Art feed

Curated by Exhibitionary

Antony Gormley
Antony Gormley
London - Burlington House
until 03-12-2019

Antony Gormley The exhibition will explore Gormley’s wide-ranging use of organic, industrial and elemental materials over the years, including iron, steel, hand-beaten lead, seawater and clay. We will also bring to light rarely-seen early works from the 1970s and 1980s, some of which led to Gormley using his own body as a tool to create work, as well as a selection of his pocket sketchbooks and drawings. Throughout a series of experiential installations, some brand-new, some remade for the RA’s galleries, we will invite visitors to slow down and become aware of their own bodies. Highlights include Clearing VII, an immersive ‘drawing in space’ made from kilometres of coiled, flexible metal which visitors find their own path through, and Lost Horizon I, 24 life-size cast iron figures set at different orientations on the walls, floor and ceiling – challenging our perception of which way is up.  

Antony Gormley The exhibition will explore Gormley’s wide-ranging use of organic, industrial and elemental materials over the years, including iron, steel, hand-beaten lead, seawater and clay. We will also bring to light rarely-seen early works from the 1970s and 1980s, some of which led to Gormley using his own body as a tool to create work, as well as a selection of his pocket sketchbooks and drawings. Throughout a series of experiential installations, some brand-new, some remade for the RA’s galleries, we will invite visitors to slow down and become aware of their own bodies. Highlights include Clearing VII, an immersive ‘drawing in space’ made from kilometres of coiled, flexible metal which visitors find their own path through, and Lost Horizon I, 24 life-size cast iron figures set at different orientations on the walls, floor and ceiling – challenging our perception of which way is up.  
Albert Oehlen
Albert Oehlen
London - Kensington Gardens
until 12-01-2020

Albert Oehlen Albert Oehlen has been a key figure in contemporary art since the 1980s. Straddling various debates surrounding the nature of painting, Oehlen’s work combines expressionist brushwork, surrealist gestures and deliberate amateurism that push the essential components of painting to bold new extremes.

Albert Oehlen Albert Oehlen has been a key figure in contemporary art since the 1980s. Straddling various debates surrounding the nature of painting, Oehlen’s work combines expressionist brushwork, surrealist gestures and deliberate amateurism that push the essential components of painting to bold new extremes.
Kara Walker
Kara Walker
London - Bankside
until 05-04-2020

Kara Walker – Fons Americanus 2019 Hyundai Commission For the 2019 Hyundai Commission at Tate Modern's Turbine Hall, Kara Walker has created a monumental sculpture and fountain entitled Fons Americanus. Directly alluding to the Victoria Memorial at Buckingham Palace, Walker’s sculpture stands as a “counter-memorial,” a playful yet incisive subversion of such monuments’ original public function within the context of European imperialist projects. Utilizing water as the foundational motif, Fons Americanus depicts a cadre of iconographic figures and scenes upon a multi-tiered platform, all interconnected through the flow of water and the legacies of the Black Atlantic: an Afro-Caribbean Venus, a team of historical sea-farers, and a tree with a hangman’s noose, in the same position as the scales of justice on the Victoria Memorial. Surrounded by two pools of water as a disaster at sea, Fons Americanus represents a counter-narrative to the Western pride of empire-building, a mythologized origin story founded upon the violent and tragic structures of our collective history.

Kara Walker – Fons Americanus 2019 Hyundai Commission For the 2019 Hyundai Commission at Tate Modern's Turbine Hall, Kara Walker has created a monumental sculpture and fountain entitled Fons Americanus. Directly alluding to the Victoria Memorial at Buckingham Palace, Walker’s sculpture stands as a “counter-memorial,” a playful yet incisive subversion of such monuments’ original public function within the context of European imperialist projects. Utilizing water as the foundational motif, Fons Americanus depicts a cadre of iconographic figures and scenes upon a multi-tiered platform, all interconnected through the flow of water and the legacies of the Black Atlantic: an Afro-Caribbean Venus, a team of historical sea-farers, and a tree with a hangman’s noose, in the same position as the scales of justice on the Victoria Memorial. Surrounded by two pools of water as a disaster at sea, Fons Americanus represents a counter-narrative to the Western pride of empire-building, a mythologized origin story founded upon the violent and tragic structures of our collective history.
Sterling Ruby
Sterling Ruby
London - 6-24 Britannia Street
until 14-12-2019

