Art feed

Curated by Exhibitionary

Cerith Wyn Evans
Cerith Wyn Evans
London - 144-152 Bermondsey Street
until 17-08-2020

Cerith Wyn Evans – No realm of thought… No field of vision  Featuring installation, sculpture and painting installed throughout the gallery, it foregrounds the artist’s longstanding exploration of transcendence, translation and perception where elements such as text, code, light, sound and time are compressed, extended, inverted and multiplied.

Cerith Wyn Evans – No realm of thought… No field of vision  Featuring installation, sculpture and painting installed throughout the gallery, it foregrounds the artist’s longstanding exploration of transcendence, translation and perception where elements such as text, code, light, sound and time are compressed, extended, inverted and multiplied.
Sarah Lucas
Sarah Lucas
London - 62 Kingly St
until 30-05-2020

Sarah Lucas – Honey Pie Sadie Coles HQ presents HONEY PIE, an exhibition by Sarah Lucas featuring ten sculptures that extend her long-term Bunny series into dynamic new forms. The exhibition consists of several sculptures made from stuffed tights and found objects, alongside an equal number of works in bronze and concrete. First conceived in 1997, Lucas’s Bunny sculptures evoke female nudes reclining on chairs in states of abandon and vulnerability. Employing the same everyday materials, the soft sculptures in HONEY PIE develop this formula through anatomical contortions, flamboyant footwear and chairs of eclectic shape and size. Bright colours applied to the figures’ limbs give them the appearance of a surrealist chorus line, at once exotic and comedic. Lucas has elevated the works on a series of plinths that reinforce their individualism, resetting the balance of power between sculpture and viewer.

Sarah Lucas – Honey Pie Sadie Coles HQ presents HONEY PIE, an exhibition by Sarah Lucas featuring ten sculptures that extend her long-term Bunny series into dynamic new forms. The exhibition consists of several sculptures made from stuffed tights and found objects, alongside an equal number of works in bronze and concrete. First conceived in 1997, Lucas’s Bunny sculptures evoke female nudes reclining on chairs in states of abandon and vulnerability. Employing the same everyday materials, the soft sculptures in HONEY PIE develop this formula through anatomical contortions, flamboyant footwear and chairs of eclectic shape and size. Bright colours applied to the figures’ limbs give them the appearance of a surrealist chorus line, at once exotic and comedic. Lucas has elevated the works on a series of plinths that reinforce their individualism, resetting the balance of power between sculpture and viewer.
Andy Warhol
Andy Warhol
London - Bankside
until 06-09-2020

Andy Warhol A new look at the extraordinary life and work of the pop art superstar Andy Warhol was the son of immigrants who became an American icon. A shy gay man who became the hub of New York’s social scene. An artist who embraced consumerism, celebrity and counter culture – and changed modern art in the process. He was born in 1928 as Andrew Warhola to working class parents from present day Slovakia. In 1949 he moved from Pittsburgh to New York. Initially working as a commercial illustrator, his skill at transforming the imagery of American culture soon found its realisation in his ground-breaking pop art. This major retrospective is the first Warhol exhibition at Tate Modern for almost 20 years. As well as his iconic pop images of Marilyn Monroe, Coca-Cola and Campbell’s soup cans, it includes works never seen before in the UK. Twenty-five works from his Ladies and Gentlemen series – portraits of black and Latinx drag queens and trans women – are shown for the first time in 30 years. Visitors can also play with his floating Silver Clouds and experience the psychedelic multimedia environment of the Exploding Plastic Inevitable. Popularly radical and radically popular, Warhol was an artist who reimagined what art could be in an age of immense social, political and technological change.?

Andy Warhol A new look at the extraordinary life and work of the pop art superstar Andy Warhol was the son of immigrants who became an American icon. A shy gay man who became the hub of New York’s social scene. An artist who embraced consumerism, celebrity and counter culture – and changed modern art in the process. He was born in 1928 as Andrew Warhola to working class parents from present day Slovakia. In 1949 he moved from Pittsburgh to New York. Initially working as a commercial illustrator, his skill at transforming the imagery of American culture soon found its realisation in his ground-breaking pop art. This major retrospective is the first Warhol exhibition at Tate Modern for almost 20 years. As well as his iconic pop images of Marilyn Monroe, Coca-Cola and Campbell’s soup cans, it includes works never seen before in the UK. Twenty-five works from his Ladies and Gentlemen series – portraits of black and Latinx drag queens and trans women – are shown for the first time in 30 years. Visitors can also play with his floating Silver Clouds and experience the psychedelic multimedia environment of the Exploding Plastic Inevitable. Popularly radical and radically popular, Warhol was an artist who reimagined what art could be in an age of immense social, political and technological change.?
Peter Schuyff
Peter Schuyff
London - 12a Savile Row
until 30-05-2020

Peter Schuyff – Works on paper

Peter Schuyff – Works on paper
Mickalene Thomas
Mickalene Thomas
Miami - 2100 Collins Avenue
until 27-09-2020

Mickalene Thomas – Better Nights Inspired by the local New Jersey play ‘Put a Little Sugar in my Bowl’ organized and performed by the artists’ mother, friends, and family as well as the parties hosted by the artist’s mother in the late 1970s, Mickalene Thomas: Better Nights is an installation that will transform the galleries into an immersive art experience for the duration of the exhibition. The installation embodies an apartment environment, conceptually reconstructed according to the domestic aesthetic of the period, including faux wood paneling, wallpaper and custom seating reupholstered with the artist’s signature textiles. An extension of Thomas’ artistic universe, the installation incorporates both work by the artist and a curated selection by Thomas featuring work by emerging and prominent artists of color, with the prop-like tableau echoing the collage-like compositional style of Thomas’ paintings.

Mickalene Thomas – Better Nights Inspired by the local New Jersey play ‘Put a Little Sugar in my Bowl’ organized and performed by the artists’ mother, friends, and family as well as the parties hosted by the artist’s mother in the late 1970s, Mickalene Thomas: Better Nights is an installation that will transform the galleries into an immersive art experience for the duration of the exhibition. The installation embodies an apartment environment, conceptually reconstructed according to the domestic aesthetic of the period, including faux wood paneling, wallpaper and custom seating reupholstered with the artist’s signature textiles. An extension of Thomas’ artistic universe, the installation incorporates both work by the artist and a curated selection by Thomas featuring work by emerging and prominent artists of color, with the prop-like tableau echoing the collage-like compositional style of Thomas’ paintings.
Donald Judd
Donald Judd
New York - 11 West 53 Street
until 11-07-2020

Donald Judd “I had always considered my work another activity of some kind,” remarked artist Donald Judd. “I certainly didn’t think I was making sculpture.” One of the foremost sculptors of our time, Judd refused this designation and other attempts to label his art: his revolutionary approach to form, materials, working methods, and display went beyond the set of existing terms in mid-century New York. His work, in turn, changed the language of modern sculpture. Bringing together sculpture, painting, drawing, and rarely seen works from throughout Judd’s career, Judd is the first US retrospective in over 30 years to explore this artist’s remarkable vision. Judd (1928–1994) began his professional career working as a painter while studying art history and writing art criticism. Among a new generation of artists who sought to move past the breakthroughs of Abstract Expressionism, Judd shifted from two to three dimensions, into what he called “real space,” relinquishing a focus on the artist’s gesture. In his constructed reliefs and wooden floor pieces from this time, he established a new type of object-making that rejected illusion, narrative, and metaphorical content. By the mid-1960s, Judd commenced his lifelong practice of using industrial materials, such as aluminum, steel, and Plexiglas, and delegating production of his work to local metal shops. With the help of these specialized fabricators, he developed a signature vocabulary of hollow, rectilinear volumes, often arranged in series. In the following years, “boxes,” “stacks,” and “progressions” continued as Judd’s principal framework to introduce different combinations of color and surface. Judd surveys the complete evolution of the artist’s career, culminating in the last decade of his life, when Judd intensified his work with color and continued to lay new ground for what ensuing generations would come to define as sculpture.

Donald Judd “I had always considered my work another activity of some kind,” remarked artist Donald Judd. “I certainly didn’t think I was making sculpture.” One of the foremost sculptors of our time, Judd refused this designation and other attempts to label his art: his revolutionary approach to form, materials, working methods, and display went beyond the set of existing terms in mid-century New York. His work, in turn, changed the language of modern sculpture. Bringing together sculpture, painting, drawing, and rarely seen works from throughout Judd’s career, Judd is the first US retrospective in over 30 years to explore this artist’s remarkable vision. Judd (1928–1994) began his professional career working as a painter while studying art history and writing art criticism. Among a new generation of artists who sought to move past the breakthroughs of Abstract Expressionism, Judd shifted from two to three dimensions, into what he called “real space,” relinquishing a focus on the artist’s gesture. In his constructed reliefs and wooden floor pieces from this time, he established a new type of object-making that rejected illusion, narrative, and metaphorical content. By the mid-1960s, Judd commenced his lifelong practice of using industrial materials, such as aluminum, steel, and Plexiglas, and delegating production of his work to local metal shops. With the help of these specialized fabricators, he developed a signature vocabulary of hollow, rectilinear volumes, often arranged in series. In the following years, “boxes,” “stacks,” and “progressions” continued as Judd’s principal framework to introduce different combinations of color and surface. Judd surveys the complete evolution of the artist’s career, culminating in the last decade of his life, when Judd intensified his work with color and continued to lay new ground for what ensuing generations would come to define as sculpture.
Peter Saul
Peter Saul
New York - 235 Bowery
until 31-05-2020

Peter Saul – Crime and Punishment For over fifty years, Peter Saul has been one of America’s boldest and most iconoclastic painters. “Crime and Punishment,” Saul’s first New York museum survey, will bring together approximately sixty paintings from across his long career.

