Art feed

Curated by Exhibitionary

Ragnar Kjartansson
Ragnar Kjartansson
Beijing - 2 Jiuxuanquao Road
until 05-08-2018

Ragnar Kjartansson – A Lot of Sorrow Faurschou Foundation Beijing has the pleasure of presenting A Lot of Sorrow — a video performance by the Icelandic artist, Ragnar Kjartansson. The work, A Lot of Sorrow, is a single channel video, showing a six-hour long concert by the British band, The National. The band performs their song, Sorrow, repeatedly, in an uninterrupted loop. First performed at MoMA PS1 in 2013 as a live concert, the piece is an impressive demonstration of perseverance and strength-both physically and mentally. As a reproduction in the form of a video installation, the visitors are able to experience the struggles and emotions the band members undergo throughout the performance. Depending on what stage of the performance the band is in, the audience will notice different states of energy, emotion, exhaustion, rejuvenation and relief. Each version of the song is, thus, unique; Each time the installation is visited or re-visited, the audience is met with a new experience, depending on their own state of mind, and the time of the performance. It is the first time that a work by Ragnar Kjartansson is exhibited in China, and Faurschou Foundation is honoured to introduce his powerful performance video for the first time in East-Asia. Ragnar Kjartansson has explained that his works are "always about a feeling, but there's no story." He works with repetition to explore the tragicomic in simple situations, through and beyond the boring, combining sorrow and happiness, horror and beauty, drama and levity. His works are often conducted as performances and video installations, but incorporate the entire spectrum of the arts; music, film, classical theatre and literature. Kjartansson was raised in an environment of theatre and music, and combines this world with his observations of people, who — as the artist concludes — ultimately fail to reach perfection, despite endless repetition. Ragnar Kjartansson (b. 1976) lives and works in Reykjavík. The artist has had solo exhibitions at the Reykjavík Art Museum, the Barbican Centre, London, the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Park, Washington D.C., the Musée d'art contemporain de Montréal, the Palais de Tokyo, Paris, the New Museum, New York, the Migros Museum für Gegenwartskunst, Zurich, the Fondazione Sandretto Re Rebaudengo, Turin, the Frankfurter Kunstverein, and the BAWAG Contemporary, Vienna.  Kjartansson participated in The Encyclopedic Palace at the Venice Biennale in 2013, Manifesta 10 in St. Petersburg, Russia in 2014, and he represented Iceland at the 2009 Venice Biennale. The artist is the recipient of the 2015 Artes Mundi's Derek Williams Trust Purchase Award, and Performa's 2011 Malcolm McLaren Award.  

Ragnar Kjartansson – A Lot of Sorrow Faurschou Foundation Beijing has the pleasure of presenting A Lot of Sorrow — a video performance by the Icelandic artist, Ragnar Kjartansson. The work, A Lot of Sorrow, is a single channel video, showing a six-hour long concert by the British band, The National. The band performs their song, Sorrow, repeatedly, in an uninterrupted loop. First performed at MoMA PS1 in 2013 as a live concert, the piece is an impressive demonstration of perseverance and strength-both physically and mentally. As a reproduction in the form of a video installation, the visitors are able to experience the struggles and emotions the band members undergo throughout the performance. Depending on what stage of the performance the band is in, the audience will notice different states of energy, emotion, exhaustion, rejuvenation and relief. Each version of the song is, thus, unique; Each time the installation is visited or re-visited, the audience is met with a new experience, depending on their own state of mind, and the time of the performance. It is the first time that a work by Ragnar Kjartansson is exhibited in China, and Faurschou Foundation is honoured to introduce his powerful performance video for the first time in East-Asia. Ragnar Kjartansson has explained that his works are "always about a feeling, but there's no story." He works with repetition to explore the tragicomic in simple situations, through and beyond the boring, combining sorrow and happiness, horror and beauty, drama and levity. His works are often conducted as performances and video installations, but incorporate the entire spectrum of the arts; music, film, classical theatre and literature. Kjartansson was raised in an environment of theatre and music, and combines this world with his observations of people, who — as the artist concludes — ultimately fail to reach perfection, despite endless repetition. Ragnar Kjartansson (b. 1976) lives and works in Reykjavík. The artist has had solo exhibitions at the Reykjavík Art Museum, the Barbican Centre, London, the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Park, Washington D.C., the Musée d'art contemporain de Montréal, the Palais de Tokyo, Paris, the New Museum, New York, the Migros Museum für Gegenwartskunst, Zurich, the Fondazione Sandretto Re Rebaudengo, Turin, the Frankfurter Kunstverein, and the BAWAG Contemporary, Vienna.  Kjartansson participated in The Encyclopedic Palace at the Venice Biennale in 2013, Manifesta 10 in St. Petersburg, Russia in 2014, and he represented Iceland at the 2009 Venice Biennale. The artist is the recipient of the 2015 Artes Mundi's Derek Williams Trust Purchase Award, and Performa's 2011 Malcolm McLaren Award.  
Olafur Eliasson
Olafur Eliasson
Beijing - Shunbai Road
until 12-08-2018

Olafur Eliasson – The Unspeakable Openness of Things  

Olafur Eliasson – The Unspeakable Openness of Things  
Haegue Yang
Haegue Yang
Cologne - Hein­rich-Böll-Platz
until 12-08-2018

Haegue Yang – ETA 1994–2018.  2018 Wolfgang Hahn Prize   In 2018, the Gesellschaft für Moderne Kunst am Museum Ludwig will recognize Haegue Yang for her extraordinary body of work with the Wolfgang Hahn Prize. The Museum Ludwig will showcase the remarkable versatility of her entire oeuvre in the artist’s first-ever survey exhibition with over 120 works ranging from action-based objects from the 1990s to lacquer paintings, photographs, works on paper, video essays, anthropomorphic sculptures, performative pieces, and large-scale installations.   The abbreviation ETA stands for “estimated time of arrival,” among other things. Thus, the exhibition title points to an artistic career in transit and the constant itineracy of an artist who maintains studios in Seoul and Berlin and has exhibited internationally since 1994.   The exhibition will begin with Yang’s first venetian blind installation from her 2006 Series of Vulnerable Arrangements—the 2006 Version Utrecht, an immersive and sensorial experience unfolding from a composition of various materials and the simultaneous use of wind, scents, light, and heat. Within this arrangement, video essays document the artist’s travels through cities around the world and convey feelings of home, isolation, and dislocation associated with her itineracy in quite personal commentaries.   One of the first rooms will feature early and in some cases reconstructed works that reveal Yang’s examination of Western art history from Duchamp to Fluxus and tendencies of Institutional Critique as well as the then-current Context Art. As in her first few exhibitions in the 1990s, these works will be staged or ironically shown in display cases, like in an archive.   A central part of the exhibition is Storage Piece. This key work was created in 2004 out of financial need and an acute lack of space as a collection of packaged works on shipping pallets. The work has since been exhibited in several configurations, and its arrangement will also change at regular intervals in the Cologne exhibition—a reflection of Yang’s consideration of transitory states. Furthermore, it was an important contribution to Conceptual Art in the mid-2000s, as well as a striking commentary on a rapidly changing art market and the increasing commodification of art.   Yang’s well-known anthropomorphic light sculptures will be represented in the exhibition with the "Medicine Men" series from 2010, among other works. These consist of a variety of materials: functional and industrially manufactured everyday objects such as clothing racks, light bulbs, electric cables, and party wigs. Yang herself refers to these sculptures as “shamans” or “transvestites,” thus pointing to the ambiguous gender and social roles that medicine men take on in nature religions. They also pose questions of exoticism and cultural identity which run throughout Yang’s work.   Yang will also continue her series "VIP's Union" (2001–) with a version for Cologne. Well-known local figures—VIPs from different areas of society such as culture, sports, business, and politics—will be invited to lend their favorite chair or table for the duration of the exhibition. This collection of different pieces of furniture will portray the local society and its domestic preferences.   The 12-meter-high DC Hall will feature two works consisting of blinds, Mountains of Encounter (2008) and Sol LeWitt Upside Down – K123456, Expanded 1078 Times, Doubled and Mirrored (2015). For the first time, two very different types of venetian blind installations will be juxtaposed in a single room: while Mountains of Encounter marked the beginning of a series of structurally complex compositions relating to historical events and personalities in Yang’s oeuvre, Sol LeWitt Upside Down – K123456, Expanded 1078 Times, Doubled and Mirrored is based on a cubic structure by the Minimalist artist Sol LeWitt, which Yang not only physically expands, but also conceptually condenses, doubles, mirrors, and finally turns upside down.   With her diverse oeuvre, Yang adeptly avoids clear attributions. Her works demonstrate elements of Institutional Critique and are conceptual as well as rich in cultural and historical references, while simultaneously sensually complex and emotionally charged. Across over 1500 square meters of exhibition space, this comprehensive retrospective’s spatial scenography will echo the conceptual dynamics of the works, lending the exhibition the quality of a Gesamtkunstwerk—harmonious yet full of dissonances.   Haegue Yang (*1971 in Seoul) lives and works in Berlin and Seoul. Since 2017, she has been teaching at the Städelschule, where she herself began her studies under Georg Herold in 1994. She was twice represented at the Venice Biennale in 2009 (in the programmatic exhibition fare mondi and in a solo exhibition in the Korean pavilion), and in 2012 she participated in dOCUMENTA (13).

Haegue Yang – ETA 1994–2018.  2018 Wolfgang Hahn Prize   In 2018, the Gesellschaft für Moderne Kunst am Museum Ludwig will recognize Haegue Yang for her extraordinary body of work with the Wolfgang Hahn Prize. The Museum Ludwig will showcase the remarkable versatility of her entire oeuvre in the artist’s first-ever survey exhibition with over 120 works ranging from action-based objects from the 1990s to lacquer paintings, photographs, works on paper, video essays, anthropomorphic sculptures, performative pieces, and large-scale installations.   The abbreviation ETA stands for “estimated time of arrival,” among other things. Thus, the exhibition title points to an artistic career in transit and the constant itineracy of an artist who maintains studios in Seoul and Berlin and has exhibited internationally since 1994.   The exhibition will begin with Yang’s first venetian blind installation from her 2006 Series of Vulnerable Arrangements—the 2006 Version Utrecht, an immersive and sensorial experience unfolding from a composition of various materials and the simultaneous use of wind, scents, light, and heat. Within this arrangement, video essays document the artist’s travels through cities around the world and convey feelings of home, isolation, and dislocation associated with her itineracy in quite personal commentaries.   One of the first rooms will feature early and in some cases reconstructed works that reveal Yang’s examination of Western art history from Duchamp to Fluxus and tendencies of Institutional Critique as well as the then-current Context Art. As in her first few exhibitions in the 1990s, these works will be staged or ironically shown in display cases, like in an archive.   A central part of the exhibition is Storage Piece. This key work was created in 2004 out of financial need and an acute lack of space as a collection of packaged works on shipping pallets. The work has since been exhibited in several configurations, and its arrangement will also change at regular intervals in the Cologne exhibition—a reflection of Yang’s consideration of transitory states. Furthermore, it was an important contribution to Conceptual Art in the mid-2000s, as well as a striking commentary on a rapidly changing art market and the increasing commodification of art.   Yang’s well-known anthropomorphic light sculptures will be represented in the exhibition with the "Medicine Men" series from 2010, among other works. These consist of a variety of materials: functional and industrially manufactured everyday objects such as clothing racks, light bulbs, electric cables, and party wigs. Yang herself refers to these sculptures as “shamans” or “transvestites,” thus pointing to the ambiguous gender and social roles that medicine men take on in nature religions. They also pose questions of exoticism and cultural identity which run throughout Yang’s work.   Yang will also continue her series "VIP's Union" (2001–) with a version for Cologne. Well-known local figures—VIPs from different areas of society such as culture, sports, business, and politics—will be invited to lend their favorite chair or table for the duration of the exhibition. This collection of different pieces of furniture will portray the local society and its domestic preferences.   The 12-meter-high DC Hall will feature two works consisting of blinds, Mountains of Encounter (2008) and Sol LeWitt Upside Down – K123456, Expanded 1078 Times, Doubled and Mirrored (2015). For the first time, two very different types of venetian blind installations will be juxtaposed in a single room: while Mountains of Encounter marked the beginning of a series of structurally complex compositions relating to historical events and personalities in Yang’s oeuvre, Sol LeWitt Upside Down – K123456, Expanded 1078 Times, Doubled and Mirrored is based on a cubic structure by the Minimalist artist Sol LeWitt, which Yang not only physically expands, but also conceptually condenses, doubles, mirrors, and finally turns upside down.   With her diverse oeuvre, Yang adeptly avoids clear attributions. Her works demonstrate elements of Institutional Critique and are conceptual as well as rich in cultural and historical references, while simultaneously sensually complex and emotionally charged. Across over 1500 square meters of exhibition space, this comprehensive retrospective’s spatial scenography will echo the conceptual dynamics of the works, lending the exhibition the quality of a Gesamtkunstwerk—harmonious yet full of dissonances.   Haegue Yang (*1971 in Seoul) lives and works in Berlin and Seoul. Since 2017, she has been teaching at the Städelschule, where she herself began her studies under Georg Herold in 1994. She was twice represented at the Venice Biennale in 2009 (in the programmatic exhibition fare mondi and in a solo exhibition in the Korean pavilion), and in 2012 she participated in dOCUMENTA (13).
Micha Cattaui
Micha Cattaui
Cologne - Erftstrasse 29
until 29-06-2018

Micha Cattaui – Antiquity 2.0 What if ancient Greek philosophers, gods, heroes, and artists came alive today? What would they say? How would we perceive them? How prophetic were their thoughts? How relevant are they for our world today?   The 21st century is the most interesting century of all the humankind’s history. Almost every section of human activity from politics to sciences has changed and improved significantly. Contemporary and modern artists have repeatedly used sculptures from antiquity as the starting point for their inspiration. One can only admire the quality and craftsmanship seen in antique art; often rivaled, mimicked, copied, but never equaled. I like to bridge that sense of artistic perfection seen in Ancient Greece and merge it with our modern society of mass consumerism. Pastel colors were first used during the Renaissance and I thought of using pastel backgrounds in photographing my sculptures as a way of giving a “new” life to antiquities. – Micha Cattaui

Micha Cattaui – Antiquity 2.0 What if ancient Greek philosophers, gods, heroes, and artists came alive today? What would they say? How would we perceive them? How prophetic were their thoughts? How relevant are they for our world today?   The 21st century is the most interesting century of all the humankind’s history. Almost every section of human activity from politics to sciences has changed and improved significantly. Contemporary and modern artists have repeatedly used sculptures from antiquity as the starting point for their inspiration. One can only admire the quality and craftsmanship seen in antique art; often rivaled, mimicked, copied, but never equaled. I like to bridge that sense of artistic perfection seen in Ancient Greece and merge it with our modern society of mass consumerism. Pastel colors were first used during the Renaissance and I thought of using pastel backgrounds in photographing my sculptures as a way of giving a “new” life to antiquities. – Micha Cattaui
Jeremy Shaw
Jeremy Shaw
Düsseldorf - Ackerstrasse 26
until 30-06-2018

