Art feed

Curated by Exhibitionary

Elmgreen & Dragset
Elmgreen & Dragset
London - 77-82 Whitechapel High Street
until 13-01-2019

Elmgreen & Dragset – This Is How We Bite Our Tongue Working together since 1995, artist duo Michael Elmgreen (b. 1961, Denmark) and Ingar Dragset (b. 1969, Norway) produce beguiling spatial scenarios that explore social and sexual politics and unveil the power structures embedded in the everyday designs that surround us. In their uncanny installations, institutional spaces are transformed into metaphors for individual desires and collective identities with subversive wit and tongue-in-cheek melancholy. This exhibition juxtaposes a survey of their emotional figurative sculptures with an extraordinary new large-scale installation that meditates on the fate of civic space.

Elmgreen & Dragset – This Is How We Bite Our Tongue Working together since 1995, artist duo Michael Elmgreen (b. 1961, Denmark) and Ingar Dragset (b. 1969, Norway) produce beguiling spatial scenarios that explore social and sexual politics and unveil the power structures embedded in the everyday designs that surround us. In their uncanny installations, institutional spaces are transformed into metaphors for individual desires and collective identities with subversive wit and tongue-in-cheek melancholy. This exhibition juxtaposes a survey of their emotional figurative sculptures with an extraordinary new large-scale installation that meditates on the fate of civic space.
Martin Eder
Martin Eder
London - Newport Street
until 13-01-2019

Martin Eder – Parasites Newport Street Gallery will present ‘Parasites’ a solo exhibition by Berlin-based artist Martin Eder, featuring major new paintings alongside work spanning over a decade of the artist’s career, from 26 September 2018. Eder’s paintings examine beauty and ugliness, depicting kittens and wide-eyed puppies alongside uncompromising nudes and more sinister and surreal encounters. Featuring over forty works, the exhibition is Eder’s largest solo show to date. ‘I look for beauty in filth. You find the most interesting colours at motorway service areas and in the bushes. A mixture of crisp packets, trainers, vomit and tufts of hair. These are colour combinations that artists seldom look at. Poetry lies hidden beneath the kitchen sink. The world is raging under my fingernails.’ – Eder in conversation with Thomas Girst, 2018. Conducting an almost scientific enquiry into his medium, Eder has dedicated his career to exploring the illusory possibilities of painting and its meaning. In preparation for ‘Parasites’, Eder shut himself away with sketchbooks, drawings and paintings dating back to the beginning of his artistic career. This period of reflection allowed him to trace numerous threads and shifts in his practice, leading him to complete a new series of works, some of which are based on ideas conceived years previously. These are shown alongside significant early works and examples from Eder’s recent series of male nudes, among others. Eder explodes accepted ideas of what ‘fine art’ should be, subverting received hierarchies of image and subject. An uncompromising, and equal, attention to detail is brought to undulations of flesh, the teased fur of a freshly groomed poodle and the shining edge of an axe. Informed by diverse movements, including the Baroque and Surrealism, his paintings place the sentimental, squalid and the sublime side by side, recasting the tropes of classical history painting. In The Inescapable Unity of Love, 2010–2018, an oversized Cavalier King Charles spaniel, sporting a doleful expression, poses on an antique sofa, towering over a seemingly unaware guitar-playing woman, cast against a foreboding stormy sky. Such complex compositions hint at narratives but thwart easy readings.

Martin Eder – Parasites Newport Street Gallery will present ‘Parasites’ a solo exhibition by Berlin-based artist Martin Eder, featuring major new paintings alongside work spanning over a decade of the artist’s career, from 26 September 2018. Eder’s paintings examine beauty and ugliness, depicting kittens and wide-eyed puppies alongside uncompromising nudes and more sinister and surreal encounters. Featuring over forty works, the exhibition is Eder’s largest solo show to date. ‘I look for beauty in filth. You find the most interesting colours at motorway service areas and in the bushes. A mixture of crisp packets, trainers, vomit and tufts of hair. These are colour combinations that artists seldom look at. Poetry lies hidden beneath the kitchen sink. The world is raging under my fingernails.’ – Eder in conversation with Thomas Girst, 2018. Conducting an almost scientific enquiry into his medium, Eder has dedicated his career to exploring the illusory possibilities of painting and its meaning. In preparation for ‘Parasites’, Eder shut himself away with sketchbooks, drawings and paintings dating back to the beginning of his artistic career. This period of reflection allowed him to trace numerous threads and shifts in his practice, leading him to complete a new series of works, some of which are based on ideas conceived years previously. These are shown alongside significant early works and examples from Eder’s recent series of male nudes, among others. Eder explodes accepted ideas of what ‘fine art’ should be, subverting received hierarchies of image and subject. An uncompromising, and equal, attention to detail is brought to undulations of flesh, the teased fur of a freshly groomed poodle and the shining edge of an axe. Informed by diverse movements, including the Baroque and Surrealism, his paintings place the sentimental, squalid and the sublime side by side, recasting the tropes of classical history painting. In The Inescapable Unity of Love, 2010–2018, an oversized Cavalier King Charles spaniel, sporting a doleful expression, poses on an antique sofa, towering over a seemingly unaware guitar-playing woman, cast against a foreboding stormy sky. Such complex compositions hint at narratives but thwart easy readings.
Urs Fischer
Urs Fischer
London - 17?19 Davies Street
until 03-11-2018

Urs Fischer – Dasha The world has always been ending.  —Urs Fischer Dasha (2018) is a larger-than-life-size wax candle depicting Dasha Zhukova, a personal friend of the artist. Cast entirely in wax, she wears a pink dress and is seated in a chair. A wick at the top of her head will be lit, and the candle will slowly melt over the course of the exhibition. Additional wicks strategically placed on the figure will be lit until the sculpture is reduced to a pile of wax drippings. Fischer’s candle sculptures are captivating in their materiality and haunting in their implications; they serve as both portraits and meditations on time and gravity, life and death. As with traditional memento mori, viewers are reminded of the transience of life, beauty, and even art. Fischer began to make the candles in the early 2000s, with a series of crudely rendered female nudes, standing upright or lounging in groups. After a period of sustained research into mold making and casting, he began to make more realistic figurative candles that could burn for several months at a time, such as Untitled (2011), which included a full-size replica of Giambologna’s sixteenth-century sculpture The Rape of the Sabine Women, and Marsupiale (Fabrizio) (2017), a hybrid of the Florentine antique dealer Fabrizio Moretti and an oversize bust of St. Leonard. The figure of Moretti was cast in red wax, and wicks placed in order that it would melt into the white bust, which remained intact and unburned, leaving a bloody wound across the patron saint of prisoners.

Urs Fischer – Dasha The world has always been ending.  —Urs Fischer Dasha (2018) is a larger-than-life-size wax candle depicting Dasha Zhukova, a personal friend of the artist. Cast entirely in wax, she wears a pink dress and is seated in a chair. A wick at the top of her head will be lit, and the candle will slowly melt over the course of the exhibition. Additional wicks strategically placed on the figure will be lit until the sculpture is reduced to a pile of wax drippings. Fischer’s candle sculptures are captivating in their materiality and haunting in their implications; they serve as both portraits and meditations on time and gravity, life and death. As with traditional memento mori, viewers are reminded of the transience of life, beauty, and even art. Fischer began to make the candles in the early 2000s, with a series of crudely rendered female nudes, standing upright or lounging in groups. After a period of sustained research into mold making and casting, he began to make more realistic figurative candles that could burn for several months at a time, such as Untitled (2011), which included a full-size replica of Giambologna’s sixteenth-century sculpture The Rape of the Sabine Women, and Marsupiale (Fabrizio) (2017), a hybrid of the Florentine antique dealer Fabrizio Moretti and an oversize bust of St. Leonard. The figure of Moretti was cast in red wax, and wicks placed in order that it would melt into the white bust, which remained intact and unburned, leaving a bloody wound across the patron saint of prisoners.
Morag Keil
Morag Keil
London - 26 Holborn Viaduct, Morley House, 3rd Floor
until 27-10-2018

Morag Keil – Here We Go Again In a segment of the classic American children’s television show Sesame Street, a young woman runs through corridors lined on each side with doors. Embarking on an Alpaquest, she “wonders what’s behind them all, doors that lead to anywhere”, each door opening up to a portal where she learns a new letter, experiences a new world. As in video games programmed to edutain, structured through a play of infinite choices, the games mask education with fantasy, learning with escape. Here we go again, Morag Keil’s second solo exhibition with Project Native Informant. The current work is a simulation of a previous installation at Jenny’s gallery in Los Angeles in January 2018. It too consisted of a series of doors, walls, and portals to individual rooms with videos. The narrative of the videos uses home automation as a start point to either control the decisions made or facilitate them, inviting the visitor to play or have a conversation. Walking into the corridors, the walls are painted the color of green screen, akin to Hollywood cinema when the special effects have yet to be uploaded. The viewer is invited to provide the content by trying each door and looking through each peephole, activating the sound and lights via the motion sensors. Two separate videos in two different rooms are motion activated to turn on when she nears them: Alexa’s voice asks the viewer to “come and play” so she can “personalize the experience”. Another asks if the viewer is “still there”. The video loops, repeating the same statements without acknowledging any response. Flashes of a BBC One inter-title of woodland animals hopping along with fairies and of scenes from popular British television series Humans and Loose Women cross the screen: Humans focuses on a female robot who is tasked to run the house and provide emotional comfort to her adolescent charges, while Loose Women is a female-led talk show discussing current themes. In both videos, the female voice elicits care and demands control. In another room, a digital eye loops into a flat screen. When the viewer looks towards the screen, she can only see her backside repeated infinitely, as in the choices of the installation’s maze. A keyhole looks out to the construction site of the new Goldman Sachs corporate office next door. The viewer stumbles into motion activated IKEA lamps, the same ones often found in homes. Everywhere, cables and power outlets make transparent the connectivity of all the mechanisms central to the installation. In the “last room”, aspects of the installation appear missing or unfinished, as if unrendered or without content. The voice of Alexa booms through the enclosures. To exit, the viewer has to retrace her steps.

Morag Keil – Here We Go Again In a segment of the classic American children’s television show Sesame Street, a young woman runs through corridors lined on each side with doors. Embarking on an Alpaquest, she “wonders what’s behind them all, doors that lead to anywhere”, each door opening up to a portal where she learns a new letter, experiences a new world. As in video games programmed to edutain, structured through a play of infinite choices, the games mask education with fantasy, learning with escape. Here we go again, Morag Keil’s second solo exhibition with Project Native Informant. The current work is a simulation of a previous installation at Jenny’s gallery in Los Angeles in January 2018. It too consisted of a series of doors, walls, and portals to individual rooms with videos. The narrative of the videos uses home automation as a start point to either control the decisions made or facilitate them, inviting the visitor to play or have a conversation. Walking into the corridors, the walls are painted the color of green screen, akin to Hollywood cinema when the special effects have yet to be uploaded. The viewer is invited to provide the content by trying each door and looking through each peephole, activating the sound and lights via the motion sensors. Two separate videos in two different rooms are motion activated to turn on when she nears them: Alexa’s voice asks the viewer to “come and play” so she can “personalize the experience”. Another asks if the viewer is “still there”. The video loops, repeating the same statements without acknowledging any response. Flashes of a BBC One inter-title of woodland animals hopping along with fairies and of scenes from popular British television series Humans and Loose Women cross the screen: Humans focuses on a female robot who is tasked to run the house and provide emotional comfort to her adolescent charges, while Loose Women is a female-led talk show discussing current themes. In both videos, the female voice elicits care and demands control. In another room, a digital eye loops into a flat screen. When the viewer looks towards the screen, she can only see her backside repeated infinitely, as in the choices of the installation’s maze. A keyhole looks out to the construction site of the new Goldman Sachs corporate office next door. The viewer stumbles into motion activated IKEA lamps, the same ones often found in homes. Everywhere, cables and power outlets make transparent the connectivity of all the mechanisms central to the installation. In the “last room”, aspects of the installation appear missing or unfinished, as if unrendered or without content. The voice of Alexa booms through the enclosures. To exit, the viewer has to retrace her steps.
Rachel Maclean
Rachel Maclean
London - 176 Prince of Wales Road
until 16-12-2018

Rachel Maclean  Rachel Maclean has rapidly established herself as one of the most distinctive creative voices in the UK. Creating baroque, hyper-real worlds using green-screen video and computer animation, and playing many of the extravagantly costumed characters herself, Maclean spins razor-sharp fables that combine comedy and horror. Her work offers a powerful critique of contemporary society and its underlying fears and desires. Maclean first exhibited at the Zabludowicz Collection in 2014 with a solo exhibition as part of our Invites programme, and now returns for the 2018 Annual Commission show. At its centre is I’m Terribly Sorry, a new Zabludowicz Collection commission in virtual reality, the artist’s first piece in the medium, made in collaboration with Werkflow. An interactive experience set in a dystopian urban British landscape of manic tourist merchandise, it reflects on societal unease and misunderstanding in a culture of voracious documentation, self-performance and voyeurism. Spite Your Face, 2017, the film with which Maclean represented Scotland at the 57th Venice Biennale, will be presented in the Main Hall. Referencing the Italian folktale The Adventures of Pinocchio, it was made in the context of significant changes in the political climate in the UK and abroad, in particular the divisive campaigns in the lead up to the Brexit vote and the US Presidential election – events central to heralding a new post-truth era.  Presented in the Back Gallery is an exclusive gallery edition and installation of Make Me Up, 2018, Maclean’s major new film commission produced by Hopscotch Films with NVA for BBC and 14-18 NOW.† The central protagonist is Siri, who wakes to find herself trapped inside a brutalist dream house. Despite the cutesy décor, the place is far from benign, and she and her inmates are encouraged to compete for survival while being watched over by surveillance cameras. Presiding over the group is an authoritarian diva (played by Maclean) who speaks entirely with the voice of Kenneth Clark from the BBC series Civilisation (1969). Make Me Up takes darkly-satirical look at the contradictory pressures faced by women today and reflects on the multiple voices within contemporary feminism’s challenge to patriarchal abuses of power. Based in Glasgow, Rachel Maclean (b.1987, Edinburgh) graduated from Edinburgh College of Art in 2009 and her work came to public attention in New Contemporaries later that year. She has since received significant acclaim, with major solo shows at Talbot Rice Gallery, Edinburgh, Dublin City Gallery The Hugh Lane, National Gallery of Australia, Canberra, Château de Servières, Marseilles, Artpace San Antonio, Texas, HOME Manchester and Tate Britain. 

Rachel Maclean  Rachel Maclean has rapidly established herself as one of the most distinctive creative voices in the UK. Creating baroque, hyper-real worlds using green-screen video and computer animation, and playing many of the extravagantly costumed characters herself, Maclean spins razor-sharp fables that combine comedy and horror. Her work offers a powerful critique of contemporary society and its underlying fears and desires. Maclean first exhibited at the Zabludowicz Collection in 2014 with a solo exhibition as part of our Invites programme, and now returns for the 2018 Annual Commission show. At its centre is I’m Terribly Sorry, a new Zabludowicz Collection commission in virtual reality, the artist’s first piece in the medium, made in collaboration with Werkflow. An interactive experience set in a dystopian urban British landscape of manic tourist merchandise, it reflects on societal unease and misunderstanding in a culture of voracious documentation, self-performance and voyeurism. Spite Your Face, 2017, the film with which Maclean represented Scotland at the 57th Venice Biennale, will be presented in the Main Hall. Referencing the Italian folktale The Adventures of Pinocchio, it was made in the context of significant changes in the political climate in the UK and abroad, in particular the divisive campaigns in the lead up to the Brexit vote and the US Presidential election – events central to heralding a new post-truth era.  Presented in the Back Gallery is an exclusive gallery edition and installation of Make Me Up, 2018, Maclean’s major new film commission produced by Hopscotch Films with NVA for BBC and 14-18 NOW.† The central protagonist is Siri, who wakes to find herself trapped inside a brutalist dream house. Despite the cutesy décor, the place is far from benign, and she and her inmates are encouraged to compete for survival while being watched over by surveillance cameras. Presiding over the group is an authoritarian diva (played by Maclean) who speaks entirely with the voice of Kenneth Clark from the BBC series Civilisation (1969). Make Me Up takes darkly-satirical look at the contradictory pressures faced by women today and reflects on the multiple voices within contemporary feminism’s challenge to patriarchal abuses of power. Based in Glasgow, Rachel Maclean (b.1987, Edinburgh) graduated from Edinburgh College of Art in 2009 and her work came to public attention in New Contemporaries later that year. She has since received significant acclaim, with major solo shows at Talbot Rice Gallery, Edinburgh, Dublin City Gallery The Hugh Lane, National Gallery of Australia, Canberra, Château de Servières, Marseilles, Artpace San Antonio, Texas, HOME Manchester and Tate Britain. 
Staging Jackson Pollock
Staging Jackson Pollock
London - 77-82 Whitechapel High Street
until 24-03-2019

Staging Jackson Pollock   The revolutionary painting of American Abstract Expressionist Jackson Pollock (1912–1956) was premiered in the UK in 1958 at the Whitechapel Gallery. Travelling to Europe from New York’s Museum of Modern Art after Pollock’s untimely death, the show provoked bewilderment and excitement. Six decades on, Pollock’s masterpiece Summertime 9A (1948) returns to the Whitechapel.  Director Bryan Robertson had decided that the Gallery should be as audaciously modern as Pollock’s art and invited architect Trevor Dannatt (b. 1920, UK) to design the exhibition. Dannatt’s constructivist design transformed the salon style gallery into a white cube. His ‘cohesive architectural ensemble’ included freestanding breezeblock walls, black panels, footlights, and an undulating ceiling of suspended fabric immersing visitors in a powerful encounter with painting as environment.

Staging Jackson Pollock   The revolutionary painting of American Abstract Expressionist Jackson Pollock (1912–1956) was premiered in the UK in 1958 at the Whitechapel Gallery. Travelling to Europe from New York’s Museum of Modern Art after Pollock’s untimely death, the show provoked bewilderment and excitement. Six decades on, Pollock’s masterpiece Summertime 9A (1948) returns to the Whitechapel.  Director Bryan Robertson had decided that the Gallery should be as audaciously modern as Pollock’s art and invited architect Trevor Dannatt (b. 1920, UK) to design the exhibition. Dannatt’s constructivist design transformed the salon style gallery into a white cube. His ‘cohesive architectural ensemble’ included freestanding breezeblock walls, black panels, footlights, and an undulating ceiling of suspended fabric immersing visitors in a powerful encounter with painting as environment.
Martin Parr
Martin Parr
London - St Martin?s Place
until 27-05-2019

Only Human: Photographs by Martin Parr A major new exhibition of works by Martin Parr, one of Britain’s best-known and most widely celebrated photographers. Only Human: Martin Parr, brings together some of Parr’s best known photographs with a number of works never exhibited before to focus on one of his most engaging subjects – people. The exhibition will include portraits of people from around the world, with a special focus on Parr’s wry observations of Britishness, explored through a series of projects that investigate British identity today, including new works which reveal Parr’s take on the social climate in Britain in the aftermath of the EU referendum.