Sterling Ruby – Acts + Table In an oeuvre spanning sculpture, ceramics, painting, drawing, collage, video, and garments, Ruby continually returns to themes of societal and art historical friction, generating feelings of anxiety and agitation by contrasting clean lines and recognizable objects with coarse and uncanny forms. ACTS + TABLE lays out Ruby’s critique of the authoritarian, exclusionary ideological underpinnings of Minimalism. He begins with familiar shapes valued by the Minimalists—simple tables and rectilinear blocks—but subverts them by defacing their smooth surfaces and exposing their physical means of production. In ACTS—short for “Absolute Contempt for Total Serenity”—Ruby captures liquid dye inside clear urethane and balances these pure prisms atop scuffed, inscribed, and spray-painted Formica bases. These works expand upon his earlier Formica sculptures such as Big Grid/DB Deth (2008), a scratched-up monolith that exudes a cold, prisonlike institutional menace. In ACTS, the juxtaposition of unfeeling laminate slabs against vibrantly pigmented urethane is a potent one; it transforms the urethane from a passive, glassy vitrine into an active agent of incarceration that suffocates the blossoming furls of dye. The exhibition also includes TABLE (DOUBLE LAST SUPPER) (2019), the culminating work of Ruby’s TABLES, a series that explores the concept of personal and cultural archaeology. In 2015, Ruby moved into a gargantuan studio outside of downtown Los Angeles and salvaged the welding tables left there from the building’s erstwhile function as a manufacturing warehouse. By affixing jutting metal pipes, faucets, and frying pans to the tables and covering them with tumorous masses of solder, Ruby stratifies and memorializes every act of labor that once took place on their surfaces, whether by the hands of workers from the building’s previous life, or of the artist and his studio. The table—whose name and adornments reflect Ruby’s own rural upbringing in a faith-dominant area of Pennsylvania—becomes a hulking, organic archaeological remnant from some unnamed human history.

Sterling Ruby – Acts + Table In an oeuvre spanning sculpture, ceramics, painting, drawing, collage, video, and garments, Ruby continually returns to themes of societal and art historical friction, generating feelings of anxiety and agitation by contrasting clean lines and recognizable objects with coarse and uncanny forms. ACTS + TABLE lays out Ruby’s critique of the authoritarian, exclusionary ideological underpinnings of Minimalism. He begins with familiar shapes valued by the Minimalists—simple tables and rectilinear blocks—but subverts them by defacing their smooth surfaces and exposing their physical means of production. In ACTS—short for “Absolute Contempt for Total Serenity”—Ruby captures liquid dye inside clear urethane and balances these pure prisms atop scuffed, inscribed, and spray-painted Formica bases. These works expand upon his earlier Formica sculptures such as Big Grid/DB Deth (2008), a scratched-up monolith that exudes a cold, prisonlike institutional menace. In ACTS, the juxtaposition of unfeeling laminate slabs against vibrantly pigmented urethane is a potent one; it transforms the urethane from a passive, glassy vitrine into an active agent of incarceration that suffocates the blossoming furls of dye. The exhibition also includes TABLE (DOUBLE LAST SUPPER) (2019), the culminating work of Ruby’s TABLES, a series that explores the concept of personal and cultural archaeology. In 2015, Ruby moved into a gargantuan studio outside of downtown Los Angeles and salvaged the welding tables left there from the building’s erstwhile function as a manufacturing warehouse. By affixing jutting metal pipes, faucets, and frying pans to the tables and covering them with tumorous masses of solder, Ruby stratifies and memorializes every act of labor that once took place on their surfaces, whether by the hands of workers from the building’s previous life, or of the artist and his studio. The table—whose name and adornments reflect Ruby’s own rural upbringing in a faith-dominant area of Pennsylvania—becomes a hulking, organic archaeological remnant from some unnamed human history.
Rayyane Tabet
Rayyane Tabet
London - 14 Wharf Road
until 14-12-2019