Jeremy Shaw – ?Quickeners Quickeners: They live about 500 years after us and belong to the entirely rational- thinking species of Quantum Human, who are immortal and connected to each other through an abstract entity called “The Hive”. However, Quickeners have a developed a rare disorder named “Human Atavism Syndrome” - or H.A.S.- that prompts them to unexplainably desire to engage in long-forgotten behavioural patterns of humans. Detached from Hive, the Quickeners fall into an ecstatic state in which they sing, clap, cry, scream, dance and handle poisonous snakes. The video work “Quickeners” (2014) by the Canadian artist Jeremy Shaw is a kind of sci-fi pseudo-documentary. It’s source material comes from the 1967 film “Holy Ghost People”; a cinema verité film that depicts the worship service of a Pentecostal church in a small American town. In these churches that emerged in America at the start of the 20th century, speaking in “tongues”, laughing out loud, bursting into tears, or experiencing twitching fits was commonplace. Shaw’s re-worked video is presented by a BBC-like narrator who details the story of the Quickeners in a deadpan tone. It is accompanied by subtitles that translate the Quickeners scrambled language and a soundtrack that embellishes the events until the film itself falls into a state of ecstasy. Jeremy Shaw's work revolves around altered states of consciousness—whether triggered by religion, drugs, dance or technology. For the istallation “DMT” (2004) he documented subjects under the influence of the ultra-psychedelic drug, dimethyltryptamine, and translated their immediate recollections of the experience into subtitles. In “Best Minds Part One” (2007), he shot footage of straight-edge hardcore dancers who consciously abstain from alcohol and drugs in order to go into a kind of puritanical ecstasy through music and dance alone. Shaw then slowed down the footage and added an ambient soundtrack, drawing parallels to shamanic and balletic dances. Ethnographic studies, neuroscience and belief systems play a recurring role in Shaw’s work. “Quickeners” fits snuggly into this universe by fusing many of Shaw’s interests into a succinct, alchemical whole. „Quickeners“ is the predecessor to “Liminals”, which was shown at the 2017 Venice Biennale, and is followed by „I Can See Forever“, that will premiere at the Kunstverein Hamburg in May 2018 and complete the „Quantification Trilogy“. Jeremy Shaw was born in 1977 in North Vancouver, Canada and lives and works in Berlin. He currently has a residency at the Hammer Museum, Los Angeles. His solo exhibition at the Kunstverein Hamburg opens May 25. He exhibited at the 57th Venice Biennale and Manifesta 11, and has had solo exhibitions at the Schinkel Pavilion Berlin (2013) and the MoMA PS1 (2011). — Gesine Borcherdt, Curator of CAPRI

Jeremy Shaw – ?Quickeners Quickeners: They live about 500 years after us and belong to the entirely rational- thinking species of Quantum Human, who are immortal and connected to each other through an abstract entity called “The Hive”. However, Quickeners have a developed a rare disorder named “Human Atavism Syndrome” - or H.A.S.- that prompts them to unexplainably desire to engage in long-forgotten behavioural patterns of humans. Detached from Hive, the Quickeners fall into an ecstatic state in which they sing, clap, cry, scream, dance and handle poisonous snakes. The video work “Quickeners” (2014) by the Canadian artist Jeremy Shaw is a kind of sci-fi pseudo-documentary. It’s source material comes from the 1967 film “Holy Ghost People”; a cinema verité film that depicts the worship service of a Pentecostal church in a small American town. In these churches that emerged in America at the start of the 20th century, speaking in “tongues”, laughing out loud, bursting into tears, or experiencing twitching fits was commonplace. Shaw’s re-worked video is presented by a BBC-like narrator who details the story of the Quickeners in a deadpan tone. It is accompanied by subtitles that translate the Quickeners scrambled language and a soundtrack that embellishes the events until the film itself falls into a state of ecstasy. Jeremy Shaw's work revolves around altered states of consciousness—whether triggered by religion, drugs, dance or technology. For the istallation “DMT” (2004) he documented subjects under the influence of the ultra-psychedelic drug, dimethyltryptamine, and translated their immediate recollections of the experience into subtitles. In “Best Minds Part One” (2007), he shot footage of straight-edge hardcore dancers who consciously abstain from alcohol and drugs in order to go into a kind of puritanical ecstasy through music and dance alone. Shaw then slowed down the footage and added an ambient soundtrack, drawing parallels to shamanic and balletic dances. Ethnographic studies, neuroscience and belief systems play a recurring role in Shaw’s work. “Quickeners” fits snuggly into this universe by fusing many of Shaw’s interests into a succinct, alchemical whole. „Quickeners“ is the predecessor to “Liminals”, which was shown at the 2017 Venice Biennale, and is followed by „I Can See Forever“, that will premiere at the Kunstverein Hamburg in May 2018 and complete the „Quantification Trilogy“. Jeremy Shaw was born in 1977 in North Vancouver, Canada and lives and works in Berlin. He currently has a residency at the Hammer Museum, Los Angeles. His solo exhibition at the Kunstverein Hamburg opens May 25. He exhibited at the 57th Venice Biennale and Manifesta 11, and has had solo exhibitions at the Schinkel Pavilion Berlin (2013) and the MoMA PS1 (2011). — Gesine Borcherdt, Curator of CAPRI
Douglas Gordon
Douglas Gordon
Düsseldorf - Grabbeplatz 5
until 19-08-2018

Douglas Gordon – k.364 The internationally acclaimed Scottish artist Douglas Gordon (*1966) presents his striking, largescale video installation "k.364", 2010 in the Grabbe Halle of the K20. In this 50-minute work, which is projected onto a pair of two-sided screens, the artist follows two Israeli musicians of Polish-Jewish heritage on their journey by train from Berlin to Warsaw, where they are scheduled to perform Mozart’s "Sinfonia Concertante for Violin, Viola, and Orchestra in E flat Major, KV 364" in the National Philharmonic. Their reflections concerning the Holocaust, the landscape, so charged with historical memory, and their visit to a synagogue in Poznan – misappropriated as a swimming hall since in the National Socialist era – are mixed with the sound of the rolling train and the soothing tones of Mozart's symphony. The work movingly documents of the profound trust of the  protagonists in the power of music against the subtly delineated background of a dark and unredeemed history.

Douglas Gordon – k.364 The internationally acclaimed Scottish artist Douglas Gordon (*1966) presents his striking, largescale video installation "k.364", 2010 in the Grabbe Halle of the K20. In this 50-minute work, which is projected onto a pair of two-sided screens, the artist follows two Israeli musicians of Polish-Jewish heritage on their journey by train from Berlin to Warsaw, where they are scheduled to perform Mozart’s "Sinfonia Concertante for Violin, Viola, and Orchestra in E flat Major, KV 364" in the National Philharmonic. Their reflections concerning the Holocaust, the landscape, so charged with historical memory, and their visit to a synagogue in Poznan – misappropriated as a swimming hall since in the National Socialist era – are mixed with the sound of the rolling train and the soothing tones of Mozart's symphony. The work movingly documents of the profound trust of the  protagonists in the power of music against the subtly delineated background of a dark and unredeemed history.
Nevin Aladag
Nevin Aladag
Düsseldorf - Birkenstrasse 47
until 01-07-2018

Nevin Aladag – Social Fabric With Nevin Aladag, the Philara Collection is showing an artist who has devoted herself to the ornament as a synonym of complex social constitutions. In her cross genre works, Aladag investigates questions about origins, identity and gender, by means of cultural artefacts and hand down plots. The dismantling of limits, the deconstruction of “the foreign” and the linking of antagonistically perceived cultural statements with organisations are the focal points in her work. Nevin Aladag tries to make the nature of our communities, their social structures as well as the interests of its individual protagonists herself included readable. In her series Colors, which has been an integral part of the Philara café Glas Lennarz since 2016, she covered diverse lamps by Poul Henningsen with variously coloured pantyhose. Through this procedure, the luminosity of the lamps changes, and the design icon Henningsen obtains a new interpretation. Simultaneously, the artist introduces a discourse about gender, skin colours and politics, which articulates a heterogeneous ideology. The series Pattern Matching is about the comparison of “western and oriental structures”. The lines of an American basketball court are assembled by a number of different parts of an oriental carpet. The patters are inconsistent. A complex reference system of alleged opposites such as privacy and publicity unfolds. Through the overlapping of patterns, that belong to different semantic systems western play versus oriental ornamentation. Aladag brings about a new, hybrid significance. Music and dance are recurring elements in Aladag’s fields of interest. In her performance Musikzimmer, which, inter alia, was also performed during the documenta 14 in Athens, she transforms pieces of furniture into musical instruments. This furniture can be used to play music, without losing its original functions. Instead, a double function is being formed, which requires an active handling with the object. Nevin Aladag forms bodies of resonance, negotiation spaces and stimulates a revision of one’s own position in them. Nevin Aladag was born in 1972 in Turkey, and now lives and works in Berlin. She studied at the Munich Academy of Fine Arts with Olaf Metzel. In 2017, she participated in documenta 14 in Athens/Kassel, as well as the 57. La Biennale di Venezia.

Nevin Aladag – Social Fabric With Nevin Aladag, the Philara Collection is showing an artist who has devoted herself to the ornament as a synonym of complex social constitutions. In her cross genre works, Aladag investigates questions about origins, identity and gender, by means of cultural artefacts and hand down plots. The dismantling of limits, the deconstruction of “the foreign” and the linking of antagonistically perceived cultural statements with organisations are the focal points in her work. Nevin Aladag tries to make the nature of our communities, their social structures as well as the interests of its individual protagonists herself included readable. In her series Colors, which has been an integral part of the Philara café Glas Lennarz since 2016, she covered diverse lamps by Poul Henningsen with variously coloured pantyhose. Through this procedure, the luminosity of the lamps changes, and the design icon Henningsen obtains a new interpretation. Simultaneously, the artist introduces a discourse about gender, skin colours and politics, which articulates a heterogeneous ideology. The series Pattern Matching is about the comparison of “western and oriental structures”. The lines of an American basketball court are assembled by a number of different parts of an oriental carpet. The patters are inconsistent. A complex reference system of alleged opposites such as privacy and publicity unfolds. Through the overlapping of patterns, that belong to different semantic systems western play versus oriental ornamentation. Aladag brings about a new, hybrid significance. Music and dance are recurring elements in Aladag’s fields of interest. In her performance Musikzimmer, which, inter alia, was also performed during the documenta 14 in Athens, she transforms pieces of furniture into musical instruments. This furniture can be used to play music, without losing its original functions. Instead, a double function is being formed, which requires an active handling with the object. Nevin Aladag forms bodies of resonance, negotiation spaces and stimulates a revision of one’s own position in them. Nevin Aladag was born in 1972 in Turkey, and now lives and works in Berlin. She studied at the Munich Academy of Fine Arts with Olaf Metzel. In 2017, she participated in documenta 14 in Athens/Kassel, as well as the 57. La Biennale di Venezia.
Michael Bauch & Berta Fischer
Michael Bauch & Berta Fischer
Düsseldorf - Birkenstrasse 3
until 30-06-2018

Michael Bauch & Berta Fischer Galerie Karin Guenther, Hamburg invited by Kadel Willborn, Düsseldorf  

Michael Bauch & Berta Fischer Galerie Karin Guenther, Hamburg invited by Kadel Willborn, Düsseldorf  
Patricia Fernández
Patricia Fernández
Los Angeles - 3006 West 7th Street #220
until 23-06-2018

Patricia Fernández – Box (a proposition for ten years) Once a year since 2013, “Box (a proposition for ten years)” for Commonwealth and Council is exhibited with its contents (re-purposed fragments, writings, drawings, paintings, and sculptural elements) as they accumulate, transform, and grow. Through this time-based sculpture, Patricia Fernández fosters a relationship with the space by proposing a personalized exchange system. For our 6th anniversary, “Box” will be presented at Tina Kim Gallery (NY) in a group exhibition titled “Commonwealth and Council” opening on June 28, 2018.   In the front room at Commonwealth and Council, Fernández presents new additions to the “Box” including a daybed with a shelf that holds a porcelain vessel, a postcard, and a model bone ship. A series of sleep paintings hangs amid curtains with embroidered images drawn from a year of dream transcription from Jungian analysis.   The daybed calls us to sleep. Fernández took this to heart while making the bed, napping and sleeping in it. The headboard, bearing “X” marks like those carved by Fernández’s grandfather, closes around the bed to create another box resembling a chamber, chest, or coffin. Visions of last year’s Perseid meteors, or Tears of St. Lawrence, emblazon the porcelain vessel, combining the myth of Perseus, cast to the sea with his mother in a wooden chest, and the story of St. Lawrence, who cried burning tears. The proposed ship will be made from human bones, and one day carry the artist, her friends, and their posterity to the Island of Formentera, to spend time together among its caves and underground passageways. The wells of Santa Casilda appear on a postcard. The artist and her grandfather, whose carvings are also found there, make an annual pilgrimage to dip their hands in the healing waters.   Fernández began painting sleepers when a found photo led her to portray St. Casilda in repose. These paintings access the peculiar vulnerability of their unconscious subjects, offered here against a sea of blue, in praise of sleep—where dreams, like death, may carry us toward eternal rest. Patricia Fernández (b. 1980 in Burgos, Spain; lives and works in Los Angeles) studied at Central Saint Martins, London, and the University of California, Los Angeles, and received an MFA from the California Institute of the Arts (2010). Fernández has exhibited her work at the Orange County Museum of Art, Newport Beach; Centro de Arte Caja de Burgos, Spain; LA><ART, Los Angeles; Los Angeles Contemporary Archive (LACA); and the Hammer Museum, Los Angeles. She is a recipient of the Pollock-Krasner Grant (2017), Lincoln City Fellowship (2015), France Los Angeles Exchange (FLAX) Grant (2012), California Community Foundation Fellowship (2011), and Joan Mitchell Grant (2010), and was Artist-in-Residence at Récollets, Paris (2016), D-Flat, CDMX (2016), Headlands Center for the Arts (2015), 18th Street Arts Center (2014), and Fondazione Antonio Ratti (2013). 

Patricia Fernández – Box (a proposition for ten years) Once a year since 2013, “Box (a proposition for ten years)” for Commonwealth and Council is exhibited with its contents (re-purposed fragments, writings, drawings, paintings, and sculptural elements) as they accumulate, transform, and grow. Through this time-based sculpture, Patricia Fernández fosters a relationship with the space by proposing a personalized exchange system. For our 6th anniversary, “Box” will be presented at Tina Kim Gallery (NY) in a group exhibition titled “Commonwealth and Council” opening on June 28, 2018.   In the front room at Commonwealth and Council, Fernández presents new additions to the “Box” including a daybed with a shelf that holds a porcelain vessel, a postcard, and a model bone ship. A series of sleep paintings hangs amid curtains with embroidered images drawn from a year of dream transcription from Jungian analysis.   The daybed calls us to sleep. Fernández took this to heart while making the bed, napping and sleeping in it. The headboard, bearing “X” marks like those carved by Fernández’s grandfather, closes around the bed to create another box resembling a chamber, chest, or coffin. Visions of last year’s Perseid meteors, or Tears of St. Lawrence, emblazon the porcelain vessel, combining the myth of Perseus, cast to the sea with his mother in a wooden chest, and the story of St. Lawrence, who cried burning tears. The proposed ship will be made from human bones, and one day carry the artist, her friends, and their posterity to the Island of Formentera, to spend time together among its caves and underground passageways. The wells of Santa Casilda appear on a postcard. The artist and her grandfather, whose carvings are also found there, make an annual pilgrimage to dip their hands in the healing waters.   Fernández began painting sleepers when a found photo led her to portray St. Casilda in repose. These paintings access the peculiar vulnerability of their unconscious subjects, offered here against a sea of blue, in praise of sleep—where dreams, like death, may carry us toward eternal rest. Patricia Fernández (b. 1980 in Burgos, Spain; lives and works in Los Angeles) studied at Central Saint Martins, London, and the University of California, Los Angeles, and received an MFA from the California Institute of the Arts (2010). Fernández has exhibited her work at the Orange County Museum of Art, Newport Beach; Centro de Arte Caja de Burgos, Spain; LA><ART, Los Angeles; Los Angeles Contemporary Archive (LACA); and the Hammer Museum, Los Angeles. She is a recipient of the Pollock-Krasner Grant (2017), Lincoln City Fellowship (2015), France Los Angeles Exchange (FLAX) Grant (2012), California Community Foundation Fellowship (2011), and Joan Mitchell Grant (2010), and was Artist-in-Residence at Récollets, Paris (2016), D-Flat, CDMX (2016), Headlands Center for the Arts (2015), 18th Street Arts Center (2014), and Fondazione Antonio Ratti (2013). 
Barbara Bloom | Andrea Fraser | Louise Lawler
Barbara Bloom | Andrea Fraser | Louise Lawler
Los Angeles - 8687 Melrose Avenue
until 15-07-2018

Barbara Bloom, Andrea Fraser, Louise Lawler – Décor The exhibition is centered around Bloom’s rarely seen The Reign of Narcissism (1988-89), a full-scale faux-neoclassical period room dedicated to a fictionalized version of the artist. Replete with crown moldings, gilded chairs, vanity mirrors, and plaster busts of the artist, the installation revels in the slippage between interior decorating and museum display. Videos and photographs by Lawler and Fraser focus on images of art in museums and the typically overlooked architectural details of institutions, with both artists invested in exploring the myriad ways décor—the arrangement of objects in space—carries meaning.  – Rebecca Matalon, MOCA