Only Human: Photographs by Martin Parr A major new exhibition of works by Martin Parr, one of Britain’s best-known and most widely celebrated photographers. Only Human: Martin Parr, brings together some of Parr’s best known photographs with a number of works never exhibited before to focus on one of his most engaging subjects – people. The exhibition will include portraits of people from around the world, with a special focus on Parr’s wry observations of Britishness, explored through a series of projects that investigate British identity today, including new works which reveal Parr’s take on the social climate in Britain in the aftermath of the EU referendum.
Julian Charrière
Julian Charrire
Berlin - Alte Jakobstrasse 124?128
until 08-04-2019

Julian Charrière – As We Used to Float GASAG Art Prize 2018 As the recipient of the GASAG Art Prize 2018, Julian Charrière will create a multimedia spatial installation for the Berlinische Galerie that takes visitors underwater in the Pacific Ocean. Seventy years after the United States began testing thermonuclear weapons at Bikini Atoll, the artist set off on an expedition to an area rendered permanently uninhabitable for human life as a result of the environmental contamination. As we used to float is a physical, three-dimensional experience that reveals the legacy of those atomic tests both above and below sea level. These unintentional monuments symbolise the interaction between anthropogenic and natural transformations. For Julian Charrière, they also mark the point in history when humans became one of the biggest factors influencing biological, geological and atmospheric processes on Earth. Julian Charrière was born in Morges in French-speaking Switzerland in 1987. He began studying art in Switzerland in 2006, and in 2007 transferred to the University of the Arts in Berlin, where he finished his studies in 2013 under Olafur Eliasson at the Institut für Raumexperimente. His work has been shown in many countries, including at the main exhibition of the Venice Biennale in 2017. This event at the Berlinische Galerie will be his first solo show at an institution in Berlin.

Julian Charrière – As We Used to Float GASAG Art Prize 2018 As the recipient of the GASAG Art Prize 2018, Julian Charrière will create a multimedia spatial installation for the Berlinische Galerie that takes visitors underwater in the Pacific Ocean. Seventy years after the United States began testing thermonuclear weapons at Bikini Atoll, the artist set off on an expedition to an area rendered permanently uninhabitable for human life as a result of the environmental contamination. As we used to float is a physical, three-dimensional experience that reveals the legacy of those atomic tests both above and below sea level. These unintentional monuments symbolise the interaction between anthropogenic and natural transformations. For Julian Charrière, they also mark the point in history when humans became one of the biggest factors influencing biological, geological and atmospheric processes on Earth. Julian Charrière was born in Morges in French-speaking Switzerland in 1987. He began studying art in Switzerland in 2006, and in 2007 transferred to the University of the Arts in Berlin, where he finished his studies in 2013 under Olafur Eliasson at the Institut für Raumexperimente. His work has been shown in many countries, including at the main exhibition of the Venice Biennale in 2017. This event at the Berlinische Galerie will be his first solo show at an institution in Berlin.
Agnieszka Polska
Agnieszka Polska
Berlin - Invalidenstrasse 50/51
until 03-03-2019

Agnieszka Polska – The Demon's Brain In the autumn of 2017 the ninth Preis der Nationalgalerie was awarded to Agnieszka Polska (born 1985 in Lublin). The artist will now present a new multi-channel video installation in a solo exhibition in the Historic Hall at Hamburger Bahnhof – Museum für Gegenwart – Berlin.  Agnieszka Polska combines animation and filmed sequences into encrypted adaptations of cultural artefacts. Often pervaded by an unsettling undertone, the artist’s alluring, visually-rich universe of works addresses the state of the world today and our role and responsibility within it. For her latest project Polska takes as her starting point a historical correspondence from the fifteenth century between Miko?aj Serafin, the official who governed the Polish salt mines, his workers, and a web of creditors and debtors. In an unprecedented occurrence the mines were leased to Serafin by the king and functioned as an early form of capitalist entity within the feudal system.  

Agnieszka Polska – The Demon's Brain In the autumn of 2017 the ninth Preis der Nationalgalerie was awarded to Agnieszka Polska (born 1985 in Lublin). The artist will now present a new multi-channel video installation in a solo exhibition in the Historic Hall at Hamburger Bahnhof – Museum für Gegenwart – Berlin.  Agnieszka Polska combines animation and filmed sequences into encrypted adaptations of cultural artefacts. Often pervaded by an unsettling undertone, the artist’s alluring, visually-rich universe of works addresses the state of the world today and our role and responsibility within it. For her latest project Polska takes as her starting point a historical correspondence from the fifteenth century between Miko?aj Serafin, the official who governed the Polish salt mines, his workers, and a web of creditors and debtors. In an unprecedented occurrence the mines were leased to Serafin by the king and functioned as an early form of capitalist entity within the feudal system.  
Jorge Pardo
Jorge Pardo
Berlin - Linienstrasse 155
until 27-10-2018

Jorge Pardo We are pleased to present an environment of new sculpture, painting and objects by Jorge Pardo for his ninth solo exhibition with neugerriemschneider. Describing his work as ‘shaping space’, over the past 25 years Jorge Pardo has made work that moves freely across the notional boundaries between art, architecture and design. His constructions range from a single light sculpture, to paintings, rooms or an assembly of buildings that combine all the individual elements of his making in the mode of the Gesamtkunstwerk or ‘total work of art’. His work contends with distinctions of private and public space, while calling to mind references as diverse as the Light and Space movement, Land art, modernist design, and the color, flora and fauna of his home in Me?rida, Mexico. Pardo’s 1994 exhibition, zeichnungen, inaugurated neugerriemschneider’s first gallery space, at Goethestr. 73, Berlin. For his exhibition Pardo creates a space for contemplation and play. A group of paintings, paired with specially-created benches from which to view them, pay homage to Junko Chodos (b. 1932, Tokyo), Charline von Heyl (b. 1960, Mainz), Joan Mitchell (b. 1925, Chicago d. 1992, Paris) and Alma Thomas (b. 1891, Columbus, Georgia d. 1978, Washington, D.C.). Painted by hand in several layers and laser engraved with intricate patterns, Pardo’s paintings overlay and distill passages of each artist’s work, integrating them with snapshots of his everyday life in Mexico. Exploring the approach of each artist, Pardo simultaneously combines ‘high’ and ‘low’ visual references, as well as digital and analog gesture, to create a final composition that is non-hierarchical. Throwing geometric shadows on all surfaces and curling through the gallery space is a constellation of 35 individual light sculptures, made of laser-cut leaves of acrylic in a spectrum of 164 different colors. Illuminated beneath this structure is a specially-created table soccer. Upending the conventional directives of an art installation, the game sets up a dynamic relation between people and the art environment. Coinciding with our exhibition in Berlin, Jorge Pardo opens the transformed palace L’Arlatan, in Arles, France, in mid- October. Pardo has created the architectural concept and all elements of painting, lighting, design, color, furniture and furnishing for 41 rooms of various roles and sizes, which together serve as a hotel and artists’ residence. Jorge Pardo (b. 1963, Havana, Cuba) was awarded a MacArthur Fellowship in 2010. His permanent, large-scale installations include L’Arlatan, Arles (2018); Tecoh, Yucata?n (2006-2011); Latin American Art Galleries, LACMA, Los Angeles (2008); untitled (restaurant), Paul-Lo?be-Haus, Deutscher Bundestag, Berlin (2002), and 4166 Sea View Lane, MOCA - Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles (1998). Selected exhibitions and special projects by the artist include starting to get the ex wife out of my summer house...and maybe some issues in objecthood along the way..., Applied Arts Pavilion, La Biennale di Venezia with the Victoria and Albert Museum, 57th Venice Biennale, Venice (2017); Jorge Pardo, Muse?e des Augustins, Toulouse (2014); Jorge Pardo, Centro de Arte Contempora?neo Wifredo Lam, Havana Biennial, Havana (2012); Untitled, One Colorado - Armory Center for the Arts, Pasadena (2011); Jorge Pardo, Irish Museum of Modern Art, Dublin (2010); Jorge Pardo, K21, Du?sseldorf (2009); Jorge Pardo: House, Museum of Contemporary Art, North Miami (2007); Jorge Pardo, Fundacio? la Caixa, Barcelona (2004), and Jorge Pardo: Project, Dia Art Foundation, New York (2000). In 1996, along with Carsten Ho?ller, Pierre Huyghe and Rirkrit Tiravanija, Pardo was featured in Nicolas Bourriaud’s exhibition Traffic at CAPC Muse?e d’Art Contemporain de Bordeaux, in the catalogue for which Bourriaud coined the term ‘Relational Aesthetics’. Jorge Pardo lives and works in Me?rida, Mexico.  

Jorge Pardo We are pleased to present an environment of new sculpture, painting and objects by Jorge Pardo for his ninth solo exhibition with neugerriemschneider. Describing his work as ‘shaping space’, over the past 25 years Jorge Pardo has made work that moves freely across the notional boundaries between art, architecture and design. His constructions range from a single light sculpture, to paintings, rooms or an assembly of buildings that combine all the individual elements of his making in the mode of the Gesamtkunstwerk or ‘total work of art’. His work contends with distinctions of private and public space, while calling to mind references as diverse as the Light and Space movement, Land art, modernist design, and the color, flora and fauna of his home in Me?rida, Mexico. Pardo’s 1994 exhibition, zeichnungen, inaugurated neugerriemschneider’s first gallery space, at Goethestr. 73, Berlin. For his exhibition Pardo creates a space for contemplation and play. A group of paintings, paired with specially-created benches from which to view them, pay homage to Junko Chodos (b. 1932, Tokyo), Charline von Heyl (b. 1960, Mainz), Joan Mitchell (b. 1925, Chicago d. 1992, Paris) and Alma Thomas (b. 1891, Columbus, Georgia d. 1978, Washington, D.C.). Painted by hand in several layers and laser engraved with intricate patterns, Pardo’s paintings overlay and distill passages of each artist’s work, integrating them with snapshots of his everyday life in Mexico. Exploring the approach of each artist, Pardo simultaneously combines ‘high’ and ‘low’ visual references, as well as digital and analog gesture, to create a final composition that is non-hierarchical. Throwing geometric shadows on all surfaces and curling through the gallery space is a constellation of 35 individual light sculptures, made of laser-cut leaves of acrylic in a spectrum of 164 different colors. Illuminated beneath this structure is a specially-created table soccer. Upending the conventional directives of an art installation, the game sets up a dynamic relation between people and the art environment. Coinciding with our exhibition in Berlin, Jorge Pardo opens the transformed palace L’Arlatan, in Arles, France, in mid- October. Pardo has created the architectural concept and all elements of painting, lighting, design, color, furniture and furnishing for 41 rooms of various roles and sizes, which together serve as a hotel and artists’ residence. Jorge Pardo (b. 1963, Havana, Cuba) was awarded a MacArthur Fellowship in 2010. His permanent, large-scale installations include L’Arlatan, Arles (2018); Tecoh, Yucata?n (2006-2011); Latin American Art Galleries, LACMA, Los Angeles (2008); untitled (restaurant), Paul-Lo?be-Haus, Deutscher Bundestag, Berlin (2002), and 4166 Sea View Lane, MOCA - Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles (1998). Selected exhibitions and special projects by the artist include starting to get the ex wife out of my summer house...and maybe some issues in objecthood along the way..., Applied Arts Pavilion, La Biennale di Venezia with the Victoria and Albert Museum, 57th Venice Biennale, Venice (2017); Jorge Pardo, Muse?e des Augustins, Toulouse (2014); Jorge Pardo, Centro de Arte Contempora?neo Wifredo Lam, Havana Biennial, Havana (2012); Untitled, One Colorado - Armory Center for the Arts, Pasadena (2011); Jorge Pardo, Irish Museum of Modern Art, Dublin (2010); Jorge Pardo, K21, Du?sseldorf (2009); Jorge Pardo: House, Museum of Contemporary Art, North Miami (2007); Jorge Pardo, Fundacio? la Caixa, Barcelona (2004), and Jorge Pardo: Project, Dia Art Foundation, New York (2000). In 1996, along with Carsten Ho?ller, Pierre Huyghe and Rirkrit Tiravanija, Pardo was featured in Nicolas Bourriaud’s exhibition Traffic at CAPC Muse?e d’Art Contemporain de Bordeaux, in the catalogue for which Bourriaud coined the term ‘Relational Aesthetics’. Jorge Pardo lives and works in Me?rida, Mexico.  
Jamie Crewe & Beatrice Gibson
Jamie Crewe & Beatrice Gibson
Berlin - Leipziger Str. 60, entrance: Jerusalemer Str.
until 25-11-2018

KW Production Series is a new commissioning project dedicated to artists’ moving image works and organized in collaboration with the JULIA STOSCHEK COLLECTION and OUTSET Germany_Switzerland. The first two commissions are by London-based artist and filmmaker Beatrice Gibson (born 1978 in London, GB), and Glasgow-based artist and singer Jamie Crewe (born 1987 in Manchester, GB). Jamie Crewe – Pastoral Drama   Over the course of a year, Jamie Crewe (born 1987 in Manchester, GB) worked on Pastoral Drama every day. The piece comprises two parallel videos that use allegory and animation to think about progress. Through intricate drawings in ink and pencil, speckled clay, and encrusted plasticine, Crewe reflects upon the evolution of mythic narratives, (inter-) personal change, and collective political time. Pastoral Drama juxtaposes the ancient Greek legend of Eurydice and the Underworld with Agostino Agazzari’s Eumelio, a 17th- century opera composed for the male inhabitants of a Roman seminary. Eumelio’s titular male figure stands in for Eurydice, and so achieves a different fate. In its double telling, Pastoral Drama envisions the collapse of mythic pasts with the dangerous after-world of the present. Beatrice Gibson – I Hope I’m Loud When I’m Dead   Exploring ideas around gender, poetry, and disobedience, Beatrice Gibson’s (born 1978 in London, GB) 16mm film, I Hope I’m Loud When I’m Dead, was developed with two of the USA’s most significant living poets – CAConrad and Eileen Myles. The filmmaker tersely distills material shot on the eve of the 45th presidential inauguration in January 2017 and blends moments of perilous public authority with more intimate scenes and tender portraits. The film uses poetry as a means to reckon with the present, and casts the figure of the poet as a guide in times of chaos.

KW Production Series is a new commissioning project dedicated to artists’ moving image works and organized in collaboration with the JULIA STOSCHEK COLLECTION and OUTSET Germany_Switzerland. The first two commissions are by London-based artist and filmmaker Beatrice Gibson (born 1978 in London, GB), and Glasgow-based artist and singer Jamie Crewe (born 1987 in Manchester, GB). Jamie Crewe – Pastoral Drama   Over the course of a year, Jamie Crewe (born 1987 in Manchester, GB) worked on Pastoral Drama every day. The piece comprises two parallel videos that use allegory and animation to think about progress. Through intricate drawings in ink and pencil, speckled clay, and encrusted plasticine, Crewe reflects upon the evolution of mythic narratives, (inter-) personal change, and collective political time. Pastoral Drama juxtaposes the ancient Greek legend of Eurydice and the Underworld with Agostino Agazzari’s Eumelio, a 17th- century opera composed for the male inhabitants of a Roman seminary. Eumelio’s titular male figure stands in for Eurydice, and so achieves a different fate. In its double telling, Pastoral Drama envisions the collapse of mythic pasts with the dangerous after-world of the present. Beatrice Gibson – I Hope I’m Loud When I’m Dead   Exploring ideas around gender, poetry, and disobedience, Beatrice Gibson’s (born 1978 in London, GB) 16mm film, I Hope I’m Loud When I’m Dead, was developed with two of the USA’s most significant living poets – CAConrad and Eileen Myles. The filmmaker tersely distills material shot on the eve of the 45th presidential inauguration in January 2017 and blends moments of perilous public authority with more intimate scenes and tender portraits. The film uses poetry as a means to reckon with the present, and casts the figure of the poet as a guide in times of chaos.
The Most Dangerous Game
The Most Dangerous Game
Berlin - John-Foster-Dulles-Allee 10
until 10-12-2018

The Most Dangerous Game: The Situationist International en route for May ’68 Pierre Alechinsky, Karel Appel, Armando, Enrico Baj, Conrad Bakker, CoBrA, Constant, Corneille, Guy Debord, Erwin Eisch, Ansgar Elde, Farfa, Lothar Fischer, Internationale Lettriste, Internationale Situationniste, Isidore Isou, Jacqueline de Jong, Asger Jorn, Laboratorio Sperimentale, Uwe Lausen, Jeppesen Victor Martin, Giors Melanotte, Eva Renée Nele, Erik Nyholm, Panamarenko, Giuseppe Pinot-Gallizio, Hans Platschek, Heimrad Prem, Ralph Rumney, Piero Simondo, Gruppe SPUR, Gretel Stadler, Hardy Strid, Helmut Sturm, Maurice Wyckaert, Hans-Peter Zimmer   Between 1957 and 1972, the Situationist International (S.I.) first projected a “revolutionary front in culture” and then shifted its propaganda to the political field. Employing ludic methods, the movement offered a fundamental critique of the spectacle of a consumerist society. In an age in which the principles of the market economy are increasingly permeating all areas of life, The Most Dangerous Game instigates a new envisioning of the years in which the S.I. articulated its critique. The exhibition’s title refers to a lost collage created by one of S.I.’s co-founders, Guy Debord. The title recalls, on the one hand, the revolutionary earnestness with which the S.I. radicalized the debates of the postwar years, while, on the other hand, emphasizing the playful element that characterized all their diverse activities. Their ‘playing field’ was the city and everyday life. It was here that they sought confrontation with the bourgeois system – aesthetically through the “construction of situations”, and theoretically through precise analyses of modern consumerist society. The exhibition’s starting-point is the Bibliothèque situationniste de Silkeborg, a venture that Debord drafted in outline with the painter Asger Jorn in 1959 for the latter’s museum in Denmark. At HKW, this project, which remained unrealized in its day, is for the first time re-constructed in its entirety. An Archive of Last Images presents for the first time works by all artists active during the initial S.I. period. The exhibition thematizes the break away from art created around 1962 – when the S.I. distanced itself from those members who wished to adhere to a primarily artistic creative praxis – and follows the activities of the S.I. up to and including the May 1968 uprising in France, in which the S.I. played an essential part. The revolt was stifled after only a few weeks. Bourgeois society, however, appropriated the themes of the insurgent younger generation and subsequently subjected all areas of life – including sexuality – to capitalist ends and exploitation.  