Rayyane Tabet – Encounters Rayyane Tabet’s works present fleeting moments in time and place, offering alternative perceptions or paradoxical views of political and personal events in an historical timeline presented here within the parameters of sculpture and found objects. Tabet explores the relationship between past and present, memory and reality. Like an archaeologist, he unearths hidden narratives in experiences and materials whose existence and content give rich meaning to his sculptural installations. His creative process often begins with a chance ‘encounter’ from which a story unfolds. For Tabet, stories have layered dimensions that go beyond the purely factual. Often the surreal coincidence of an encounter will set off an exploration of personal memories and the collective experience.

Rayyane Tabet – Encounters Rayyane Tabet’s works present fleeting moments in time and place, offering alternative perceptions or paradoxical views of political and personal events in an historical timeline presented here within the parameters of sculpture and found objects. Tabet explores the relationship between past and present, memory and reality. Like an archaeologist, he unearths hidden narratives in experiences and materials whose existence and content give rich meaning to his sculptural installations. His creative process often begins with a chance ‘encounter’ from which a story unfolds. For Tabet, stories have layered dimensions that go beyond the purely factual. Often the surreal coincidence of an encounter will set off an exploration of personal memories and the collective experience.
Doug Aitken
Doug Aitken
London - 16 Wharf Road
until 20-12-2019

Doug Aitken – Return to the Real A starting point for this exhibition is the idea of the contemporary individual and the ways in which humans are continuously both in and out of sync. Diametrically opposed notions of connectivity and freedom, collectivity and isolation are highlighted, reminding us how this new frontier is being shaped and is transforming our lives in real time and, in many ways, defining our generation. The exhibition creates a fragmented narrative of today’s unprecedented digital landscape, in which artworks function like signposts, inviting the viewer to pause, stop and evaluate their surroundings.

Doug Aitken – Return to the Real A starting point for this exhibition is the idea of the contemporary individual and the ways in which humans are continuously both in and out of sync. Diametrically opposed notions of connectivity and freedom, collectivity and isolation are highlighted, reminding us how this new frontier is being shaped and is transforming our lives in real time and, in many ways, defining our generation. The exhibition creates a fragmented narrative of today’s unprecedented digital landscape, in which artworks function like signposts, inviting the viewer to pause, stop and evaluate their surroundings.
Elizabeth Peyton
Elizabeth Peyton
London - St Martin?s Place
until 05-01-2020

Elizabeth Peyton – Aire and Angels Created in close collaboration with the artist, Elizabeth Peyton: Aire and Angels, explores the development of Peyton’s unique art from the 1990s to the present day. Elizabeth Peyton is one of the world’s leading contemporary artists. Internationally renowned, her work has been at the forefront of a re-evaluation of figurative art and the tradition of portrait painting since the 1990s. The exhibition will include a selection of key portraits from the first two decades of her career, and investigate the new direction in her work over the last 10 years.  Portraits on display from her diverse and ever-expanding repertoire of recurring subjects will include Kurt Cobain, Liam Gallagher, Frida Kahlo, Napoleon, Queen Elizabeth II, David Bowie, Phoebe Philo, David Hockney, Eva-Maria Westbroek and Jonas Kaufmann among others. In addition to over 40 works on display in the exhibition, Peyton will become the first artist ever to be given the run of the entire National Portrait Gallery, with a selection of her portraits dispersed throughout the permanent Collection, juxtaposing Peyton’s paintings with historic portraits from the Tudor period onwards.