Barbara Bloom, Andrea Fraser, Louise Lawler – Décor The exhibition is centered around Bloom’s rarely seen The Reign of Narcissism (1988-89), a full-scale faux-neoclassical period room dedicated to a fictionalized version of the artist. Replete with crown moldings, gilded chairs, vanity mirrors, and plaster busts of the artist, the installation revels in the slippage between interior decorating and museum display. Videos and photographs by Lawler and Fraser focus on images of art in museums and the typically overlooked architectural details of institutions, with both artists invested in exploring the myriad ways décor—the arrangement of objects in space—carries meaning.  – Rebecca Matalon, MOCA
Albert Oehlen & Peppi Bottrop
Albert Oehlen & Peppi Bottrop
Los Angeles - 4357 Wilshire Boulevard
until 30-06-2018

Albert Oehlen & Peppi Bottrop – Line Packers” The Marciano Art Foundation presents Line Packers”, a special exhibition, conceived by Cornelius Tittel, of two German painters Peppi Bottrop (b. 1986, Bottrop) and Albert Oehlen (b. 1954, Krefeld). Beginning March 1, the foundation’s Lounge Gallery will feature Bottrop’s line-drawing paintings responding to the architecture of the Lounge Gallery itself alongside works from Oehlen’s Computer Paintings, a series that the artist began in the early 1990s, which is now regarded as a turning point for contemporary painting. Bottrop’s work is conceived as a meditation on his hometown, a once prominent coal mining and rail center in the Ruhr region. Bottrop employs charcoal—a metaphor for what once powered the world, and a nod to the now-defunct mechanical industry—in an expansive wall-drawing engraved into slabs of Fermacell, a material now replacing sheetrock or gypsum used in the construction of institutional architecture. Oehlen’s Computer Paintings, which will be affixed to Bottrop’s walls, made between 1992 and 2008, exemplify Oehlen’s pioneering role as one of the first contemporary painters to explore the nascent capabilities and limits of drawing and line-making through the use of a now-rudimentary Texas Instruments computer. The wall-drawings and supports by Bottrop juxtaposed with Oehlen’s Computer Paintings suggest new possibilities for the line in painting. This line, embedded materially into the Fermacell walls, offers a proposition for the medium of painting to re-define itself. The two autonomous, yet mutually-dependent works establish a place of intensive communication and self-exploration, supporting one another in this single, temporary unification that looks to Wilshire Blvd. and Los Angeles, a city that is just as easily defined by its own lines of interstate and highway infrastructure. Accompanying this exhibition will be a new text by the arts writer and science fiction novelist, Mark von Schlegell. Albert Oehlen was born in Krefeld, Germany in 1954, and lives and works in Switzerland. From 1978 to 1981 he studied at Hochschule für Bildende Künste, Hamburg. From 2000 to 2009, Oehlen owned a Professorship in Painting at the Kunstakademie in Düsseldorf. Albert Oehlen´s work was included in the 55th Biennale di Venezia in 2013 and 2018 will see a major retrospective of Oehlen’s work opening at the Pinault Collection, Palazzo Grassi in Venice. Peppi Bottrop was born 1986 in Bottrop, Germany and lives and works in Düsseldorf, where he graduated from the Kunstakademie Düsseldorf. Bottrop is known for his large site-specific graphite and charcoal drawings on different carriers like canvas and Fermacell boards. His most recent body of work explores socio-economical shifts linked to architecture, city planning and property development. His work has been shown in numerous solo and group shows including Jan Kaps, Cologne; Galerie Bernhard, Zurich; Saloon, Brussels; Fondazione Carriero Milan and Museum Quadrat, Bottrop amongst others.  

Albert Oehlen & Peppi Bottrop – Line Packers” The Marciano Art Foundation presents Line Packers”, a special exhibition, conceived by Cornelius Tittel, of two German painters Peppi Bottrop (b. 1986, Bottrop) and Albert Oehlen (b. 1954, Krefeld). Beginning March 1, the foundation’s Lounge Gallery will feature Bottrop’s line-drawing paintings responding to the architecture of the Lounge Gallery itself alongside works from Oehlen’s Computer Paintings, a series that the artist began in the early 1990s, which is now regarded as a turning point for contemporary painting. Bottrop’s work is conceived as a meditation on his hometown, a once prominent coal mining and rail center in the Ruhr region. Bottrop employs charcoal—a metaphor for what once powered the world, and a nod to the now-defunct mechanical industry—in an expansive wall-drawing engraved into slabs of Fermacell, a material now replacing sheetrock or gypsum used in the construction of institutional architecture. Oehlen’s Computer Paintings, which will be affixed to Bottrop’s walls, made between 1992 and 2008, exemplify Oehlen’s pioneering role as one of the first contemporary painters to explore the nascent capabilities and limits of drawing and line-making through the use of a now-rudimentary Texas Instruments computer. The wall-drawings and supports by Bottrop juxtaposed with Oehlen’s Computer Paintings suggest new possibilities for the line in painting. This line, embedded materially into the Fermacell walls, offers a proposition for the medium of painting to re-define itself. The two autonomous, yet mutually-dependent works establish a place of intensive communication and self-exploration, supporting one another in this single, temporary unification that looks to Wilshire Blvd. and Los Angeles, a city that is just as easily defined by its own lines of interstate and highway infrastructure. Accompanying this exhibition will be a new text by the arts writer and science fiction novelist, Mark von Schlegell. Albert Oehlen was born in Krefeld, Germany in 1954, and lives and works in Switzerland. From 1978 to 1981 he studied at Hochschule für Bildende Künste, Hamburg. From 2000 to 2009, Oehlen owned a Professorship in Painting at the Kunstakademie in Düsseldorf. Albert Oehlen´s work was included in the 55th Biennale di Venezia in 2013 and 2018 will see a major retrospective of Oehlen’s work opening at the Pinault Collection, Palazzo Grassi in Venice. Peppi Bottrop was born 1986 in Bottrop, Germany and lives and works in Düsseldorf, where he graduated from the Kunstakademie Düsseldorf. Bottrop is known for his large site-specific graphite and charcoal drawings on different carriers like canvas and Fermacell boards. His most recent body of work explores socio-economical shifts linked to architecture, city planning and property development. His work has been shown in numerous solo and group shows including Jan Kaps, Cologne; Galerie Bernhard, Zurich; Saloon, Brussels; Fondazione Carriero Milan and Museum Quadrat, Bottrop amongst others.  
Mark Grotjahn
Mark Grotjahn
Los Angeles - 5905 Wilshire Boulevard
until 19-08-2018

Mark Grotjahn – 50 Kitchens Los Angeles-based artist Mark Grotjahn (b. 1968) has made “Butterfly” compositions since 2002, and the latest to come out of his studio is 50 Kitchens (2013–18), exhibited here for the first time. Conceived as one work, 50 Kitchens takes its inspiration from a single composition (in black and cream-colored pencil) that Grotjahn made to meet the dimensional specifications of a wall in his kitchen. The more than 50 subsequent chromatic drawings explore pairs of radiating colors (like Tuscan Red and Chartreuse, or Grass Green and Canary Yellow) and together create a prismatic display. The works allude to artists interested in color, light, and optics, such as Wassily Kandinsky and the Op art painters of the 1960s, and also incorporate residual traces of earlier drawings that have been seamlessly integrated into the new works.  

Mark Grotjahn – 50 Kitchens Los Angeles-based artist Mark Grotjahn (b. 1968) has made “Butterfly” compositions since 2002, and the latest to come out of his studio is 50 Kitchens (2013–18), exhibited here for the first time. Conceived as one work, 50 Kitchens takes its inspiration from a single composition (in black and cream-colored pencil) that Grotjahn made to meet the dimensional specifications of a wall in his kitchen. The more than 50 subsequent chromatic drawings explore pairs of radiating colors (like Tuscan Red and Chartreuse, or Grass Green and Canary Yellow) and together create a prismatic display. The works allude to artists interested in color, light, and optics, such as Wassily Kandinsky and the Op art painters of the 1960s, and also incorporate residual traces of earlier drawings that have been seamlessly integrated into the new works.  
Flora Hauser
Flora Hauser
Los Angeles - 670 South Anderson Street
until 30-06-2018

Flora Hauser – Telescope at the Sun Ibid Gallery is pleased to present the debut US solo exhibition of Vienna-based artist Flora Hauser. Building upon her first institutional exhibition titled Heimoti at Kunstraum Innsbruck, Austria, Hauser continues her consideration into how definitions of home, habitat, and identity are formed in relation to natural and personal landscapes. Flora Hauser’s practice spans the space between writing and drawing. Her paintings and drawings suggest visual landscapes without necessarily depicting an illusionistic space. Subdued color washes spreads across her large-scale canvas with the quality of a Romantic watercolorist, but neater – upon closer examination of the surface, the washes are revealed as drawn in color pencil rather than painted. Finely sharpened pencil point is the tongue of Hauser’s coded drawing vocabulary. Her glyph-based drawn forms accompany the color washes to form topographic images. Elevations are read according to color-coding and symbol, though without a key. In this way, Hauser’s canvases hold two forms images: the illusionistic image space and the topographic vantage point. The third perspective or image-form present in Hauser’s work is the textual qualities of the canvases. In the tradition of artists and authors like Unica Zürn and Robert Walser, both of whom kept notebooks and diaries of micro-drawing and writing, Hauser’s journals and memo pads are filled with unusual lists, personal reflections, diagrams, and observations. Hauser’s canvases and works on paper are part of the same system of writing and drawing running through her notebooks and daily life. Traces of a common spirit are felt across her practices, a phantasmagoria of landscape and interiority. These new works on canvas and paper are directly influenced by the diversity of California’s natural landscapes, which Hauser traveled through extensively earlier this year during her residency at the MAK Center for Art and Architecture. Her travels through Sequoia National Park, Joshua Tree, and Angeles National Forest informed the pictures as an outsider new to the landscape – not emotionally or sentimentally attached, but overwhelmed nonetheless. While Hauser’s Kunstraum Innsbruck exhibition considered the 11th century German word Heimoti as related to the contemporary German term for “homeland”, but with an emphasis on local habitat rather than national identity, Telescope at the Sun takes its focus as an outsider to an unfamiliar landscape.  Flora Hauser was born 1992 in Vienna, Austria. She studied at die Graphische, Vienna; the University of Applied Arts, Vienna; and the Ecole Nationale Supérieure d’Arts Paris-Cergy, Paris. Her first debut solo exhibition Owls and Foes at Ibid Gallery, London, UK (2015) was followed shortly by her debut solo museum exhibition Heimoti at Kunstraum Innsbruck, Austria (2016). Recent group exhibitions include EEA 13 at the Rietveld Pavilion, Amsterdam (2013); If Damien were Viennese at ve.sch, Vienna (2014); … und eine welt noch (… and yet one more world) at Kunsthaus Hamburg, Germany (2016); focus (2-7) at Ibid Gallery, London, UK (2016); sec. at Galerie Christine König, Vienna (2016); and Les Limbes at La Galerie – Centre d’Art Contemporain, Paris Noisy, France. She was a 2018 MAK Center Artist-in-Residence at the Rudolph Schindler designed Mackey Apartments in Los Angeles, CA. Flora Hauser currently lives and works in Vienna, Austria. 

Flora Hauser – Telescope at the Sun Ibid Gallery is pleased to present the debut US solo exhibition of Vienna-based artist Flora Hauser. Building upon her first institutional exhibition titled Heimoti at Kunstraum Innsbruck, Austria, Hauser continues her consideration into how definitions of home, habitat, and identity are formed in relation to natural and personal landscapes. Flora Hauser’s practice spans the space between writing and drawing. Her paintings and drawings suggest visual landscapes without necessarily depicting an illusionistic space. Subdued color washes spreads across her large-scale canvas with the quality of a Romantic watercolorist, but neater – upon closer examination of the surface, the washes are revealed as drawn in color pencil rather than painted. Finely sharpened pencil point is the tongue of Hauser’s coded drawing vocabulary. Her glyph-based drawn forms accompany the color washes to form topographic images. Elevations are read according to color-coding and symbol, though without a key. In this way, Hauser’s canvases hold two forms images: the illusionistic image space and the topographic vantage point. The third perspective or image-form present in Hauser’s work is the textual qualities of the canvases. In the tradition of artists and authors like Unica Zürn and Robert Walser, both of whom kept notebooks and diaries of micro-drawing and writing, Hauser’s journals and memo pads are filled with unusual lists, personal reflections, diagrams, and observations. Hauser’s canvases and works on paper are part of the same system of writing and drawing running through her notebooks and daily life. Traces of a common spirit are felt across her practices, a phantasmagoria of landscape and interiority. These new works on canvas and paper are directly influenced by the diversity of California’s natural landscapes, which Hauser traveled through extensively earlier this year during her residency at the MAK Center for Art and Architecture. Her travels through Sequoia National Park, Joshua Tree, and Angeles National Forest informed the pictures as an outsider new to the landscape – not emotionally or sentimentally attached, but overwhelmed nonetheless. While Hauser’s Kunstraum Innsbruck exhibition considered the 11th century German word Heimoti as related to the contemporary German term for “homeland”, but with an emphasis on local habitat rather than national identity, Telescope at the Sun takes its focus as an outsider to an unfamiliar landscape.  Flora Hauser was born 1992 in Vienna, Austria. She studied at die Graphische, Vienna; the University of Applied Arts, Vienna; and the Ecole Nationale Supérieure d’Arts Paris-Cergy, Paris. Her first debut solo exhibition Owls and Foes at Ibid Gallery, London, UK (2015) was followed shortly by her debut solo museum exhibition Heimoti at Kunstraum Innsbruck, Austria (2016). Recent group exhibitions include EEA 13 at the Rietveld Pavilion, Amsterdam (2013); If Damien were Viennese at ve.sch, Vienna (2014); … und eine welt noch (… and yet one more world) at Kunsthaus Hamburg, Germany (2016); focus (2-7) at Ibid Gallery, London, UK (2016); sec. at Galerie Christine König, Vienna (2016); and Les Limbes at La Galerie – Centre d’Art Contemporain, Paris Noisy, France. She was a 2018 MAK Center Artist-in-Residence at the Rudolph Schindler designed Mackey Apartments in Los Angeles, CA. Flora Hauser currently lives and works in Vienna, Austria. 
Lauren Halsey
Lauren Halsey
Los Angeles - 250 South Grand Avenue
until 03-09-2018

Lauren Halsey – we still here, there The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles (MOCA), presents Lauren Halsey: we still here, there, a site-specific installation work created at MOCA’s Grand Avenue location. This spring Los Angeles–based artist Lauren Halsey (b. 1987, Los Angeles, California) will take up residence at MOCA Grand Avenue, where she will build and regularly change an immersive space resembling a fantastical system of caves that viewers are invited to linger in and explore. This environment will serve as a visionary archive reflecting the diversity of everyday black cultural experiences in South Central L.A., the artist’s home since childhood.  Curator: Lanka Tattersall  Curatorial Assistant: Karlyn Olvido 

Lauren Halsey – we still here, there The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles (MOCA), presents Lauren Halsey: we still here, there, a site-specific installation work created at MOCA’s Grand Avenue location. This spring Los Angeles–based artist Lauren Halsey (b. 1987, Los Angeles, California) will take up residence at MOCA Grand Avenue, where she will build and regularly change an immersive space resembling a fantastical system of caves that viewers are invited to linger in and explore. This environment will serve as a visionary archive reflecting the diversity of everyday black cultural experiences in South Central L.A., the artist’s home since childhood.  Curator: Lanka Tattersall  Curatorial Assistant: Karlyn Olvido 
Andrea Zittel
Andrea Zittel
Los Angeles - 10899 Wilshire Boulevard
until 30-09-2018

Hammer Museum Store: A-Z West Works Pop-Up by Andrea Zittel The A-Z West Works pop-up shop, now open at the Hammer Museum Store, features a selection of works generated from A-Z West, Andrea Zittel's home and testing grounds for living prototypes in Joshua Tree, CA, and from High Desert Test Sites (HDTS), the arts nonprofit founded in 2002 by Andrea Zittel, Andy Stillpass, John Connelly, Lisa Anne Auerbach, and Shaun Caley Regen that promotes experimental exchanges in the High Desert of Southern California. Proceeds from all HDTS rock and product sales will support HDTS projects and monthly programming. The pop-up includes a new line of A-Z West Works products alongside an array of one-of-a-kind ceramics, textiles, furnishings, books, snacks, tinctures, and clothing made by artists from the High Desert community. The pop-up also features the annual High Desert Test Sites Gem/Mineral Expo, which offers stones sourced from Quartzsite, Arizona, as well as other HDTS products including publications, postcards, and print editions. Special A-Z West Works events will take place at the store throughout the duration of the pop-up, and more details will be announced.