The Most Dangerous Game: The Situationist International en route for May ’68 Pierre Alechinsky, Karel Appel, Armando, Enrico Baj, Conrad Bakker, CoBrA, Constant, Corneille, Guy Debord, Erwin Eisch, Ansgar Elde, Farfa, Lothar Fischer, Internationale Lettriste, Internationale Situationniste, Isidore Isou, Jacqueline de Jong, Asger Jorn, Laboratorio Sperimentale, Uwe Lausen, Jeppesen Victor Martin, Giors Melanotte, Eva Renée Nele, Erik Nyholm, Panamarenko, Giuseppe Pinot-Gallizio, Hans Platschek, Heimrad Prem, Ralph Rumney, Piero Simondo, Gruppe SPUR, Gretel Stadler, Hardy Strid, Helmut Sturm, Maurice Wyckaert, Hans-Peter Zimmer   Between 1957 and 1972, the Situationist International (S.I.) first projected a “revolutionary front in culture” and then shifted its propaganda to the political field. Employing ludic methods, the movement offered a fundamental critique of the spectacle of a consumerist society. In an age in which the principles of the market economy are increasingly permeating all areas of life, The Most Dangerous Game instigates a new envisioning of the years in which the S.I. articulated its critique. The exhibition’s title refers to a lost collage created by one of S.I.’s co-founders, Guy Debord. The title recalls, on the one hand, the revolutionary earnestness with which the S.I. radicalized the debates of the postwar years, while, on the other hand, emphasizing the playful element that characterized all their diverse activities. Their ‘playing field’ was the city and everyday life. It was here that they sought confrontation with the bourgeois system – aesthetically through the “construction of situations”, and theoretically through precise analyses of modern consumerist society. The exhibition’s starting-point is the Bibliothèque situationniste de Silkeborg, a venture that Debord drafted in outline with the painter Asger Jorn in 1959 for the latter’s museum in Denmark. At HKW, this project, which remained unrealized in its day, is for the first time re-constructed in its entirety. An Archive of Last Images presents for the first time works by all artists active during the initial S.I. period. The exhibition thematizes the break away from art created around 1962 – when the S.I. distanced itself from those members who wished to adhere to a primarily artistic creative praxis – and follows the activities of the S.I. up to and including the May 1968 uprising in France, in which the S.I. played an essential part. The revolt was stifled after only a few weeks. Bourgeois society, however, appropriated the themes of the insurgent younger generation and subsequently subjected all areas of life – including sexuality – to capitalist ends and exploitation.  
Gregor Hildebrandt
Gregor Hildebrandt
Berlin - Tempelhofer Ufer 22
until 03-11-2018

Gregor Hildebrandt – Im Zimmer ein Raum Galerie Wentrup is pleased to present Ein Zimmer im Raum, its 7th solo show by Gregor Hildebrandt (born 1974 in Bad Homburg, Germany), who lives and works in Berlin and also teaches as professor of painting at Munich’s Akademie der Künste.  His minimalist oeuvre, which Galerie Wentrup has been presenting since 2004, engages primarily with concepts of cross-media transfers of music and poetry into visual art. Hildebrandt’s core material are almost exclusively sound recording media, such as magnetic audio tapes and vinyl records, which he processes, or records something on them before using them on canvas, in photographic prints, or in expansive installations.  The starting points for his up to this point most colourful show are the title Ein Zimmer im Raum, borrowed from poet and novelist R. M. Rilke, as well as the black-and-white photograph on the invitation. It shows the view from the artist’s bed towards the ceiling. Just like in the descriptions by Victor Hugo, Stefan Andres, and Xavier de Maistre in his Journey Around My Room, and others before, Hildebrandt gazes into the supposed void and imagines the whole world: the authentic source of his thematic universe, from which his extremely rigorous oeuvre grows – it offers the idea of using obsolete recording techniques which transfer, on a level that resonates invisibly, romantic themes in a contemporary way for today’s audience.  The sleeping room, the centre and the ultimate retreat of almost every apartment, serves in Hildebrandt’s case to this day as an energy source for his creative work. Surrounded by peace and quiet, and despite the seemingly empty ceiling (or perhaps precisely because of it), the room fills when he looks up, unexpected ideas and thoughts start coming to mind. Only marginally noticeable is the Jugendstil window frame leading to the building’s backcourt, exemplary for the truncated link to the exterior world.  The seemingly simple initial view of the interior develops a universe of its own that can be separated into elemental parts, which are then pulled back together. Lying down quietly, the artist starts a journey of discovery, explores new territories, real and imaginary ones, going on an intellectual Grand Tour which provides him with new inspiration. And as he observes how the white of the wall interacts with the light of his round lamp, it transforms into a planet that starts to rotate.  This surrogate moment of that transformation is visually stimulated by the structured ingrain wallpaper now covering all the gallery’s walls. This wallpaper, so typical for West Germany in the 1970s into which Hildebrandt was born, expands the usual gallery dimension in a surprising and subtle manner.  As part of the exhibition, a monumental panel painting is formed of 624 multi-coloured vinyl records that were cut apart to 7488 triangles and then reassembled like a mosaic, with recordings of a musician who is a close friend of the artist. In a different work, Anni Albers, whose fascinating formal vocabulary thrilled and inspired Hildebrandt early on, led him into a hypnotic daydream. The succession of patterns of the woven upright format in black is an expansion of the meticulous tapestry drawings by the Bauhaus pioneer. Its diagonally offset hanging lets this work function as a counterpart to the actual front door, like an opening into infinite artistic possibilities. The backs of the compact cassette cases of the letter case form a reverse projection of the view from the bed: the artist, dressed, lying, lost in thought, gazes back. This exact counter-image to the invitation card is the projection surface that, as an opposite, keeps inviting Hildebrandt to enter into an inner dialogue.  In October 2018 Gregor Hildebrandt will be honored with a comprehensive solo exhibition at Kunsthalle Recklinghausen. Recent institutional solo and group exhibitions include The Bass Museum of Art, Miami, FL; The Centre Pompidou in Paris, France; Miami Art Museum, Miami, FL; ICA, Boston, MA; Saarlandmuseum, Saarbrücken, Germany; Künstlerhaus Bethanien, Berlin, Germany; Berlinische Galerie, Berlin, Germany Museum van Bommel van Dam, Venlo, The Netherlands; Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis, St. Louis, MI; Kunsthalle Andratx, Mallorca, Spain; Temporäre Kunsthalle, Berlin, Germany; Kunstverein Heppenheim, Heppenheim, Germany; Musée d´Art Moderne de la Ville, Paris, France and Tel Aviv Museum of Art, Tel Aviv, Israel. Works by Gregor Hildebrandt are in the public collections of the Centre Pompidou, Paris, France; Berlinische Galerie, Berlin, Germany; Saarland Museum, Saarbrücken, Germany; Sammlung zeitgenössische Kunst des Bundes, Bonn, Germany; Museum van Bommel van Dam, AD Venlo, The Netherlands; Martin Z. Margulies Collection, Miami, FL; Sammlung Philara, Düsseldorf, Germany; Rubell Family Collection, Miam, FLi; Vanhaerents Art Collection, Brussels,Belgium; Burger Collection, Zurich/Hong Kong; Budi Tek/Yuz Collection, Shanghai, China as well as numerous distinguished private collections.

Gregor Hildebrandt – Im Zimmer ein Raum Galerie Wentrup is pleased to present Ein Zimmer im Raum, its 7th solo show by Gregor Hildebrandt (born 1974 in Bad Homburg, Germany), who lives and works in Berlin and also teaches as professor of painting at Munich’s Akademie der Künste.  His minimalist oeuvre, which Galerie Wentrup has been presenting since 2004, engages primarily with concepts of cross-media transfers of music and poetry into visual art. Hildebrandt’s core material are almost exclusively sound recording media, such as magnetic audio tapes and vinyl records, which he processes, or records something on them before using them on canvas, in photographic prints, or in expansive installations.  The starting points for his up to this point most colourful show are the title Ein Zimmer im Raum, borrowed from poet and novelist R. M. Rilke, as well as the black-and-white photograph on the invitation. It shows the view from the artist’s bed towards the ceiling. Just like in the descriptions by Victor Hugo, Stefan Andres, and Xavier de Maistre in his Journey Around My Room, and others before, Hildebrandt gazes into the supposed void and imagines the whole world: the authentic source of his thematic universe, from which his extremely rigorous oeuvre grows – it offers the idea of using obsolete recording techniques which transfer, on a level that resonates invisibly, romantic themes in a contemporary way for today’s audience.  The sleeping room, the centre and the ultimate retreat of almost every apartment, serves in Hildebrandt’s case to this day as an energy source for his creative work. Surrounded by peace and quiet, and despite the seemingly empty ceiling (or perhaps precisely because of it), the room fills when he looks up, unexpected ideas and thoughts start coming to mind. Only marginally noticeable is the Jugendstil window frame leading to the building’s backcourt, exemplary for the truncated link to the exterior world.  The seemingly simple initial view of the interior develops a universe of its own that can be separated into elemental parts, which are then pulled back together. Lying down quietly, the artist starts a journey of discovery, explores new territories, real and imaginary ones, going on an intellectual Grand Tour which provides him with new inspiration. And as he observes how the white of the wall interacts with the light of his round lamp, it transforms into a planet that starts to rotate.  This surrogate moment of that transformation is visually stimulated by the structured ingrain wallpaper now covering all the gallery’s walls. This wallpaper, so typical for West Germany in the 1970s into which Hildebrandt was born, expands the usual gallery dimension in a surprising and subtle manner.  As part of the exhibition, a monumental panel painting is formed of 624 multi-coloured vinyl records that were cut apart to 7488 triangles and then reassembled like a mosaic, with recordings of a musician who is a close friend of the artist. In a different work, Anni Albers, whose fascinating formal vocabulary thrilled and inspired Hildebrandt early on, led him into a hypnotic daydream. The succession of patterns of the woven upright format in black is an expansion of the meticulous tapestry drawings by the Bauhaus pioneer. Its diagonally offset hanging lets this work function as a counterpart to the actual front door, like an opening into infinite artistic possibilities. The backs of the compact cassette cases of the letter case form a reverse projection of the view from the bed: the artist, dressed, lying, lost in thought, gazes back. This exact counter-image to the invitation card is the projection surface that, as an opposite, keeps inviting Hildebrandt to enter into an inner dialogue.  In October 2018 Gregor Hildebrandt will be honored with a comprehensive solo exhibition at Kunsthalle Recklinghausen. Recent institutional solo and group exhibitions include The Bass Museum of Art, Miami, FL; The Centre Pompidou in Paris, France; Miami Art Museum, Miami, FL; ICA, Boston, MA; Saarlandmuseum, Saarbrücken, Germany; Künstlerhaus Bethanien, Berlin, Germany; Berlinische Galerie, Berlin, Germany Museum van Bommel van Dam, Venlo, The Netherlands; Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis, St. Louis, MI; Kunsthalle Andratx, Mallorca, Spain; Temporäre Kunsthalle, Berlin, Germany; Kunstverein Heppenheim, Heppenheim, Germany; Musée d´Art Moderne de la Ville, Paris, France and Tel Aviv Museum of Art, Tel Aviv, Israel. Works by Gregor Hildebrandt are in the public collections of the Centre Pompidou, Paris, France; Berlinische Galerie, Berlin, Germany; Saarland Museum, Saarbrücken, Germany; Sammlung zeitgenössische Kunst des Bundes, Bonn, Germany; Museum van Bommel van Dam, AD Venlo, The Netherlands; Martin Z. Margulies Collection, Miami, FL; Sammlung Philara, Düsseldorf, Germany; Rubell Family Collection, Miam, FLi; Vanhaerents Art Collection, Brussels,Belgium; Burger Collection, Zurich/Hong Kong; Budi Tek/Yuz Collection, Shanghai, China as well as numerous distinguished private collections.
True Stories
True Stories
Berlin - Goethestrasse 2/3
until 27-10-2018

True Stories. A Show Related to an Era – The Eighties. Part I Miros?aw Ba?ka, Herbert Brandl, Werner Büttner, Clegg & Guttmann, Mathis Esterhazy, Günther Förg, Isa Genzken, Robert Gober, Félix González-Torres, Georg Herold, Axel Hütte, Cristina Iglesias, Mike Kelley, Martin Kippenberger, Jeff Koons, Liz Larner, Zoe Leonard, Inge Mahn, Meuser, Reinhard Mucha, Cady Noland, Albert Oehlen, Markus Oehlen, Richard Prince, Didi Sattmann, Julian Schnabel, Wilhelm Schürmann, Cindy Sherman, Mariella Simoni, Thomas Struth, Rosemarie Trockel, Franz West, Terry Winters, Christopher Wool, Otto Zitko, Heimo Zobernig Curated by Peter Pakesch Galerie Max Hetzler is pleased to announce the group show True Stories. A Show Related to an Era – The Eighties, curated by Peter Pakesch which is on view both at Goethestraße 2/3 and a temporary space at Kurfürstendamm 213. Seen from today’s perspective, during this decade, the way art would function in society has changed largely. Within the history of the late 20th Century, the very two years 1968 and 1989 are truly significant for politics as well as for culture. One signifies the height of the Cold War and the departure to new freedoms, the other one the end of this Cold War and the dawn of a new world order (that still is not in place yet). In a certain reading of Western culture, visual art, as well as other fields of the cultural domain, have come to a certain end by the 1960ties - the end of the Modern. Aesthetics and politics went alongside with this verdict. After some confusion, some years later, artists on both sides of the Atlantic would get a lot of satisfaction by acting against all consequences of history. The end of the ‘End of Art’ around 1980 was experienced as a liberation at least as strong as the move to freedom more than a decade before. The world was to change in an unexpected way. The artist as a strong individual in a world where an individual identity has been revealed as obsolete: that contradiction became enormously productive, creating new strategies and attitudes for artistic challenges. The exhibition intends to present significant positions of that time and how they were shown in galleries between New York and Los Angeles on one side, as well as Cologne and Vienna on the other side. Those four cities of intellectual importance experienced a growing exchange during that period. Having always been in the focus of post-war art as the supreme centre where things would ‘happen’, New York looked more and more to Cologne, Germany’s centre of the artistic production and discourse, of the gallery world and collecting. This glance was returned with even larger intensity, as American and German attention would also drift further down east to the long dormant capital Vienna, which started to move out of the shadow of the Iron Curtain, in anticipation of the overthrow that changed the world at the end of the decade. The regard would also point further west in the direction of California, mainly to Los Angeles, which became more and more an important contributor, independent from New York and very specific in its way to deal with either the American as well as the European opposites. Thus the show would link the American centers, Los Angeles in the West and New York in the East, with the two European hotspots Cologne and Vienna, trying to understand and to demonstrate what was new and what would prove to be revolutionary for the way art developed in the future decades leading into the 21st century. – Peter Pakesch, 2018 At the same time, we present our first solo exhibition with new paintings by Louise Bonnet at Bleibtreustraße 45.  

True Stories. A Show Related to an Era – The Eighties. Part I Miros?aw Ba?ka, Herbert Brandl, Werner Büttner, Clegg & Guttmann, Mathis Esterhazy, Günther Förg, Isa Genzken, Robert Gober, Félix González-Torres, Georg Herold, Axel Hütte, Cristina Iglesias, Mike Kelley, Martin Kippenberger, Jeff Koons, Liz Larner, Zoe Leonard, Inge Mahn, Meuser, Reinhard Mucha, Cady Noland, Albert Oehlen, Markus Oehlen, Richard Prince, Didi Sattmann, Julian Schnabel, Wilhelm Schürmann, Cindy Sherman, Mariella Simoni, Thomas Struth, Rosemarie Trockel, Franz West, Terry Winters, Christopher Wool, Otto Zitko, Heimo Zobernig Curated by Peter Pakesch Galerie Max Hetzler is pleased to announce the group show True Stories. A Show Related to an Era – The Eighties, curated by Peter Pakesch which is on view both at Goethestraße 2/3 and a temporary space at Kurfürstendamm 213. Seen from today’s perspective, during this decade, the way art would function in society has changed largely. Within the history of the late 20th Century, the very two years 1968 and 1989 are truly significant for politics as well as for culture. One signifies the height of the Cold War and the departure to new freedoms, the other one the end of this Cold War and the dawn of a new world order (that still is not in place yet). In a certain reading of Western culture, visual art, as well as other fields of the cultural domain, have come to a certain end by the 1960ties - the end of the Modern. Aesthetics and politics went alongside with this verdict. After some confusion, some years later, artists on both sides of the Atlantic would get a lot of satisfaction by acting against all consequences of history. The end of the ‘End of Art’ around 1980 was experienced as a liberation at least as strong as the move to freedom more than a decade before. The world was to change in an unexpected way. The artist as a strong individual in a world where an individual identity has been revealed as obsolete: that contradiction became enormously productive, creating new strategies and attitudes for artistic challenges. The exhibition intends to present significant positions of that time and how they were shown in galleries between New York and Los Angeles on one side, as well as Cologne and Vienna on the other side. Those four cities of intellectual importance experienced a growing exchange during that period. Having always been in the focus of post-war art as the supreme centre where things would ‘happen’, New York looked more and more to Cologne, Germany’s centre of the artistic production and discourse, of the gallery world and collecting. This glance was returned with even larger intensity, as American and German attention would also drift further down east to the long dormant capital Vienna, which started to move out of the shadow of the Iron Curtain, in anticipation of the overthrow that changed the world at the end of the decade. The regard would also point further west in the direction of California, mainly to Los Angeles, which became more and more an important contributor, independent from New York and very specific in its way to deal with either the American as well as the European opposites. Thus the show would link the American centers, Los Angeles in the West and New York in the East, with the two European hotspots Cologne and Vienna, trying to understand and to demonstrate what was new and what would prove to be revolutionary for the way art developed in the future decades leading into the 21st century. – Peter Pakesch, 2018 At the same time, we present our first solo exhibition with new paintings by Louise Bonnet at Bleibtreustraße 45.  
Julien Ceccaldi
Julien Ceccaldi
Cologne - Hahnenstrasse 6
until 11-11-2018

Julien Ceccaldi – Solito  Produced on site at the Kölnischer Kunstverein over the course of two months, Julien Ceccaldi’s Solito is a large-scale exhibition in which a fairy tale unfolds around a character of the same name, a concupiscent and boyish 30-year-old virgin willing to give himself to anybody. The plot is inspired by stories such as Beauty and the Beast, Bluebeard, and The Nutcracker and the Mouse King, in which the protagonists end up in love with ugly men, and sexuality manifests itself through power and violence. In the comic book published by Ceccaldi for this exhibition Solito goes so far as to make advances to death itself. 