Elizabeth Peyton – Aire and Angels Created in close collaboration with the artist, Elizabeth Peyton: Aire and Angels, explores the development of Peyton’s unique art from the 1990s to the present day. Elizabeth Peyton is one of the world’s leading contemporary artists. Internationally renowned, her work has been at the forefront of a re-evaluation of figurative art and the tradition of portrait painting since the 1990s. The exhibition will include a selection of key portraits from the first two decades of her career, and investigate the new direction in her work over the last 10 years.  Portraits on display from her diverse and ever-expanding repertoire of recurring subjects will include Kurt Cobain, Liam Gallagher, Frida Kahlo, Napoleon, Queen Elizabeth II, David Bowie, Phoebe Philo, David Hockney, Eva-Maria Westbroek and Jonas Kaufmann among others. In addition to over 40 works on display in the exhibition, Peyton will become the first artist ever to be given the run of the entire National Portrait Gallery, with a selection of her portraits dispersed throughout the permanent Collection, juxtaposing Peyton’s paintings with historic portraits from the Tudor period onwards.
Peter Halley
Peter Halley
New York - 508 West 26 Street ? Ground Floor & 8th Floor
until 20-12-2019

Peter Halley – Heterotopia II  Halley’s exhibition will present eight new shaped-canvas paintings within the radically transformed architectural space, creating a new heterotopia – a term borrowed from philosopher Michel Foucault.

Peter Halley – Heterotopia II  Halley’s exhibition will present eight new shaped-canvas paintings within the radically transformed architectural space, creating a new heterotopia – a term borrowed from philosopher Michel Foucault.
Douglas Gordon
Douglas Gordon
New York - 39 Great Jones Street
until 15-12-2019

Douglas Gordon Douglas Gordon is known for his interest in cinema and images taken from collective memory and everyday culture. His work encompasses film, performance, sculptural installation, and conceptual text. The exhibition is centered on the ongoing installation Happy Birthday To Me..., accompanied by a new 24-part burned print work titled Self Portrait of You + Me (Neighborly Love), the film installation Video Diptych, and a text-based wall piece Shadow and ghosts on the entry floor. Below ground level, the films Full Circle, Sharpening Fantasy, and Self-Portrait in Tangier play in dialogue with each other to create an immersive visual and audio experience.  In the central installation, viewers find themselves confronted by human skull replicas randomly strewn in a corner. The gallery walls and carpet are red, the light penetrating the red gel-covered windows intensifies the sacred atmosphere evoked by the skulls. Each skull represents one year of the artist's life; engraved into each skull are five-pointed stars representing his age, one star for each year. The stars recall the star-shaped tonsure on the back of Marcel Duchamp’s head in a photograph by Man Ray. Preoccupied with collective and individual memory, pop culture, and history, Happy Birthday To Me... encapsulates the artist's oeuvre as well as his life, juxtaposing immortality and transience. The engraved stars not only represent Gordon's age but also allude to movie stars, as does Self Portrait of You + Me (Neighborly Love) and earlier works in which Gordon distorted the faces of stars by slowing-down or otherwise manipulating movies, thereby giving a new dimension to collective memory. In Gordon's work, portraits always serve as a mirror of the viewer who identifies with the portrayed. Elsewhere, Gordon has allowed the viewer to step behind the screen and perceive its verso as a mirror image. Self Portrait of You + Me (Neighborly Love) highlights the artist's ambivalent relationship to pop art and, in particular, to Andy Warhol. While the latter’s immortal icons leave no room for the dark side of human existence, Gordon burns holes into the shiny surface. The replica skulls in Video Diptych floating in the flooded garden of the Lambert Collection in Montfavet resemble Monet's Water Lilies. This is Gordon’s way of working through the genre memento mori. The video installation Sharpening Fantasy shows knife grinders in Tangier carrying out the movements needed to sharpen knives and scissors but without an object to work on. The film alludes to muscle memory, i.e. to the way movements can bear and evoke memories. The images are accompanied by the sound of grinding and other background noises from a working day in Tangier. Sharpening Fantasy blurs the boundaries between vision, imagination, and memory. The work opens a sometimes contradictory space of mythical logic, which is furthered by the two complementary films Full Circle and Self-Portrait in Tangier. By presenting different, yet related works in a spatial order that creates its own dynamic, the show becomes an installation in and of itself. As in Happy Birthday To Me... viewers find themselves not merely in front of a work but rather immersed in art. Their memories are evoked, it is as if they were to find themselves in their own film. The installation’s title ironically points to a celebration of life, as the viewer is let into memento mori, juxtaposing the mortality of human life and the immortality of art. Each year the artist comes closer to his death, and yet his œuvre will continue to exist beyond it. Douglas Gordon, born in 1966 in Glasgow, Scotland, is one of the most influential video artists working today. 