Hammer Museum Store: A-Z West Works Pop-Up by Andrea Zittel The A-Z West Works pop-up shop, now open at the Hammer Museum Store, features a selection of works generated from A-Z West, Andrea Zittel's home and testing grounds for living prototypes in Joshua Tree, CA, and from High Desert Test Sites (HDTS), the arts nonprofit founded in 2002 by Andrea Zittel, Andy Stillpass, John Connelly, Lisa Anne Auerbach, and Shaun Caley Regen that promotes experimental exchanges in the High Desert of Southern California. Proceeds from all HDTS rock and product sales will support HDTS projects and monthly programming. The pop-up includes a new line of A-Z West Works products alongside an array of one-of-a-kind ceramics, textiles, furnishings, books, snacks, tinctures, and clothing made by artists from the High Desert community. The pop-up also features the annual High Desert Test Sites Gem/Mineral Expo, which offers stones sourced from Quartzsite, Arizona, as well as other HDTS products including publications, postcards, and print editions. Special A-Z West Works events will take place at the store throughout the duration of the pop-up, and more details will be announced.
The World's Game
The World's Game
Miami - 1103 Biscayne Blvd
until 02-09-2018

The World's Game. Fútbol and Contemporary Art The World’s Game: Fútbol and Contemporary Art is an art-based exhibition on the subject of soccer, or fútbol, and its interactions with societies around the world. Planned to overlap with the 2018 FIFA World Cup™, the exhibition will explore how the sport has stimulated artists to reflect upon its implications on society. With approximately twenty artists working in video, photography, painting, and sculpture, the aim of this exhibition is to create an experience where the viewer/spectator can use a universal theme to engage with the work of contemporary artists from around the world. Through visual art, PAMM seeks to present the art form of soccer—a place where social, cultural, and political issues of identity, nationalism, globalism, and mass spectacle play out vibrantly. The exhibition celebrates the commonality of human experience through a sport that has been one of the few common languages worldwide.  

The World's Game. Fútbol and Contemporary Art The World’s Game: Fútbol and Contemporary Art is an art-based exhibition on the subject of soccer, or fútbol, and its interactions with societies around the world. Planned to overlap with the 2018 FIFA World Cup™, the exhibition will explore how the sport has stimulated artists to reflect upon its implications on society. With approximately twenty artists working in video, photography, painting, and sculpture, the aim of this exhibition is to create an experience where the viewer/spectator can use a universal theme to engage with the work of contemporary artists from around the world. Through visual art, PAMM seeks to present the art form of soccer—a place where social, cultural, and political issues of identity, nationalism, globalism, and mass spectacle play out vibrantly. The exhibition celebrates the commonality of human experience through a sport that has been one of the few common languages worldwide.  
Laure Prouvost
Laure Prouvost
Miami - 2100 Collins Avenue
until 02-09-2018

Laure Prouvost They Are Waiting for You presents Laure Prouvost’s absorbing moving image installations in which she conflates reality with fiction and art with everyday life. Often narrated in the artist’s voice, and interspersed with spoken and written instructions that directly address the viewer, her works confound expectations through a rapid-fire succession of moving images and sounds. Combining painting, sculpture, and found objects, Prouvost draws us into a shifting terrain where we lose our grasp of words and meanings, while the objects around us seem to gain theirs. Laure Prouvost’s artistic output consistently returns to themes of escape into unfamiliar worlds or imaginings of unexpected alternative environments. A strong narrative impulse propels her practice, resulting in immersive, trans-medial installations with interwoven story lines that combine fiction and reality. Her videos, installations, paintings and tapestries unhinge commonplace and expected connections between language, image, and perception. Stepping away from traditional linear narratives, the artist crafts sensual environments laden with playful mistranslation that open a space for the viewer to grapple with the unstable relationship between imagination and reality. Prouvost (b. 1978, Croix-Lille, France) lives and works in London, U.K. and Antwerp, Belgium. Recent solo exhibitions include: Softer and rounder so as to shine through your smooth marble, SALT Galata, Istanbul (2017); the wet wet wanderer, Witte de With Center for Contemporary Art, Rotterdam (2017); Laure Prouvost, wot hit talk, Laznia Centre for Contemporary Art, Gda?sk (2017); And she will say: hi her, ailleurs, to higher grounds…, Kunstmuseum Luzern (2016); GDM-Grandad Visitor Center, Pirelli Hangar Bicocca, Milan (2016); all behind, we’ll go deeper, deep down and she will say:, MMK, Frankfurt (2016); Dropped here and then, to live, leave it all behind, FRAC/ Consortium Dijon (2016); A Way To Leak, Lick, Leek, Fahrenheit, Los Angeles (2016); We Will Go Far, Musée Départemental d’Art Contemporain de Rochechouart (2015), It, Heat, Hit, e-flux, New York (2015), Der Öffentlichkeit — Von Den Freunden Haus Der Kunst, Haus der Kunst, Munich (2015), For Forgetting, New Museum, New York (2014). Provoust received the Max Mara Art Prize for Women in 2011 and the Turner Prize in 2013.

Laure Prouvost They Are Waiting for You presents Laure Prouvost’s absorbing moving image installations in which she conflates reality with fiction and art with everyday life. Often narrated in the artist’s voice, and interspersed with spoken and written instructions that directly address the viewer, her works confound expectations through a rapid-fire succession of moving images and sounds. Combining painting, sculpture, and found objects, Prouvost draws us into a shifting terrain where we lose our grasp of words and meanings, while the objects around us seem to gain theirs. Laure Prouvost’s artistic output consistently returns to themes of escape into unfamiliar worlds or imaginings of unexpected alternative environments. A strong narrative impulse propels her practice, resulting in immersive, trans-medial installations with interwoven story lines that combine fiction and reality. Her videos, installations, paintings and tapestries unhinge commonplace and expected connections between language, image, and perception. Stepping away from traditional linear narratives, the artist crafts sensual environments laden with playful mistranslation that open a space for the viewer to grapple with the unstable relationship between imagination and reality. Prouvost (b. 1978, Croix-Lille, France) lives and works in London, U.K. and Antwerp, Belgium. Recent solo exhibitions include: Softer and rounder so as to shine through your smooth marble, SALT Galata, Istanbul (2017); the wet wet wanderer, Witte de With Center for Contemporary Art, Rotterdam (2017); Laure Prouvost, wot hit talk, Laznia Centre for Contemporary Art, Gda?sk (2017); And she will say: hi her, ailleurs, to higher grounds…, Kunstmuseum Luzern (2016); GDM-Grandad Visitor Center, Pirelli Hangar Bicocca, Milan (2016); all behind, we’ll go deeper, deep down and she will say:, MMK, Frankfurt (2016); Dropped here and then, to live, leave it all behind, FRAC/ Consortium Dijon (2016); A Way To Leak, Lick, Leek, Fahrenheit, Los Angeles (2016); We Will Go Far, Musée Départemental d’Art Contemporain de Rochechouart (2015), It, Heat, Hit, e-flux, New York (2015), Der Öffentlichkeit — Von Den Freunden Haus Der Kunst, Haus der Kunst, Munich (2015), For Forgetting, New Museum, New York (2014). Provoust received the Max Mara Art Prize for Women in 2011 and the Turner Prize in 2013.
Still Human
Still Human
Miami - 95 NW 29th Street
until 25-08-2018

Still Human   Ed Atkins, Neil Beloufa, Frank Benson, Paul Chan, Andrea Crespo, Simon Denny, Cécile B. Evans, Loretta Fahrenholz, Isa Genzken, Christian Holstad, Anne Imhof, Josh Kline, Liu Chuang, Shahryar Nashat, Katja Novitskova, Yuri Pattison, Seth Price, Christina Quarles, Jon Rafman, Sean Raspet, Charles Ray, Jennifer Rubell, Max Hooper Schneider, Frances Stark, Hito Steyerl, Iiu Susiraja, Hank Willis Thomas, Ryan Trecartin, Theo Triantafyllidis, Stewart Uoo, Wang Shang, Andro Wekua, Jordan Wolfson, Anicka Yi ?Still Human confronts the complex consequences of the digital revolution and recent technological developments as they redefine the human condition. Twenty-five artists working across a range of mediums address concerns related to artificial intelligence, biotechnology, bioethics, planned obsolescence, desire as mediated by technology, surveillance, social justice, and virtual existence.  Is there perhaps something in the universe that cannot be reduced to data? Suppose non-conscious algorithms could eventually outperform conscious intelligence in all known data-processing tasks -- what, if anything, would be lost by replacing conscious intelligence with superior non-conscious algorithms?    – Yuval Noah Harari

Still Human   Ed Atkins, Neil Beloufa, Frank Benson, Paul Chan, Andrea Crespo, Simon Denny, Cécile B. Evans, Loretta Fahrenholz, Isa Genzken, Christian Holstad, Anne Imhof, Josh Kline, Liu Chuang, Shahryar Nashat, Katja Novitskova, Yuri Pattison, Seth Price, Christina Quarles, Jon Rafman, Sean Raspet, Charles Ray, Jennifer Rubell, Max Hooper Schneider, Frances Stark, Hito Steyerl, Iiu Susiraja, Hank Willis Thomas, Ryan Trecartin, Theo Triantafyllidis, Stewart Uoo, Wang Shang, Andro Wekua, Jordan Wolfson, Anicka Yi ?Still Human confronts the complex consequences of the digital revolution and recent technological developments as they redefine the human condition. Twenty-five artists working across a range of mediums address concerns related to artificial intelligence, biotechnology, bioethics, planned obsolescence, desire as mediated by technology, surveillance, social justice, and virtual existence.  Is there perhaps something in the universe that cannot be reduced to data? Suppose non-conscious algorithms could eventually outperform conscious intelligence in all known data-processing tasks -- what, if anything, would be lost by replacing conscious intelligence with superior non-conscious algorithms?    – Yuval Noah Harari
Radical Women
Radical Women
New York - 200 Eastern Parkway
until 22-07-2018

Radical Women: Latin American Art, 1960–1985 The Brooklyn Museum presents Radical Women: Latin American Art, 1960–1985, the first comprehensive exhibition to explore the pioneering artistic practices of Latin American and Latina women artists during a tumultuous and transformational period in the history of the Americas and the development of contemporary art. Radical Women includes more than 260 works—including photography, video, and other experimental mediums, as well as paintings, sculpture, and prints—by more than 120 artists working in 15 countries. The Brooklyn Museum is the only East Coast venue of this critically acclaimed exhibition organized by the Hammer Museum in Los Angeles. Addressing an art-historical vacuum, one that has largely excluded Latin American and US-based Latina women artists from the record, Radical Women highlights work created during a period of profound political and social turmoil in many Latin American countries in the 1960s, 1970s, and early 1980s, a period that saw the emergence of multiple dictatorships as well as significant and often subversive interventions by the government of the United States. The artworks in Radical Women can be viewed as heroic acts giving voice to generations of women across Latin America and the United States. Proposing both aesthetic and political radicality, the work in the exhibition foregrounds feminist concerns such as bodily autonomy, oppressive social norms, gendered violence, and the environment.

Radical Women: Latin American Art, 1960–1985 The Brooklyn Museum presents Radical Women: Latin American Art, 1960–1985, the first comprehensive exhibition to explore the pioneering artistic practices of Latin American and Latina women artists during a tumultuous and transformational period in the history of the Americas and the development of contemporary art. Radical Women includes more than 260 works—including photography, video, and other experimental mediums, as well as paintings, sculpture, and prints—by more than 120 artists working in 15 countries. The Brooklyn Museum is the only East Coast venue of this critically acclaimed exhibition organized by the Hammer Museum in Los Angeles. Addressing an art-historical vacuum, one that has largely excluded Latin American and US-based Latina women artists from the record, Radical Women highlights work created during a period of profound political and social turmoil in many Latin American countries in the 1960s, 1970s, and early 1980s, a period that saw the emergence of multiple dictatorships as well as significant and often subversive interventions by the government of the United States. The artworks in Radical Women can be viewed as heroic acts giving voice to generations of women across Latin America and the United States. Proposing both aesthetic and political radicality, the work in the exhibition foregrounds feminist concerns such as bodily autonomy, oppressive social norms, gendered violence, and the environment.
Claire Fontaine
Claire Fontaine
New York - 1329 Willoughby Avenue
until 29-07-2018

Claire Fontaine – Invisible Receivers Century Pictures is pleased to announce an exhibition featuring a sculptural installation by French artist collective Claire Fontaine. All over our country, and others, tennis balls containing either contraband, or miscellaneous sundry items are often flung over prison walls into exercise yards by loved ones, friends or cohorts.  The act can be a brazen one, passing over a known commodity to an anonymous receiver for future exploitation, or it can be one of compassion, a transfer of a little comfort or convenience of home that the giver hopes, will perhaps make imprisonment slightly less brutal.   Untitled (Tennis Ball Sculpture) presents the viewer with an, “exploration of work as the inside of prison and of prison as the outside of work” as Claire Fontaine puts it. The implication of violence is ever-present as the installation reveals its contents through gashes. Spilling out of bright receptacles are an array of everyday items: matches, pencils, cigarette filters, sweets, and string that are lodged into tennis balls, conjuring the deficit and inhumanity of the industrial-prison complex. Loved ones, as reported by news sources, defy security checkpoints and risk imprisonment themselves in order to send everything from narcotics to writing utensils from the 'outside.' Claire Fontaine, the name itself a readymade sourced from the ubiquitous French stationary company, use this staging to call attention to broken systems in and of language, labor, and culture. The mass of tennis balls act here both as vehicle and receptacle, but of what? As she, the collective’s chosen pronoun, remarks, “there is a poverty in these presents sent to invisible receivers that transports us into a forgotten universe of deprivation and violence.” Claire Fontaine is a Paris-based collective, founded in 2004. Fontaine has had one-person exhibitions at CCA Wattis Institute, San Francisco; Museo Tamayo, Mexico City; the Jewish Museum, New York; Palais de Tokyo, Paris; Witte de With Center for Contemporary Art, Rotterdam; and Kunsthalle Zurich. Her work has been included in group exhibitions at the Columbus Museum of Art, Ohio; Museum of Contemporary Art Detroit; Centre Pompidou, Paris; 21er Haus, Vienna; KW Institute for Contemporary Art, Berlin; Maison Rouge, Paris; Colección Jumex, Mexico City; and CAPC Musée d'Art Contemporain, Bordeaux, and in the 2016 Whitney Biennial at The Whitney Museum of American Art. Claire Fontaine’s publication "Human Strike Has Already Begun & Other Writings" (2013) is available for free download at metamute.org.