Peter Saul – Crime and Punishment For over fifty years, Peter Saul has been one of America’s boldest and most iconoclastic painters. “Crime and Punishment,” Saul’s first New York museum survey, will bring together approximately sixty paintings from across his long career.
George Condo
George Condo
New York - 19 East 64th Street
until 21-12-2020

George Condo – Paintings & Works on Paper

George Condo – Paintings & Works on Paper
Gerhard Richter
Gerhard Richter
New York - 945 Madison Avenue
until 05-07-2020

Gerhard Richter – Painting After All Devoted to one of the greatest artists of our time, Gerhard Richter: Painting After All will consider Richter's six-decade-long preoccupation with the dual means of representation and abstraction to explore the material, conceptual and historical implications of painting. Spanning the entirety of Richter's prolific and innovative career, the exhibition will present over one hundred works that focus on his specific commitment to the medium, as well as his related interests in photography, digital reproduction, and sculpture.  

Gerhard Richter – Painting After All Devoted to one of the greatest artists of our time, Gerhard Richter: Painting After All will consider Richter's six-decade-long preoccupation with the dual means of representation and abstraction to explore the material, conceptual and historical implications of painting. Spanning the entirety of Richter's prolific and innovative career, the exhibition will present over one hundred works that focus on his specific commitment to the medium, as well as his related interests in photography, digital reproduction, and sculpture.  
Julia Haller
Julia Haller
Vienna - Eschenbachgasse 9
until 13-06-2020

Julia Haller – Knights

Julia Haller – Knights
Renate Bertlmann
Renate Bertlmann
Vienna - Prinz Eugen-Straße 27
until 30-08-2020

Renate Bertlmann – Carlone Contemporary  For the exhibition starting in February 2020 at the Upper Belvedere, the Austrian artist developed a new version of her contribution to the Biennale. Red Murano glass roses, rigorously arranged in a grid pattern, will adorn the lavishly frescoed Carlone Hall of the palace. This juxtaposition of fragility and aggression mirrors the duality found in the Baroque frescoes. The ostensibly fragile blossoms are not without protection as they are armed with blades protruding from each one of their flower heads; in fact, they themselves pose a threat. The contradiction proclaimed in the work's title of Discordo Ergo Sum [I dissent, therefore I am], thus becomes physically materialized in the space. 

Renate Bertlmann – Carlone Contemporary  For the exhibition starting in February 2020 at the Upper Belvedere, the Austrian artist developed a new version of her contribution to the Biennale. Red Murano glass roses, rigorously arranged in a grid pattern, will adorn the lavishly frescoed Carlone Hall of the palace. This juxtaposition of fragility and aggression mirrors the duality found in the Baroque frescoes. The ostensibly fragile blossoms are not without protection as they are armed with blades protruding from each one of their flower heads; in fact, they themselves pose a threat. The contradiction proclaimed in the work's title of Discordo Ergo Sum [I dissent, therefore I am], thus becomes physically materialized in the space. 
Kinke Kooi & Tenant of Culture
Kinke Kooi & Tenant of Culture
Vienna - Elisabethstrasse 24
until 30-05-2020

Kinke Kooi & Tenant of Culture – Fittings The exhibition Fittings combines the works of the Dutch artists Kinke Kooi, born 1961, and Hendrickje Schimmel, born 1990, who operates under the synonyme Tenant of Culture. Fittings is part of an ongoing series of exhibitions combining artists of different generations and backgrounds.

Kinke Kooi & Tenant of Culture – Fittings The exhibition Fittings combines the works of the Dutch artists Kinke Kooi, born 1961, and Hendrickje Schimmel, born 1990, who operates under the synonyme Tenant of Culture. Fittings is part of an ongoing series of exhibitions combining artists of different generations and backgrounds.
The Cindy Sherman Effect
The Cindy Sherman Effect
Vienna - Freyung 8
until 21-06-2020

The Cindy Sherman Effect. Identity and Transformation in Contemporary Art The exhibition addresses one of the key issues in art: the preoccupation with themes of identity, its construction, forms of transformation and fiction are hot topics in the face of a world that is in constant flux through increasing globalisation. At the same time, new technologies such as the Internet, gene manipulation and cloning give cause for us to consider the concept of identity in terms of subject generation and definition. Cindy Sherman’s work is counted among the classics of performance photography and artistic role play; starting out from this base, the exhibition will cast light on these relevant questions pertaining to the theme of Identity. Sherman’s photographic works – developed out of 1970s performance art and her specific interest in ever-changing identities – has never ceased to be a formative stylistic influence down to the immediate present.

The Cindy Sherman Effect. Identity and Transformation in Contemporary Art The exhibition addresses one of the key issues in art: the preoccupation with themes of identity, its construction, forms of transformation and fiction are hot topics in the face of a world that is in constant flux through increasing globalisation. At the same time, new technologies such as the Internet, gene manipulation and cloning give cause for us to consider the concept of identity in terms of subject generation and definition. Cindy Sherman’s work is counted among the classics of performance photography and artistic role play; starting out from this base, the exhibition will cast light on these relevant questions pertaining to the theme of Identity. Sherman’s photographic works – developed out of 1970s performance art and her specific interest in ever-changing identities – has never ceased to be a formative stylistic influence down to the immediate present.
Roman Signer
Roman Signer
Vienna - Eschenbachgasse 11
until 30-05-2020

Roman Signer

Roman Signer
Femininity
Femininity
Cologne - Jülicher Strasse 14
until 27-06-2020

Femininity Nobuyoshi Araki, Candice Breitz, Barbara deGenevieve, Richard Kern, Ugo Rondinone, Weegee (Arthur Fellig), Anonymous The view of women in art history, be it in painting or photography, is dominated by a masculine viewpoint and goes hand in hand with power, dominance and desire. Femininity brings together photographic works from the 1950s to the 1990s that embody and address this patriarchal view, but also repeatedly disrupt it.

Femininity Nobuyoshi Araki, Candice Breitz, Barbara deGenevieve, Richard Kern, Ugo Rondinone, Weegee (Arthur Fellig), Anonymous The view of women in art history, be it in painting or photography, is dominated by a masculine viewpoint and goes hand in hand with power, dominance and desire. Femininity brings together photographic works from the 1950s to the 1990s that embody and address this patriarchal view, but also repeatedly disrupt it.
Art Cologne
Art Cologne
Cologne - St. Apern Strasse 26
until 13-06-2020

Art Cologne  Karla Black, Maria Brunner, Isabella Ducrot, Jadé Fadojutimi, Ximena Garrido-Lecca, Meuser, Marcel Odenbach, Tobias Pils, Seth Price, Monika Sosnowska, John Stezaker, Hiroki Tsukuda and Christopher Williams 

Art Cologne  Karla Black, Maria Brunner, Isabella Ducrot, Jadé Fadojutimi, Ximena Garrido-Lecca, Meuser, Marcel Odenbach, Tobias Pils, Seth Price, Monika Sosnowska, John Stezaker, Hiroki Tsukuda and Christopher Williams 
Yelena Popova
Yelena Popova
Cologne - Aachener Strasse 65
until 30-05-2020

Yelena Popova – Landscapes of Power With her exhibition "Landscapes of Power" (the title references a book by Sylvia Crowe, Landscape of Power, published in 1958) Yelena Popova in a way returns to her beginnings. Working across a range of media including painting, installation and tapestry, Popova’s research project addresses an ongoing fascination of the nuclear history and materiality.

Yelena Popova – Landscapes of Power With her exhibition "Landscapes of Power" (the title references a book by Sylvia Crowe, Landscape of Power, published in 1958) Yelena Popova in a way returns to her beginnings. Working across a range of media including painting, installation and tapestry, Popova’s research project addresses an ongoing fascination of the nuclear history and materiality.
Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
Cologne - Hahnenstrasse 6
until 12-07-2020

Tony Conrad  The experimental artist, whose career spans over six decades, counts as a central figure of the avant-garde and media art. As a violinist and pioneer of Minimal Music, his musical work—in composition, performance, and self-made musical instruments—is inevitably linked to his work as a visual artist. Conrad was a master of "crossover", of bridging and connecting different disciplines, so that it seems impossible to imagine the interdependence between fine art, film, music, and performance in contemporary art without him.

Tony Conrad  The experimental artist, whose career spans over six decades, counts as a central figure of the avant-garde and media art. As a violinist and pioneer of Minimal Music, his musical work—in composition, performance, and self-made musical instruments—is inevitably linked to his work as a visual artist. Conrad was a master of "crossover", of bridging and connecting different disciplines, so that it seems impossible to imagine the interdependence between fine art, film, music, and performance in contemporary art without him.
Avery Singer
Avery Singer
Cologne - Hein­rich-Böll-Platz
until 04-10-2020

Schultze Projects #2 – Avery Singer For the se­cond edi­tion of the se­ries Schultze Pro­jects, the Amer­i­can artist Av­ery Singer has cre­at­ed a new, site-spe­cif­ic work for the stair­well at the Mu­se­um Lud­wig. The sev­en-part work is over sev­en­teen me­ters long and three and a half me­ters high. The name of the se­ries re­fers to Ber­nard Schultze and his wife Ur­su­la (Schultze-Bluhm), whose es­tate is ma­n­aged by the Mu­se­um Lud­wig, and in whose me­m­o­ry ev­ery two years since 2017 an artist has been in­vit­ed to cre­ate a ma­jor work for the pro­mi­nent front wall of the stair­well.