Douglas Gordon Douglas Gordon is known for his interest in cinema and images taken from collective memory and everyday culture. His work encompasses film, performance, sculptural installation, and conceptual text. The exhibition is centered on the ongoing installation Happy Birthday To Me..., accompanied by a new 24-part burned print work titled Self Portrait of You + Me (Neighborly Love), the film installation Video Diptych, and a text-based wall piece Shadow and ghosts on the entry floor. Below ground level, the films Full Circle, Sharpening Fantasy, and Self-Portrait in Tangier play in dialogue with each other to create an immersive visual and audio experience.  In the central installation, viewers find themselves confronted by human skull replicas randomly strewn in a corner. The gallery walls and carpet are red, the light penetrating the red gel-covered windows intensifies the sacred atmosphere evoked by the skulls. Each skull represents one year of the artist's life; engraved into each skull are five-pointed stars representing his age, one star for each year. The stars recall the star-shaped tonsure on the back of Marcel Duchamp’s head in a photograph by Man Ray. Preoccupied with collective and individual memory, pop culture, and history, Happy Birthday To Me... encapsulates the artist's oeuvre as well as his life, juxtaposing immortality and transience. The engraved stars not only represent Gordon's age but also allude to movie stars, as does Self Portrait of You + Me (Neighborly Love) and earlier works in which Gordon distorted the faces of stars by slowing-down or otherwise manipulating movies, thereby giving a new dimension to collective memory. In Gordon's work, portraits always serve as a mirror of the viewer who identifies with the portrayed. Elsewhere, Gordon has allowed the viewer to step behind the screen and perceive its verso as a mirror image. Self Portrait of You + Me (Neighborly Love) highlights the artist's ambivalent relationship to pop art and, in particular, to Andy Warhol. While the latter’s immortal icons leave no room for the dark side of human existence, Gordon burns holes into the shiny surface. The replica skulls in Video Diptych floating in the flooded garden of the Lambert Collection in Montfavet resemble Monet's Water Lilies. This is Gordon’s way of working through the genre memento mori. The video installation Sharpening Fantasy shows knife grinders in Tangier carrying out the movements needed to sharpen knives and scissors but without an object to work on. The film alludes to muscle memory, i.e. to the way movements can bear and evoke memories. The images are accompanied by the sound of grinding and other background noises from a working day in Tangier. Sharpening Fantasy blurs the boundaries between vision, imagination, and memory. The work opens a sometimes contradictory space of mythical logic, which is furthered by the two complementary films Full Circle and Self-Portrait in Tangier. By presenting different, yet related works in a spatial order that creates its own dynamic, the show becomes an installation in and of itself. As in Happy Birthday To Me... viewers find themselves not merely in front of a work but rather immersed in art. Their memories are evoked, it is as if they were to find themselves in their own film. The installation’s title ironically points to a celebration of life, as the viewer is let into memento mori, juxtaposing the mortality of human life and the immortality of art. Each year the artist comes closer to his death, and yet his œuvre will continue to exist beyond it. Douglas Gordon, born in 1966 in Glasgow, Scotland, is one of the most influential video artists working today. 
Hans Haacke
Hans Haacke
New York - 235 Bowery
until 26-01-2020