Claire Fontaine – Invisible Receivers Century Pictures is pleased to announce an exhibition featuring a sculptural installation by French artist collective Claire Fontaine. All over our country, and others, tennis balls containing either contraband, or miscellaneous sundry items are often flung over prison walls into exercise yards by loved ones, friends or cohorts.  The act can be a brazen one, passing over a known commodity to an anonymous receiver for future exploitation, or it can be one of compassion, a transfer of a little comfort or convenience of home that the giver hopes, will perhaps make imprisonment slightly less brutal.   Untitled (Tennis Ball Sculpture) presents the viewer with an, “exploration of work as the inside of prison and of prison as the outside of work” as Claire Fontaine puts it. The implication of violence is ever-present as the installation reveals its contents through gashes. Spilling out of bright receptacles are an array of everyday items: matches, pencils, cigarette filters, sweets, and string that are lodged into tennis balls, conjuring the deficit and inhumanity of the industrial-prison complex. Loved ones, as reported by news sources, defy security checkpoints and risk imprisonment themselves in order to send everything from narcotics to writing utensils from the 'outside.' Claire Fontaine, the name itself a readymade sourced from the ubiquitous French stationary company, use this staging to call attention to broken systems in and of language, labor, and culture. The mass of tennis balls act here both as vehicle and receptacle, but of what? As she, the collective’s chosen pronoun, remarks, “there is a poverty in these presents sent to invisible receivers that transports us into a forgotten universe of deprivation and violence.” Claire Fontaine is a Paris-based collective, founded in 2004. Fontaine has had one-person exhibitions at CCA Wattis Institute, San Francisco; Museo Tamayo, Mexico City; the Jewish Museum, New York; Palais de Tokyo, Paris; Witte de With Center for Contemporary Art, Rotterdam; and Kunsthalle Zurich. Her work has been included in group exhibitions at the Columbus Museum of Art, Ohio; Museum of Contemporary Art Detroit; Centre Pompidou, Paris; 21er Haus, Vienna; KW Institute for Contemporary Art, Berlin; Maison Rouge, Paris; Colección Jumex, Mexico City; and CAPC Musée d'Art Contemporain, Bordeaux, and in the 2016 Whitney Biennial at The Whitney Museum of American Art. Claire Fontaine’s publication "Human Strike Has Already Begun & Other Writings" (2013) is available for free download at metamute.org.
Julia Phillips
Julia Phillips
New York - 22-25 Jackson Avenue
until 03-09-2018

Julia Phillips – Failure Detection MoMA PS1 will present the first solo museum exhibition of New York-based artist Julia Phillips (German and American, b. 1985), featuring six newly commissioned major works alongside existing sculptures. Primarily working with ceramics, New York-based Phillips creates objects and scenes that are intimately connected to the body. Her sculptures often propose various support structures for the human form, while emphasizing its absence. Impressions of the body are visible through casts of limbs, orifices, handprints, and other corporeal traces. Though evocative of physical functions, these works also produce social and psychological resonances. For Phillips, the body is materially, linguistically, and metaphorically entangled in politics, as suggested by terms such as “manipulator,” “protector,” and “extruder” that appear in the titles of her works. Directives for specific actions of constraining, armoring, or penetrating the body, they hint at how formal arrangements double as relations of power. Julia Phillips lives and works in New York City. She has been included in group exhibitions at The Studio Museum in Harlem, New York; The Kitchen, New York; and Kunsthaus, Hamburg. Phillips is currently featured in the New Museum’s 2018 Triennial, Songs for Sabotage.  

Julia Phillips – Failure Detection MoMA PS1 will present the first solo museum exhibition of New York-based artist Julia Phillips (German and American, b. 1985), featuring six newly commissioned major works alongside existing sculptures. Primarily working with ceramics, New York-based Phillips creates objects and scenes that are intimately connected to the body. Her sculptures often propose various support structures for the human form, while emphasizing its absence. Impressions of the body are visible through casts of limbs, orifices, handprints, and other corporeal traces. Though evocative of physical functions, these works also produce social and psychological resonances. For Phillips, the body is materially, linguistically, and metaphorically entangled in politics, as suggested by terms such as “manipulator,” “protector,” and “extruder” that appear in the titles of her works. Directives for specific actions of constraining, armoring, or penetrating the body, they hint at how formal arrangements double as relations of power. Julia Phillips lives and works in New York City. She has been included in group exhibitions at The Studio Museum in Harlem, New York; The Kitchen, New York; and Kunsthaus, Hamburg. Phillips is currently featured in the New Museum’s 2018 Triennial, Songs for Sabotage.  
Cécile B. Evans
Cécile B. Evans
Vienna - Museumsplatz 1
until 01-07-2018

Cécile B. Evans — AMOS' WORLD: Episode One In her work, Cécile B. Evans examines the significance and role of emotion in contemporary societies as well as the increasing influence of new technologies on our feelings and actions. For her forthcoming show at mumok, Evans creates an architectural video installation. AMOS’ WORLD is conceived as a television show set in a socially progressive housing estate. The show, divided into episodes, follows an architect called Amos–a cross between Saint-Exupe?ry’s Little Prince and a brutalistic architect–and the inhabitants of the housing estate. Viewers are first introduced to Amos and some of the tenants, each individual interwoven into the larger infrastructure of Amos’ building. His comfortable perch takes a turn when his perfect individual-communal fantasy for the Capitalist age begins to crumble as the tenants fail to conform to the behaviours he had envisaged. Fissures in this carefully constructed network reveal a breakdown of person-to-person and person-to-infrastructure power dynamics. Seemingly free from the pressures of an outside environment but with a visibly constricted view – how has the networked age impacted the irreconcilable gap between individual rights and the controlling nature of the systems that create them? Cécile B. Evans (*1983) is an American-Belgian artist living and working in London. Recent selected solo exhibitions include Galerie Emanuel Layr, Vienna (AT), Tate Liverpool (UK), Kunsthalle Aarhus (DK), M Museum Leuven (BE), and the De Hallen Haarlem (NL). Her work will be included amongst others in the 7th International Moscow Biennale (RU), the 4th Ural Industrial Biennal (RU), Galerie Kamel Mennour (FR), and the Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, Copenhagen (DK). It was included among others in the 9th Berlin Biennale (DE), the 20th Sydney Biennale (AUS), Fundacio? Joan Miro?, Barcelona (ES), and the Musée d'Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris (FR). Public collections include The Museum of Modern Art, New York (US), The Rubell Family Collection, Miami (US), the Whitney Museum of American Art (US), the De Haallen (NL), the Castello di Rivoli, Turin (IT), the Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, Copenhagen (DK) and the FRAC Auvergne (FR). Curated by Marianne Dobner  

Cécile B. Evans — AMOS' WORLD: Episode One In her work, Cécile B. Evans examines the significance and role of emotion in contemporary societies as well as the increasing influence of new technologies on our feelings and actions. For her forthcoming show at mumok, Evans creates an architectural video installation. AMOS’ WORLD is conceived as a television show set in a socially progressive housing estate. The show, divided into episodes, follows an architect called Amos–a cross between Saint-Exupe?ry’s Little Prince and a brutalistic architect–and the inhabitants of the housing estate. Viewers are first introduced to Amos and some of the tenants, each individual interwoven into the larger infrastructure of Amos’ building. His comfortable perch takes a turn when his perfect individual-communal fantasy for the Capitalist age begins to crumble as the tenants fail to conform to the behaviours he had envisaged. Fissures in this carefully constructed network reveal a breakdown of person-to-person and person-to-infrastructure power dynamics. Seemingly free from the pressures of an outside environment but with a visibly constricted view – how has the networked age impacted the irreconcilable gap between individual rights and the controlling nature of the systems that create them? Cécile B. Evans (*1983) is an American-Belgian artist living and working in London. Recent selected solo exhibitions include Galerie Emanuel Layr, Vienna (AT), Tate Liverpool (UK), Kunsthalle Aarhus (DK), M Museum Leuven (BE), and the De Hallen Haarlem (NL). Her work will be included amongst others in the 7th International Moscow Biennale (RU), the 4th Ural Industrial Biennal (RU), Galerie Kamel Mennour (FR), and the Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, Copenhagen (DK). It was included among others in the 9th Berlin Biennale (DE), the 20th Sydney Biennale (AUS), Fundacio? Joan Miro?, Barcelona (ES), and the Musée d'Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris (FR). Public collections include The Museum of Modern Art, New York (US), The Rubell Family Collection, Miami (US), the Whitney Museum of American Art (US), the De Haallen (NL), the Castello di Rivoli, Turin (IT), the Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, Copenhagen (DK) and the FRAC Auvergne (FR). Curated by Marianne Dobner  
Rachel Whiteread
Rachel Whiteread
Vienna - Arsenalstrasse 1
until 29-07-2018

Rachel Whiteread For over three decades, Rachel Whiteread has materialized the intangible. Her sculptures make voids visible and awaken memories of that which has been irretrievably lost. For the first time in Austria, the Belvedere 21 shows a cross-section of the renowned British artist's work. Rachel Whiteread is one of the leading international artists of her generation. Born 1963 in London, she was the first woman to win the prestigious Turner Prize in 1993 and went on to represent the UK at the 1997 Venice Biennale. In Vienna, she is principally known for her Holocaust memorial at the Judenplatz. With this monument, the British artist left a lasting mark on the city and transformed the discourse surrounding remembrance. For her casts of empty spaces that range in scale from the monumental to the intimate Whiteread uses industrial materials such as plaster, concrete, resin, rubber, metal, and paper. Despite their minimalist language and severity, her sculptures have a poetic quality and evoke personal and universal human experiences and memories. For the first time in Austria, Belvedere 21 shows a cross-section of Rachel Whiteread's entire oeuvre. The range of sculptures on view covers casts of entire rooms and architectural features such as floors, doors, and windows as well as negative casts of domestic objects such as tables, boxes, and water bottles. Also on view are milestones from Whiteread's career, such as Closet and Mantle (both from 1988) as well as Untitled (Twenty-Five Spaces) from 1995. A special emphasis of the exhibition is focused on her memorial for the Austrian Jewish victims of the Holocaust, first unveiled in 2000 at the Judenplatz in Vienna.  

Rachel Whiteread For over three decades, Rachel Whiteread has materialized the intangible. Her sculptures make voids visible and awaken memories of that which has been irretrievably lost. For the first time in Austria, the Belvedere 21 shows a cross-section of the renowned British artist's work. Rachel Whiteread is one of the leading international artists of her generation. Born 1963 in London, she was the first woman to win the prestigious Turner Prize in 1993 and went on to represent the UK at the 1997 Venice Biennale. In Vienna, she is principally known for her Holocaust memorial at the Judenplatz. With this monument, the British artist left a lasting mark on the city and transformed the discourse surrounding remembrance. For her casts of empty spaces that range in scale from the monumental to the intimate Whiteread uses industrial materials such as plaster, concrete, resin, rubber, metal, and paper. Despite their minimalist language and severity, her sculptures have a poetic quality and evoke personal and universal human experiences and memories. For the first time in Austria, Belvedere 21 shows a cross-section of Rachel Whiteread's entire oeuvre. The range of sculptures on view covers casts of entire rooms and architectural features such as floors, doors, and windows as well as negative casts of domestic objects such as tables, boxes, and water bottles. Also on view are milestones from Whiteread's career, such as Closet and Mantle (both from 1988) as well as Untitled (Twenty-Five Spaces) from 1995. A special emphasis of the exhibition is focused on her memorial for the Austrian Jewish victims of the Holocaust, first unveiled in 2000 at the Judenplatz in Vienna.  
Fashion Drive
Fashion Drive
Zürich - Heimplatz 1
until 15-07-2018

Fashion Drive. Extreme Clothing in the Visual Arts Joseph Beuys, Giovanni Boldini, Leigh Bowery, Daniele Buetti, Salvador Dalí, Honoré Daumier, Albrecht Dürer, Esther Eppstein, Sylvie Fleury, Emilie Flöge & Gustav Klimt, Natalia Goncharova, K8 Hardy, Herlinde Koelbl, Peter Lindbergh, Manon, Malcolm McLaren & Vivienne Westwood, Mai-Thu Perret, Tula Roy and Christoph Wirsing, Wolfgang Tillmans, Félix Vallotton, Andy Warhol a.o. Why ‘fashion drive’? Fashion is both drive and dilemma; but first and foremost it is a barometer of changing times. This exhibition looks at 500 years of vestimentary expression through the prism of art, and asks: how did artists react to extreme phenomena such as slashed clothing, codpieces, crinolines and the dinner jacket? Georg Simmel, in his ‘Philosophy of Fashion’, describes it as follows: ‘Considered objectively, living in accordance with fashion is a mixture of destruction and creation.’ Fashion is both an economic factor and a seismograph of social sensitivities, the expression of longing and an instrument for mechanisms of inclusion and exclusion. The exhibition, which focuses on the period from the end of the 18th century to the start of the 20th with digressions into the Renaissance and the present day, considers the manifestations of fashion at the tipping points where it is extreme, vibrating, loud, disguised or prohibited. In a modern age of globalization and homogenization through ‘fast fashion’, this show attempts an overview of the critical and sensory observation of clothing in art, the problematic and subversive turns in fashion history, through the techniques of painting, drawing, sculpture, installation, photography and video art.   

Fashion Drive. Extreme Clothing in the Visual Arts Joseph Beuys, Giovanni Boldini, Leigh Bowery, Daniele Buetti, Salvador Dalí, Honoré Daumier, Albrecht Dürer, Esther Eppstein, Sylvie Fleury, Emilie Flöge & Gustav Klimt, Natalia Goncharova, K8 Hardy, Herlinde Koelbl, Peter Lindbergh, Manon, Malcolm McLaren & Vivienne Westwood, Mai-Thu Perret, Tula Roy and Christoph Wirsing, Wolfgang Tillmans, Félix Vallotton, Andy Warhol a.o. Why ‘fashion drive’? Fashion is both drive and dilemma; but first and foremost it is a barometer of changing times. This exhibition looks at 500 years of vestimentary expression through the prism of art, and asks: how did artists react to extreme phenomena such as slashed clothing, codpieces, crinolines and the dinner jacket? Georg Simmel, in his ‘Philosophy of Fashion’, describes it as follows: ‘Considered objectively, living in accordance with fashion is a mixture of destruction and creation.’ Fashion is both an economic factor and a seismograph of social sensitivities, the expression of longing and an instrument for mechanisms of inclusion and exclusion. The exhibition, which focuses on the period from the end of the 18th century to the start of the 20th with digressions into the Renaissance and the present day, considers the manifestations of fashion at the tipping points where it is extreme, vibrating, loud, disguised or prohibited. In a modern age of globalization and homogenization through ‘fast fashion’, this show attempts an overview of the critical and sensory observation of clothing in art, the problematic and subversive turns in fashion history, through the techniques of painting, drawing, sculpture, installation, photography and video art.   
Paperwork
Paperwork
Berlin - Herzbergstrasse 40?43
until 07-07-2018

Paperwork karin sander – office works barbara schmidt heins  gabriele schmidt heins  michel würthle – l'oeil du prince hans weigand – flat mountain press works on paper from the haubrok collection michael asher, paul bonet, martin boyce, stanley brouwn, martin creed, rodney graham, lone haugaard madsen, georg herold, manfred holtfrerich, on kawara, martin kippenberger, konrad klapheck, tim lee, david lieske, jonathan monk, peter piller, mathias poledna, vaclav pozarek, florian pumhösl, karin sander, barbara schmidt heins, andreas slominski, michel würthle, heimo zobernig

Paperwork karin sander – office works barbara schmidt heins  gabriele schmidt heins  michel würthle – l'oeil du prince hans weigand – flat mountain press works on paper from the haubrok collection michael asher, paul bonet, martin boyce, stanley brouwn, martin creed, rodney graham, lone haugaard madsen, georg herold, manfred holtfrerich, on kawara, martin kippenberger, konrad klapheck, tim lee, david lieske, jonathan monk, peter piller, mathias poledna, vaclav pozarek, florian pumhösl, karin sander, barbara schmidt heins, andreas slominski, michel würthle, heimo zobernig
Pae White
Pae White
Berlin - Linienstrasse 155
until 23-06-2018