Schultze Projects #2 – Avery Singer For the se­cond edi­tion of the se­ries Schultze Pro­jects, the Amer­i­can artist Av­ery Singer has cre­at­ed a new, site-spe­cif­ic work for the stair­well at the Mu­se­um Lud­wig. The sev­en-part work is over sev­en­teen me­ters long and three and a half me­ters high. The name of the se­ries re­fers to Ber­nard Schultze and his wife Ur­su­la (Schultze-Bluhm), whose es­tate is ma­n­aged by the Mu­se­um Lud­wig, and in whose me­m­o­ry ev­ery two years since 2017 an artist has been in­vit­ed to cre­ate a ma­jor work for the pro­mi­nent front wall of the stair­well.
exp. 3: Affect Archives. Sinthujan Varatharajah & Osías Yanov
exp. 3: Affect Archives. Sinthujan Varatharajah & Osías Yanov
Berlin - Bornemannstrasse 9
until 25-07-2020

exp. 3: Affect Archives. Sinthujan Varatharajah & Osías Yanov Sinthujan Varatharajah and Osías Yanov explore different tracings of the body and the imprints of its collective geographies. Their contributions center around the obstacles and objects that keep us apart, but that occasionally become penetrable, allowing bodies to press together, move through, and flow. How can we understand bodies as reservoirs of historical and sensual memories, bodies as borders in and of themselves? Varatharajah is a researcher building an archive of living memory; Yanov is an artist who excavates the body, queering it into a source of archaic meaning. At stake are not only different modes of reconstructing lost journeys but also ways of shaping the future memories of ourselves.  

exp. 3: Affect Archives. Sinthujan Varatharajah & Osías Yanov Sinthujan Varatharajah and Osías Yanov explore different tracings of the body and the imprints of its collective geographies. Their contributions center around the obstacles and objects that keep us apart, but that occasionally become penetrable, allowing bodies to press together, move through, and flow. How can we understand bodies as reservoirs of historical and sensual memories, bodies as borders in and of themselves? Varatharajah is a researcher building an archive of living memory; Yanov is an artist who excavates the body, queering it into a source of archaic meaning. At stake are not only different modes of reconstructing lost journeys but also ways of shaping the future memories of ourselves.  
Lothar Hempel
Lothar Hempel
Berlin - Fasanenstrasse 61
until 30-05-2020

Lothar Hempel – Freitag der 13.  

Lothar Hempel – Freitag der 13.  
Elmgreen & Dragset
Elmgreen & Dragset
Berlin - Alexandrinenstrasse 118-121
until 02-08-2020

Elmgreen & Dragset – Short Story For their first solo exhibition at König Galerie in Berlin, Elmgreen & Dragset will present three new figurative sculptures within an immersive setting that transforms the visual appearance of the upper gallery, the Nave, at St. Agnes.

Elmgreen & Dragset – Short Story For their first solo exhibition at König Galerie in Berlin, Elmgreen & Dragset will present three new figurative sculptures within an immersive setting that transforms the visual appearance of the upper gallery, the Nave, at St. Agnes.
Sigmar Polke
Sigmar Polke
Berlin - Goethestrasse 2/3
until 30-05-2020

Sigmar Polke – "Zeitreise" Photographs 1966–1986 Galerie Max Hetzler is pleased to announce the solo exhibition "ZEITREISE" – Photographs 1966 – 1986. Collection Georg Polke with photographs by Sigmar Polke from the Collection Georg Polke at Goethestraße 2/3. In his early photographs, Sigmar Polke proves to be an experimental quick- change artist and alchemist in the darkroom. Most of the photographs have only recently been revealed, characterising Sigmar Polke as a protagonist of the art world and perceptive chronicler with a unique sense of humour. The broad set of photographs points to a life of constant companionship with the camera, and takes its viewer on a journey back in time to the late 60s and 70s up until Polke's participation in the 1986 Biennale. In numerous photographs Polke depicts his immediate surroundings: in his Sigmar Polke, Untitled (Dog), 1970-1980 home, at frst in Düsseldorf, from 1972 onwards at the Gaspelshof in Willich, later on in Cologne, and also of visits to vernissages and of travels. This creates “incredible documents of being present” (Bice Curiger), which bear witness to the photographer's zest for life and compassion, his alertness and presence. Life and art merge into one another in his images, whereby the Rhenish art scene of the 1970s always tended to stage itself in front of the lens. Polke defes rules in an extremely carefree way in his photography, constantly searching for ways to escape the triviality of everyday life. By processing his photographs with various technical and photochemical interventions, Polke explores the limits of the medium, leaving the sentiment of photography as a mere form of documentation far behind. He purposely blurs and disrespects exposure time, solarises, erases certain parts of the image and plays with double exposure. Spontaneously manipulating and superposing negatives, on occasion under the infuence of hallucinatory substances, contributes to giving his work a particular mystical glow. Through the processing, the motifs become ambiguous and ambivalent, at the same time they are alienated by a surreal picture language and undergo a superelevation, whereby Polke's photography signifcantly gains characteristics of his paintings. “Polke uses deliberately produced 'mistakes' and random efects as a kind of catalyst. By doing so he creates humorous images that break from everyday life and endow a mysterious aura to the trivial.”(Dr. Fritz Emslander, Stellvertretender Direktor, Museum Morsbroich, Leverkusen, 2018) Some of the photographs in the Georg Polke Collection derive from the photographic laboratory at the Gaspelshof in Willich, which Sigmar Polke partly left to his son Georg in 1978, while another part was given to Georg Polke by his father in 1986. For many years the photographs remained fairly unknown and frst came into the public eye in 2018 in the exhibition Sigmar Polke. Fotografen 70-80 at the Museum Morsbroich, Leverkusen, and were presented the following year in the exhibition Sigmar Polke's Photographic Infamies at LE BAL, Paris.   The exhibition is complemented by a large-scale vitrine showcasing almost all monographic publications by and about Sigmar Polke. The vast collection (Prigge Collection, Eifel) spans all exhibition catalogues and publishing house publications as well as the majority of distributed invitation cards, leafets and other ephemera. Apart from this it comprises rare catalogue editions, catalogues with original drawings by Polke and limited edition artist books. The bibliophile collector Thomas Prigge has been following Polke's exhibitions and publications intensively since the late 1960s and assured that he "always kept everything". Prigge's large archive cabinet contains the entire Polke collection published to date, spanning from Polke's frst publication on the occasion of his frst solo exhibition at the Galerie Rene Block (Berlin, 1966) to the most recent exhibition catalogues. Over many years the passionate collector rounded of his archive with true rarities – including for example the typescript of Polke's self-interview in 1966, the artist booklet on the occasion of the legendary exhibition Fünf in Köln (Kölnischer Kunstverein, 1979), published in only a few photocopies, as well as unique works, such as Polke's collaged comic Diabolik (1979) and his randomly executed klecksographs ohne Titel (Stenogramme) in a binder from 1985. The numerous publications on Sigmar Polke's photographic oeuvre are presented in display cases. Sigmar Polke (1941–2010), lived and worked in Düsseldorf, Cologne and Hamburg. Polke's work was part of solo and group exhibitions in renown institutions.  

Sigmar Polke – "Zeitreise" Photographs 1966–1986 Galerie Max Hetzler is pleased to announce the solo exhibition "ZEITREISE" – Photographs 1966 – 1986. Collection Georg Polke with photographs by Sigmar Polke from the Collection Georg Polke at Goethestraße 2/3. In his early photographs, Sigmar Polke proves to be an experimental quick- change artist and alchemist in the darkroom. Most of the photographs have only recently been revealed, characterising Sigmar Polke as a protagonist of the art world and perceptive chronicler with a unique sense of humour. The broad set of photographs points to a life of constant companionship with the camera, and takes its viewer on a journey back in time to the late 60s and 70s up until Polke's participation in the 1986 Biennale. In numerous photographs Polke depicts his immediate surroundings: in his Sigmar Polke, Untitled (Dog), 1970-1980 home, at frst in Düsseldorf, from 1972 onwards at the Gaspelshof in Willich, later on in Cologne, and also of visits to vernissages and of travels. This creates “incredible documents of being present” (Bice Curiger), which bear witness to the photographer's zest for life and compassion, his alertness and presence. Life and art merge into one another in his images, whereby the Rhenish art scene of the 1970s always tended to stage itself in front of the lens. Polke defes rules in an extremely carefree way in his photography, constantly searching for ways to escape the triviality of everyday life. By processing his photographs with various technical and photochemical interventions, Polke explores the limits of the medium, leaving the sentiment of photography as a mere form of documentation far behind. He purposely blurs and disrespects exposure time, solarises, erases certain parts of the image and plays with double exposure. Spontaneously manipulating and superposing negatives, on occasion under the infuence of hallucinatory substances, contributes to giving his work a particular mystical glow. Through the processing, the motifs become ambiguous and ambivalent, at the same time they are alienated by a surreal picture language and undergo a superelevation, whereby Polke's photography signifcantly gains characteristics of his paintings. “Polke uses deliberately produced 'mistakes' and random efects as a kind of catalyst. By doing so he creates humorous images that break from everyday life and endow a mysterious aura to the trivial.”(Dr. Fritz Emslander, Stellvertretender Direktor, Museum Morsbroich, Leverkusen, 2018) Some of the photographs in the Georg Polke Collection derive from the photographic laboratory at the Gaspelshof in Willich, which Sigmar Polke partly left to his son Georg in 1978, while another part was given to Georg Polke by his father in 1986. For many years the photographs remained fairly unknown and frst came into the public eye in 2018 in the exhibition Sigmar Polke. Fotografen 70-80 at the Museum Morsbroich, Leverkusen, and were presented the following year in the exhibition Sigmar Polke's Photographic Infamies at LE BAL, Paris.   The exhibition is complemented by a large-scale vitrine showcasing almost all monographic publications by and about Sigmar Polke. The vast collection (Prigge Collection, Eifel) spans all exhibition catalogues and publishing house publications as well as the majority of distributed invitation cards, leafets and other ephemera. Apart from this it comprises rare catalogue editions, catalogues with original drawings by Polke and limited edition artist books. The bibliophile collector Thomas Prigge has been following Polke's exhibitions and publications intensively since the late 1960s and assured that he "always kept everything". Prigge's large archive cabinet contains the entire Polke collection published to date, spanning from Polke's frst publication on the occasion of his frst solo exhibition at the Galerie Rene Block (Berlin, 1966) to the most recent exhibition catalogues. Over many years the passionate collector rounded of his archive with true rarities – including for example the typescript of Polke's self-interview in 1966, the artist booklet on the occasion of the legendary exhibition Fünf in Köln (Kölnischer Kunstverein, 1979), published in only a few photocopies, as well as unique works, such as Polke's collaged comic Diabolik (1979) and his randomly executed klecksographs ohne Titel (Stenogramme) in a binder from 1985. The numerous publications on Sigmar Polke's photographic oeuvre are presented in display cases. Sigmar Polke (1941–2010), lived and worked in Düsseldorf, Cologne and Hamburg. Polke's work was part of solo and group exhibitions in renown institutions.  
Andreas Eriksson
Andreas Eriksson
Berlin - Linienstrasse 155
until 06-06-2020