Julien Ceccaldi – Solito  Produced on site at the Kölnischer Kunstverein over the course of two months, Julien Ceccaldi’s Solito is a large-scale exhibition in which a fairy tale unfolds around a character of the same name, a concupiscent and boyish 30-year-old virgin willing to give himself to anybody. The plot is inspired by stories such as Beauty and the Beast, Bluebeard, and The Nutcracker and the Mouse King, in which the protagonists end up in love with ugly men, and sexuality manifests itself through power and violence. In the comic book published by Ceccaldi for this exhibition Solito goes so far as to make advances to death itself. 
Monika Sosnowska
Monika Sosnowska
Cologne - St. Apern Strae 26
until 20-10-2018

Monika Sosnowska – Urban Flowers

Monika Sosnowska – Urban Flowers
Charlotte Trossbach
Charlotte Trossbach
Cologne - Moltkestrasse 81
until 20-10-2018

Charlotte Trossbach – Shine On the occasion of the DC Open, a collective open weekend organised by Dusseldorf and Cologne galleries, Galerie Bene Taschen will present its first solo gallery exhibition with German painter Charlotte Trossbach, of Mainz. The exhibition will show a selection of thirteen oil paintings created by Trossbach in 2018. The exhibition title, Shine, embodies a strong characteristic of Charlotte Trossbach’s work, with gloss and brilliance being trademark to her technique. Paint, glass and metal shine out of the canvas. The viewer succumbs to an illusion with her images radiating strength, femininity, clarity and elegance. Charlotte Trossbach’s photorealistic images seek beauty in the superficial and fleeting. Her motifs show everyday things, such as gourmet products or consumer goods, which are painstakingly replicated on canvas with elaborate photographic aesthetics. Deviations of the norm in a seemingly perfect order are lovingly projected onto the screen. Macro shots of secluded, still life-like scenes, which are given little importance in everyday life, are staged in a stylish way by Trossbach’s painterly arts. Spatial distance reinforces the motif of the photorealistic illusion, but from a close-up, individual color surfaces seem abstract. The aristocratic array of lipsticks in the work „London Lipsticks“ illustrates the almost documentary view of the painter, which arises from frontal perspectives and organizational structures. Themes in Charlotte Trossbach’s paintings include light and the illuminated, the moving and the transparent. Elegant and powerful displays of gloss, reflections, color gradients and complicated refractions are transferred to the canvas, creating an illusion of plasticity and material. Painting as a plea for the original. Pictures as pictures, detached from functionality. Charlotte Trossbach was born in 1985 in Mainz. She lives and works in Cologne.

Charlotte Trossbach – Shine On the occasion of the DC Open, a collective open weekend organised by Dusseldorf and Cologne galleries, Galerie Bene Taschen will present its first solo gallery exhibition with German painter Charlotte Trossbach, of Mainz. The exhibition will show a selection of thirteen oil paintings created by Trossbach in 2018. The exhibition title, Shine, embodies a strong characteristic of Charlotte Trossbach’s work, with gloss and brilliance being trademark to her technique. Paint, glass and metal shine out of the canvas. The viewer succumbs to an illusion with her images radiating strength, femininity, clarity and elegance. Charlotte Trossbach’s photorealistic images seek beauty in the superficial and fleeting. Her motifs show everyday things, such as gourmet products or consumer goods, which are painstakingly replicated on canvas with elaborate photographic aesthetics. Deviations of the norm in a seemingly perfect order are lovingly projected onto the screen. Macro shots of secluded, still life-like scenes, which are given little importance in everyday life, are staged in a stylish way by Trossbach’s painterly arts. Spatial distance reinforces the motif of the photorealistic illusion, but from a close-up, individual color surfaces seem abstract. The aristocratic array of lipsticks in the work „London Lipsticks“ illustrates the almost documentary view of the painter, which arises from frontal perspectives and organizational structures. Themes in Charlotte Trossbach’s paintings include light and the illuminated, the moving and the transparent. Elegant and powerful displays of gloss, reflections, color gradients and complicated refractions are transferred to the canvas, creating an illusion of plasticity and material. Painting as a plea for the original. Pictures as pictures, detached from functionality. Charlotte Trossbach was born in 1985 in Mainz. She lives and works in Cologne.
Carolina Fusilier
Carolina Fusilier
Cologne - Jlicher Strasse 14
until 20-10-2018

Carolina Fusilier – Angel Engines What if our privatized nature, our dear machines, our complex urban systems, not only were not inert but had interior lives, a whole cosmogony? Would Carolina Fusiliers’ landscapes be their paradise? Their hell? Do they dream of us like we dream of owning them? If the long- running ambition of science has been to disenchant the world and to organize everything that is knowable into objective and rational categories, then Fusilier’s Angel Engines is resolved on doing the opposite. It is not that this group of works are anti-science or irrational but they are open and willing to speculate. The artworks re-enchant the world, they overlap a poetic, non-linear narrative on our reality to reveal an agency that could very well be there. The angel engines are in a world adjacent to ours and relayed by a sassy, primal, fluid deity, an ally and knower of the inner-lives of our belongings, a first cousin of electricity, a lost child of the sea. In Dreams of a Pipe Deity, a sound- piece streaming out of a chrome-tipped seashell, this divinity describes their own embodiment and omnipresence, their travels within our cotidianity and their wish to transform the banality of turning on the faucet into an encounter with mysticism. They are a curious presence, a voice that scolds us for our indifference and prods us into reassessing our place in the world. But that also sings songs and offers themselves up in a tap-water sculpture for visitors to ingest in a sort of communion rite, a reconciliation. Fusilier’s paintings depict no place, an undefinable moment in history, they could be either pre- human or post-human.They are portholes into the endless existence all around us, reconfiguring the gallery as a ship flying over the uncanny. A utopia of retired metal objects where ridden of mankind they get to do what they want: grow in spirals, melt into liquid, flow in and out of pools. Fusilier speculates on the realities and futures available to us, but also on those accessible to our artifacts or what we generically call our resources: our waters, metals, oils. She follows Ursula K Le Guin’s advice: “One way to stop seeing trees, or rivers, or hills, only as ‘natural resources’ is to class them as fellow beings—kinfolk.”1 And she de-objectifies, connects, spreads thick empathy all over a weird landscape. — Gaby Cepeda Carolina Fusilier (b. 1985) lives and works in Mexico City and Buenos Aires. Having completed postgraduate program at Soma, Mexico City in 2017, Fusilier participated in numerous exhibition including, most recently, “74 million million million tons”, a group exhibition at the Sculpture Center, NewYork. She is currently part of Open Sessions 2018- 2020, two-year program in Drawing Center, New York. This fall, Fusilier will be a guest student in Dusseldorf academy with Prof. Rita McBride.  

Carolina Fusilier – Angel Engines What if our privatized nature, our dear machines, our complex urban systems, not only were not inert but had interior lives, a whole cosmogony? Would Carolina Fusiliers’ landscapes be their paradise? Their hell? Do they dream of us like we dream of owning them? If the long- running ambition of science has been to disenchant the world and to organize everything that is knowable into objective and rational categories, then Fusilier’s Angel Engines is resolved on doing the opposite. It is not that this group of works are anti-science or irrational but they are open and willing to speculate. The artworks re-enchant the world, they overlap a poetic, non-linear narrative on our reality to reveal an agency that could very well be there. The angel engines are in a world adjacent to ours and relayed by a sassy, primal, fluid deity, an ally and knower of the inner-lives of our belongings, a first cousin of electricity, a lost child of the sea. In Dreams of a Pipe Deity, a sound- piece streaming out of a chrome-tipped seashell, this divinity describes their own embodiment and omnipresence, their travels within our cotidianity and their wish to transform the banality of turning on the faucet into an encounter with mysticism. They are a curious presence, a voice that scolds us for our indifference and prods us into reassessing our place in the world. But that also sings songs and offers themselves up in a tap-water sculpture for visitors to ingest in a sort of communion rite, a reconciliation. Fusilier’s paintings depict no place, an undefinable moment in history, they could be either pre- human or post-human.They are portholes into the endless existence all around us, reconfiguring the gallery as a ship flying over the uncanny. A utopia of retired metal objects where ridden of mankind they get to do what they want: grow in spirals, melt into liquid, flow in and out of pools. Fusilier speculates on the realities and futures available to us, but also on those accessible to our artifacts or what we generically call our resources: our waters, metals, oils. She follows Ursula K Le Guin’s advice: “One way to stop seeing trees, or rivers, or hills, only as ‘natural resources’ is to class them as fellow beings—kinfolk.”1 And she de-objectifies, connects, spreads thick empathy all over a weird landscape. — Gaby Cepeda Carolina Fusilier (b. 1985) lives and works in Mexico City and Buenos Aires. Having completed postgraduate program at Soma, Mexico City in 2017, Fusilier participated in numerous exhibition including, most recently, “74 million million million tons”, a group exhibition at the Sculpture Center, NewYork. She is currently part of Open Sessions 2018- 2020, two-year program in Drawing Center, New York. This fall, Fusilier will be a guest student in Dusseldorf academy with Prof. Rita McBride.  
Jens Wolf
Jens Wolf
Cologne - An der Schanz 1a
until 27-10-2018

Jens Wolf  

Jens Wolf  
Bunny Rogers
Bunny Rogers
Los Angeles - 4357 Wilshire Boulevard
until 06-01-2019

Bunny Rogers – Inattention  As an obsessive consumer and self-proclaimed Internet addict since childhood, Bunny Rogers (b. 1990, Houston, TX; lives and works in New York) probes how the media shaped her identity. Fixated on animated television shows like Clone High and Invader Zim and websites such as Neopets, Rogers grew attached to fictional people and creatures that have become recurring characters in her work. These children’s programs overlapped in time with severe and violent events widely covered by news media outlets, including the 1999 Columbine High School massacre in which 15 students and teachers died, and another 23 were injured. Rogers grew up during the rise of school shootings and cites the Columbine imagery as significant and unforgettable.  

Bunny Rogers – Inattention  As an obsessive consumer and self-proclaimed Internet addict since childhood, Bunny Rogers (b. 1990, Houston, TX; lives and works in New York) probes how the media shaped her identity. Fixated on animated television shows like Clone High and Invader Zim and websites such as Neopets, Rogers grew attached to fictional people and creatures that have become recurring characters in her work. These children’s programs overlapped in time with severe and violent events widely covered by news media outlets, including the 1999 Columbine High School massacre in which 15 students and teachers died, and another 23 were injured. Rogers grew up during the rise of school shootings and cites the Columbine imagery as significant and unforgettable.  
Claire Fontaine
Claire Fontaine
Los Angeles - 2228 West 7th Street, 2nd Floor (entrance on South Grand View Street)
until 20-10-2018

Claire Fontaine – Happy for No Reason

Claire Fontaine – Happy for No Reason
Petrit Halilaj
Petrit Halilaj
Los Angeles - 10899 Wilshire Boulevard
until 20-01-2019

Petrit Halilaj  For his first solo exhibition in Los Angeles, Halilaj will present a group of the moths suspended at various heights, illuminated by custom flickering lights.   Mining his personal history and cultural identity, Petrit Halilaj constructs whimsical worlds inhabited by fantastical creatures and reimagined relics. Using humble materials such as sticks, mud and fabric he has re-imagined animals from forgotten places and times. His affinity for animals extends beyond representation as art works – on several occasions the artist has adopted an animal persona as a method of both disguise and metamorphosis. He’s been a bird, a dog, and most recently a moth. Working collaboratively with his mother, Halilaj crafted giant moth costumes using traditional Kosovar fabrics or materials like qilim, dyshek and jan carpets (they were shown at the 2017 Venice Biennale). 

Petrit Halilaj  For his first solo exhibition in Los Angeles, Halilaj will present a group of the moths suspended at various heights, illuminated by custom flickering lights.   Mining his personal history and cultural identity, Petrit Halilaj constructs whimsical worlds inhabited by fantastical creatures and reimagined relics. Using humble materials such as sticks, mud and fabric he has re-imagined animals from forgotten places and times. His affinity for animals extends beyond representation as art works – on several occasions the artist has adopted an animal persona as a method of both disguise and metamorphosis. He’s been a bird, a dog, and most recently a moth. Working collaboratively with his mother, Halilaj crafted giant moth costumes using traditional Kosovar fabrics or materials like qilim, dyshek and jan carpets (they were shown at the 2017 Venice Biennale). 
Lari Pittman
Lari Pittman
Los Angeles - 6750 Santa Monica Boulevard
until 27-10-2018

Lari Pittman – Portraits of Textiles & Portraits of Humans Regen Projects is pleased to present an exhibition of new paintings by Lari Pittman. On view will be a series of twelve portraits of textile fabrics arranged alongside their corresponding human portrait. This marks his eighth solo presentation at the gallery.  Over the course of his decades-long career, Pittman has developed a singular visual aesthetic that has established him as one of the most important painters of his generation. His intricately constructed and multi-layered works draw on the history of painting with an emphasis on decoration and the applied arts. Pittman’s signature style utilizes various methods of applying paint to the canvas, ranging from stencils to spray to unadulterated applications of the medium.

Lari Pittman – Portraits of Textiles & Portraits of Humans Regen Projects is pleased to present an exhibition of new paintings by Lari Pittman. On view will be a series of twelve portraits of textile fabrics arranged alongside their corresponding human portrait. This marks his eighth solo presentation at the gallery.  Over the course of his decades-long career, Pittman has developed a singular visual aesthetic that has established him as one of the most important painters of his generation. His intricately constructed and multi-layered works draw on the history of painting with an emphasis on decoration and the applied arts. Pittman’s signature style utilizes various methods of applying paint to the canvas, ranging from stencils to spray to unadulterated applications of the medium.
Hidden Narratives
Hidden Narratives
Los Angeles - 5905 Wilshire Boulevard
until 06-01-2019

Hidden Narratives. Recent Acquisitions of Postwar Art   Hidden Narratives brings together a selection of recent acquisitions from LACMA’s growing collection of modern and contemporary art. Though the works on view were made decades apart by artists of different backgrounds, they nevertheless share certain conceptual and formal concerns. The featured artists communicate narratives in artistic mediums ranging from painting to sculpture, from film to mixed media, and through both abstract and figurative means. The stories they relay remain enigmatic, allowing viewers to interpret the works through the lens of their own experiences. Many of these artists explore language as an artistic medium or conceptual framework, as seen in works by Jesse Howard, Joseph Kosuth, Los Carpinteros, Alexis Smith, and Lawrence Weiner. Others foreground the body, considering its capabilities and limits, and the stories it might mask or expose; this interest in physicality is evident in pieces by Bas Jan Ader, Lynn Hershman Leeson, Ken Price, Dorothea Tanning, and Idelle Weber. Whether focusing attention on the artists’ personal beliefs and experiences, on shared cultural narratives, or on the overlooked, the works included in this exhibition illuminate the times in which they were made while also resonating in the present day.  

Hidden Narratives. Recent Acquisitions of Postwar Art   Hidden Narratives brings together a selection of recent acquisitions from LACMA’s growing collection of modern and contemporary art. Though the works on view were made decades apart by artists of different backgrounds, they nevertheless share certain conceptual and formal concerns. The featured artists communicate narratives in artistic mediums ranging from painting to sculpture, from film to mixed media, and through both abstract and figurative means. The stories they relay remain enigmatic, allowing viewers to interpret the works through the lens of their own experiences. Many of these artists explore language as an artistic medium or conceptual framework, as seen in works by Jesse Howard, Joseph Kosuth, Los Carpinteros, Alexis Smith, and Lawrence Weiner. Others foreground the body, considering its capabilities and limits, and the stories it might mask or expose; this interest in physicality is evident in pieces by Bas Jan Ader, Lynn Hershman Leeson, Ken Price, Dorothea Tanning, and Idelle Weber. Whether focusing attention on the artists’ personal beliefs and experiences, on shared cultural narratives, or on the overlooked, the works included in this exhibition illuminate the times in which they were made while also resonating in the present day.  
A Journey That Wasn’t
A Journey That Wasn?t
Los Angeles - 221 South Grand Avenue
until 05-01-2019

A Journey That Wasn’t Bernd and Hilla Becher, Gregory Crewdson, Andreas Gursky, Elliott Hundley, Pierre Huyghe, Anselm Kiefer, Sherrie Levine, Glenn Ligon, Sharon Lockhart, Paul Pfeiffer, Ed Ruscha a.o. A Journey That Wasn’t considers artists’ complex representations of time, and features the return of the beloved video installation, The Visitors, by Ragnar Kjartansson. The exhibition presents more than 20 artists including Bernd and Hilla Becher, Gregory Crewdson, Andreas Gursky, Elliott Hundley, Pierre Huyghe, Anselm Kiefer, Sherrie Levine, Glenn Ligon, Sharon Lockhart, Paul Pfeiffer and Ed Ruscha. The featured works in the exhibition—ranging from painting and sculpture to photography, film and installation—examine the passage of time by alluding to nostalgia or sentiments about aging, often depicting specific places in states of decay; these works can act as documentation, memorial or symbol. Still others imply movement or narrative within single still images; in these works, historical styles and events are ruptured, collaged and re-contextualized as to become portals into seemingly other worlds.

A Journey That Wasn’t Bernd and Hilla Becher, Gregory Crewdson, Andreas Gursky, Elliott Hundley, Pierre Huyghe, Anselm Kiefer, Sherrie Levine, Glenn Ligon, Sharon Lockhart, Paul Pfeiffer, Ed Ruscha a.o. A Journey That Wasn’t considers artists’ complex representations of time, and features the return of the beloved video installation, The Visitors, by Ragnar Kjartansson. The exhibition presents more than 20 artists including Bernd and Hilla Becher, Gregory Crewdson, Andreas Gursky, Elliott Hundley, Pierre Huyghe, Anselm Kiefer, Sherrie Levine, Glenn Ligon, Sharon Lockhart, Paul Pfeiffer and Ed Ruscha. The featured works in the exhibition—ranging from painting and sculpture to photography, film and installation—examine the passage of time by alluding to nostalgia or sentiments about aging, often depicting specific places in states of decay; these works can act as documentation, memorial or symbol. Still others imply movement or narrative within single still images; in these works, historical styles and events are ruptured, collaged and re-contextualized as to become portals into seemingly other worlds.
Janet Werner
Janet Werner
Los Angeles - 2660 South La Cienega Boulevard
until 20-10-2018

Janet Werner – The Splits  Anat Ebgi is pleased to announce The Splits, the first major solo exhibition of Canadian painter Janet Werner in the United States. Developed over a practice spanning thirty years, Werner’s figures revel in multiple, fragile personalities culled from fashion magazines, children’s toys and art history. Despite their representational qualities, each subject remains an ambiguous distortion of references, devoid of one, singular identity. Trading in the traditional “likeness” of naturalist portraiture, Werner focuses on gestural tension and the deceit of traditional beauty.