Pae White – MOTHERFLOCKER UPPERCASE We are pleased to present MOTHERFLOCKER UPPERCASE, a new body of work by Pae White harnessing material experimentation and developing her long-standing interest in typography. In a font newly-created by White, entitled Ghost Face, the exhibition comprises a series of singular, flocked screen prints, following the Latin alphabet. The letters’ highly structured forms recall White’s immersive ‘super-graphic’ installations, where- by hundreds of architectural bands of color traverse and re-form a space. The prints’ textures explore the exper- imental possibilities of flocking, a process of affixing fine fabric particles to a surface, which is an industrial method of creating one of the least reflective materials in existence, usually in single areas of color. Typical of Pae White’s pursuit of the limits and unexpected potential of materials, she upends flocking, approaching this rigid material like a wet-on-wet watercolor and creating a final output that appears simultaneously soft and metallic. This new work was developed in conjunction with STPI Creative Workshop in Singapore, an organization incubating artists to forge new conceptual developments in print and paper. White’s interest in typography began early in her career, when she created experimental, meticulously detailed catalogues and books that explored text structure, spacing and design. White’s site-specific ‘super-graphic’ installations have called on letters as motifs, unravelling their typically two-dimensional reach into a multi-dimen- sional work. With her expansion into architectural projects, she produced Birds’ Words (2014), a building textured by sculptural, typographic forms. Each of the works in the new series is comprised of an individualized color composition and structure. Applied in thread-like sections, the architecture of the fonts is designed to imply the ‘tension’ of a musical string, which the artist intensifies through the raised surface of the letters’ threads. Open to combination, the works can be placed to sound out words or names. ‘Flocking’ has a twofold meaning, implying both the method of propelling charg- ed, textured particles onto a surface, and a Los Angeles slang term for burglary. MOTHERFLOCKER UPPER- CASE plays on the ubiquity and malleability of text, vernacular and branding in our urban surroundings. For White, the Latin alphabet has the potential to be read in many places at once and each letter implies an omni- presence. As is often the case in her work, ubiquity and accessibility of motif is coupled with a complex and experimental material process, to produce highly original new work. Pae White (b. 1963) is a California-based artist, whose work traverses sculpture, tapestry, graphic design, and large-scale installation. White’s practice probes both material and motif, exploring the limits of a given medium’s possibility and upending its associations. Her works often combine scale and delicacy, repurposing everyday substances, such as foil, glass, smoke, insects and popcorn, into sensory and revelatory new arrangements. Pae White’s selected solo exhibitions include Saarlandmuseum, Moderne Galerie, Saarbru?cken (2017); Le Qwalala, Stanze del Vetro, Fondazione Giorgio Cini, 57 Venice Biennale, Venice (2017); Command-Shift-4, Henry Art Gallery, Seattle (2015); Pae White: Orllegro, MAK, Vienna (2013); In Love With Tomorrow, Langen Foundation, Du?sseldorf (2013); Too Much Night, Again, South London Gallery, London (2013); Material Mutters, The Power Plant, Toronto (2011); Restless Rainbow, The Art Institute of Chicago (2011); The Whitney Biennial, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (2010); Dying Oak/Elephant, St Louis Art Museum, St Louis (2010); Weaving Unsung, 53rd Venice Biennale, Venice (2009); Directions: Virgil Marti and Pae White, Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington (2007); In no particular order, Manchester Art Gallery, Manchester (2006); Pae White, Hammer Museum, Los Angeles (2004). Pae White lives and works in Los Angeles.  

Pae White – MOTHERFLOCKER UPPERCASE We are pleased to present MOTHERFLOCKER UPPERCASE, a new body of work by Pae White harnessing material experimentation and developing her long-standing interest in typography. In a font newly-created by White, entitled Ghost Face, the exhibition comprises a series of singular, flocked screen prints, following the Latin alphabet. The letters’ highly structured forms recall White’s immersive ‘super-graphic’ installations, where- by hundreds of architectural bands of color traverse and re-form a space. The prints’ textures explore the exper- imental possibilities of flocking, a process of affixing fine fabric particles to a surface, which is an industrial method of creating one of the least reflective materials in existence, usually in single areas of color. Typical of Pae White’s pursuit of the limits and unexpected potential of materials, she upends flocking, approaching this rigid material like a wet-on-wet watercolor and creating a final output that appears simultaneously soft and metallic. This new work was developed in conjunction with STPI Creative Workshop in Singapore, an organization incubating artists to forge new conceptual developments in print and paper. White’s interest in typography began early in her career, when she created experimental, meticulously detailed catalogues and books that explored text structure, spacing and design. White’s site-specific ‘super-graphic’ installations have called on letters as motifs, unravelling their typically two-dimensional reach into a multi-dimen- sional work. With her expansion into architectural projects, she produced Birds’ Words (2014), a building textured by sculptural, typographic forms. Each of the works in the new series is comprised of an individualized color composition and structure. Applied in thread-like sections, the architecture of the fonts is designed to imply the ‘tension’ of a musical string, which the artist intensifies through the raised surface of the letters’ threads. Open to combination, the works can be placed to sound out words or names. ‘Flocking’ has a twofold meaning, implying both the method of propelling charg- ed, textured particles onto a surface, and a Los Angeles slang term for burglary. MOTHERFLOCKER UPPER- CASE plays on the ubiquity and malleability of text, vernacular and branding in our urban surroundings. For White, the Latin alphabet has the potential to be read in many places at once and each letter implies an omni- presence. As is often the case in her work, ubiquity and accessibility of motif is coupled with a complex and experimental material process, to produce highly original new work. Pae White (b. 1963) is a California-based artist, whose work traverses sculpture, tapestry, graphic design, and large-scale installation. White’s practice probes both material and motif, exploring the limits of a given medium’s possibility and upending its associations. Her works often combine scale and delicacy, repurposing everyday substances, such as foil, glass, smoke, insects and popcorn, into sensory and revelatory new arrangements. Pae White’s selected solo exhibitions include Saarlandmuseum, Moderne Galerie, Saarbru?cken (2017); Le Qwalala, Stanze del Vetro, Fondazione Giorgio Cini, 57 Venice Biennale, Venice (2017); Command-Shift-4, Henry Art Gallery, Seattle (2015); Pae White: Orllegro, MAK, Vienna (2013); In Love With Tomorrow, Langen Foundation, Du?sseldorf (2013); Too Much Night, Again, South London Gallery, London (2013); Material Mutters, The Power Plant, Toronto (2011); Restless Rainbow, The Art Institute of Chicago (2011); The Whitney Biennial, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (2010); Dying Oak/Elephant, St Louis Art Museum, St Louis (2010); Weaving Unsung, 53rd Venice Biennale, Venice (2009); Directions: Virgil Marti and Pae White, Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington (2007); In no particular order, Manchester Art Gallery, Manchester (2006); Pae White, Hammer Museum, Los Angeles (2004). Pae White lives and works in Los Angeles.  
Gerd Rohling
Gerd Rohling
Berlin - Prinzenallee 78-79
until 24-08-2018

Gerd Rohling – 3 x 3 Gerd Rohling has been known above all for his Objets trouvés, which he encounters during his travels through the metropolises of this world and which he refines into sculptural treasures with imagination and irony. The spectrum ranges from flattened chewing gum - turned into gilded jewels, to splendid chalices made of discarded plastic bottles, to the remains of children's bikes found in the abandoned subway shafts of New York.  

Gerd Rohling – 3 x 3 Gerd Rohling has been known above all for his Objets trouvés, which he encounters during his travels through the metropolises of this world and which he refines into sculptural treasures with imagination and irony. The spectrum ranges from flattened chewing gum - turned into gilded jewels, to splendid chalices made of discarded plastic bottles, to the remains of children's bikes found in the abandoned subway shafts of New York.  
Bettina Pousttchi
Bettina Pousttchi
Berlin - Charlottenstrasse 75
until 23-06-2018

Bettina Pousttchi – Avenue In the Buchmann Box Bettina Pousttchi (*1971 in Mainz, lives and works in Berlin) will be showing new sculptures under the title Allee / Avenue, which start out from the artist's engagement with public space and its structures.   Street furniture, in this case protective tree-barriers, have been brought into a mobile, dynamic form by means of mechanical bending, pressing and twisting. Arranged in pairs or small groups, the tree bars worked in this way are mounted into a sculpture whose volume emerges purely from lines. The functional objects can be recognized easily, even in their changed form, and therefore reconstruct the forces to which they have been subjected. The works cannot be denied the occasional anthropological reference, and so develop a dancerly and sequential quality in their mobility.    The moss or light green colour is reminiscent of camouflage or protective colouring, thus enhancing the optical merger of the individual parts into a self-contained form.   Bettina Pousttchi's works often refer to the urban and historical context of a given place. The artist recognizes latent possibilities in objects, places and situations and brings these to the fore in order to create something new; at the same time they reveal aspects of whatever they have been based upon, as Jeremy Stick from the Nasher Sculpture Center Dallas says in his essay “Urban Objects: The Sculpture of Bettina Pousttchi”. And he goes on to say: “Hers is an art where curiosity and imagination cross with research and deft manipulation, wherein the complex meanings of objects, places, and situations become a field for the artist's action.”    Since 2009 Bettina Pousttchi has been realizing monumental, site-specific interventions into buildings in public space, which refer to the historical and urban context of the respective structure. In 2009/2010 the artist realized the photo installation Echo across the full façade of the Temporary Kunsthalle in Berlin, which was a reminder of the Palace of the Republic demolished there only a short time before. At the Schirn Kunsthalle in 2012, her site-specific photo installation Framework could be seen on the windows of the rotunda and the east wing, so referencing the changes in Frankfurt inner city's urban and social context. For the monumental work The City Bettina Pousttchi covered the façade of Wolfsburg Palace with a photomontage of skyscrapers, which were each, at the time of their completion, the highest buildings in the world. She converted the Nasher Sculpture Center by Renzo Piano in Dallas into a Drive Thru Museum and so reacted to the specific setting of the museum, a former public car park, and to the social and urban structure of the city, which was constructed for automobiles.   Recently, works by the artist could be seen in a collaboration with Daniel Buren in Kunsthalle Mainz. In addition, over the last two years Bettina Pousttchi has enjoyed solo exhibitions in the Arts Club of Chicago, the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden and the Phillips Collection, both in Washington D.C., as well as previously in the Nasher Sculpture Center Dallas. Kunstmuseum St.Gallen is currently showing a major presentation of new works by Bettina Pousttchi in the Lokremise.

Bettina Pousttchi – Avenue In the Buchmann Box Bettina Pousttchi (*1971 in Mainz, lives and works in Berlin) will be showing new sculptures under the title Allee / Avenue, which start out from the artist's engagement with public space and its structures.   Street furniture, in this case protective tree-barriers, have been brought into a mobile, dynamic form by means of mechanical bending, pressing and twisting. Arranged in pairs or small groups, the tree bars worked in this way are mounted into a sculpture whose volume emerges purely from lines. The functional objects can be recognized easily, even in their changed form, and therefore reconstruct the forces to which they have been subjected. The works cannot be denied the occasional anthropological reference, and so develop a dancerly and sequential quality in their mobility.    The moss or light green colour is reminiscent of camouflage or protective colouring, thus enhancing the optical merger of the individual parts into a self-contained form.   Bettina Pousttchi's works often refer to the urban and historical context of a given place. The artist recognizes latent possibilities in objects, places and situations and brings these to the fore in order to create something new; at the same time they reveal aspects of whatever they have been based upon, as Jeremy Stick from the Nasher Sculpture Center Dallas says in his essay “Urban Objects: The Sculpture of Bettina Pousttchi”. And he goes on to say: “Hers is an art where curiosity and imagination cross with research and deft manipulation, wherein the complex meanings of objects, places, and situations become a field for the artist's action.”    Since 2009 Bettina Pousttchi has been realizing monumental, site-specific interventions into buildings in public space, which refer to the historical and urban context of the respective structure. In 2009/2010 the artist realized the photo installation Echo across the full façade of the Temporary Kunsthalle in Berlin, which was a reminder of the Palace of the Republic demolished there only a short time before. At the Schirn Kunsthalle in 2012, her site-specific photo installation Framework could be seen on the windows of the rotunda and the east wing, so referencing the changes in Frankfurt inner city's urban and social context. For the monumental work The City Bettina Pousttchi covered the façade of Wolfsburg Palace with a photomontage of skyscrapers, which were each, at the time of their completion, the highest buildings in the world. She converted the Nasher Sculpture Center by Renzo Piano in Dallas into a Drive Thru Museum and so reacted to the specific setting of the museum, a former public car park, and to the social and urban structure of the city, which was constructed for automobiles.   Recently, works by the artist could be seen in a collaboration with Daniel Buren in Kunsthalle Mainz. In addition, over the last two years Bettina Pousttchi has enjoyed solo exhibitions in the Arts Club of Chicago, the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden and the Phillips Collection, both in Washington D.C., as well as previously in the Nasher Sculpture Center Dallas. Kunstmuseum St.Gallen is currently showing a major presentation of new works by Bettina Pousttchi in the Lokremise.
Yu Honglei
Yu Honglei
Berlin - Kohlfurter Strasse 41/43
until 23-06-2018

Yu Honglei Kraupa-Tuskany Zeidler is pleased to announce the first solo exhibition of Yu Honglei with the gallery for Gallery Weekend Berlin 2018. The gallery will present new sculptures made of bronze and resin and a video installation. Yu Honglei (b. 1984) lives and works in Beijing. Yu Honglei draws upon wide visual vernacular from visual cultures of Chinese urban landscapes and poetry. Yu Honglei keenly observes the translation, transposition and circulation of images, by weaving through the physical and the digital realm of image production. In his interest in plasticity of cultural knowledge and aesthetics, what arises is a constellation of hermeneutic and polysemic output, executed through highly personal artistic discourse. Yu Honglei’s work has been showed internationally in Daimler Contemporary, Berlin (2017); ZKM Center for art and media, Karlsruhe, (2017); chi K11 Art Museum, Shanghai (2017); Carl Kostyál, London, (2017); Fondazione Baruchello, Rome (2017); Long March Space, Beijing, (2017); Antenna Space, Shanghai (2016); Upstream Gallery, Amsterdam (2016); M WOODS, Beijing (2015); Museo Pino Pascali, Polignano (2016); Telescope, Beijing (2015); Spring Workshop, Hong Kong (2015); Rubell Family Collection, San Antonio Museum of Art, Texas (2015); Minsheng Art Museum, Shanghai (2015); Magician Space, Beijing (2013).

Yu Honglei Kraupa-Tuskany Zeidler is pleased to announce the first solo exhibition of Yu Honglei with the gallery for Gallery Weekend Berlin 2018. The gallery will present new sculptures made of bronze and resin and a video installation. Yu Honglei (b. 1984) lives and works in Beijing. Yu Honglei draws upon wide visual vernacular from visual cultures of Chinese urban landscapes and poetry. Yu Honglei keenly observes the translation, transposition and circulation of images, by weaving through the physical and the digital realm of image production. In his interest in plasticity of cultural knowledge and aesthetics, what arises is a constellation of hermeneutic and polysemic output, executed through highly personal artistic discourse. Yu Honglei’s work has been showed internationally in Daimler Contemporary, Berlin (2017); ZKM Center for art and media, Karlsruhe, (2017); chi K11 Art Museum, Shanghai (2017); Carl Kostyál, London, (2017); Fondazione Baruchello, Rome (2017); Long March Space, Beijing, (2017); Antenna Space, Shanghai (2016); Upstream Gallery, Amsterdam (2016); M WOODS, Beijing (2015); Museo Pino Pascali, Polignano (2016); Telescope, Beijing (2015); Spring Workshop, Hong Kong (2015); Rubell Family Collection, San Antonio Museum of Art, Texas (2015); Minsheng Art Museum, Shanghai (2015); Magician Space, Beijing (2013).
James Turrell
James Turrell
Berlin - Lindenstrasse 9?14
until 30-09-2018

James Turrell – Ganzfeld "Aural" In a temporary structure in the museum garden, we are presenting the immersive installation Ganzfeld “Aural” by the artist James Turrell. “Aural” is the Berlin premiere of a Ganzfeld by the world’s foremost light sculptor. The installation is part of the Ganzfeld Pieces series, in which Turrell creates liminal zones of experience. Upon entering the Ganzfeld “Aural” installation, visitors are immersed in a space that reveals neither its light source nor its dimensions. Their eyes lose their frame of reference; their gaze is unleashed. Light, color, and space melt together. The installation’s gradual color shifts are punctuated by flashes of light. James Turell demands time from his visitors. Our eyes must first adjust before the light’s effect fully unfolds. Suddenly, we perceive the slightest stimuli and changes. This leads to dreamlike experiences reminiscent of thick fog, expanses of snow, or the dark of night.