Andreas Eriksson – Nite Flights neugerriemschneider is pleased to present its second solo exhibition with Andreas Eriksson at the gallery. Dedicated to his new series of paintings entitled Nite Flights (2019), the eponymous exhibition also features a selection of screen prints, monotypes and bronze sculptures by the artist, each of which plays off and gradually reveals his painterly vocabulary. Nite Flights unfolds like a journey through the night, delicately fusing notions of isolation and geographies with the natural and built worlds, shaping a context that is at once familiar and enigmatic. Engaging with painting as a source of metaphorical reference that expands its formal aspects, Andreas Eriksson derives the patterns, hues, textures and motifs that he employs from his immediate natural environment, with day- night cycles and the seasonally shifting color schemes of the Swedish landscape recurring in his work. As their titles suggest, the Nite Flights paintings capture moments just before dawn as seen through an airplane’s window. They emerge as presentations of abstract, unidentified and often dreamlike locations in which the permanent is confronted by the ephemeral, the static by the dynamic, the heavy by the weightless and the deliberate by the unconscious. Eriksson characterizes night, with its ability to nearly suspend time and trap light, as simultaneously unsettling and captivating. Formally, the paintings are distinguished by fields of color arranged in geographical patterns as discerned through the night, featuring a nuanced constellation of deep blacks, dark browns and nocturnal blues set against dusky highlights. Thin coats of acrylic are covered in thick strokes of oil paint to create a sense of luminescence emanating from the surface’s darkness reminiscent of the light cast by harvest, strawberry, blue and snow moons. The paintings, viewed in the context of Eriksson’s oeuvre, act as contrasting counterparts to his linen wall weavings, which are rendered in light, variegated yellow, beige and brown earth tones, visually drawing upon the landscape of the artist’s native Sweden. Acting as points of reference for the wall weavings are the three black-on- white screen prints on view: Subrosa, Sketch for unfinished painting, and Arsenura (all 2017). With their pared down compositions, they mirror the reduced nature of the black-and-white tapestry-making templates used by Eriksson and his team of weavers, and function as negative impressions of Andreas Eriksson’s nocturnal topographies. Framing the landscapes that surround Lake Vänern, Eriksson’s studio windows mark a threshold between inside and outside, creating a dialogue between them. The monotypes The Moon, Window First Snow, and Window 11 (all 2019) draw the viewer into a darkened winter landscape. Their compositions of night-like tones create depth through reflection, with the mark-making and layering characteristic of monotypes allowing for unpredictable, organic structures. The window reappears as the conceptual framework for Eriksson’s series Content is a Glimpse (2014 - ongoing) comprising bronze casts of birds that met their untimely end after colliding with Eriksson’s studio window. Reflections in windows create the illusion of landscape, ultimately misdirecting and deceiving. In a poetic attempt to suspend the birds’ decay, Eriksson immortalized them in bronze, furthering his fascination with capturing nature’s ephemera. Andreas Eriksson’s work is an exercise in remapping and reconsidering once familiar terrain. An exploration of an increasingly globalized, interconnected world, Nite Flights expands this line of inquiry to the celestial realm and creates a space for questions about our existence within time and space. Andreas Eriksson was born in 1975 in Björsäter, Sweden. Selected solo exhibitions include Cutouts, Mistakes and Threads, Braunsfelder, Cologne (2019), Work in Progress, Skissernas Museum, Lund (2017); Erosion, Kunstforum Baloise, Basel (2015); Roundabouts, Bonniers Konsthall, Stockholm (2014), Trondheim Kunstmuseum, Trondheim; Centre PasquArt, Biel; Reykjavik Art Museum, Reykjavik; The Nordic Pavilion, La Biennale di Venezia, Venice (2011); Walking the Dog, Lying on the Sofa, mumok Museum moderner Kunst Stiftung Ludwig, Vienna (2008). Group exhibitions include New Materialism, Bonniers Konsthall, Stockholm (2018); Monkey and Waterfall - Pictures of our Climate, Sara Hildén Art Museum, Tampere (2018); Making and Unmaking, Camden Arts Centre, London (2016); The Imminence of Poetics São Paulo Biennial, São Paulo (2012); Pink Caviar, Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, Humblebaek (2012) and Modernautställningen 2010 at the Moderna Museet, Stockholm in 2010. Andreas Eriksson lives and works in Kinnekulle, Sweden. For further press information and imagery, please contact Alexia Timmermans at neugerriemschneider: +49 30 288 77277 or [email protected]

Andreas Eriksson – Nite Flights neugerriemschneider is pleased to present its second solo exhibition with Andreas Eriksson at the gallery. Dedicated to his new series of paintings entitled Nite Flights (2019), the eponymous exhibition also features a selection of screen prints, monotypes and bronze sculptures by the artist, each of which plays off and gradually reveals his painterly vocabulary. Nite Flights unfolds like a journey through the night, delicately fusing notions of isolation and geographies with the natural and built worlds, shaping a context that is at once familiar and enigmatic. Engaging with painting as a source of metaphorical reference that expands its formal aspects, Andreas Eriksson derives the patterns, hues, textures and motifs that he employs from his immediate natural environment, with day- night cycles and the seasonally shifting color schemes of the Swedish landscape recurring in his work. As their titles suggest, the Nite Flights paintings capture moments just before dawn as seen through an airplane’s window. They emerge as presentations of abstract, unidentified and often dreamlike locations in which the permanent is confronted by the ephemeral, the static by the dynamic, the heavy by the weightless and the deliberate by the unconscious. Eriksson characterizes night, with its ability to nearly suspend time and trap light, as simultaneously unsettling and captivating. Formally, the paintings are distinguished by fields of color arranged in geographical patterns as discerned through the night, featuring a nuanced constellation of deep blacks, dark browns and nocturnal blues set against dusky highlights. Thin coats of acrylic are covered in thick strokes of oil paint to create a sense of luminescence emanating from the surface’s darkness reminiscent of the light cast by harvest, strawberry, blue and snow moons. The paintings, viewed in the context of Eriksson’s oeuvre, act as contrasting counterparts to his linen wall weavings, which are rendered in light, variegated yellow, beige and brown earth tones, visually drawing upon the landscape of the artist’s native Sweden. Acting as points of reference for the wall weavings are the three black-on- white screen prints on view: Subrosa, Sketch for unfinished painting, and Arsenura (all 2017). With their pared down compositions, they mirror the reduced nature of the black-and-white tapestry-making templates used by Eriksson and his team of weavers, and function as negative impressions of Andreas Eriksson’s nocturnal topographies. Framing the landscapes that surround Lake Vänern, Eriksson’s studio windows mark a threshold between inside and outside, creating a dialogue between them. The monotypes The Moon, Window First Snow, and Window 11 (all 2019) draw the viewer into a darkened winter landscape. Their compositions of night-like tones create depth through reflection, with the mark-making and layering characteristic of monotypes allowing for unpredictable, organic structures. The window reappears as the conceptual framework for Eriksson’s series Content is a Glimpse (2014 - ongoing) comprising bronze casts of birds that met their untimely end after colliding with Eriksson’s studio window. Reflections in windows create the illusion of landscape, ultimately misdirecting and deceiving. In a poetic attempt to suspend the birds’ decay, Eriksson immortalized them in bronze, furthering his fascination with capturing nature’s ephemera. Andreas Eriksson’s work is an exercise in remapping and reconsidering once familiar terrain. An exploration of an increasingly globalized, interconnected world, Nite Flights expands this line of inquiry to the celestial realm and creates a space for questions about our existence within time and space. Andreas Eriksson was born in 1975 in Björsäter, Sweden. Selected solo exhibitions include Cutouts, Mistakes and Threads, Braunsfelder, Cologne (2019), Work in Progress, Skissernas Museum, Lund (2017); Erosion, Kunstforum Baloise, Basel (2015); Roundabouts, Bonniers Konsthall, Stockholm (2014), Trondheim Kunstmuseum, Trondheim; Centre PasquArt, Biel; Reykjavik Art Museum, Reykjavik; The Nordic Pavilion, La Biennale di Venezia, Venice (2011); Walking the Dog, Lying on the Sofa, mumok Museum moderner Kunst Stiftung Ludwig, Vienna (2008). Group exhibitions include New Materialism, Bonniers Konsthall, Stockholm (2018); Monkey and Waterfall - Pictures of our Climate, Sara Hildén Art Museum, Tampere (2018); Making and Unmaking, Camden Arts Centre, London (2016); The Imminence of Poetics São Paulo Biennial, São Paulo (2012); Pink Caviar, Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, Humblebaek (2012) and Modernautställningen 2010 at the Moderna Museet, Stockholm in 2010. Andreas Eriksson lives and works in Kinnekulle, Sweden. For further press information and imagery, please contact Alexia Timmermans at neugerriemschneider: +49 30 288 77277 or [email protected]
Bernhard Martin
Bernhard Martin
Berlin - Argentinische Allee 30
until 05-07-2020

Bernhard Martin – Image Ballett Bernhard Martin (b. 1966) is one of those painters, we might call them visual vagabonds, who trawl the seas of the internet, social media as well as art history for images to process. Passionately, Martin seizes on images, which trigger desires, fears and nausea. Intermingled with his own world of private desires he translates the material by sophisticated painterly means into nightmares. Here, erotic fantasies mix with the newspeak of newsreaders. Hot air is turned into humbug. Garbage is spoken. And among the codswallop and the hammer and tongs is the occasional eye and ear. Everything is possible. Everything is conceivable. Nothing is out of the question in the furious, rousing imagery between the depiction of saints and of the apocalypse, which Bernhard Martin has created since the 1990s. Image Ballet represents a first survey of the artist, who grew up in Kassel, has lived in Barcelona, Nice and London before making his home on the banks of the river Spree in Berlin. On the occasion of the show he has created a new cycle entitled “Le Mot” on the subject of influencers, press conferences, fake news and language. In the catalogue Munich based philosopher Björn Vedder develops further insights into these subjects. In addition, publisher Florian Illies elicits provocative comments on painting from the artist in the catalogue interview. 