Janet Werner – The Splits  Anat Ebgi is pleased to announce The Splits, the first major solo exhibition of Canadian painter Janet Werner in the United States. Developed over a practice spanning thirty years, Werner’s figures revel in multiple, fragile personalities culled from fashion magazines, children’s toys and art history. Despite their representational qualities, each subject remains an ambiguous distortion of references, devoid of one, singular identity. Trading in the traditional “likeness” of naturalist portraiture, Werner focuses on gestural tension and the deceit of traditional beauty.
KAYA
KAYA
Dsseldorf - Ackerstrasse 26
until 03-11-2018

KAYA_The Store presents CFGNY, Nic Xedro, N.O.Madski, Nhu Duong Global art and lifestyle brand KAYA today announces a pivotal partnership with fashion powerhouses CFGNY / Nhu Duong. The iconic fashion designers will join KAYA’s growing coalition of unapologetically accomplished art – including the graffiti icon N.O.Madski, and musical knockout Nic Xedro– to push new boundaries in the brand's long-term mission of empowering art to be the best version of itself. The KAYA x CFGNY / Nhu Duong collection will be introduced in late 2018 and will sit in KAYA_The Store– an initiative that focuses on developing art wear and apparel that delivers the next generation of performance and expression, from conceptual runway designs to tech-driven sound products that fill retail shelves. "As an art brand, we look to partners and artists who want to truly change the world," shared KAYA. "There's no better embodiment of this than KAYA: a true visionary who possesses a relentless desire to help artists become the best version of themselves.” Before Justin Bieber and his monkey; before One Direction; before Westlife and Boyzone; before even Take That, there was Nic Xedro. Although he’s hardly new now and has been around the block quite a few times (feel free to add any ageist jokes of your own at this point), the new Nic Xedro is still setting hearts aflutter. KAYA is set to embark on releasing remastered classics of Nic Xedro from his impressive and influential decade-spanning oeuvre. A spectacular live performance element will be introduced during the Opening on Sept 7th. Timed with the opening of KAYA_The Store, is the launch of a limited edition book by graffiti legend N.O.Madski. The extraordinary collection of 5 unique books delves into the fantastical and empowering world of the mysterious graffiti artist who has overwhelmed the world. “Some Street Artists are getting really big and can be called the Picasso’s of their time,” KAYA says. “It is with great honor that we are able to celebrate with one of the most influential artists around with a body of work that has been exhibited at the most exclusive and prestigious institutions of the world, including of course Capri, Düsseldorf.” About KAYA KAYA International Ltd., headquartered in, NYC, USA, and Napoli, Italy is a leading artist designer, marketer and distributor of art and lifestyle art wear, apparel and equipment. An American-inspired global art brand, KAYA is a pioneer in the artistic goods industry with a rich and storied art heritage. KAYA develops products, technologies and programming which enable movements and is committed to accompanying people on their journey to fulfill their potential. KAYA connects with the art consumer wherever they are and however they choose to stay artistically fit – whether it's functional training, painting, sculpting, videotaping, performing, walking, dancing, yoga or aerobics. A subsidiary of Christo and Jeanne-Claude, KAYA is the exclusive authentic global art of the planet. Conceived by the artists Kerstin Brätsch and Debo Eilers by invitation of Gesine Borcherdt, curator of CAPRI

KAYA_The Store presents CFGNY, Nic Xedro, N.O.Madski, Nhu Duong Global art and lifestyle brand KAYA today announces a pivotal partnership with fashion powerhouses CFGNY / Nhu Duong. The iconic fashion designers will join KAYA’s growing coalition of unapologetically accomplished art – including the graffiti icon N.O.Madski, and musical knockout Nic Xedro– to push new boundaries in the brand's long-term mission of empowering art to be the best version of itself. The KAYA x CFGNY / Nhu Duong collection will be introduced in late 2018 and will sit in KAYA_The Store– an initiative that focuses on developing art wear and apparel that delivers the next generation of performance and expression, from conceptual runway designs to tech-driven sound products that fill retail shelves. "As an art brand, we look to partners and artists who want to truly change the world," shared KAYA. "There's no better embodiment of this than KAYA: a true visionary who possesses a relentless desire to help artists become the best version of themselves.” Before Justin Bieber and his monkey; before One Direction; before Westlife and Boyzone; before even Take That, there was Nic Xedro. Although he’s hardly new now and has been around the block quite a few times (feel free to add any ageist jokes of your own at this point), the new Nic Xedro is still setting hearts aflutter. KAYA is set to embark on releasing remastered classics of Nic Xedro from his impressive and influential decade-spanning oeuvre. A spectacular live performance element will be introduced during the Opening on Sept 7th. Timed with the opening of KAYA_The Store, is the launch of a limited edition book by graffiti legend N.O.Madski. The extraordinary collection of 5 unique books delves into the fantastical and empowering world of the mysterious graffiti artist who has overwhelmed the world. “Some Street Artists are getting really big and can be called the Picasso’s of their time,” KAYA says. “It is with great honor that we are able to celebrate with one of the most influential artists around with a body of work that has been exhibited at the most exclusive and prestigious institutions of the world, including of course Capri, Düsseldorf.” About KAYA KAYA International Ltd., headquartered in, NYC, USA, and Napoli, Italy is a leading artist designer, marketer and distributor of art and lifestyle art wear, apparel and equipment. An American-inspired global art brand, KAYA is a pioneer in the artistic goods industry with a rich and storied art heritage. KAYA develops products, technologies and programming which enable movements and is committed to accompanying people on their journey to fulfill their potential. KAYA connects with the art consumer wherever they are and however they choose to stay artistically fit – whether it's functional training, painting, sculpting, videotaping, performing, walking, dancing, yoga or aerobics. A subsidiary of Christo and Jeanne-Claude, KAYA is the exclusive authentic global art of the planet. Conceived by the artists Kerstin Brätsch and Debo Eilers by invitation of Gesine Borcherdt, curator of CAPRI
Lutz Bacher
Lutz Bacher
Dsseldorf - Stndehausstrasse 1
until 06-01-2019

Lutz Bacher – What's Love Got to Do With It" The US-American artist Lutz Bacher – who has concealed her identity beneath a masculine pseudonym throughout her career – works conceptually in a range of media. A longtime resident of California who now lives in New York, the artist has based her work since the 1970s on found objects and image material from popular culture. Advertising photographs, excerpts from pornographic magazines, and unedited cell phone videos are incorporated into her works along with discarded objects from the world of consumerism.

Lutz Bacher – What's Love Got to Do With It" The US-American artist Lutz Bacher – who has concealed her identity beneath a masculine pseudonym throughout her career – works conceptually in a range of media. A longtime resident of California who now lives in New York, the artist has based her work since the 1970s on found objects and image material from popular culture. Advertising photographs, excerpts from pornographic magazines, and unedited cell phone videos are incorporated into her works along with discarded objects from the world of consumerism.
Gregor Schneider
Gregor Schneider
Dsseldorf - Platanenstrasse 7
until 03-11-2018

Gregor Schneider – Nacht und Tag Konrad Fischer Galerie gladly presents Gregor Schneider's solo show Nacht und Tag including artworks realized between 2001 and 2015.  All color photographies from his series Haus u r 10, RAL (1993-2015) show the famous Kaffeezimmer (coffee table) from his landmark masterpiece Totes Haus u r / Der Deutsche Beitrag. The work has been presented at German Pavilion at Biennale di Venezia (2001) which won him the Golden Lion Award. The very same motif is modified in different RAL color nuances partly blurred beyond recognition. The images do not allow for any association referring to the time of the day. Is it night? Is it daytime?  The new colored Windows (2015) showing interior parts like drapery and curtains or a glance out of the window. These new works are presented in the context of the rain-wet windows from Haus u r / Totes Haus u r , Rheydt / Venedig (1985-2001). Gregor Schneider who is always having his built rooms accompanied by photographic and cinematic works considers his photographies as equivalent reduplications of reality, as consequent continuations of his sculptural works.  In addition, we present a previously unreleased multi-part video by Gregor Schneider associated with the Goebbels House in Mönchengladbach-Rheydt titled SOMMERMÄRCHEN 2014 RHEYDT 13. Juli 2014, 21:00 – 23:36 Uhr (Fußball-Weltmeister 2014 / Deutschland). During the FIFA world championship's finals the artist was shooting in front of the building Nazi politician Joseph Goebbels spent his youth. The spooky atmosphere of the deserted street contrasts with the party mood of the celebrating soccer fans only some few steps away, in the City center.  Gregor Schneider (born 1969, lives and works in Rheydt, Germany) is no doubt among the most important artists of his generation. His works have been recently shown in a large-scale retrospective at Bundeskunsthalle Bonn. Works by Gregor Schneider have been presented, among others, at Skulptur-Projekte in Münster, at Kunstmuseum Wolfsburg (2017), at Mathildenhöhe Darmstadt (2016) and at Havana Biennial (2015). His works are shown in the collections of Neue Nationalgalerie Berlin, Bundeskunstsammlung Bonn, Kunstsammlung NRW in Düsseldorf, MMK Frankfurt/Main, Museum Abteiberg Mönchengladbach, Hamburger Kunsthalle, TATE Modern, MoMA, New York, MOCA Los Angeles and MCA Chicago.

Gregor Schneider – Nacht und Tag Konrad Fischer Galerie gladly presents Gregor Schneider's solo show Nacht und Tag including artworks realized between 2001 and 2015.  All color photographies from his series Haus u r 10, RAL (1993-2015) show the famous Kaffeezimmer (coffee table) from his landmark masterpiece Totes Haus u r / Der Deutsche Beitrag. The work has been presented at German Pavilion at Biennale di Venezia (2001) which won him the Golden Lion Award. The very same motif is modified in different RAL color nuances partly blurred beyond recognition. The images do not allow for any association referring to the time of the day. Is it night? Is it daytime?  The new colored Windows (2015) showing interior parts like drapery and curtains or a glance out of the window. These new works are presented in the context of the rain-wet windows from Haus u r / Totes Haus u r , Rheydt / Venedig (1985-2001). Gregor Schneider who is always having his built rooms accompanied by photographic and cinematic works considers his photographies as equivalent reduplications of reality, as consequent continuations of his sculptural works.  In addition, we present a previously unreleased multi-part video by Gregor Schneider associated with the Goebbels House in Mönchengladbach-Rheydt titled SOMMERMÄRCHEN 2014 RHEYDT 13. Juli 2014, 21:00 – 23:36 Uhr (Fußball-Weltmeister 2014 / Deutschland). During the FIFA world championship's finals the artist was shooting in front of the building Nazi politician Joseph Goebbels spent his youth. The spooky atmosphere of the deserted street contrasts with the party mood of the celebrating soccer fans only some few steps away, in the City center.  Gregor Schneider (born 1969, lives and works in Rheydt, Germany) is no doubt among the most important artists of his generation. His works have been recently shown in a large-scale retrospective at Bundeskunsthalle Bonn. Works by Gregor Schneider have been presented, among others, at Skulptur-Projekte in Münster, at Kunstmuseum Wolfsburg (2017), at Mathildenhöhe Darmstadt (2016) and at Havana Biennial (2015). His works are shown in the collections of Neue Nationalgalerie Berlin, Bundeskunstsammlung Bonn, Kunstsammlung NRW in Düsseldorf, MMK Frankfurt/Main, Museum Abteiberg Mönchengladbach, Hamburger Kunsthalle, TATE Modern, MoMA, New York, MOCA Los Angeles and MCA Chicago.
Sol Calero
Sol Calero
Dsseldorf - Grabbeplatz 4
until 28-10-2018

Sol Calero – Pica Pica Kunstverein für die Rheinlande und Westfalen, Düsseldorf is pleased to present Pica Pica, a solo exhibition by Venezuela-born, Berlin-based artist Sol Calero. Over the course of the past years, Calero has explored cultural codes, communal environments, and image production in Latin America and of the Latino communities living in migration. She transforms exhibition venues into immersive and colorful spaces of collective practice: the beauty salon, the dance class, the school, or even the setting of a telenovela, are all scenarios that she has recreated, exposing how the construction of a common paradigm is mediated by, and inseparable from, the social fabric where it is woven.    

Sol Calero – Pica Pica Kunstverein für die Rheinlande und Westfalen, Düsseldorf is pleased to present Pica Pica, a solo exhibition by Venezuela-born, Berlin-based artist Sol Calero. Over the course of the past years, Calero has explored cultural codes, communal environments, and image production in Latin America and of the Latino communities living in migration. She transforms exhibition venues into immersive and colorful spaces of collective practice: the beauty salon, the dance class, the school, or even the setting of a telenovela, are all scenarios that she has recreated, exposing how the construction of a common paradigm is mediated by, and inseparable from, the social fabric where it is woven.    
Jason Duval
Jason Duval
Dsseldorf - Gerresheimer Strasse 33
until 21-10-2018

Jason Duval – Interiors Jason Duval’s paintings explore the expressive potential of abstract form and pictorial space. Figural fragments and architectural remnants coalesce, collapse and manifest in a cubo-surrealist-inspired space. Painterly materiality and the suggestion of narrative time make tangible Duval’s conception of painting as an occasion for pleasurable or melancholic reflection. Looking inward lately tends toward escapism, which shuns contemplation. Duval’s understanding and usage of interiority is provocatively unfashionable. His paintings, in their vulnerability and reticence, do not give away anything, do not aim to please, nor do they want to displease. They are sincere and searching, as a matter of fact. Abstraction, reflection and interiority are the paramount themes in Duval’s recent works. Subtle arches and soft frames are backdrop to the painter’s forms, which vacillate from biomorphic to rectilinear and are highly suggestive. Compositions have an awkward grace that resists stasis. Passages of painterly gesture and linear drawing intertwined, encourage the eye to travel in shallow modernist space as form and content unfold in time. Evident is a profound concern for meaning and space in abstraction.

Jason Duval – Interiors Jason Duval’s paintings explore the expressive potential of abstract form and pictorial space. Figural fragments and architectural remnants coalesce, collapse and manifest in a cubo-surrealist-inspired space. Painterly materiality and the suggestion of narrative time make tangible Duval’s conception of painting as an occasion for pleasurable or melancholic reflection. Looking inward lately tends toward escapism, which shuns contemplation. Duval’s understanding and usage of interiority is provocatively unfashionable. His paintings, in their vulnerability and reticence, do not give away anything, do not aim to please, nor do they want to displease. They are sincere and searching, as a matter of fact. Abstraction, reflection and interiority are the paramount themes in Duval’s recent works. Subtle arches and soft frames are backdrop to the painter’s forms, which vacillate from biomorphic to rectilinear and are highly suggestive. Compositions have an awkward grace that resists stasis. Passages of painterly gesture and linear drawing intertwined, encourage the eye to travel in shallow modernist space as form and content unfold in time. Evident is a profound concern for meaning and space in abstraction.
Entropy
Entropy
Beijing - 2 Jiuxuanquao Road
until 24-02-2019

Entropy He An, Yang Fudong, Liu Wei, Sun Xun, Zhao Zhao, Yu Ji, Chen Tianzhuo Entropy is a group exhibition presented at Faurschou Beijing, which aims to grasp the Chinese art scene at large by exploring the works of seven Chinese contemporary artists. Each artist has been given their own exhibition section, in order for them to express themselves with their own distinct voice. The overall exhibition offers the viewers an insight into the complex and ever-evolving Chinese art scene of today within an overall framework – artists born and raised in a rapidly changing China, marked by economic growth and cultural exchange. Like the scientific term “entropy,” which is a measurement of the number of possible states in a given system, the exhibition is one voice from China, formed by many, and can be interpreted and experienced in various ways.

Entropy He An, Yang Fudong, Liu Wei, Sun Xun, Zhao Zhao, Yu Ji, Chen Tianzhuo Entropy is a group exhibition presented at Faurschou Beijing, which aims to grasp the Chinese art scene at large by exploring the works of seven Chinese contemporary artists. Each artist has been given their own exhibition section, in order for them to express themselves with their own distinct voice. The overall exhibition offers the viewers an insight into the complex and ever-evolving Chinese art scene of today within an overall framework – artists born and raised in a rapidly changing China, marked by economic growth and cultural exchange. Like the scientific term “entropy,” which is a measurement of the number of possible states in a given system, the exhibition is one voice from China, formed by many, and can be interpreted and experienced in various ways.
Vivien Zhang
Vivien Zhang
Beijing - Jiuxianqiao Road
until 28-10-2018

Vivien Zhang – Codescape   Long March Space is honored to announce our representation of London-based Chinese artist Vivien Zhang. We are proud to present “Codescape”, her first solo exhibition in China. Zhang’s approach to painting is vitally grounded in the present moment, exhibiting a distinctly network-like aesthetic. Using repetitive structures disrupted by carefully selected motifs and forms, her paintings resemble the visual experience of digital technology, the structure of algorithms themselves, and hyperlinked connections between information. Yet the results also retain an emotional core: by returning to her birthplace for this exhibition the artist is engaging with half-forgotten recollections of childhood and traces of family history. 

Vivien Zhang – Codescape   Long March Space is honored to announce our representation of London-based Chinese artist Vivien Zhang. We are proud to present “Codescape”, her first solo exhibition in China. Zhang’s approach to painting is vitally grounded in the present moment, exhibiting a distinctly network-like aesthetic. Using repetitive structures disrupted by carefully selected motifs and forms, her paintings resemble the visual experience of digital technology, the structure of algorithms themselves, and hyperlinked connections between information. Yet the results also retain an emotional core: by returning to her birthplace for this exhibition the artist is engaging with half-forgotten recollections of childhood and traces of family history. 
Rebekka Steiger
Rebekka Steiger
Beijing - 798 East Street
until 21-10-2018

Rebekka Steiger Galerie Urs Meile is pleased to announce the first solo exhibition ???–virages nocturnes in China by Swiss emerging artist Rebekka Steiger (b. 1993, Zurich, Switzerland). We will present recent paintings and works on paper created during her residency at Galerie Urs Meile in Beijing. The Chinese part of the title is the mandarin word for ‘owl’ but literally translates into cat-headed hawk. The artist got across this word when she was looking for the historical meaning of a little bronze figure that she bought on the Beijing antiques flee market. The sculpture reminded her strongly of her often painted figures, meanwhile virages nocturnes is a colloquial term in French that describes a nightly stroll or being up in the night, meaning a nightly bend, turn or shift. This combination of the title coincides with what the artist wants to depict and deliver through her imageries. Through layer-by-layer color rendering, Rebekka Steiger transforms her perception of emotions and atmosphere into mysterious and delicate art pieces, achieving unexpected visual results. During her onsite artistic practice in Beijing 2018, Rebekka Steiger continued her usual creative style, but the change of the physical space to a foreign country also brought her more mind freedom and openness, while the failure of her accustomed navigation system opened up more possibilities. Due to regional differences, once familiar painting materials have caused unexpected “mistakes” and surprises. She also deliberately followed these surprises further along—abandoning her previous method of referencing old photographs and old books for inspiration in favor of a spontaneous approach of “action first, brush first,” thus folding the homesickness, restlessness, confusion and novelty of the outsider into her painting. She draws on her sharper intuition, and allows her emotions to spread and fertilize freely before ultimately flowing onto the canvas. At the same time, unexpected new motifs find their way quite naturally into her paintings—a unicorn (another tired man lays down his hand, 2018, oil and tempera on canvas, 190 × 240 cm), a cat-eared woman (running for the flesh (of dinosaurs and men), 2018, oil, tempera, pastel and gouache on canvas, 200 × 240 cm), and mysterious plants seemingly from a fantasy dreamland (virages nocturne (under the volcano), 2018, oil, tempera, pastel and gouache on canvas, 240 × 200 cm). These motifs are actually derived from the life experiences of the artist as a stranger to Beijing— the bronze owl bought from the antique market, the tall and straight black-skinned trees seen everywhere on roadside (for example blind bend, 2018, oil and tempera on canvas, 190 × 240 cm; back to the roots, 2018, oil and tempera on canvas, 50 × 70 cm). By repainting her “vocabulary of forms” over and over again, those figurative motifs go through constant metamorphosis, at times dissolving into the almost abstract (as seen in queen, 2018, oil and tempera on canvas, 50 × 70 cm). Some faintly recognizable shapes endow a certain rhythm to the picture, while others are ambiguous and lost in the utopian background, which leads the viewer to an unpredictable territory, the calm concealing potential danger (as seen in night shift, 2018, oil and tempera on canvas, 54 × 65 cm; and lady bird, 2018, oil, tempera and pastel on canvas, 170 × 240 cm). The “contradiction” between abstraction and representation, the expressive rendering of strong colors, as well as the presentation of figurative content without imposing a straight narrative on the viewers’ interpretation, is what not only makes the painting itself intriguing, but also unsettling.