James Turrell – Ganzfeld "Aural" In a temporary structure in the museum garden, we are presenting the immersive installation Ganzfeld “Aural” by the artist James Turrell. “Aural” is the Berlin premiere of a Ganzfeld by the world’s foremost light sculptor. The installation is part of the Ganzfeld Pieces series, in which Turrell creates liminal zones of experience. Upon entering the Ganzfeld “Aural” installation, visitors are immersed in a space that reveals neither its light source nor its dimensions. Their eyes lose their frame of reference; their gaze is unleashed. Light, color, and space melt together. The installation’s gradual color shifts are punctuated by flashes of light. James Turell demands time from his visitors. Our eyes must first adjust before the light’s effect fully unfolds. Suddenly, we perceive the slightest stimuli and changes. This leads to dreamlike experiences reminiscent of thick fog, expanses of snow, or the dark of night.
Neolithic Childhood
Neolithic Childhood
Berlin - John-Foster-Dulles-Allee 10
until 09-07-2018

Neolithic Childhood. Art in a False Present, c. 1930 Jean (Hans) Arp, Willi Baumeister, Georges Braque, Claude Cahun, Maya Deren, Sergei Eisenstein, T. Lux Feininger, Max Ernst, Florence Henri, Hannah Höch, Heinrich Hoerle, Valentine Hugo, Paul Klee, Germaine Krull, André Masson, Richard Oelze, Wolfgang Paalen, Jean Painlevé, Alexandra Povòrina, Gaston-Louis Roux, Kurt Seligmann, Kalifala Sidibé, Jind?ich Štyrský, Toyen, Frits Van den Berghe, Paule Vézelay, Catherine Yarrow, and others Neolithic Childhood examines how in the interwar years the artistic avant-gardes in Europe and beyond reacted to the “crisis” of almost everything, from the barbarism of technological mass war to the hypocrisies of colonial discourse. The perceived need to re-establish European civilization after the disaster of the First World War led to an interminable reconstruction of origins and beginnings—making “ground zero” the limiting function of modernity. Based on the writings of the extra-academic art historian Carl Einstein (1885-1940), the exhibition is devoted to despair over the present and the pressing interest in “altering” humanity, as manifested from the 1920s to the 1940s in the artistic avant-gardes and the sciences. In addition to works of art, publications and archival materials will be presented that demonstrate the intensive interplay of the visual arts, politics, philosophy, ethnology, psychology, and the natural sciences in this epoch of historic turmoil and totalitarian projects. The title of the project, Neolithic Childhood, is based on a 1930 essay by Carl Einstein in which he interprets the pictorial symbols in Jean (Hans) Arp’s art as a repetition of children’s ritual, “prehistoric” play. The printed matter and archival materials included in the exhibition constitute the manifold material evidence of the diverse and active roles played by art, scholarship, and political theory in the perception and radicalization of the crises around 1930. In cooperation with the Akademie der Künste the Carl Einstein Archive, which is held there, has been fully digitized. Original manuscripts and typescripts from the Archive will be presented in the exhibition. The exhibition will include works by Jean (Hans) Arp, Willi Baumeister, Georges Braque, Claude Cahun, Maya Deren, Sergei Eisenstein, T. Lux Feininger, Max Ernst, Florence Henri, Hannah Höch, Heinrich Hoerle, Valentine Hugo, Paul Klee, Germaine Krull, André Masson, Richard Oelze, Wolfgang Paalen, Jean Painlevé, Alexandra Povòrina, Gaston-Louis Roux, Kurt Seligmann, Kalifala Sidibé, Jind?ich Štyrský, Toyen, Frits Van den Berghe, Paule Vézelay, Catherine Yarrow, and others. A comprehensive, richly illustrated reader will be published on occasion of the accompanying conference in late May 2018. The authors include Irene Albers, Philipp Albers, Joyce Cheng, Rosa Eidelpes, Anselm Franke, Charles W. Haxthausen, Tom Holert, Clemens Krümmel, Sven Lütticken, Jenny Nachtigall, David Quigley, Cornelius Reiber, Erhard Schüttpelz, Kerstin Stakemeier, Maria Stavrinaki, Elena Vogman, Zairong Xiang, and Sebastian Zeidler. Curated by Anselm Franke and Tom Holert. Advisory board: Irene Albers, Jenny Nachtigall, and Kerstin Stakemeier.

Neolithic Childhood. Art in a False Present, c. 1930 Jean (Hans) Arp, Willi Baumeister, Georges Braque, Claude Cahun, Maya Deren, Sergei Eisenstein, T. Lux Feininger, Max Ernst, Florence Henri, Hannah Höch, Heinrich Hoerle, Valentine Hugo, Paul Klee, Germaine Krull, André Masson, Richard Oelze, Wolfgang Paalen, Jean Painlevé, Alexandra Povòrina, Gaston-Louis Roux, Kurt Seligmann, Kalifala Sidibé, Jind?ich Štyrský, Toyen, Frits Van den Berghe, Paule Vézelay, Catherine Yarrow, and others Neolithic Childhood examines how in the interwar years the artistic avant-gardes in Europe and beyond reacted to the “crisis” of almost everything, from the barbarism of technological mass war to the hypocrisies of colonial discourse. The perceived need to re-establish European civilization after the disaster of the First World War led to an interminable reconstruction of origins and beginnings—making “ground zero” the limiting function of modernity. Based on the writings of the extra-academic art historian Carl Einstein (1885-1940), the exhibition is devoted to despair over the present and the pressing interest in “altering” humanity, as manifested from the 1920s to the 1940s in the artistic avant-gardes and the sciences. In addition to works of art, publications and archival materials will be presented that demonstrate the intensive interplay of the visual arts, politics, philosophy, ethnology, psychology, and the natural sciences in this epoch of historic turmoil and totalitarian projects. The title of the project, Neolithic Childhood, is based on a 1930 essay by Carl Einstein in which he interprets the pictorial symbols in Jean (Hans) Arp’s art as a repetition of children’s ritual, “prehistoric” play. The printed matter and archival materials included in the exhibition constitute the manifold material evidence of the diverse and active roles played by art, scholarship, and political theory in the perception and radicalization of the crises around 1930. In cooperation with the Akademie der Künste the Carl Einstein Archive, which is held there, has been fully digitized. Original manuscripts and typescripts from the Archive will be presented in the exhibition. The exhibition will include works by Jean (Hans) Arp, Willi Baumeister, Georges Braque, Claude Cahun, Maya Deren, Sergei Eisenstein, T. Lux Feininger, Max Ernst, Florence Henri, Hannah Höch, Heinrich Hoerle, Valentine Hugo, Paul Klee, Germaine Krull, André Masson, Richard Oelze, Wolfgang Paalen, Jean Painlevé, Alexandra Povòrina, Gaston-Louis Roux, Kurt Seligmann, Kalifala Sidibé, Jind?ich Štyrský, Toyen, Frits Van den Berghe, Paule Vézelay, Catherine Yarrow, and others. A comprehensive, richly illustrated reader will be published on occasion of the accompanying conference in late May 2018. The authors include Irene Albers, Philipp Albers, Joyce Cheng, Rosa Eidelpes, Anselm Franke, Charles W. Haxthausen, Tom Holert, Clemens Krümmel, Sven Lütticken, Jenny Nachtigall, David Quigley, Cornelius Reiber, Erhard Schüttpelz, Kerstin Stakemeier, Maria Stavrinaki, Elena Vogman, Zairong Xiang, and Sebastian Zeidler. Curated by Anselm Franke and Tom Holert. Advisory board: Irene Albers, Jenny Nachtigall, and Kerstin Stakemeier.
Raphaela Vogel
Raphaela Vogel
Basel - Steinenberg 7
until 12-08-2018

Raphaela Vogel – Ultranackt Raphaela Vogel’s exhibition hosts impressive sculptural installations, mostly poised in precarious balance, often in combination with pulsating sound or videos that feature the artist herself (*1988). Her series of new works in this first solo exhibition outside the artist’s native Germany unfurls a dystopian world full of dynamic perspectives. Ultranackt, or “ultra naked,” the exhibition’s title, offers a first clue. How could nakedness be raised to a higher power? By skinning, Raphaela Vogel seems to suggest in the final room of this first solo exhibition outside her native Germany. Here, she appears in a video donning a full-body leotard imprinted with human musculature as if revealed by flaying. In other artworks leading up to it, she is, alternately, in her birthday suit, her body pressed against a lone tree and the earth, or barely clothed, barreling down a waterslide. Camera operator, editor, costume and lighting designer, sound technician: Vogel typically occupies all of these roles, including that of sole human protagonist of her videos. Thus if there is a thread that runs through the artist’s work like a red-hot vein, it is the centrality of the artist herself, unabashedly exposed and exposing; if not literally naked, then meta- phorically so, baring it all. The effect of Vogel’s unrelenting exhibitionism is an anarchic critique of phallocracy: at once taking possession of her own image and commandeering the tools and technology necessary for its production, she renders these devices emancipatory. There is a restlessness to the result, a feverishness to the sound juxtapositions created by this former teenage founder of a punk band, and to the images captured by her audacious camera placements. As an art student, Vogel threw or swung cam- eras as they recorded; for one video, she even attached a camcorder to the automatic retractable roof of a convertible car and, for another, fastened it to the leg of a galloping horse. Lately, she has secured cameras to various pre-programmed drones, literalizing the notion of a bird’s-eye view (“Vogel” means “bird” in German), or let a camera careen down a waterslide while recording her. She cuts the images so they refract and reflect or repeat as they throb with soundtracks that range from song snippets of Judas Priest or a singer auditioning for a heavy metal band to the artist’s own cracking voice as she covers sentimental ballads. To open the exhibition, she dispenses with moving images altogether and instead relies on an installation whose soundtrack features swarms of crickets periodically interspersed by eruptions of one of Borussia Dortmund’s (BVB) anthems, passionately intoned by the German soccer club's fans

Raphaela Vogel – Ultranackt Raphaela Vogel’s exhibition hosts impressive sculptural installations, mostly poised in precarious balance, often in combination with pulsating sound or videos that feature the artist herself (*1988). Her series of new works in this first solo exhibition outside the artist’s native Germany unfurls a dystopian world full of dynamic perspectives. Ultranackt, or “ultra naked,” the exhibition’s title, offers a first clue. How could nakedness be raised to a higher power? By skinning, Raphaela Vogel seems to suggest in the final room of this first solo exhibition outside her native Germany. Here, she appears in a video donning a full-body leotard imprinted with human musculature as if revealed by flaying. In other artworks leading up to it, she is, alternately, in her birthday suit, her body pressed against a lone tree and the earth, or barely clothed, barreling down a waterslide. Camera operator, editor, costume and lighting designer, sound technician: Vogel typically occupies all of these roles, including that of sole human protagonist of her videos. Thus if there is a thread that runs through the artist’s work like a red-hot vein, it is the centrality of the artist herself, unabashedly exposed and exposing; if not literally naked, then meta- phorically so, baring it all. The effect of Vogel’s unrelenting exhibitionism is an anarchic critique of phallocracy: at once taking possession of her own image and commandeering the tools and technology necessary for its production, she renders these devices emancipatory. There is a restlessness to the result, a feverishness to the sound juxtapositions created by this former teenage founder of a punk band, and to the images captured by her audacious camera placements. As an art student, Vogel threw or swung cam- eras as they recorded; for one video, she even attached a camcorder to the automatic retractable roof of a convertible car and, for another, fastened it to the leg of a galloping horse. Lately, she has secured cameras to various pre-programmed drones, literalizing the notion of a bird’s-eye view (“Vogel” means “bird” in German), or let a camera careen down a waterslide while recording her. She cuts the images so they refract and reflect or repeat as they throb with soundtracks that range from song snippets of Judas Priest or a singer auditioning for a heavy metal band to the artist’s own cracking voice as she covers sentimental ballads. To open the exhibition, she dispenses with moving images altogether and instead relies on an installation whose soundtrack features swarms of crickets periodically interspersed by eruptions of one of Borussia Dortmund’s (BVB) anthems, passionately intoned by the German soccer club's fans
Naama Tsabar
Naama Tsabar
Basel - St. Jakob-Strasse 170
until 16-07-2018

Naama Tsabar – ?Transitions#4 New-York based artist Naama Tsabar adorns the spaces of the Kunsthaus Baselland with an installation comprised of three bodies of work – Transition, Works On Felt and Barricade. This grouping of works is in a constant shift between the visual and the sonic, the active and the passive. At first, when one comes down the stairs to the lower floor, the Transition canvases appear to be large-scale paintings or drawings. But instead of pigment, Tsabar uses cables, buttons, connectors and parts from amplifiers and speakers in order to create her sensuous compositions. On the one hand, they are attached simply to the wall; on the other, they still function as amplifiers and speakers and emit sound once activated. Tsabar’s description of choice is ‘sculptural paintings that have the ability to output sound’. Barricade consists of several microphones arranged in a triangle formation. The microphones’ cables line the floor in a formal composition, reflecting the path of transmitted sound. The spatial arrangement of the microphone mount’s act as both barrier and enabler as the performative space between the microphones is physically limited. The sound picked up within Barricade expands into the different exhibition rooms as each side of the microphone shape feeds directly through a separate Transition canvas located in the first room. Dispersed in several locations are works from Tsabar’s ongoing Works On Felt series. Much like the Transition canvases the Felt works are between the sculptural and the sonic. By the addition of carbon fiber, piano strings and guitar tuning pegs, the felt gains new features that contradict its natural characteristics. Through their visible materiality and size they engage the body, to be touched, activated, felt. One is immediately confronted with their minimal design and then given a chance to directly engage with the work itself by plucking the strings, creating sounds from them. For some time Naama Tsabar has been interested in the shift within a given physical space and field of reading that can happen through music and sound. When they are activated Tsabar’s works’ legibility changes, as does the distance between object and subject – when the viewer stops in their tracks to interact with the works and activate them, they breach the borders between their own body and the art object. At once constituting both an intimate and performative relationship with the works and space, Tsabar does not want to present her viewer with work that should be admired only for its visual formal qualities. “I don’t like authority, to be framed – restricted,” says the artist. “These works break the borders that were set for them. They do this by possessing the potential to expand to a different field of action; they are in constant states of transition.” Making reference to the gender roles and codes of behaviour implicit in the music and club world, in her works and performances Naama Tsabar both pulls into focus the aggressive gestures of rock’n’roll and their associations with masculinity and power and simultaneously undercuts them. Her works function like a filter for the decadence of urban nightlife with all its seductive and subversive facets. Through the energetic and sensory encounter with the works a choreography of movement and sound emerges, which draws in the visitor and extends the work across the whole exhibition space. A unique performance composed on and in the exhibition will premiere on the 13th of June, at noon, by Tsabar and a group of collaborating musicians. Naama Tsabar was born in 1982 in Israel. She received her MFA from Columbia University in 2010. Selected Solo Exhibitions and Performances: Museum of Art and Design, New York (2017-2018); Palais De Tokyo, Paris (2017); Paul Kasmin Gallery, New York (2017); High Line, New York (2016); Spinello Projects, Miami (2016); Paramo Gallery, Guadalajara (2016); Dvir Gallery, Tel Aviv (2016, 2007); MARTE-C, El Salvador (2015); Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York (2014); Frieze Projects, New York (2014); Tel Aviv Museum of Art, Tel Aviv (2013, 2010); Pianissimo Gallery, Milan (2008); and The Herziliya Museum for Contemporary Art, Herziliya (2006). Selected group exhibitions: Prospect New Orleans 4, New Orleans (2017-2018); Hessel Museum of Art, New York (2018, 2015); Museum Dhondt-Dhaenens, Sint-Martens-Latem (2017); TM StadTriennale, Hasselt/Genk, (2016) ExtraCity, Antwerp (2011); MoMa PS1, New York (2010); the Fisher Landau Center, New York (2010); The Bucharest Biennale for Young Artists, Bucharest (2008); and Casino Luxembourg, Luxembourg (2008). Selected Grants: Tsabar is a Three-time recipient of an Artis Grant (2018, 2014, 2010), a two-time recipient of the America-Israel Cultural Foundation Grant (2009, 2005), the 2009–2010 recipient of the Joan Sovern Award from Columbia University, and the 2012 Grantee of The Rema Hort Mann Foundation Award;.” Her work is held in the permanent collections of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, Jimenez-Colon, Tel Aviv Museum, Israel Museum and Coleccion Dieresis. Tsabar lives and works in Brooklyn.