Bernhard Martin – Image Ballett Bernhard Martin (b. 1966) is one of those painters, we might call them visual vagabonds, who trawl the seas of the internet, social media as well as art history for images to process. Passionately, Martin seizes on images, which trigger desires, fears and nausea. Intermingled with his own world of private desires he translates the material by sophisticated painterly means into nightmares. Here, erotic fantasies mix with the newspeak of newsreaders. Hot air is turned into humbug. Garbage is spoken. And among the codswallop and the hammer and tongs is the occasional eye and ear. Everything is possible. Everything is conceivable. Nothing is out of the question in the furious, rousing imagery between the depiction of saints and of the apocalypse, which Bernhard Martin has created since the 1990s. Image Ballet represents a first survey of the artist, who grew up in Kassel, has lived in Barcelona, Nice and London before making his home on the banks of the river Spree in Berlin. On the occasion of the show he has created a new cycle entitled “Le Mot” on the subject of influencers, press conferences, fake news and language. In the catalogue Munich based philosopher Björn Vedder develops further insights into these subjects. In addition, publisher Florian Illies elicits provocative comments on painting from the artist in the catalogue interview. 
Heimo Zobernig
Heimo Zobernig
Berlin - Weydingerstrasse 2/4
until 20-06-2020

Heimo Zobernig For a few years now Heimo Zobernig has been going outdoors with his camera to photograph plants. An experiment for him. He is not nostalgic. Zobernig is always interested in the latest technical possibilities. A digital camera can nowadays easily record sequences of 20 frames per second. The best picture may be that which cannot be made "consciously" at all, but one from the sequence that the machine takes when its release button is pressed ("It" photographs). In the magic moment Roland Barthes once called "punctum", the machine makes the perfect picture. The art is above all to recognize it. The relationship between tools and artists is shifting. Authorship is not 100% autonomous – it has never been. High-speed cameras and their possibilities come closer to the image that photography has always dreamed of, the image of an imperishable presence of the captured. But they cannot do without the view, which filters out the decisive picture from a number of similar ones. Painting approaches this moment, the moment of aesthetic experience which art has been trying to catch up with since the beginning of modernity, in a different way. Painting is always "made". Back in the studio, Zobernig blanks out his photo experiment. The idea of "doing something" with the photos takes a back seat. In front of the canvas, he doesn’t even think that it might have something to do with his current production. How do you approach the "unmade" with painting? Make a painting and then paint it again and again. After the first repetition, the focus is no longer on the motif, but perhaps on the painting process or, as with the camera, on the sequential automatism. The aim is apparently not to reach perfection in painting as with Asian copying techniques. On the contrary, maybe it is possible to unlearn “making” in repetition, and then the perfect picture happens by accident. The art here is to see it.

Heimo Zobernig For a few years now Heimo Zobernig has been going outdoors with his camera to photograph plants. An experiment for him. He is not nostalgic. Zobernig is always interested in the latest technical possibilities. A digital camera can nowadays easily record sequences of 20 frames per second. The best picture may be that which cannot be made "consciously" at all, but one from the sequence that the machine takes when its release button is pressed ("It" photographs). In the magic moment Roland Barthes once called "punctum", the machine makes the perfect picture. The art is above all to recognize it. The relationship between tools and artists is shifting. Authorship is not 100% autonomous – it has never been. High-speed cameras and their possibilities come closer to the image that photography has always dreamed of, the image of an imperishable presence of the captured. But they cannot do without the view, which filters out the decisive picture from a number of similar ones. Painting approaches this moment, the moment of aesthetic experience which art has been trying to catch up with since the beginning of modernity, in a different way. Painting is always "made". Back in the studio, Zobernig blanks out his photo experiment. The idea of "doing something" with the photos takes a back seat. In front of the canvas, he doesn’t even think that it might have something to do with his current production. How do you approach the "unmade" with painting? Make a painting and then paint it again and again. After the first repetition, the focus is no longer on the motif, but perhaps on the painting process or, as with the camera, on the sequential automatism. The aim is apparently not to reach perfection in painting as with Asian copying techniques. On the contrary, maybe it is possible to unlearn “making” in repetition, and then the perfect picture happens by accident. The art here is to see it.
Daniel Steegman Mangrané
Daniel Steegman Mangrané
Berlin - Potsdamer Strasse 81E
until 06-06-2020

Daniel Steegman Mangrané – Fog Dog Esther Schipper is pleased to announce Daniel Steegmann Mangrané’s second solo exhibition with the gallery. Entitled Fog Dog, the exhibition includes architectural light interventions, a sound installation and a new film.    A two-part light intervention greets the visitor upon entering the exhibition. Lit entirely by natural light, angled dividing walls transform the space into a series of connecting rooms. A large triangular opening in the ceiling and a head-high funnel-shaped construction narrowing toward an aperture fundamentally alter the experience of the space, controlling and shaping the entering light. The works evoke a long tradition of encounters with natural light, drawing attention to the subjectivity of perception and its metaphorical associations.   A second rectangular construction in the back of the gallery opens into an adjoining room, funnelling the light to create a diffuse brightness, apparition-like. While the rectangular openings recall the windows found in ecclesiastic architecture and its tradition of controlling light (e.g. as marker of the divine), yet also obliquely refer to the work of 20th century light & space artists constructing environments to shape light.   The visual experience—perhaps synaesthetically felt as tactility of light as well—is augmented by the artist’s introduction of a sound-based work: the floor of the exhibition space is covered with fine gravel, giving an unexpected feeling and sound to the visitor’s gait, as a series of human and animal steps can be heard moving closer and further away again in irregular intervals. For the visitor these disembodied sounds may take on a ghostly quality—suggesting the presence of others, no longer or not yet visible.     In the largest semi-enclosed room created by the divisions of the space, Steegmann Mangrané’s new film, Fog Dog, will be screened. Premiered in early February at the Dhaka Art Summit 2020, Fog Dog is the artist’s first foray into cinematic storytelling. It takes as point of departure the curious interaction of human and non-human inhabitants of the Institute of Fine Arts of Dhaka, documenting the daily life of the school and and the numerous stray dogs that live there and seem to lead a parallel existence.   Designed by architect and pioneer of Bangladeshi modernism Muzharul Islam (1923-2012) and characterized by an open structure—open colonnades, free-standing staircases, ceramic jalousies, and wooden screens allow for an interweaving of interior and exterior—the building is both stage and protagonist of the film. Boundaries between inside and outside, building and surrounding gardens, institutional and public spaces seem fluid. The ambient noises of the tropical landscape and the urban environment mingle, creating a richly evocative sonic landscape.    Drawing on the inextricable entanglement of traces of the past and prospects of the future in today’s realities, conversations about the lasting consequences of the colonial past and a TV report on the effects of climate change are woven into the daily lives we encounter, as the film settles in on the routine of the school’s nightwatchman. During the night the building is visited by a ghostly presence—a phantom that will not seem out of place and continues to haunt its guardian even after daybreak.    Both the film Fog Dog, with its ample portrait of a world beyond human modes of existence, and the exhibition as a whole with its heightened awareness of light, sound, and tactility, created through the architectural interventions and sound installation, seek to address how human perception makes sense of the world, questioning a traditional model of Western dichotomy between subject and object, and proposing a more nuanced, less hierarchical, and richer paradigm. The creation of the subject through experience and its relation to others is posited in a continuum, not one that is characterized by linear progression but by simultaneity. Subjectivity is understood not as an individuation process but as a “cosmic ecology of selves,” as the anthropologist Eduardo Kohn puts it.   The doubling of concrete and ephemeral phenomena is reinforced by the exhibition’s title, Fog Dog, which can refer to a faint beam of light sometimes seen in a breaking fog bank but also refers to the metaphorical trope of a fog’s fleeting, ambulant and thus “dog-like” quality.     Daniel Steegmann Mangrané was born in 1977 in Barcelona, Spain. He studied at the Escola de disseny I art, and the Gris ART School of Photography, both in Barcelona. The artist lives and works in Rio de Janeiro. Steegmann Mangrané was nominated for the prestigious PIPA Prize for Latin American artists in 2012, 2013 and 2014.