Rebekka Steiger Galerie Urs Meile is pleased to announce the first solo exhibition ???–virages nocturnes in China by Swiss emerging artist Rebekka Steiger (b. 1993, Zurich, Switzerland). We will present recent paintings and works on paper created during her residency at Galerie Urs Meile in Beijing. The Chinese part of the title is the mandarin word for ‘owl’ but literally translates into cat-headed hawk. The artist got across this word when she was looking for the historical meaning of a little bronze figure that she bought on the Beijing antiques flee market. The sculpture reminded her strongly of her often painted figures, meanwhile virages nocturnes is a colloquial term in French that describes a nightly stroll or being up in the night, meaning a nightly bend, turn or shift. This combination of the title coincides with what the artist wants to depict and deliver through her imageries. Through layer-by-layer color rendering, Rebekka Steiger transforms her perception of emotions and atmosphere into mysterious and delicate art pieces, achieving unexpected visual results. During her onsite artistic practice in Beijing 2018, Rebekka Steiger continued her usual creative style, but the change of the physical space to a foreign country also brought her more mind freedom and openness, while the failure of her accustomed navigation system opened up more possibilities. Due to regional differences, once familiar painting materials have caused unexpected “mistakes” and surprises. She also deliberately followed these surprises further along—abandoning her previous method of referencing old photographs and old books for inspiration in favor of a spontaneous approach of “action first, brush first,” thus folding the homesickness, restlessness, confusion and novelty of the outsider into her painting. She draws on her sharper intuition, and allows her emotions to spread and fertilize freely before ultimately flowing onto the canvas. At the same time, unexpected new motifs find their way quite naturally into her paintings—a unicorn (another tired man lays down his hand, 2018, oil and tempera on canvas, 190 × 240 cm), a cat-eared woman (running for the flesh (of dinosaurs and men), 2018, oil, tempera, pastel and gouache on canvas, 200 × 240 cm), and mysterious plants seemingly from a fantasy dreamland (virages nocturne (under the volcano), 2018, oil, tempera, pastel and gouache on canvas, 240 × 200 cm). These motifs are actually derived from the life experiences of the artist as a stranger to Beijing— the bronze owl bought from the antique market, the tall and straight black-skinned trees seen everywhere on roadside (for example blind bend, 2018, oil and tempera on canvas, 190 × 240 cm; back to the roots, 2018, oil and tempera on canvas, 50 × 70 cm). By repainting her “vocabulary of forms” over and over again, those figurative motifs go through constant metamorphosis, at times dissolving into the almost abstract (as seen in queen, 2018, oil and tempera on canvas, 50 × 70 cm). Some faintly recognizable shapes endow a certain rhythm to the picture, while others are ambiguous and lost in the utopian background, which leads the viewer to an unpredictable territory, the calm concealing potential danger (as seen in night shift, 2018, oil and tempera on canvas, 54 × 65 cm; and lady bird, 2018, oil, tempera and pastel on canvas, 170 × 240 cm). The “contradiction” between abstraction and representation, the expressive rendering of strong colors, as well as the presentation of figurative content without imposing a straight narrative on the viewers’ interpretation, is what not only makes the painting itself intriguing, but also unsettling.
Francis Alÿs
Francis Als
Miami - 61 NE 41st Street
until 25-11-2018

Francis Alÿs The Institute of Contemporary Art, Miami hosts a presentation of paintings by Francis Alÿs based on three important multipanel works in the museum’s permanent collection. The artist’s “Sign Painting Project” series (1993–97), one of his first important bodies of work, involves his close collaboration with three commercial sign makers in Mexico City who copied, enlarged, or otherwise interpreted his original paintings. Alÿs in turn made new versions of his paintings based on these interpretations, calling into question the final works’ authorship and value. This body of work is typical to Alÿs for its deft navigation of social and economic factors. Reflecting on the declining art of commercial sign painting in a digital and hyper-capitalist age, the artist considers the culture of image making and disrupts the market, redistributing value to traditional image makers. Francis Alÿs (b. 1959, Antwerp, Belgium) is an interdisciplinary conceptual artist working in installation, video, painting, drawing, photography, and performance to address issues of geopolitical and social conflict in urban environments. Trained as an architect, Alÿs moved to Mexico City in 1986, where he began making public performance works as meditations on the experience of urban living. These interventions into urban space reflect conditions of dynamic unrest among communities living on Latin American borders. Alÿs’s solo exhibitions at major international institutions include the Museum of Contemporary Art Tokyo; Tate Modern, London; Wiels Centre d’Art Contemporain, Brussels; Museum of Modern Art, New York; and Hammer Museum, Los Angeles. His work belongs to the permanent collections of, among many others, the Institute of Contemporary Art, Miami; Philadelphia Museum of Art; Art Institute of Chicago; Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York; and Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam. The artist lives and works in Mexico City.  

Francis Alÿs The Institute of Contemporary Art, Miami hosts a presentation of paintings by Francis Alÿs based on three important multipanel works in the museum’s permanent collection. The artist’s “Sign Painting Project” series (1993–97), one of his first important bodies of work, involves his close collaboration with three commercial sign makers in Mexico City who copied, enlarged, or otherwise interpreted his original paintings. Alÿs in turn made new versions of his paintings based on these interpretations, calling into question the final works’ authorship and value. This body of work is typical to Alÿs for its deft navigation of social and economic factors. Reflecting on the declining art of commercial sign painting in a digital and hyper-capitalist age, the artist considers the culture of image making and disrupts the market, redistributing value to traditional image makers. Francis Alÿs (b. 1959, Antwerp, Belgium) is an interdisciplinary conceptual artist working in installation, video, painting, drawing, photography, and performance to address issues of geopolitical and social conflict in urban environments. Trained as an architect, Alÿs moved to Mexico City in 1986, where he began making public performance works as meditations on the experience of urban living. These interventions into urban space reflect conditions of dynamic unrest among communities living on Latin American borders. Alÿs’s solo exhibitions at major international institutions include the Museum of Contemporary Art Tokyo; Tate Modern, London; Wiels Centre d’Art Contemporain, Brussels; Museum of Modern Art, New York; and Hammer Museum, Los Angeles. His work belongs to the permanent collections of, among many others, the Institute of Contemporary Art, Miami; Philadelphia Museum of Art; Art Institute of Chicago; Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York; and Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam. The artist lives and works in Mexico City.  
Karen Rifas
Karen Rifas
Miami - 2100 Collins Avenue
until 21-10-2018

Karen Rifas – Deceptive Constructions For more than thirty years, Miami-based artist Karen Rifas has amassed a body of work that endeavors to understand and re-imagine space. Well known for her minimal cord and leaf installations, and precise, methodical line drawings, in 2016, Rifas began a focused exploration into the constructive possibilities of color. Employing densely hued shapes and irregular lines, Rifas creates spaces that oscillate between the two- and three-dimensional. Deceptive Constructions surveys this recent body of work for the artist’s first solo museum exhibition in over 10 years. Through variegated floor and sculptural installations, works on paper, and wood panel, Rifas uses a concise language of richly contrasted color to alter our perception of space. Karen Rifas (Chicago, b. 1942) lives and works in Miami and is a professor at New World School of the Arts. Recent solo exhibitions have been held at: Emerson Dorsch (2017), Meeting House Gallery (2016), De La Cruz Collection (2010), Pinnacle Gallery, Savannah College of Art and Design (2007), Polk Museum of Art (2004), and Museo De Arte Comtemporaneo, Panama City (1993). She has also exhibited in group shows and presented the following projects: Transphysics, Art and Culture Center, Hollywood (2017), 100+ Degrees in the Shade: A Survey of South Florida Art (2015), MIA-BER, Berlin Arts Club (2014), Following the Line, Girls’ Club (2012), I Triennial, Santo Domingo (2010), globe>miami<island, DC Museum of Contemporary Art (2002) and The Bass (2001). Rifas is represented in various permanent collections, including The Bass (Miami Beach), Fairchild Tropical Gardens (Miami), Metro-Dade Art in Public Places Trust (Miami), Museo de Arte de Ponce (Puerto Rico), Museum of Contemporary Art (North Miami), Perez Art Museum Miami, and Valencia Community College (Orlando).  

Karen Rifas – Deceptive Constructions For more than thirty years, Miami-based artist Karen Rifas has amassed a body of work that endeavors to understand and re-imagine space. Well known for her minimal cord and leaf installations, and precise, methodical line drawings, in 2016, Rifas began a focused exploration into the constructive possibilities of color. Employing densely hued shapes and irregular lines, Rifas creates spaces that oscillate between the two- and three-dimensional. Deceptive Constructions surveys this recent body of work for the artist’s first solo museum exhibition in over 10 years. Through variegated floor and sculptural installations, works on paper, and wood panel, Rifas uses a concise language of richly contrasted color to alter our perception of space. Karen Rifas (Chicago, b. 1942) lives and works in Miami and is a professor at New World School of the Arts. Recent solo exhibitions have been held at: Emerson Dorsch (2017), Meeting House Gallery (2016), De La Cruz Collection (2010), Pinnacle Gallery, Savannah College of Art and Design (2007), Polk Museum of Art (2004), and Museo De Arte Comtemporaneo, Panama City (1993). She has also exhibited in group shows and presented the following projects: Transphysics, Art and Culture Center, Hollywood (2017), 100+ Degrees in the Shade: A Survey of South Florida Art (2015), MIA-BER, Berlin Arts Club (2014), Following the Line, Girls’ Club (2012), I Triennial, Santo Domingo (2010), globe>miami<island, DC Museum of Contemporary Art (2002) and The Bass (2001). Rifas is represented in various permanent collections, including The Bass (Miami Beach), Fairchild Tropical Gardens (Miami), Metro-Dade Art in Public Places Trust (Miami), Museo de Arte de Ponce (Puerto Rico), Museum of Contemporary Art (North Miami), Perez Art Museum Miami, and Valencia Community College (Orlando).  
Mark Handforth
Mark Handforth
Miami - 61 NE 41st Street
until 26-06-2021

Mark Handforth Dr Pepper (2017) by Mark Handforth marks a major public commission for this leading Miami-based artist. Alluding to a lantern form, the totemic standing star shape describes a continuous, inevitable, and even chaotic movement through space—a process writ large in crumpled aluminum. The composition expresses an implicit relationship between the looseness of the gesture and the physicality of the work—the grounded, weighted reality of objecthood, which is a common theme in Handforth’s practice. The color palette, which borrows from a chromate yellow aircraft primer, is set against deep blacks that reflect a peculiar duality, as does the webbing of the leg, and the structural plates crisscrossing the languid form. In his sculptural installations, Handforth often transplants familiar objects found in civic infrastructure— such as municipal signs, motor scooters, hydrants, street lamps, wheels, and traffic cones—into unfamiliar surroundings and transforms them, by reworking or deforming their structures and configurations, in order to reveal something new about the ways in which these objects function in our everyday lives. He revels in the skewed perspectives and unintended consequences that result from cultural exchange and displacement. Handforth (b. 1969, Hong Kong) was raised in London and has been based in Miami since 1992. His work has appeared in exhibitions worldwide, including solo presentations and outdoor public sculptures at the Museo d’Arte Contemporanea, Villa Croce, Genova, Italy (2016); Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago (2011); Dallas Museum of Art (2007); Kunsthaus Zu?rich (2005); and the Hammer Museum, Los Angeles (2002).

Mark Handforth Dr Pepper (2017) by Mark Handforth marks a major public commission for this leading Miami-based artist. Alluding to a lantern form, the totemic standing star shape describes a continuous, inevitable, and even chaotic movement through space—a process writ large in crumpled aluminum. The composition expresses an implicit relationship between the looseness of the gesture and the physicality of the work—the grounded, weighted reality of objecthood, which is a common theme in Handforth’s practice. The color palette, which borrows from a chromate yellow aircraft primer, is set against deep blacks that reflect a peculiar duality, as does the webbing of the leg, and the structural plates crisscrossing the languid form. In his sculptural installations, Handforth often transplants familiar objects found in civic infrastructure— such as municipal signs, motor scooters, hydrants, street lamps, wheels, and traffic cones—into unfamiliar surroundings and transforms them, by reworking or deforming their structures and configurations, in order to reveal something new about the ways in which these objects function in our everyday lives. He revels in the skewed perspectives and unintended consequences that result from cultural exchange and displacement. Handforth (b. 1969, Hong Kong) was raised in London and has been based in Miami since 1992. His work has appeared in exhibitions worldwide, including solo presentations and outdoor public sculptures at the Museo d’Arte Contemporanea, Villa Croce, Genova, Italy (2016); Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago (2011); Dallas Museum of Art (2007); Kunsthaus Zu?rich (2005); and the Hammer Museum, Los Angeles (2002).
Force and Form
Force and Form
Miami - 23 NE 41st Street
until 01-11-2018

Force and Form Kathryn Andrews, Tauba Auerbach, Hernan Bas, Walead Beshty, Mark Bradford, Joe Bradley, Dan Colen, Martin Creed, Aaron Curry, Salvador Dalí, Peter Doig, Isa Genzken, Félix González-Torres, Mark Grotjahn, Wade Guyton, Guyton/Walker, Rachel Harrison, Arturo Herrera, Jim Hodges, Evan Holloway, Thomas Houseago, Alex Israel, Rashid Johnson, Alex Katz, Martin Kippenberger, Michael Krebber, Wifredo Lam, Glenn Ligon, Michael Linares, Nate Lowman, Adam McEwen, Ana Mendieta, Albert Oehlen, Laura Owens, Jorge Pardo, Manfred Pernice, Sigmar Polke, Seth Price, Sterling Ruby, Analia Saban, Josh Smith, Reena Spaulings, Rudolf Stingel, Rufino Tamayo, Kelley Walker, Christopher Wool Force and Form, further explores shifts in contemporary visual culture, as revealed through the vision of collectors, Rosa and Carlos de la Cruz. “Our exhibitions are a collective effort that includes the voice of the artists. This exchange helps us build possibilities that extend beyond our understanding of current art practices, and allows for the inclusion of the artists’ vision.” – Rosa de la Cruz In response to the acceleration of communication and global technological advancements, new modes of production are reshaping the way in which artists employ inventive mark making, digital language, and the use of non-traditional and commercial fabrication. In this context, media is freely deconstructed, pushing the boundaries of high-art and presenting new possibilities.  Force and Form brings together pivotal works from artists in the collection whose practices respond to issues of identity, gender, class, power, and the values that contribute to our social fabric. Challenging traditional practices of sculpture, installation, and painting, familiar materials and found imagery address the innate conflicts of the mechanical gesture and human intention found within commodities and popular culture.  

Force and Form Kathryn Andrews, Tauba Auerbach, Hernan Bas, Walead Beshty, Mark Bradford, Joe Bradley, Dan Colen, Martin Creed, Aaron Curry, Salvador Dalí, Peter Doig, Isa Genzken, Félix González-Torres, Mark Grotjahn, Wade Guyton, Guyton/Walker, Rachel Harrison, Arturo Herrera, Jim Hodges, Evan Holloway, Thomas Houseago, Alex Israel, Rashid Johnson, Alex Katz, Martin Kippenberger, Michael Krebber, Wifredo Lam, Glenn Ligon, Michael Linares, Nate Lowman, Adam McEwen, Ana Mendieta, Albert Oehlen, Laura Owens, Jorge Pardo, Manfred Pernice, Sigmar Polke, Seth Price, Sterling Ruby, Analia Saban, Josh Smith, Reena Spaulings, Rudolf Stingel, Rufino Tamayo, Kelley Walker, Christopher Wool Force and Form, further explores shifts in contemporary visual culture, as revealed through the vision of collectors, Rosa and Carlos de la Cruz. “Our exhibitions are a collective effort that includes the voice of the artists. This exchange helps us build possibilities that extend beyond our understanding of current art practices, and allows for the inclusion of the artists’ vision.” – Rosa de la Cruz In response to the acceleration of communication and global technological advancements, new modes of production are reshaping the way in which artists employ inventive mark making, digital language, and the use of non-traditional and commercial fabrication. In this context, media is freely deconstructed, pushing the boundaries of high-art and presenting new possibilities.  Force and Form brings together pivotal works from artists in the collection whose practices respond to issues of identity, gender, class, power, and the values that contribute to our social fabric. Challenging traditional practices of sculpture, installation, and painting, familiar materials and found imagery address the innate conflicts of the mechanical gesture and human intention found within commodities and popular culture.  
Pipilotti Rist
Pipilotti Rist
Munich - Barer Strasse 40
until 31-12-2018

Pipilotti Rist – Himalaya Goldsteins Stube The new collection display also features one of the largest whole-room installations by the Swiss video artist Pipilotti Rist (b. 1962), now on show again for the first time in several yeahirs. The work Himalaya Goldsteins Stube combines everyday furnishings, video projections, light, and music to create a richly evocative environment. Superimposed over the space’s sensual materials are flickering video images, projected from armchairs, side tables, and lamps. These ghostly emanations penetrate the space’s dimensions and flit between layers of reality. The interior and exterior world, the public and private are melded into one.

Pipilotti Rist – Himalaya Goldsteins Stube The new collection display also features one of the largest whole-room installations by the Swiss video artist Pipilotti Rist (b. 1962), now on show again for the first time in several yeahirs. The work Himalaya Goldsteins Stube combines everyday furnishings, video projections, light, and music to create a richly evocative environment. Superimposed over the space’s sensual materials are flickering video images, projected from armchairs, side tables, and lamps. These ghostly emanations penetrate the space’s dimensions and flit between layers of reality. The interior and exterior world, the public and private are melded into one.
Jutta Koether
Jutta Koether
Munich - Trkenstrasse 19
until 21-10-2018

Jutta Koether – Tour de Madame There is scarcely any other artist who has shaped our current understanding of painting and the cultural landscape as significantly as Jutta Koether (born 1958). Tour de Madame is the first in-depth survey show dedicated to her work and, as such, represents a unique opportunity for the general public to view the astonishing and spectacular scope of her paintings. In many respects the exhibition will be a journey of discovery, bringing togerther more than 150 paintings in a totally novel fashion. Many of the works have either never been exhibited before, or have not been on display since their initial presentation. One highlight of the exhibition will be a newly produced 15-part series of paintings – with a nod to Cy Twombly's Battle of Lepanto cycle on permanent display at Museum Brandhorst – embodying Koether's own "battle" with art history.

