supplemented by key works from other public and private collections, and provides an extended glimpse into the prolific production of this 91-year-old painter.

Alex Katz   The Museum Brandhorst is delighted to present a major exhibition of works by celebrated American painter Alex Katz. A towering figure in contemporary painting best known for his iconic portraits of beautiful, stylish women, masterfully rendered in bold, vibrant colors, Katz has influenced and inspired generations of artists around the world. Featuring about ninety works—including some of the artist’s most important paintings—the exhibition will offer visitors a retrospective overview of this seminal artist’s oeuvre from the 1950s to today.   Alex Katz (born 1927, New York) emerged on the New York scene during the heyday of Abstract Expressionism and just prior to the explosion of Pop Art. Although he is often hailed as one of the precursors to Pop, his aesthetic is perhaps more closely aligned with such poets as Frank O’Hara and John Ashbery than with other painters of his generation. His unique oeuvre, which now spans some 70 years, is utterly devoted to the representation of the here and now and the immediacy of human perception—a commitment to what the artist has often described as “painting in the present tense.” Working variously en plein air, from photographic sources, and from his own sketches and preparatory drawings, he has focused his attention on subject matter from his immediate milieu: portraits of family (in particular his wife Ada) and friends, artistic collaborators and scenes of social interaction, landscapes and architectural scenes, and flowers. Throughout, Katz’s sensitivity for painterly surfaces unfolds in productive tension with the formal languages of film, fashion, and advertising.   The exhibition begins with works from the late 1950s and early 1960s, including portraits of the renowned choreographer and dancer Paul Taylor and his company, for which Katz designed many sets. A series of seminal single and group portraits from the 1960s establish Katz’s signature style as well as the social and artistic milieu of Downtown New York, both of which remain leitmotifs throughout his work and the exhibition. Two large galleries of landscapes show Katz playing at the edge of abstraction while at the same time recommitting himself to a decidedly modern form of realism.   The quality of light itself, whether direct, reflected, or diffused, becomes a central concern in these paintings. So, too, does the ability of an individual brushstroke to delimit multiple different types of form while also retaining its status as an autonomous mark.   Also on display will be a sizable collection of small oil paintings, sketches, and preparatory drawings. Often directly related to the large-scale paintings on view, these works will provide visitors with an expanded understanding of the artist’s multi-layered working process.   The exhibition draws on the Museum Brandhorst’s own extensive collection of works by the artist—including masterpieces from across his long career—supplemented by key works from other public and private collections, and provides an extended glimpse into the prolific production of this 91-year-old painter.