Daniel Steegman Mangrané – Fog Dog Esther Schipper is pleased to announce Daniel Steegmann Mangrané’s second solo exhibition with the gallery. Entitled Fog Dog, the exhibition includes architectural light interventions, a sound installation and a new film.    A two-part light intervention greets the visitor upon entering the exhibition. Lit entirely by natural light, angled dividing walls transform the space into a series of connecting rooms. A large triangular opening in the ceiling and a head-high funnel-shaped construction narrowing toward an aperture fundamentally alter the experience of the space, controlling and shaping the entering light. The works evoke a long tradition of encounters with natural light, drawing attention to the subjectivity of perception and its metaphorical associations.   A second rectangular construction in the back of the gallery opens into an adjoining room, funnelling the light to create a diffuse brightness, apparition-like. While the rectangular openings recall the windows found in ecclesiastic architecture and its tradition of controlling light (e.g. as marker of the divine), yet also obliquely refer to the work of 20th century light & space artists constructing environments to shape light.   The visual experience—perhaps synaesthetically felt as tactility of light as well—is augmented by the artist’s introduction of a sound-based work: the floor of the exhibition space is covered with fine gravel, giving an unexpected feeling and sound to the visitor’s gait, as a series of human and animal steps can be heard moving closer and further away again in irregular intervals. For the visitor these disembodied sounds may take on a ghostly quality—suggesting the presence of others, no longer or not yet visible.     In the largest semi-enclosed room created by the divisions of the space, Steegmann Mangrané’s new film, Fog Dog, will be screened. Premiered in early February at the Dhaka Art Summit 2020, Fog Dog is the artist’s first foray into cinematic storytelling. It takes as point of departure the curious interaction of human and non-human inhabitants of the Institute of Fine Arts of Dhaka, documenting the daily life of the school and and the numerous stray dogs that live there and seem to lead a parallel existence.   Designed by architect and pioneer of Bangladeshi modernism Muzharul Islam (1923-2012) and characterized by an open structure—open colonnades, free-standing staircases, ceramic jalousies, and wooden screens allow for an interweaving of interior and exterior—the building is both stage and protagonist of the film. Boundaries between inside and outside, building and surrounding gardens, institutional and public spaces seem fluid. The ambient noises of the tropical landscape and the urban environment mingle, creating a richly evocative sonic landscape.    Drawing on the inextricable entanglement of traces of the past and prospects of the future in today’s realities, conversations about the lasting consequences of the colonial past and a TV report on the effects of climate change are woven into the daily lives we encounter, as the film settles in on the routine of the school’s nightwatchman. During the night the building is visited by a ghostly presence—a phantom that will not seem out of place and continues to haunt its guardian even after daybreak.    Both the film Fog Dog, with its ample portrait of a world beyond human modes of existence, and the exhibition as a whole with its heightened awareness of light, sound, and tactility, created through the architectural interventions and sound installation, seek to address how human perception makes sense of the world, questioning a traditional model of Western dichotomy between subject and object, and proposing a more nuanced, less hierarchical, and richer paradigm. The creation of the subject through experience and its relation to others is posited in a continuum, not one that is characterized by linear progression but by simultaneity. Subjectivity is understood not as an individuation process but as a “cosmic ecology of selves,” as the anthropologist Eduardo Kohn puts it.   The doubling of concrete and ephemeral phenomena is reinforced by the exhibition’s title, Fog Dog, which can refer to a faint beam of light sometimes seen in a breaking fog bank but also refers to the metaphorical trope of a fog’s fleeting, ambulant and thus “dog-like” quality.     Daniel Steegmann Mangrané was born in 1977 in Barcelona, Spain. He studied at the Escola de disseny I art, and the Gris ART School of Photography, both in Barcelona. The artist lives and works in Rio de Janeiro. Steegmann Mangrané was nominated for the prestigious PIPA Prize for Latin American artists in 2012, 2013 and 2014.
William Tucker
William Tucker
Berlin - Charlottenstrasse 13
until 19-06-2020

William Tucker – Figure Advancing William Tucker (*1935 in Cairo, lives in Williamsburg, MA) belonged to the influential circle of young British sculptors such as Philip King and Tim Scott in the 1970s. They were introduced as the 'New Generation' in the exhibition of the same name at the Whitechapel Art Gallery London in 1965 and provided decisive impulses for the development of abstract sculpture and the expansion of the concept of sculpture. During this time he also became known as a theoretician, critic and exhibition organizer. Tucker published the standard work on the history of the modern sculpture The Language of Sculpture in 1972 and published numerous reviews and essays in Studio International, the English counterpart of ARTFORUM.  In his fourth solo exhibition at the Buchmann Gallery, William Tucker realizes for the first time two monumental wall works, called Mural Engravings by the artist. The wall works are contrasted by three large-format bronzes, such as the work Figure Advancing, which was created in 2018 and is exhibited here for the first time. The wall works, Cat's Cradle IV, 2019, and Porte VI, 2019, consist of 6 cm deep and 6 cm wide incisions in the wall, which, painted black, form a negative relief. The Mural Engravings refer to three series of abstract sculptures from the early 1970s, the groups Shuttler, 1970, Cat's Cradle, 1971, and Porte from 1973, which, composed of linear elements, derive their power from the play of spatial illusions and analytically describe space. The Mural Engravings translate essential aspects of these historical works into two-dimensionality, thus updating their relevance. The oscillation between two- and three-dimensionality in the Mural Engravings also breaks the viewer's expectations: from a distance, the works are perceived as wall drawings or wall paintings and seem to be flat. The real three-dimensionality and depth of the work only becomes apparent on closer inspection. The negative space of the works, the 6 cm deep "engraving" of the wall, creates remarkable plasticity and also supports the three-dimensionality of the drawing on the wall, which the viewer concedes an illusionistic space. As reduced drawings that create their plasticity and create a virtual negative space, the two Mural Engravings form the antithesis to the large fully-plastic bronzes in the exhibition Figure Advancing, 2018, Cave, 2005, and Secret, 2010. These bronzes, which have been continuously advanced since the mid-1980s, oscillate between figure and pure form, preserving within themselves the delicate moment of transition from the inert, amorphous mass from which they are created, and moving towards the readable figure. The title-giving sculpture Figure Advancing from 2018 is one of the artist's most recent large-format works and is, in turn, more autonomously designed than the previous works, moving towards greater abstraction. The development of William Tucker's bronzes since the 1980s was preceded by a fundamental break with William Tucker's constructivist and minimalist practice, which secured the artist a place among radical and avant-garde artists from the early 1960s onwards. The exhibition now confidently unites his two fields of work and shows that the constructivist minimalist and anthropomorphic-figurative phases in William Tucker's extensive oeuvre were never mutually exclusive, but rather mutually dependent. Looking back on a rich body of work, the exhibition uses the new wall works to bridge the gap between the analytical approach of the artist's first phase of work, based on line, space, and body, and the current work, which takes on a new form in Figure Advancing.  

William Tucker – Figure Advancing William Tucker (*1935 in Cairo, lives in Williamsburg, MA) belonged to the influential circle of young British sculptors such as Philip King and Tim Scott in the 1970s. They were introduced as the 'New Generation' in the exhibition of the same name at the Whitechapel Art Gallery London in 1965 and provided decisive impulses for the development of abstract sculpture and the expansion of the concept of sculpture. During this time he also became known as a theoretician, critic and exhibition organizer. Tucker published the standard work on the history of the modern sculpture The Language of Sculpture in 1972 and published numerous reviews and essays in Studio International, the English counterpart of ARTFORUM.  In his fourth solo exhibition at the Buchmann Gallery, William Tucker realizes for the first time two monumental wall works, called Mural Engravings by the artist. The wall works are contrasted by three large-format bronzes, such as the work Figure Advancing, which was created in 2018 and is exhibited here for the first time. The wall works, Cat's Cradle IV, 2019, and Porte VI, 2019, consist of 6 cm deep and 6 cm wide incisions in the wall, which, painted black, form a negative relief. The Mural Engravings refer to three series of abstract sculptures from the early 1970s, the groups Shuttler, 1970, Cat's Cradle, 1971, and Porte from 1973, which, composed of linear elements, derive their power from the play of spatial illusions and analytically describe space. The Mural Engravings translate essential aspects of these historical works into two-dimensionality, thus updating their relevance. The oscillation between two- and three-dimensionality in the Mural Engravings also breaks the viewer's expectations: from a distance, the works are perceived as wall drawings or wall paintings and seem to be flat. The real three-dimensionality and depth of the work only becomes apparent on closer inspection. The negative space of the works, the 6 cm deep "engraving" of the wall, creates remarkable plasticity and also supports the three-dimensionality of the drawing on the wall, which the viewer concedes an illusionistic space. As reduced drawings that create their plasticity and create a virtual negative space, the two Mural Engravings form the antithesis to the large fully-plastic bronzes in the exhibition Figure Advancing, 2018, Cave, 2005, and Secret, 2010. These bronzes, which have been continuously advanced since the mid-1980s, oscillate between figure and pure form, preserving within themselves the delicate moment of transition from the inert, amorphous mass from which they are created, and moving towards the readable figure. The title-giving sculpture Figure Advancing from 2018 is one of the artist's most recent large-format works and is, in turn, more autonomously designed than the previous works, moving towards greater abstraction. The development of William Tucker's bronzes since the 1980s was preceded by a fundamental break with William Tucker's constructivist and minimalist practice, which secured the artist a place among radical and avant-garde artists from the early 1960s onwards. The exhibition now confidently unites his two fields of work and shows that the constructivist minimalist and anthropomorphic-figurative phases in William Tucker's extensive oeuvre were never mutually exclusive, but rather mutually dependent. Looking back on a rich body of work, the exhibition uses the new wall works to bridge the gap between the analytical approach of the artist's first phase of work, based on line, space, and body, and the current work, which takes on a new form in Figure Advancing.  
Rirkrit Tiravanija
Rirkrit Tiravanija
Basel - Drahtzugstrasse 67
until 31-05-2020

Rirkrit Tiravanija – The Odious Smell of Truth This is the second work of a ten-year programme of public installations produced by Beat Raeber, Galerie at Drahtzugstrasse 67 in Basel. Rirkrit Tiravanija's work is characterised by great versatility and a constant involvement of the viewer – exchange and freedom of interpretation are essential components of his practice. Since the late 1980s, he has been experimenting with open, sometimes surprising formats that question how the classical conceptions of art can be extended, how the boundaries of an exhibition space broadened, and its limiting barriers circumvented. Creating spaces for relationships, encounters and reactions forms the basis of his works. He works with different cultural contexts, linking them and using them as references. As a modern nomad – the Thai artist was born in Buenos Aires and lives between New York, Berlin and Chiang Mai – he uses the distinctive and connecting aspects of Western and Eastern ways of life and philosophies and integrates them into his work. Further influences come from literature, pop and news culture. Exploiting the mechanisms of propaganda or advertising, utilising their effect patterns, such as the oscillation between promises, deception, and applied truths, are key part of his work.  