Jutta Koether – Tour de Madame There is scarcely any other artist who has shaped our current understanding of painting and the cultural landscape as significantly as Jutta Koether (born 1958). Tour de Madame is the first in-depth survey show dedicated to her work and, as such, represents a unique opportunity for the general public to view the astonishing and spectacular scope of her paintings. In many respects the exhibition will be a journey of discovery, bringing togerther more than 150 paintings in a totally novel fashion. Many of the works have either never been exhibited before, or have not been on display since their initial presentation. One highlight of the exhibition will be a newly produced 15-part series of paintings – with a nod to Cy Twombly's Battle of Lepanto cycle on permanent display at Museum Brandhorst – embodying Koether's own "battle" with art history.
Generations Part 2
Generations Part 2
Munich - Prinzregentenstrasse 1
until 27-01-2019

Generations Part 2: Female Artists in Dialogue – Sammlung Goetz in Haus der Kunst Curated by Cornelia Gockel and Susanne Touw From the beginning, works by women have had a significant importance in the Sammlung Goetz. Thus, central individual positions – like those of Yayoi Kusama, Rosemarie Trockel and Mona Hatoum, or groupings like the Young British Artists – were established early on, and the work of such artists collected consistently over the years. In her passion for collecting, Ingvild Goetz allowed herself to be guided by her interest in socio-political topics, formal-aesthetic issues and artistic materials, while always remaining open to new discoveries.  In the second part of the exhibition, staged in the former air shelter in Haus der Kunst, the focus is on the body and the exploration of its limits, as well as the examination of social concepts of sexuality, gender and identity in moving images.

Generations Part 2: Female Artists in Dialogue – Sammlung Goetz in Haus der Kunst Curated by Cornelia Gockel and Susanne Touw From the beginning, works by women have had a significant importance in the Sammlung Goetz. Thus, central individual positions – like those of Yayoi Kusama, Rosemarie Trockel and Mona Hatoum, or groupings like the Young British Artists – were established early on, and the work of such artists collected consistently over the years. In her passion for collecting, Ingvild Goetz allowed herself to be guided by her interest in socio-political topics, formal-aesthetic issues and artistic materials, while always remaining open to new discoveries.  In the second part of the exhibition, staged in the former air shelter in Haus der Kunst, the focus is on the body and the exploration of its limits, as well as the examination of social concepts of sexuality, gender and identity in moving images.
Olaf Metzel
Olaf Metzel
Munich - Barer Strasse 40
until 31-12-2018

Olaf Metzel – Reise nach Jerusalem / Musical Chairs For the opening of the Pinakothek der Moderne, Olaf Metzel created a sculpture that highlighted the stage-like appearance of the staircase. The artist was particularly interested by the lone column on the mid-landing, which he dressed in a dazzling robe of colourful acrylic glass, in the centre of which he stacked deformed plastic chairs. Metzel named this eccentric work “Journey to Jerusalem”, (the West-German name for musical chairs) and it soon became one of the museum’s most iconic works. This expansive work may be seen again on the occasion of the museum's 15th anniversary.

Olaf Metzel – Reise nach Jerusalem / Musical Chairs For the opening of the Pinakothek der Moderne, Olaf Metzel created a sculpture that highlighted the stage-like appearance of the staircase. The artist was particularly interested by the lone column on the mid-landing, which he dressed in a dazzling robe of colourful acrylic glass, in the centre of which he stacked deformed plastic chairs. Metzel named this eccentric work “Journey to Jerusalem”, (the West-German name for musical chairs) and it soon became one of the museum’s most iconic works. This expansive work may be seen again on the occasion of the museum's 15th anniversary.
Anselm Kiefer
Anselm Kiefer
Munich - Barer Strasse 40
until 31-12-2018

Anselm Kiefer  The Michael & Eleonore Stoffel Foundation has worked in close collaboration with the Bayerische Staatsgemäldesammlungen to acquire on behalf of the latter institution five works by Anselm Kiefer. The acquisition marks a milestone in the development of the collection. Anselm Kiefer has created a body of work that broke the silence surrounding the German past in the Third Reich, while also finding a poignant language for articulating the global intertwinement of human civilization. He delves deep into old Christian, Kabbalistic, and Far Eastern traditions, explores the world’s great mythical, religious, and poetic texts, and forges links between them and the world as it is experienced today. The monumental painting “Der Sand aus den Urnen” (2009) and the two large wall pieces transferred onto lead in 2011 and entitled “OCCUPATIONS” (1969/2011) as well as the two display cases “Die 12 Stämme“ (2010) and “Morgenthau” (2016) will now form an additional highlight in the collection profile at the Pinakothek der Moderne.

Anselm Kiefer  The Michael & Eleonore Stoffel Foundation has worked in close collaboration with the Bayerische Staatsgemäldesammlungen to acquire on behalf of the latter institution five works by Anselm Kiefer. The acquisition marks a milestone in the development of the collection. Anselm Kiefer has created a body of work that broke the silence surrounding the German past in the Third Reich, while also finding a poignant language for articulating the global intertwinement of human civilization. He delves deep into old Christian, Kabbalistic, and Far Eastern traditions, explores the world’s great mythical, religious, and poetic texts, and forges links between them and the world as it is experienced today. The monumental painting “Der Sand aus den Urnen” (2009) and the two large wall pieces transferred onto lead in 2011 and entitled “OCCUPATIONS” (1969/2011) as well as the two display cases “Die 12 Stämme“ (2010) and “Morgenthau” (2016) will now form an additional highlight in the collection profile at the Pinakothek der Moderne.
Huma Bhabha
Huma Bhabha
New York - 1000 Fifth Avenue
until 28-10-2018

The Roof Garden Commission: Huma Bhabha – We Come in Peace  Huma Bhabha has been selected to create a site-specific installation for The Met’s Roof Garden. The title of the installation, We Come in Peace, has its origins in the classic American science-fiction film The Day the Earth Stood Still (1951), a tale of first contact between humans and aliens. The installation’s two sculptures—the 12-foot-tall five-headed intersex figure We Come in Peace, and the 18-foot-long prostrate Benaam (an Urdu word that translates as “without name”)—are carefully oriented toward each other as if they have just landed on The Met’s Cantor Roof. Bhabha has choreographed a dramatic mise-en-scène, inspiring visitors to envision tales of foreign visitation. The Roof Garden Commission: Huma Bhabha, We Come in Peace was conceived by the artist in consultation with Sheena Wagstaff, Leonard A. Lauder Chairman of Modern and Contemporary Art, and Shanay Jhaveri, Assistant Curator of South Asian Art, both of The Met’s Department of Modern and Contemporary Art. It is the sixth in a series of site-specific commissions for the outdoor space.  

The Roof Garden Commission: Huma Bhabha – We Come in Peace  Huma Bhabha has been selected to create a site-specific installation for The Met’s Roof Garden. The title of the installation, We Come in Peace, has its origins in the classic American science-fiction film The Day the Earth Stood Still (1951), a tale of first contact between humans and aliens. The installation’s two sculptures—the 12-foot-tall five-headed intersex figure We Come in Peace, and the 18-foot-long prostrate Benaam (an Urdu word that translates as “without name”)—are carefully oriented toward each other as if they have just landed on The Met’s Cantor Roof. Bhabha has choreographed a dramatic mise-en-scène, inspiring visitors to envision tales of foreign visitation. The Roof Garden Commission: Huma Bhabha, We Come in Peace was conceived by the artist in consultation with Sheena Wagstaff, Leonard A. Lauder Chairman of Modern and Contemporary Art, and Shanay Jhaveri, Assistant Curator of South Asian Art, both of The Met’s Department of Modern and Contemporary Art. It is the sixth in a series of site-specific commissions for the outdoor space.  
Wolfgang Tillmans
Wolfgang Tillmans
New York - 519, 525 & 533 West 19th Street
until 20-10-2018

Wolfgang Tillmans – How likely is it that only I am right in this matter?   This exhibition will present new and recent work by Wolfgang Tillmans, marking the artist’s third solo show with David Zwirner.  Few artists have shaped the scope of contemporary art and influenced a younger generation more than Tillmans. Since the early 1990s, his works have epitomized a new kind of subjectivity in photography, pairing intimacy and playfulness with social critique and the persistent questioning of existing values and hierarchies. Through his seamless integration of genres, subjects, techniques, and exhibition strategies, he has expanded conventional ways of approaching the medium and his practice continues to address the fundamental question of what it means to create pictures in an increasingly image-saturated world.

Wolfgang Tillmans – How likely is it that only I am right in this matter?   This exhibition will present new and recent work by Wolfgang Tillmans, marking the artist’s third solo show with David Zwirner.  Few artists have shaped the scope of contemporary art and influenced a younger generation more than Tillmans. Since the early 1990s, his works have epitomized a new kind of subjectivity in photography, pairing intimacy and playfulness with social critique and the persistent questioning of existing values and hierarchies. Through his seamless integration of genres, subjects, techniques, and exhibition strategies, he has expanded conventional ways of approaching the medium and his practice continues to address the fundamental question of what it means to create pictures in an increasingly image-saturated world.
Marguerite Humeau
Marguerite Humeau
New York - 235 Bowery
until 06-01-2019

Marguerite Humeau – Birth Canal    The New Museum will present the first US solo museum exhibition by Marguerite Humeau, debuting a new installation of sculpture, sound, and scent. For Birth Canal, Humeau investigates the origins of Venus figurines, prehistoric female goddess statuettes found throughout the world; she also expands on the idea that early modern humans may have ingested animal brains for their psychoactive effects. The exhibition will feature ten digitally rendered sculptures realized in cast bronze and carved stone, which beckon the viewer into a dark space that smells faintly sweet and mineral-like, its odor inspired by bodily liquids associated with birth.

Marguerite Humeau – Birth Canal    The New Museum will present the first US solo museum exhibition by Marguerite Humeau, debuting a new installation of sculpture, sound, and scent. For Birth Canal, Humeau investigates the origins of Venus figurines, prehistoric female goddess statuettes found throughout the world; she also expands on the idea that early modern humans may have ingested animal brains for their psychoactive effects. The exhibition will feature ten digitally rendered sculptures realized in cast bronze and carved stone, which beckon the viewer into a dark space that smells faintly sweet and mineral-like, its odor inspired by bodily liquids associated with birth.
Richard Bernstein
Richard Bernstein
New York - 18 Wooster Street
until 27-10-2018

Richard Bernstein – Fame

Richard Bernstein – Fame
Rirkrit Tiravanija
Rirkrit Tiravanija
New York - 439 W 127 Street
until 24-10-2018

Rirkrit Tiravanija

Rirkrit Tiravanija
Saâdane Afif
Sadane Afif
Vienna - Treitlstrasse 2
until 18-11-2018

Saâdane Afif – This is Ornamental Work by the French artist Saâdane Afif was included in several group exhibitions at Kunsthalle Wien, including Blue Times (2015), Individual Stories. Collecting as Portrait and Methodology (2015), and Political Populism (2015–2016). With This Is Ornamental, Kunsthalle Wien now presents the first solo show of Afif’s work in Austria. Saâdane Afif's practice is characterized by extreme variability—even fluidity—between forms, categories, inspirations and methods used. Always pushing the limits of the artwork as an object fashioned by a demiurge artist, he creates ever-changing works that are only temporarily crystallized. To create them, he appeals to collaborators of diverse horizons, who bring their subjectivity and their know-how which he then re-appropriates and makes resound in his works, comparable to endless feedback loops. At Kunsthalle Wien Karlsplatz, a new inflection comes into play. Not only does Afif continue this method of collaboration, derivation and variation—always engaging the authorship of the work, its reification as an object and its reception. He also addresses the entire process of musealization, institutionalization, and, finally, of historicization. For This Is Ornamental, he invited the writer and poet Thomas Clerc to create the script of a play inspired by one of his earlier performance pieces, Souvenir: La Leçon de Géométrie, in which seven figures meet an eighth, Yasmine d’Ouezzan – a French-Moroccan woman born in 1913 who was the first French female carom billiard champion. Drawing on two core elements of Clerc’s L’Heptaèdre—the matter of the text itself, the language, and its main character, Yasmine d’Ouezzan—the show at Kunsthalle Wien Karlsplatz is Afif’s first exhibition experiment arising from this collaboration. In the show, the text is screened on a LED panel. Placed high at one end of the exhibition space, it is immediately reminiscent of supertitles used in theatres. On the other side of the gallery, around sixty documents about Yasmine d’Ouezzan’s life—all gathered during the months preceding the exhibition—are presented on a several-meter-long structure made of wooden panels and painted yellow. The scenography, inspired by the spatial configuration and the architecture of Kunsthalle Wien Karlsplatz, evokes temporary exhibitions in town halls or at tourist information centers. The entire exhibition oscillates between fictional and documentary moments, between (fake) musealization and the creation of a myth. In Saâdane Afif’s work, d’Ouezzan becomes a motif, inflected in several manners and metamorphosed by the artist in his own quest to invent and create a new artistic shape through history and space. Curator: Anne Faucheret Saâdane Afif (b. 1970, Vendôme, France) is a conceptual and installation artist based in Berlin. His work focuses on interpretation, exchange, and circulation and explores various media (performance, objects, text and printed matter) without categorizing his methods under any specific discipline. All of his projects are subject to a continuous process of alteration. Recent international exhibitions have included Paroles, Wiels, Brussels (2018); Ici., Leopold-Hoesch-Museum & Papiermuseum, Düren, Germany (2017) and Là-Bas., La Panacée, Montpellier, France (2017); The Fountain Archives, Nouveau Musée National de Monaco (2017) and Centre Pompidou, Paris (2017); Quoi?—L’Éternité, Atelier Hermès, Seoul (2016); Vice de Forme: Das Kabarett, Hamburger Bahnhof, Berlin (2016); Das Ende der Welt, Museum für Naturkunde, Berlin (2015); and Political Populism, Kunsthalle Wien, Vienna (2015). His work was included in Documenta 12 (2007) and in the International Exhibition of the 56th Venice Biennale (2015). The artist won the Prix Marcel Duchamp in 2009, which led to an exhibition at the Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris (2010), and the Prix Meurice pour l’art contemporain in 2015.

Saâdane Afif – This is Ornamental Work by the French artist Saâdane Afif was included in several group exhibitions at Kunsthalle Wien, including Blue Times (2015), Individual Stories. Collecting as Portrait and Methodology (2015), and Political Populism (2015–2016). With This Is Ornamental, Kunsthalle Wien now presents the first solo show of Afif’s work in Austria. Saâdane Afif's practice is characterized by extreme variability—even fluidity—between forms, categories, inspirations and methods used. Always pushing the limits of the artwork as an object fashioned by a demiurge artist, he creates ever-changing works that are only temporarily crystallized. To create them, he appeals to collaborators of diverse horizons, who bring their subjectivity and their know-how which he then re-appropriates and makes resound in his works, comparable to endless feedback loops. At Kunsthalle Wien Karlsplatz, a new inflection comes into play. Not only does Afif continue this method of collaboration, derivation and variation—always engaging the authorship of the work, its reification as an object and its reception. He also addresses the entire process of musealization, institutionalization, and, finally, of historicization. For This Is Ornamental, he invited the writer and poet Thomas Clerc to create the script of a play inspired by one of his earlier performance pieces, Souvenir: La Leçon de Géométrie, in which seven figures meet an eighth, Yasmine d’Ouezzan – a French-Moroccan woman born in 1913 who was the first French female carom billiard champion. Drawing on two core elements of Clerc’s L’Heptaèdre—the matter of the text itself, the language, and its main character, Yasmine d’Ouezzan—the show at Kunsthalle Wien Karlsplatz is Afif’s first exhibition experiment arising from this collaboration. In the show, the text is screened on a LED panel. Placed high at one end of the exhibition space, it is immediately reminiscent of supertitles used in theatres. On the other side of the gallery, around sixty documents about Yasmine d’Ouezzan’s life—all gathered during the months preceding the exhibition—are presented on a several-meter-long structure made of wooden panels and painted yellow. The scenography, inspired by the spatial configuration and the architecture of Kunsthalle Wien Karlsplatz, evokes temporary exhibitions in town halls or at tourist information centers. The entire exhibition oscillates between fictional and documentary moments, between (fake) musealization and the creation of a myth. In Saâdane Afif’s work, d’Ouezzan becomes a motif, inflected in several manners and metamorphosed by the artist in his own quest to invent and create a new artistic shape through history and space. Curator: Anne Faucheret Saâdane Afif (b. 1970, Vendôme, France) is a conceptual and installation artist based in Berlin. His work focuses on interpretation, exchange, and circulation and explores various media (performance, objects, text and printed matter) without categorizing his methods under any specific discipline. All of his projects are subject to a continuous process of alteration. Recent international exhibitions have included Paroles, Wiels, Brussels (2018); Ici., Leopold-Hoesch-Museum & Papiermuseum, Düren, Germany (2017) and Là-Bas., La Panacée, Montpellier, France (2017); The Fountain Archives, Nouveau Musée National de Monaco (2017) and Centre Pompidou, Paris (2017); Quoi?—L’Éternité, Atelier Hermès, Seoul (2016); Vice de Forme: Das Kabarett, Hamburger Bahnhof, Berlin (2016); Das Ende der Welt, Museum für Naturkunde, Berlin (2015); and Political Populism, Kunsthalle Wien, Vienna (2015). His work was included in Documenta 12 (2007) and in the International Exhibition of the 56th Venice Biennale (2015). The artist won the Prix Marcel Duchamp in 2009, which led to an exhibition at the Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris (2010), and the Prix Meurice pour l’art contemporain in 2015.
Polly Apfelbaum
Polly Apfelbaum
Vienna - Arsenalstrasse 1
until 13-01-2019

Polly Apfelbaum – Happiness Runs The Belvedere 21 in Vienna is pleased to present American artist Polly Apfelbaum’s first solo exhibition in an Austrian museum. Apfelbaum’s holistic composition comprising carpets handwoven in Mexico enters into a dialogue with the open, modern architecture of the building. A characteristic feature of Polly Apfelbaum’s multifaceted oeuvre is a hybrid aesthetic that merges traditions from sculpture, painting, arts and crafts, design and installation. The artist draws on a plethora of media to break down the barriers between art and craft. She experiments with ceramic, textiles, paper and handwoven carpets. Since the 1990s, Apfelbaum has used the floor as a surface on which to present her ‘Fallen Paintings’. Colour, both visually and formally, is a key element in Polly Apfelbaum’s creative work. Themes such as feminism and spirituality, quotations from the history of art, as well as references to popular prints and comics are intrinsic to her art. The exploration of artistic role models like Gene Davis, Morris Louis and Andy Warhol or the examination of stylistic influences like Colour Field Painting, Pop Art, Abstract Expressionism and Minimal Art are sometimes obvious and sometimes barely perceptible. The artist connects various thoughts and narrative threads, combining these components into new, independent works. Her pieces are poised on the boundary between abstraction and narration yet deny any definite attribution. Polly Apfelbaum’s site-specific works enter into a dialogue with their surroundings, the venue and the architecture. Apfelbaum’s intent exploration of space, colour, form and materiality finds its logical progression at the Belvedere 21. Here, the artist is particularly interested in the history of the space – a late-modern building originally designed as the pavilion for the 1958 Expo in Brussels, which was then dismantled and transported to Vienna. Similarly, her work is also about relocating, transplanting and connecting fragments. Apposite to this year’s motto at the Belvedere 21, ‘Spirit of ’68’, the title of the exhibition is based on the Donovan song Happiness Runs in a Circular Motion from 1968. The simple, forceful form of the canon can also be applied to the exhibition. With Happiness Runs, the artist is adorning this large, ample space for the first time, almost exclusively using carpet works laid on the floor. Visitors can walk on and experience the installations (without shoes). The artist thereby enables them to immerse themselves in these woven colour fields. The exhibition should be understood as an open space for contemplation and as a friendly invitation to participate. Polly Apfelbaum was born in Abington, Pennsylvania (USA), in 1955. She studied painting at the Tyler School of Art, Elkins Park, Pennsylvania, and at Purchase College, State University of New York. International exhibitions since the 1980s; works in the collections of the Museum of Modern Art, New York, Whitney Museum, New York, Brooklyn Museum, New York, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, and many more. The artist lives and works in New York.