Naama Tsabar – ?Transitions#4 New-York based artist Naama Tsabar adorns the spaces of the Kunsthaus Baselland with an installation comprised of three bodies of work – Transition, Works On Felt and Barricade. This grouping of works is in a constant shift between the visual and the sonic, the active and the passive. At first, when one comes down the stairs to the lower floor, the Transition canvases appear to be large-scale paintings or drawings. But instead of pigment, Tsabar uses cables, buttons, connectors and parts from amplifiers and speakers in order to create her sensuous compositions. On the one hand, they are attached simply to the wall; on the other, they still function as amplifiers and speakers and emit sound once activated. Tsabar’s description of choice is ‘sculptural paintings that have the ability to output sound’. Barricade consists of several microphones arranged in a triangle formation. The microphones’ cables line the floor in a formal composition, reflecting the path of transmitted sound. The spatial arrangement of the microphone mount’s act as both barrier and enabler as the performative space between the microphones is physically limited. The sound picked up within Barricade expands into the different exhibition rooms as each side of the microphone shape feeds directly through a separate Transition canvas located in the first room. Dispersed in several locations are works from Tsabar’s ongoing Works On Felt series. Much like the Transition canvases the Felt works are between the sculptural and the sonic. By the addition of carbon fiber, piano strings and guitar tuning pegs, the felt gains new features that contradict its natural characteristics. Through their visible materiality and size they engage the body, to be touched, activated, felt. One is immediately confronted with their minimal design and then given a chance to directly engage with the work itself by plucking the strings, creating sounds from them. For some time Naama Tsabar has been interested in the shift within a given physical space and field of reading that can happen through music and sound. When they are activated Tsabar’s works’ legibility changes, as does the distance between object and subject – when the viewer stops in their tracks to interact with the works and activate them, they breach the borders between their own body and the art object. At once constituting both an intimate and performative relationship with the works and space, Tsabar does not want to present her viewer with work that should be admired only for its visual formal qualities. “I don’t like authority, to be framed – restricted,” says the artist. “These works break the borders that were set for them. They do this by possessing the potential to expand to a different field of action; they are in constant states of transition.” Making reference to the gender roles and codes of behaviour implicit in the music and club world, in her works and performances Naama Tsabar both pulls into focus the aggressive gestures of rock’n’roll and their associations with masculinity and power and simultaneously undercuts them. Her works function like a filter for the decadence of urban nightlife with all its seductive and subversive facets. Through the energetic and sensory encounter with the works a choreography of movement and sound emerges, which draws in the visitor and extends the work across the whole exhibition space. A unique performance composed on and in the exhibition will premiere on the 13th of June, at noon, by Tsabar and a group of collaborating musicians. Naama Tsabar was born in 1982 in Israel. She received her MFA from Columbia University in 2010. Selected Solo Exhibitions and Performances: Museum of Art and Design, New York (2017-2018); Palais De Tokyo, Paris (2017); Paul Kasmin Gallery, New York (2017); High Line, New York (2016); Spinello Projects, Miami (2016); Paramo Gallery, Guadalajara (2016); Dvir Gallery, Tel Aviv (2016, 2007); MARTE-C, El Salvador (2015); Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York (2014); Frieze Projects, New York (2014); Tel Aviv Museum of Art, Tel Aviv (2013, 2010); Pianissimo Gallery, Milan (2008); and The Herziliya Museum for Contemporary Art, Herziliya (2006). Selected group exhibitions: Prospect New Orleans 4, New Orleans (2017-2018); Hessel Museum of Art, New York (2018, 2015); Museum Dhondt-Dhaenens, Sint-Martens-Latem (2017); TM StadTriennale, Hasselt/Genk, (2016) ExtraCity, Antwerp (2011); MoMa PS1, New York (2010); the Fisher Landau Center, New York (2010); The Bucharest Biennale for Young Artists, Bucharest (2008); and Casino Luxembourg, Luxembourg (2008). Selected Grants: Tsabar is a Three-time recipient of an Artis Grant (2018, 2014, 2010), a two-time recipient of the America-Israel Cultural Foundation Grant (2009, 2005), the 2009–2010 recipient of the Joan Sovern Award from Columbia University, and the 2012 Grantee of The Rema Hort Mann Foundation Award;.” Her work is held in the permanent collections of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, Jimenez-Colon, Tel Aviv Museum, Israel Museum and Coleccion Dieresis. Tsabar lives and works in Brooklyn.
Martha Rosler & Hito Steyerl
Martha Rosler & Hito Steyerl
Basel - St. Alban-Rheinweg 60
until 02-12-2018

Martha Rosler & Hito Steyerl – War Games The exhibition presents works by the artists Martha Rosler (Brooklyn, NY) and Hito Steyerl (Berlin) in a dialogue that brings intersections between their thematic interests and similarities in their uses of media into focus. It is the first exhibition at a Swiss museum for both artists and the first show anywhere in which their works appear side by side. Yet the two oeuvres have a great deal in common, growing out of an unusually tenacious commitment to critical engagement with social and political issues. Resonances between their works speak to the affinity between their stances and the concerns both share—concerns that are of global significance and suggest both artists’ probing critical attention to the political developments of our time. Reality, in their art, is always considered in its interplay with the audiovisual media that shape the fabric of today’s lifeworld and our identities, highlighting their disruptive impact on human lives. It is not surprising, then, that both Rosler and Steyerl have repeatedly turned to new media for their work. In addition to creating photography and collages, Rosler was an early pioneer of video art, which lets her broadcast feminist ideas and counter the myths peddled by television and magazines with alternative depictions of women and modern everyday life. Lately she has complemented photographs, photocollages, and action and project formats with a growing preoccupation with social media and drone technology. In part based on computer animations, Steyerl’s more recent video installations—whose aesthetic is strongly informed by the visuals disseminated through online platforms like YouTube—are among the most advanced work done by visual artists in this medium today. Both artists choose to involve themselves in contemporary controversies while also studying their historical backgrounds and the role played by media. Fascinating in their aesthetic construction, Rosler’s and Steyerl’s works are formulations of resistance to the normalization of democratic decline, the privatization of public spaces and domains of life and their subjection to economic pressures, violence and oppression at the hands of private actors as well as the authorities, the reduction of the human being to his value as a source of labor and consumer, and the militarization of spheres of social life. In light of the rising tide of illiberalism around the world, the exhibition thus also reaffirms the museum’s commitment to showing art that does not shy away from contention in asserting the need to foster democratic structures, civic values, and tolerance.  

Martha Rosler & Hito Steyerl – War Games The exhibition presents works by the artists Martha Rosler (Brooklyn, NY) and Hito Steyerl (Berlin) in a dialogue that brings intersections between their thematic interests and similarities in their uses of media into focus. It is the first exhibition at a Swiss museum for both artists and the first show anywhere in which their works appear side by side. Yet the two oeuvres have a great deal in common, growing out of an unusually tenacious commitment to critical engagement with social and political issues. Resonances between their works speak to the affinity between their stances and the concerns both share—concerns that are of global significance and suggest both artists’ probing critical attention to the political developments of our time. Reality, in their art, is always considered in its interplay with the audiovisual media that shape the fabric of today’s lifeworld and our identities, highlighting their disruptive impact on human lives. It is not surprising, then, that both Rosler and Steyerl have repeatedly turned to new media for their work. In addition to creating photography and collages, Rosler was an early pioneer of video art, which lets her broadcast feminist ideas and counter the myths peddled by television and magazines with alternative depictions of women and modern everyday life. Lately she has complemented photographs, photocollages, and action and project formats with a growing preoccupation with social media and drone technology. In part based on computer animations, Steyerl’s more recent video installations—whose aesthetic is strongly informed by the visuals disseminated through online platforms like YouTube—are among the most advanced work done by visual artists in this medium today. Both artists choose to involve themselves in contemporary controversies while also studying their historical backgrounds and the role played by media. Fascinating in their aesthetic construction, Rosler’s and Steyerl’s works are formulations of resistance to the normalization of democratic decline, the privatization of public spaces and domains of life and their subjection to economic pressures, violence and oppression at the hands of private actors as well as the authorities, the reduction of the human being to his value as a source of labor and consumer, and the militarization of spheres of social life. In light of the rising tide of illiberalism around the world, the exhibition thus also reaffirms the museum’s commitment to showing art that does not shy away from contention in asserting the need to foster democratic structures, civic values, and tolerance.  
Night Fever. Designing Club Culture 1960 – Today
Night Fever. Designing Club Culture 1960 ? Today
Basel - Charles-Eames-Strasse 2
until 09-09-2018

Night Fever. Designing Club Culture 1960 – Today »Night Fever« opens with the 1960s, exploring the emergence of nightclubs as spaces for experimentation with interior design, new media, and alternative lifestyles. The Electric Circus (1967) in New York, for example, was designed as a countercultural venue by architect Charles Forberg while graphic designers Chermayeff & Geismar created its distinctive logo and font. Its multidisciplinary approach influenced many clubs in Europe, including Space Electronic (1969) in Florence. Designed by the collective Gruppo 9999, this was one of several nightclubs associated with Italy’s Radical Design avant-garde. The same goes for Piper in Turin (1966), a club designed by Giorgio Ceretti, Pietro Derossi, and Riccardo Rosso as a multifunctional space with a modular interior suitable for concerts, happenings, and experimental theatre as well as dancing. Gruppo UFO’s Bamba Issa (1969), a beach club in Forte dei Marmi, was another highly histrionic venue, its themed interior completely overhauled for every summer of its three years of existence. With the rise of disco in the 1970s, club culture gained a new momentum. Dance music developed into a genre of its own and the dance floor emerged as a stage for individual and collective performance, with fashion designers such as Halston and Stephen Burrows providing the perfect outfits to perform and shine. New York’s Studio 54, founded by Ian Schrager and Steve Rubell in 1977 and designed by Scott Bromley and Ron Doud, soon became a celebrity favourite. Only two years later, the movie »Saturday Night Fever« marked the apex of Disco’s commercialisation, which in turn sparked a backlash with homophobic and racist overtones that peaked at the Disco Demolition Night staged at a baseball stadium in Chicago. Around the same time, places in New York’s thriving nightlife like the Mudd Club (1978) and Area (1983) offered artists new spaces to merge the club scene and the arts and launched the careers of artists like Keith Haring und Jean-Michel Basquiat. In early 1980s London, meanwhile, clubs like Blitz and Taboo brought forth the New Romantic music and fashion movement, with wild child Vivienne Westwood a frequent guest at Michael and Gerlinde Costiff’s »Kinky Gerlinky« clubnight. But it was in Manchester that architect and designer Ben Kelly created the post-industrial cathedral of rave, The Haçienda (1982), from where Acid House conquered the UK. House and Techno were arguably the last great dance music movements to define a generation of clubs and ravers. They reached Berlin in the early 1990s just after the fall of the wall, when disused and derelict spaces became available for clubs like Tresor (1991); more than a decade later, the notorious Berghain (2004) was established in a former heating plant, demonstrating yet again how a vibrant club scene can flourish in the cracks of the urban fabric, on empty lots and in vacant buildings. Developments have become ever more complex since the early 2000s. On the one hand, club culture is thriving and evolving as it is adopted by global brands and music festivals; on the other, many nightclubs have been pushed out of the city or survive merely as sad historical monuments and modern ruins of a hedonistic past. At the same time, a new generation of architects is addressing the nightclub typology. The architectural firm OMA, founded by Rem Koolhaas, has developed a proposal for a twenty-first-century Ministry of Sound II for London, while Detroit-based designers Akoaki have created a mobile DJ booth called »The Mothership« to promote their hometown’s rich club heritage.  Based on extensive research and featuring many exhibits never before displayed in a museum, »Night Fever« brings together a wide range of material, from furniture to graphic design, architectural models to art, film and photography to fashion. The exhibition takes visitors through a fascinating nocturnal world that provides a vital contrast to the rules and routines of our everyday life.  While the exhibition basically follows a chronological concept, a music and light installation created specially by exhibition designer Konstantin Grcic and lighting designer Matthias Singer offers visitors the opportunity to experience all the many facets of nightclub design, from visual effects to sounds and sensations. A display of record covers, ranging from Peter Saville’s designs for Factory Records to Grace Jones’s album cover »Nightclubbing«, underlines the significant relationship between music and design in club culture. The multidisciplinary exhibition reveals the nightclub as much more than a dance bar or a music venue; it is an immersive environment for intense experiences.   

Night Fever. Designing Club Culture 1960 – Today »Night Fever« opens with the 1960s, exploring the emergence of nightclubs as spaces for experimentation with interior design, new media, and alternative lifestyles. The Electric Circus (1967) in New York, for example, was designed as a countercultural venue by architect Charles Forberg while graphic designers Chermayeff & Geismar created its distinctive logo and font. Its multidisciplinary approach influenced many clubs in Europe, including Space Electronic (1969) in Florence. Designed by the collective Gruppo 9999, this was one of several nightclubs associated with Italy’s Radical Design avant-garde. The same goes for Piper in Turin (1966), a club designed by Giorgio Ceretti, Pietro Derossi, and Riccardo Rosso as a multifunctional space with a modular interior suitable for concerts, happenings, and experimental theatre as well as dancing. Gruppo UFO’s Bamba Issa (1969), a beach club in Forte dei Marmi, was another highly histrionic venue, its themed interior completely overhauled for every summer of its three years of existence. With the rise of disco in the 1970s, club culture gained a new momentum. Dance music developed into a genre of its own and the dance floor emerged as a stage for individual and collective performance, with fashion designers such as Halston and Stephen Burrows providing the perfect outfits to perform and shine. New York’s Studio 54, founded by Ian Schrager and Steve Rubell in 1977 and designed by Scott Bromley and Ron Doud, soon became a celebrity favourite. Only two years later, the movie »Saturday Night Fever« marked the apex of Disco’s commercialisation, which in turn sparked a backlash with homophobic and racist overtones that peaked at the Disco Demolition Night staged at a baseball stadium in Chicago. Around the same time, places in New York’s thriving nightlife like the Mudd Club (1978) and Area (1983) offered artists new spaces to merge the club scene and the arts and launched the careers of artists like Keith Haring und Jean-Michel Basquiat. In early 1980s London, meanwhile, clubs like Blitz and Taboo brought forth the New Romantic music and fashion movement, with wild child Vivienne Westwood a frequent guest at Michael and Gerlinde Costiff’s »Kinky Gerlinky« clubnight. But it was in Manchester that architect and designer Ben Kelly created the post-industrial cathedral of rave, The Haçienda (1982), from where Acid House conquered the UK. House and Techno were arguably the last great dance music movements to define a generation of clubs and ravers. They reached Berlin in the early 1990s just after the fall of the wall, when disused and derelict spaces became available for clubs like Tresor (1991); more than a decade later, the notorious Berghain (2004) was established in a former heating plant, demonstrating yet again how a vibrant club scene can flourish in the cracks of the urban fabric, on empty lots and in vacant buildings. Developments have become ever more complex since the early 2000s. On the one hand, club culture is thriving and evolving as it is adopted by global brands and music festivals; on the other, many nightclubs have been pushed out of the city or survive merely as sad historical monuments and modern ruins of a hedonistic past. At the same time, a new generation of architects is addressing the nightclub typology. The architectural firm OMA, founded by Rem Koolhaas, has developed a proposal for a twenty-first-century Ministry of Sound II for London, while Detroit-based designers Akoaki have created a mobile DJ booth called »The Mothership« to promote their hometown’s rich club heritage.  Based on extensive research and featuring many exhibits never before displayed in a museum, »Night Fever« brings together a wide range of material, from furniture to graphic design, architectural models to art, film and photography to fashion. The exhibition takes visitors through a fascinating nocturnal world that provides a vital contrast to the rules and routines of our everyday life.  While the exhibition basically follows a chronological concept, a music and light installation created specially by exhibition designer Konstantin Grcic and lighting designer Matthias Singer offers visitors the opportunity to experience all the many facets of nightclub design, from visual effects to sounds and sensations. A display of record covers, ranging from Peter Saville’s designs for Factory Records to Grace Jones’s album cover »Nightclubbing«, underlines the significant relationship between music and design in club culture. The multidisciplinary exhibition reveals the nightclub as much more than a dance bar or a music venue; it is an immersive environment for intense experiences.