Rirkrit Tiravanija – The Odious Smell of Truth This is the second work of a ten-year programme of public installations produced by Beat Raeber, Galerie at Drahtzugstrasse 67 in Basel. Rirkrit Tiravanija's work is characterised by great versatility and a constant involvement of the viewer – exchange and freedom of interpretation are essential components of his practice. Since the late 1980s, he has been experimenting with open, sometimes surprising formats that question how the classical conceptions of art can be extended, how the boundaries of an exhibition space broadened, and its limiting barriers circumvented. Creating spaces for relationships, encounters and reactions forms the basis of his works. He works with different cultural contexts, linking them and using them as references. As a modern nomad – the Thai artist was born in Buenos Aires and lives between New York, Berlin and Chiang Mai – he uses the distinctive and connecting aspects of Western and Eastern ways of life and philosophies and integrates them into his work. Further influences come from literature, pop and news culture. Exploiting the mechanisms of propaganda or advertising, utilising their effect patterns, such as the oscillation between promises, deception, and applied truths, are key part of his work.  
Steven Pippin
Steven Pippin
Düsseldorf - Ackerstrasse 71, corner of Birkenstrasse
until 20-06-2020

Steven Pippin – No Flash Photography  

Steven Pippin – No Flash Photography  
Charlotte Posenenske
Charlotte Posenenske
Düsseldorf - Platanenstrasse 7
until 21-08-2020

Charlotte Posenenske

Charlotte Posenenske
Siren Eun Young Jung
Siren Eun Young Jung
Düsseldorf - Grabbeplatz 4
until 26-07-2020

Siren Eun Young Jung – Deferral Theatre Kunstverein für die Rheinlande und Westfalen, Düsseldorf is pleased to present Deferral Theatre, the first comprehensive solo exhibition of siren eun young jung in Europe. Informed by historical acts of resistance, the research-driven practice of the Seoul-based artist engages across a wide rage of media to critically deconstruct oppressive conventions around gender, tradition, and history. The starting point of the Düsseldorf exhibition is the Yeoseong Gukgeuk Project, her long-term research project on the so called Yeoseong Gukgeuk theatre: an art form similar to the Korean traditional opera, in which all characters – male or female – are played solely by women. After it peaked during the 1950s and 1960s its popularity swiftly declined, not least because of deviant ‘modernization ideologies’ of the military government of president Park Chung-hee. With this reinvention of traditional Korean female theatre, the Yeoseong Gukgeuk performer brought gender shifts into the limelight and undermined prevalent norms and binaries.

Siren Eun Young Jung – Deferral Theatre Kunstverein für die Rheinlande und Westfalen, Düsseldorf is pleased to present Deferral Theatre, the first comprehensive solo exhibition of siren eun young jung in Europe. Informed by historical acts of resistance, the research-driven practice of the Seoul-based artist engages across a wide rage of media to critically deconstruct oppressive conventions around gender, tradition, and history. The starting point of the Düsseldorf exhibition is the Yeoseong Gukgeuk Project, her long-term research project on the so called Yeoseong Gukgeuk theatre: an art form similar to the Korean traditional opera, in which all characters – male or female – are played solely by women. After it peaked during the 1950s and 1960s its popularity swiftly declined, not least because of deviant ‘modernization ideologies’ of the military government of president Park Chung-hee. With this reinvention of traditional Korean female theatre, the Yeoseong Gukgeuk performer brought gender shifts into the limelight and undermined prevalent norms and binaries.
Johannes Wohnseifer
Johannes Wohnseifer
Düsseldorf - Birkenstrasse 43
until 26-06-2020

Johannes Wohnseifer – B- B- Bilder The cool smile of an icon whose frontal portrait does not seem tangible. The seductive gaze of a significant pair of eyes, whose recognizability can undoubtedly be located in the pop culture and cultural history of the 20th and 21st centuries. The adult face of a woman in half profile as a representative of pride and strength. Opposite it, half the reflection of her face full of grace and dignity. And the wistful facial expression of a distant heroine, who is synonymous with a new form of female self-confidence as a symbol of a contemporary, surreal beauty. Johannes Wohnseifer’s pictures of the American musical star Beyoncé, shown on five different RAL wall paints, reflect all these facets, and at the same time illustrate the construct of a public identity, the true nature of which cannot be grasped behind the multilayered masks of a figure created over decades. A truly hyperrealistic picture that only shows the perceptibility of its iconic subject in fragments—as in the stuttering of the significant exhibition title B-B-Bilder. Only visible in their entirety from a distance through the perforation of the aluminum grids, the five equally sized prints on PVC banners shown in Johannes Wohnseifer’s second solo exhibition at Galerie Linn Lühn obscure the direct view of her face from close up. Mysterious and distant, like the image of a modern sphinx, her physical features recede and hide behind the mask of the painted metal elements, like a coarsening filter whose inverted picture puzzle is diametrically related to the tendencies of visual smoothing and image refinement on social media. As photographs that both name and question the subject of the media representation of a mainstream figure that shifts between cliché, symbol, and icon by taking it from the star’s Instagram profile, Wohnseifer’s works return to the subject of an earlier series of Beyoncé Paintings that he began between 2007 and 2008. Based on professional images for promotional purposes, in which the shaping of a star’s image represented and received by the media is determined primarily by external influences, Wohnseifer’s new works now examine the sustainability and visual significance of their iconic image. A figure whose image now moves between emancipated self-representation, feminist empowerment, and political emancipation as well as the controlled staging of its own (brand) identity through its omnipresence in social media. An image that we never look at in its entirety, despite its media oversaturation and constantly growing relevance, and that remains a surface. That eludes us, despite the strategy of appropriation chosen by Wohnseifer, even though we seem to be closer to it than ever through the mediation and intimate reach of media such as Instagram. Bearing the visual aura of a partly complementary contrast system of the color spectrum of historical Porsche paints, Johannes Wohnseifer’s manipulations between selfie and artistic portrait also form the connection of a monochrome abstract support with a figurative element. A template—see-through due to its perforation—on whose conceptual level original and cliché meet in the same way as icon and symbol. As artistic means, they are visual insignia represented by colors that outwardly describe the perception of a luxurious object as well as the formal means of industrial painting. The latter takes on an equal compositional role in Wohnseifer’s works across from the photographs, while situating its production process on the perforated plates in an asrea of the surface whose structures can also be found mirrored in the architecture of media representation. Auratic and unapproachable like the images on which they are based, they too become an independent picture, behind whose glowing grid patterns the silhouette of an icon always encodes itself anew. — Philipp Fernandes do Brito

Johannes Wohnseifer – B- B- Bilder The cool smile of an icon whose frontal portrait does not seem tangible. The seductive gaze of a significant pair of eyes, whose recognizability can undoubtedly be located in the pop culture and cultural history of the 20th and 21st centuries. The adult face of a woman in half profile as a representative of pride and strength. Opposite it, half the reflection of her face full of grace and dignity. And the wistful facial expression of a distant heroine, who is synonymous with a new form of female self-confidence as a symbol of a contemporary, surreal beauty. Johannes Wohnseifer’s pictures of the American musical star Beyoncé, shown on five different RAL wall paints, reflect all these facets, and at the same time illustrate the construct of a public identity, the true nature of which cannot be grasped behind the multilayered masks of a figure created over decades. A truly hyperrealistic picture that only shows the perceptibility of its iconic subject in fragments—as in the stuttering of the significant exhibition title B-B-Bilder. Only visible in their entirety from a distance through the perforation of the aluminum grids, the five equally sized prints on PVC banners shown in Johannes Wohnseifer’s second solo exhibition at Galerie Linn Lühn obscure the direct view of her face from close up. Mysterious and distant, like the image of a modern sphinx, her physical features recede and hide behind the mask of the painted metal elements, like a coarsening filter whose inverted picture puzzle is diametrically related to the tendencies of visual smoothing and image refinement on social media. As photographs that both name and question the subject of the media representation of a mainstream figure that shifts between cliché, symbol, and icon by taking it from the star’s Instagram profile, Wohnseifer’s works return to the subject of an earlier series of Beyoncé Paintings that he began between 2007 and 2008. Based on professional images for promotional purposes, in which the shaping of a star’s image represented and received by the media is determined primarily by external influences, Wohnseifer’s new works now examine the sustainability and visual significance of their iconic image. A figure whose image now moves between emancipated self-representation, feminist empowerment, and political emancipation as well as the controlled staging of its own (brand) identity through its omnipresence in social media. An image that we never look at in its entirety, despite its media oversaturation and constantly growing relevance, and that remains a surface. That eludes us, despite the strategy of appropriation chosen by Wohnseifer, even though we seem to be closer to it than ever through the mediation and intimate reach of media such as Instagram. Bearing the visual aura of a partly complementary contrast system of the color spectrum of historical Porsche paints, Johannes Wohnseifer’s manipulations between selfie and artistic portrait also form the connection of a monochrome abstract support with a figurative element. A template—see-through due to its perforation—on whose conceptual level original and cliché meet in the same way as icon and symbol. As artistic means, they are visual insignia represented by colors that outwardly describe the perception of a luxurious object as well as the formal means of industrial painting. The latter takes on an equal compositional role in Wohnseifer’s works across from the photographs, while situating its production process on the perforated plates in an asrea of the surface whose structures can also be found mirrored in the architecture of media representation. Auratic and unapproachable like the images on which they are based, they too become an independent picture, behind whose glowing grid patterns the silhouette of an icon always encodes itself anew. — Philipp Fernandes do Brito
degree_show
degree_show
Düsseldorf - Mannesmannufer 1b
until 21-06-2020

degree_show – out of KHM Céline Berger, András Blazsek, Viktor Brim, Anna Ehrenstein, Kerstin Ergenzinger, Denzel Russell, Søren Siebel presents Bas Grossfeldt In their works, the artists in degree_show – out of KHM react to social and natural developments of our time. Their work begins with observation, research, personal cultural backgrounds, and the use of a wide variety of media, with a focus on topics including natural and human resources, tradition and its reinterpretation, exploitation, and capitalism. All the films, pictures, performances, and installations featured in the exhibition deal with the relationship between people and places. They tell stories of workers, prisoners, artists, and different social groups. They deal with the destruction of nature and its influence on human life. The exhibition offers information, questions everyday patterns, and makes room for a longing for the essential: at the end of the space, visitors can let sound and movement, rain and wind carry them away and reflect on what they have seen and heard.  

degree_show – out of KHM Céline Berger, András Blazsek, Viktor Brim, Anna Ehrenstein, Kerstin Ergenzinger, Denzel Russell, Søren Siebel presents Bas Grossfeldt In their works, the artists in degree_show – out of KHM react to social and natural developments of our time. Their work begins with observation, research, personal cultural backgrounds, and the use of a wide variety of media, with a focus on topics including natural and human resources, tradition and its reinterpretation, exploitation, and capitalism. All the films, pictures, performances, and installations featured in the exhibition deal with the relationship between people and places. They tell stories of workers, prisoners, artists, and different social groups. They deal with the destruction of nature and its influence on human life. The exhibition offers information, questions everyday patterns, and makes room for a longing for the essential: at the end of the space, visitors can let sound and movement, rain and wind carry them away and reflect on what they have seen and heard.  
Ree Morton
Ree Morton
Los Angeles - 1717 East 7th Street
until 14-06-2020

Ree Morton – The Plant That Heals May Also Poison The Plant That Heals May Also Poison is the first major retrospective of artist Ree Morton (1936–1977) in the United States in forty years. The exhibition features several rarely seen works, including a selection of sculptures, drawings, paintings, and archival materials that span a single decade of artistic production before Morton’s untimely death in 1977. Her use of bold color, feminine imagery, and embrace of the decorative infused her objects with sly humor and asserted sentiment as a legitimate subject of artmaking. 