Polly Apfelbaum – Happiness Runs The Belvedere 21 in Vienna is pleased to present American artist Polly Apfelbaum’s first solo exhibition in an Austrian museum. Apfelbaum’s holistic composition comprising carpets handwoven in Mexico enters into a dialogue with the open, modern architecture of the building. A characteristic feature of Polly Apfelbaum’s multifaceted oeuvre is a hybrid aesthetic that merges traditions from sculpture, painting, arts and crafts, design and installation. The artist draws on a plethora of media to break down the barriers between art and craft. She experiments with ceramic, textiles, paper and handwoven carpets. Since the 1990s, Apfelbaum has used the floor as a surface on which to present her ‘Fallen Paintings’. Colour, both visually and formally, is a key element in Polly Apfelbaum’s creative work. Themes such as feminism and spirituality, quotations from the history of art, as well as references to popular prints and comics are intrinsic to her art. The exploration of artistic role models like Gene Davis, Morris Louis and Andy Warhol or the examination of stylistic influences like Colour Field Painting, Pop Art, Abstract Expressionism and Minimal Art are sometimes obvious and sometimes barely perceptible. The artist connects various thoughts and narrative threads, combining these components into new, independent works. Her pieces are poised on the boundary between abstraction and narration yet deny any definite attribution. Polly Apfelbaum’s site-specific works enter into a dialogue with their surroundings, the venue and the architecture. Apfelbaum’s intent exploration of space, colour, form and materiality finds its logical progression at the Belvedere 21. Here, the artist is particularly interested in the history of the space – a late-modern building originally designed as the pavilion for the 1958 Expo in Brussels, which was then dismantled and transported to Vienna. Similarly, her work is also about relocating, transplanting and connecting fragments. Apposite to this year’s motto at the Belvedere 21, ‘Spirit of ’68’, the title of the exhibition is based on the Donovan song Happiness Runs in a Circular Motion from 1968. The simple, forceful form of the canon can also be applied to the exhibition. With Happiness Runs, the artist is adorning this large, ample space for the first time, almost exclusively using carpet works laid on the floor. Visitors can walk on and experience the installations (without shoes). The artist thereby enables them to immerse themselves in these woven colour fields. The exhibition should be understood as an open space for contemplation and as a friendly invitation to participate. Polly Apfelbaum was born in Abington, Pennsylvania (USA), in 1955. She studied painting at the Tyler School of Art, Elkins Park, Pennsylvania, and at Purchase College, State University of New York. International exhibitions since the 1980s; works in the collections of the Museum of Modern Art, New York, Whitney Museum, New York, Brooklyn Museum, New York, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, and many more. The artist lives and works in New York.
Film and More
Film and More
Vienna - Museumsplatz 1
until 03-02-2019

Film and More Curated by Marie-Therese Hochwartner, Naoko Kaltschmidt, Matthias Michalka, Susanne Neuburger The exhibition presents and contrasts the archives of Kurt Kren (1929–1998) und Ernst Schmidt jr. (1938–1988), which are held in mumok and are now generally accessible. The presentation of these two key filmmakers of the Austrian postwar avant-garde will include notes, sketches, correspondence, and materials related to their work as well as a selection of their films. Kren’s notations are a major body of work that illustrates his structural approach and his visual mind. Conceptual analysis of language is important in the work of Schmidt jr., whether he was working as author, critic, editor, or artist. Through comparison of the two men’s work, this exhibition is able to consider them in context, addressing their similar interests in matters material and physical, and also their often very individual and also highly diverse practical work as artists. The exhibition display was conceived by Josef Dabernig.  

Film and More Curated by Marie-Therese Hochwartner, Naoko Kaltschmidt, Matthias Michalka, Susanne Neuburger The exhibition presents and contrasts the archives of Kurt Kren (1929–1998) und Ernst Schmidt jr. (1938–1988), which are held in mumok and are now generally accessible. The presentation of these two key filmmakers of the Austrian postwar avant-garde will include notes, sketches, correspondence, and materials related to their work as well as a selection of their films. Kren’s notations are a major body of work that illustrates his structural approach and his visual mind. Conceptual analysis of language is important in the work of Schmidt jr., whether he was working as author, critic, editor, or artist. Through comparison of the two men’s work, this exhibition is able to consider them in context, addressing their similar interests in matters material and physical, and also their often very individual and also highly diverse practical work as artists. The exhibition display was conceived by Josef Dabernig.  
Double Lives
Double Lives
Vienna - Museumsplatz 1
until 11-11-2018

Double Lives. Visual Artists Making Music Alva Noto (Carsten Nicolai); Laurie Anderson; Christian Ludwig Attersee; Beauties of the Night (Christian Egger, Manuel Gorkiewicz, Markus Krottendorfer, Alexander Wolff); John Cage; Captain Beefheart & His Magic Band (Alex St. Clair Snouffer, Jeff Cotton, Jerry Handley, John French); Charlemagne Palestine; Chicken (Hari Ganglberger, Nicholas Hoffman, Katrin Plav?ak); Tony Conrad; Martin Creed & Band; DA EAT (Stefan Branca, Mattias Vatter, Phillip Zaiser, Thomas Zipp), Hanne Darboven; Destroy all Monsters (Mike Kelley, Cary Loren, Jim Shaw, Niagara); Die Tödliche Doris (Tabea Blumenschein, Käthe Kruse, Wolfgang Müller, Nikolaus Utermöhlen); Essachai Vow (Christian Kosmas Mayer, Alexander Wolff); Marcel Duchamp; GRAF+ZYX; Hotel Morphila Orchester (Paul Braunsteiner, Loys Egg, Franz Machek, Wolfgang Stelzer, Peter Weibel); Yves Klein; Jutta Koether; Laibach (Milan Fras, Dejan Knez, Daniel Landin, Ivan Novak); Les Reines Prochaines (Teresa Alonso, Fränzi Madörin, Muda Mathis, Pipilotti Rist, Regina Florida Schmid); Christian Marclay; Molto Brutto (Gunther Damisch, Josef Danner, Blihal, Andreas Kunzmann, Gerwald Rockenschaub); Monoton; Phill Niblock; Hermann Nitsch; Markus Oehlen; Yoko Ono; O.T. (Lothar Fiedler, Helge Leiberg, A. R. Penck, Christoph Winckel); Nam June Paik; Pas Paravant (Felix Dorner, Karl Kowanz, Renate Kowanz-Kocer, Wolfgang Poor, Günther Schrom, ManfreDu Schu, Wolfgang Stengel, Hans Weigand); Stephen Prina; Gerhard Rühm; Luigi Russolo; Selten gehörte Musik (Günter Brus, Hermann Nitsch, Dieter Roth, Gerhard Rühm, Oswald Wiener); Suicide (Alan Vega, Martin Rev); Emily Sundblad mit Pete Drungle und Ensemble, The Alma Band (Herbert Brandl, Josef Danner, Martin Kippenberger, Albert Oehlen, Markus Oehlen); The Pop Rivets (Brand Buds, Wild Billy Childish, Big Russ, Little Russ), The Red Krayola with Art & Language (Kathryn Bigelow, Ian Burn, Jesse Chamberlain, Christine Kozlov, Nigel Lendon, Mel Ramsden, Paula Ramsden, Terry Smith, Mayo Thompson); The Wired Salutation (Andrea Belfi, Angela Bulloch, David Grubbs, Stefano Pilia); Throbbing Gristle (Chris Carter, Cosey Fanni Tutti, Peter Christopherson, Genesis P-Orridge), Wolfgang Tillmans, Trabant (Viðar Hákon Gíslason, Þorvaldur H. Gröndal, Ragnar Kjartansson, Gísli Galdur Thorgeirsson, Hlynur Aðils Vilmarsson), Wendy Gondeln (Albert Oehlen); Heimo Zobernig with Marcus Geiger, Martin Guttmann, Hans Weigand. It is quite remarkable how many fine artists also made music. This was much more than just an interest in another medium. Public musical performances and the production of recorded music involve different ways of working, different environments, and also the confrontation with a different audience. This is why art critic Jörg Heiser refers to a “contextual shift” between the fine arts and music when he writes about this phenomenon beginning in the 1960s. Alluding to the fact that some artists did not make their work in other fields transparent and open, his book is called Double Lives. It is certainly true that there are many different ways in which individuals can either combine these two fields in their lives and work—or keep them separate. In some cases, work in both fields was only known to insiders. Other artists, by contrast, made a deliberate use of the frame of the fine arts for their musical performances. There is a broad spectrum with many intermediate forms. Double Lives will focus on fine artists who wrote or produced music, who performed it in public, or who were members of artists’ bands. This raises the question as to the difference between pure musicians and artists and those working in both fields. The exhibition will also address the role of music by fine artists within the history of 20th and 21st century music. Double Lives will present “only” music, which will be linked with visual material, with videos and photographs of concert and studio performances. The exhibition will thus respect the significance of the artists’ choices of performance situations. As early as 1913, the year of his first ready-made, Marcel Duchamp used principles of chance as a compositional method in his Momentum Musicale, while in the same year futurist Luigi Russolo designed his first noise instruments (Intonarumori). Already in classical modernism, fine artists were developing questions and methods that were to define not only the fine arts but also the musical avantgarde. After World War II, the phenomenon of fine artists making music became more and more significant. Key impulses came from John Cage, a pioneering composer and musician in so many ways, who was always in close contact with fine artists and also himself created a number of visual artworks. In the second half of the 1950s, he taught at the New School for Social Research in New York, where key members of the later Fluxus movement were among his audience. In addition to Fluxus artists, in the 1960s and 1970s, more and more fine artists also came forward as musicians. Their approaches, questions, and methods often resembled those of the fine arts, as in the case of the Americans La Monte Young, Charlemagne Palestine, and Tony Conrad, whose positions were close to minimal art. The same is true of the musical work of European artists, which remained closer to the Western musical traditions than the music of their American colleagues. Important representatives of the double life between the fine arts and music are also to be found among the protagonists in the shift from rock and pop to punk and new wave music. With the success of these new musical movements, and simultaneous with a booming return to painting after the years of conceptual and performance art, the late 1970s and the following years saw a high point in the phenomenon of bands consisting partly or entirely of fine artists. It was not least the art schools that became key focuses for the development of a more or less professional (or often also deliberately amateurish) collective form of musical performance. From the 1990s, the music of fine artists entered into a period of stylistic pluralism, corresponding to developments in the visual arts. Curated by Eva Badura-Triska and Edek Bartz  

Double Lives. Visual Artists Making Music Alva Noto (Carsten Nicolai); Laurie Anderson; Christian Ludwig Attersee; Beauties of the Night (Christian Egger, Manuel Gorkiewicz, Markus Krottendorfer, Alexander Wolff); John Cage; Captain Beefheart & His Magic Band (Alex St. Clair Snouffer, Jeff Cotton, Jerry Handley, John French); Charlemagne Palestine; Chicken (Hari Ganglberger, Nicholas Hoffman, Katrin Plav?ak); Tony Conrad; Martin Creed & Band; DA EAT (Stefan Branca, Mattias Vatter, Phillip Zaiser, Thomas Zipp), Hanne Darboven; Destroy all Monsters (Mike Kelley, Cary Loren, Jim Shaw, Niagara); Die Tödliche Doris (Tabea Blumenschein, Käthe Kruse, Wolfgang Müller, Nikolaus Utermöhlen); Essachai Vow (Christian Kosmas Mayer, Alexander Wolff); Marcel Duchamp; GRAF+ZYX; Hotel Morphila Orchester (Paul Braunsteiner, Loys Egg, Franz Machek, Wolfgang Stelzer, Peter Weibel); Yves Klein; Jutta Koether; Laibach (Milan Fras, Dejan Knez, Daniel Landin, Ivan Novak); Les Reines Prochaines (Teresa Alonso, Fränzi Madörin, Muda Mathis, Pipilotti Rist, Regina Florida Schmid); Christian Marclay; Molto Brutto (Gunther Damisch, Josef Danner, Blihal, Andreas Kunzmann, Gerwald Rockenschaub); Monoton; Phill Niblock; Hermann Nitsch; Markus Oehlen; Yoko Ono; O.T. (Lothar Fiedler, Helge Leiberg, A. R. Penck, Christoph Winckel); Nam June Paik; Pas Paravant (Felix Dorner, Karl Kowanz, Renate Kowanz-Kocer, Wolfgang Poor, Günther Schrom, ManfreDu Schu, Wolfgang Stengel, Hans Weigand); Stephen Prina; Gerhard Rühm; Luigi Russolo; Selten gehörte Musik (Günter Brus, Hermann Nitsch, Dieter Roth, Gerhard Rühm, Oswald Wiener); Suicide (Alan Vega, Martin Rev); Emily Sundblad mit Pete Drungle und Ensemble, The Alma Band (Herbert Brandl, Josef Danner, Martin Kippenberger, Albert Oehlen, Markus Oehlen); The Pop Rivets (Brand Buds, Wild Billy Childish, Big Russ, Little Russ), The Red Krayola with Art & Language (Kathryn Bigelow, Ian Burn, Jesse Chamberlain, Christine Kozlov, Nigel Lendon, Mel Ramsden, Paula Ramsden, Terry Smith, Mayo Thompson); The Wired Salutation (Andrea Belfi, Angela Bulloch, David Grubbs, Stefano Pilia); Throbbing Gristle (Chris Carter, Cosey Fanni Tutti, Peter Christopherson, Genesis P-Orridge), Wolfgang Tillmans, Trabant (Viðar Hákon Gíslason, Þorvaldur H. Gröndal, Ragnar Kjartansson, Gísli Galdur Thorgeirsson, Hlynur Aðils Vilmarsson), Wendy Gondeln (Albert Oehlen); Heimo Zobernig with Marcus Geiger, Martin Guttmann, Hans Weigand. It is quite remarkable how many fine artists also made music. This was much more than just an interest in another medium. Public musical performances and the production of recorded music involve different ways of working, different environments, and also the confrontation with a different audience. This is why art critic Jörg Heiser refers to a “contextual shift” between the fine arts and music when he writes about this phenomenon beginning in the 1960s. Alluding to the fact that some artists did not make their work in other fields transparent and open, his book is called Double Lives. It is certainly true that there are many different ways in which individuals can either combine these two fields in their lives and work—or keep them separate. In some cases, work in both fields was only known to insiders. Other artists, by contrast, made a deliberate use of the frame of the fine arts for their musical performances. There is a broad spectrum with many intermediate forms. Double Lives will focus on fine artists who wrote or produced music, who performed it in public, or who were members of artists’ bands. This raises the question as to the difference between pure musicians and artists and those working in both fields. The exhibition will also address the role of music by fine artists within the history of 20th and 21st century music. Double Lives will present “only” music, which will be linked with visual material, with videos and photographs of concert and studio performances. The exhibition will thus respect the significance of the artists’ choices of performance situations. As early as 1913, the year of his first ready-made, Marcel Duchamp used principles of chance as a compositional method in his Momentum Musicale, while in the same year futurist Luigi Russolo designed his first noise instruments (Intonarumori). Already in classical modernism, fine artists were developing questions and methods that were to define not only the fine arts but also the musical avantgarde. After World War II, the phenomenon of fine artists making music became more and more significant. Key impulses came from John Cage, a pioneering composer and musician in so many ways, who was always in close contact with fine artists and also himself created a number of visual artworks. In the second half of the 1950s, he taught at the New School for Social Research in New York, where key members of the later Fluxus movement were among his audience. In addition to Fluxus artists, in the 1960s and 1970s, more and more fine artists also came forward as musicians. Their approaches, questions, and methods often resembled those of the fine arts, as in the case of the Americans La Monte Young, Charlemagne Palestine, and Tony Conrad, whose positions were close to minimal art. The same is true of the musical work of European artists, which remained closer to the Western musical traditions than the music of their American colleagues. Important representatives of the double life between the fine arts and music are also to be found among the protagonists in the shift from rock and pop to punk and new wave music. With the success of these new musical movements, and simultaneous with a booming return to painting after the years of conceptual and performance art, the late 1970s and the following years saw a high point in the phenomenon of bands consisting partly or entirely of fine artists. It was not least the art schools that became key focuses for the development of a more or less professional (or often also deliberately amateurish) collective form of musical performance. From the 1990s, the music of fine artists entered into a period of stylistic pluralism, corresponding to developments in the visual arts. Curated by Eva Badura-Triska and Edek Bartz  
Donna Huanca
Donna Huanca
Vienna - Prinz Eugen-Strae 27
until 06-01-2019

Donna Huanca – Piedra Quemada? Fall 2018 will see the first solo presentation of the Bolivian-American artist Donna Huanca, staged in the Lower Belvedere. Using sculpture, painting, sound, video, and live performance, she forges interplay between multisensory art, the Baroque architecture, and participants. 

Donna Huanca – Piedra Quemada? Fall 2018 will see the first solo presentation of the Bolivian-American artist Donna Huanca, staged in the Lower Belvedere. Using sculpture, painting, sound, video, and live performance, she forges interplay between multisensory art, the Baroque architecture, and participants. 
Double Take
Double Take
Zrich - Gasometerstrasse 30/32
until 03-11-2018

Double Take Chérif & Silvie Defraoui, Manon Wertenbroek, Jason Dodge, Bruno Jakob, Per Kirkeby, Katja Schenker, Vittorio Santoro, Simon Starling, Gregory Hari, Samson Young, Michael Etzensperger, Christoph Hefti Curated by Linda Jensen and Arianna Gellini Fluid in its approach the exhibition Double Take features thematic juxtapositions, continuities and ruptures with many works pertaining to the potential of the misidentified, misheard and the ambiguous space of the inexpressible. The exhibition explores subjects such as the limitations of language, the act of muting, subjectivity, immateriality, montage and hybridity, the process of sedimentation as well as historical memory. The show’s title makes reference to the undecipherable at first glance.   

Double Take Chérif & Silvie Defraoui, Manon Wertenbroek, Jason Dodge, Bruno Jakob, Per Kirkeby, Katja Schenker, Vittorio Santoro, Simon Starling, Gregory Hari, Samson Young, Michael Etzensperger, Christoph Hefti Curated by Linda Jensen and Arianna Gellini Fluid in its approach the exhibition Double Take features thematic juxtapositions, continuities and ruptures with many works pertaining to the potential of the misidentified, misheard and the ambiguous space of the inexpressible. The exhibition explores subjects such as the limitations of language, the act of muting, subjectivity, immateriality, montage and hybridity, the process of sedimentation as well as historical memory. The show’s title makes reference to the undecipherable at first glance.