Ree Morton – The Plant That Heals May Also Poison The Plant That Heals May Also Poison is the first major retrospective of artist Ree Morton (1936–1977) in the United States in forty years. The exhibition features several rarely seen works, including a selection of sculptures, drawings, paintings, and archival materials that span a single decade of artistic production before Morton’s untimely death in 1977. Her use of bold color, feminine imagery, and embrace of the decorative infused her objects with sly humor and asserted sentiment as a legitimate subject of artmaking. 
Lawrence Weiner
Lawrence Weiner
Los Angeles - 6750 Santa Monica Boulevard
until 20-06-2020

Lawrence Weiner – On View Regen Projects is pleased to announce ON VIEW, an exhibition by New York-based artist Lawrence Weiner. This marks his tenth solo presentation at the gallery; his first, ASSUMING THE POSITION, was Regen Projects' inaugural show in 1989.    Lawrence Weiner describes his exhibition as follows:   IT’S ALL ABOUT THE THING ITSELF & HOW IT IS FIRST PERCEIVED & HOW IT IS USED   A leading figure in the development of the Conceptual art movement in the 1960s, Lawrence Weiner’s seminal and singular practice uses language as the core material in his work – a distinct challenge that redefined expectations of what an artwork is and can be. Questioning the fundamentals of sculpture and art-making itself, Weiner shifted his practice from object-making to producing text-based work with his 1968 precept:   1. THE ARTIST MAY CONSTRUCT THE WORK 2. THE WORK MAY BE FABRICATED 3. THE WORK NEED NOT BE BUILT   EACH BEING EQUAL AND CONSISTENT WITH THE INTENT OF THE ARTIST THE DECISION AS TO CONDITION RESTS WITH THE RECEIVER UPON THE OCCASION OF RECEIVERSHIP

Lawrence Weiner – On View Regen Projects is pleased to announce ON VIEW, an exhibition by New York-based artist Lawrence Weiner. This marks his tenth solo presentation at the gallery; his first, ASSUMING THE POSITION, was Regen Projects' inaugural show in 1989.    Lawrence Weiner describes his exhibition as follows:   IT’S ALL ABOUT THE THING ITSELF & HOW IT IS FIRST PERCEIVED & HOW IT IS USED   A leading figure in the development of the Conceptual art movement in the 1960s, Lawrence Weiner’s seminal and singular practice uses language as the core material in his work – a distinct challenge that redefined expectations of what an artwork is and can be. Questioning the fundamentals of sculpture and art-making itself, Weiner shifted his practice from object-making to producing text-based work with his 1968 precept:   1. THE ARTIST MAY CONSTRUCT THE WORK 2. THE WORK MAY BE FABRICATED 3. THE WORK NEED NOT BE BUILT   EACH BEING EQUAL AND CONSISTENT WITH THE INTENT OF THE ARTIST THE DECISION AS TO CONDITION RESTS WITH THE RECEIVER UPON THE OCCASION OF RECEIVERSHIP
Christopher Wool
Christopher Wool
Los Angeles - 221 South Grand Avenue
until 31-12-2020

Christopher Wool In celebration of The Broad's fifth anniversary, the museum will dedicate its first and third floor galleries to a series of free exhibitions and in-depth, single-artist presentations in a unique, rolling sequence beginning February 8 until early 2021 that includes deep dives into the work of icons of American postwar art and 1960s pop, key artists of the 1980s New York and Los Angeles art scenes, and works by important figures of the 1990s to the present day. An in-depth installation featuring 16 works by Christopher Wool (13 of which are on view for the first time at The Broad).

Christopher Wool In celebration of The Broad's fifth anniversary, the museum will dedicate its first and third floor galleries to a series of free exhibitions and in-depth, single-artist presentations in a unique, rolling sequence beginning February 8 until early 2021 that includes deep dives into the work of icons of American postwar art and 1960s pop, key artists of the 1980s New York and Los Angeles art scenes, and works by important figures of the 1990s to the present day. An in-depth installation featuring 16 works by Christopher Wool (13 of which are on view for the first time at The Broad).
Barbara Kruger
Barbara Kruger
Los Angeles - 152 North Central Avenue
until 30-11-2020

Barbara Kruger – Untitled (Questions) (1990/2018) MOCA has reinstalled the monumental wall work by Los Angeles–based artist Barbara Kruger (b. New York 1945), Untitled (Questions) (1990/2018). The emblematic red, white, and blue artwork was originally commissioned by MOCA in 1989 for the exhibition A Forest of Signs: Art in the Crisis of Representation, and was last installed in 1990 on the south wall of MOCA’s building (now The Geffen Contemporary at MOCA). The work holds an iconic place in the collective memory of Los Angeles’s art community and is considered one of the museum’s curatorial highlights over its forty-year history. This iteration is installed on the north facade of The Geffen Contemporary at MOCA, facing Temple Street and measuring 30 by 191 feet. Asking nine questions including “Who is beyond the law?,” “Who is bought and sold?,” and “Who is free to choose?,” the work points to issues of patriotism, civic engagement, and power relations. In connection with the work, MOCA led a series of voter registration efforts during the 2018 midterms, and will continue these efforts in advance of the 2020 general election.

Barbara Kruger – Untitled (Questions) (1990/2018) MOCA has reinstalled the monumental wall work by Los Angeles–based artist Barbara Kruger (b. New York 1945), Untitled (Questions) (1990/2018). The emblematic red, white, and blue artwork was originally commissioned by MOCA in 1989 for the exhibition A Forest of Signs: Art in the Crisis of Representation, and was last installed in 1990 on the south wall of MOCA’s building (now The Geffen Contemporary at MOCA). The work holds an iconic place in the collective memory of Los Angeles’s art community and is considered one of the museum’s curatorial highlights over its forty-year history. This iteration is installed on the north facade of The Geffen Contemporary at MOCA, facing Temple Street and measuring 30 by 191 feet. Asking nine questions including “Who is beyond the law?,” “Who is bought and sold?,” and “Who is free to choose?,” the work points to issues of patriotism, civic engagement, and power relations. In connection with the work, MOCA led a series of voter registration efforts during the 2018 midterms, and will continue these efforts in advance of the 2020 general election.
Cyprien Gaillard
Cyprien Gaillard
Los Angeles - 5900 Wilshire Boulevard
until 30-06-2020

Cyprien Gaillard – Reefs to Rigs Reefs to Rigs is an exhibition of new sculptures and photographs by Cyprien Gaillard, as well as his most recent film, in a presentation that connects with the Los Angeles gallery’s particular site above a future LA Metro station and across from the La Brea Tar Pits. At this intersection of urban infrastructure and prehistoric matter, Gaillard’s works emphasize the cyclical, era-spanning interactions between nature and human industry, made visible and palpable through materials encountered across the world. On the ground floor of Sprüth Magers, Los Angeles, large wall-based sculptures circumscribe the gallery space, composed of impossibly thin limestone panels atop honeycomb aluminum structures. Swirling constellations of fossils are embedded within each panel, as is the cryptic logo of the New Jersey Transit commuter rail line (with its interlocking “N” and “J”) that connects the state’s cities and towns with the New York City metroplex. The works’ thick aluminum substrates, which protrude from the wall, lay bare the industrial, fabricated nature of each sculpture, as do inlaid screws, whose placement across one of the stone panels recreates—on a one-to-one scale—those found around the windows of a New York MTA subway car. This same arrangement is materialized in pink coral inlay in several other panels.

Cyprien Gaillard – Reefs to Rigs Reefs to Rigs is an exhibition of new sculptures and photographs by Cyprien Gaillard, as well as his most recent film, in a presentation that connects with the Los Angeles gallery’s particular site above a future LA Metro station and across from the La Brea Tar Pits. At this intersection of urban infrastructure and prehistoric matter, Gaillard’s works emphasize the cyclical, era-spanning interactions between nature and human industry, made visible and palpable through materials encountered across the world. On the ground floor of Sprüth Magers, Los Angeles, large wall-based sculptures circumscribe the gallery space, composed of impossibly thin limestone panels atop honeycomb aluminum structures. Swirling constellations of fossils are embedded within each panel, as is the cryptic logo of the New Jersey Transit commuter rail line (with its interlocking “N” and “J”) that connects the state’s cities and towns with the New York City metroplex. The works’ thick aluminum substrates, which protrude from the wall, lay bare the industrial, fabricated nature of each sculpture, as do inlaid screws, whose placement across one of the stone panels recreates—on a one-to-one scale—those found around the windows of a New York MTA subway car. This same arrangement is materialized in pink coral inlay in several other panels.