Hans Haacke – All Connected  For six decades, Haacke has been a pioneer in kinetic art, environmental art, Conceptual art, and institutional critique. This retrospective will bring together more than thirty works from across the artist’s career, focusing in particular on the way he expanded the parameters of his practice to encompass the social, political, and economic structures in which art is produced, circulated, and displayed. The exhibition will include a number of Haacke’s rarely seen kinetic works, environmental sculptures, and visitor polls of the late 1960s and early ’70s, all of which were central to discussions around systems aesthetics in art during that period; works from the 1970s and ’80s addressing the corporate sponsorship of major art institutions and political interference; and more recent works considering the intersection of global capitalism, nationalism, and humanitarian crises around the world. The exhibition will also serve as the New York premiere of Haacke’s sculpture Gift Horse (2014), a bronze sculpture of a horse’s skeleton adorned with an LED ribbon streaming stock prices in real time, which the artist originally created for London’s Fourth Plinth program. This long-overdue assessment of his work will highlight its formal and critical complexity and the remarkable consistency with which he has approached the relationship between art and society.

Hans Haacke – All Connected  For six decades, Haacke has been a pioneer in kinetic art, environmental art, Conceptual art, and institutional critique. This retrospective will bring together more than thirty works from across the artist’s career, focusing in particular on the way he expanded the parameters of his practice to encompass the social, political, and economic structures in which art is produced, circulated, and displayed. The exhibition will include a number of Haacke’s rarely seen kinetic works, environmental sculptures, and visitor polls of the late 1960s and early ’70s, all of which were central to discussions around systems aesthetics in art during that period; works from the 1970s and ’80s addressing the corporate sponsorship of major art institutions and political interference; and more recent works considering the intersection of global capitalism, nationalism, and humanitarian crises around the world. The exhibition will also serve as the New York premiere of Haacke’s sculpture Gift Horse (2014), a bronze sculpture of a horse’s skeleton adorned with an LED ribbon streaming stock prices in real time, which the artist originally created for London’s Fourth Plinth program. This long-overdue assessment of his work will highlight its formal and critical complexity and the remarkable consistency with which he has approached the relationship between art and society.
Andro Wekua
Andro Wekua
New York - 515 West 24th Street
until 21-12-2019

Andro Wekua Gladstone Gallery is pleased to present an exhibition of new work by Andro Wekua. Known for the multidisciplinary nature of his practice, Wekua has created a series of paintings and sculptures that continue his career-long exploration of the liminal space between objectivity and subjective interpretation. n works that are redolent with the artifacts of an ambiguous and undefined history, Wekua presents a series of tableaux that reveal themselves to us as emotionally familiar in spite of the artist’s gestures of obfuscation and his conscious disavowal of the formal tropes of narrative.  

Andro Wekua Gladstone Gallery is pleased to present an exhibition of new work by Andro Wekua. Known for the multidisciplinary nature of his practice, Wekua has created a series of paintings and sculptures that continue his career-long exploration of the liminal space between objectivity and subjective interpretation. n works that are redolent with the artifacts of an ambiguous and undefined history, Wekua presents a series of tableaux that reveal themselves to us as emotionally familiar in spite of the artist’s gestures of obfuscation and his conscious disavowal of the formal tropes of narrative.  
Jason Rhoades
Jason Rhoades
New York - 519, 525 & 533 West 19th Street
until 07-12-2019

Jason Rhoades – Tijuanatanjierchandelier Making its debut in New York, Jason Rhoades’s large-scale installation Tijuanatanjierchandelier exemplifies the artist’s singular investigation of contemporary consumer culture, his career-long interest in probing both language and identity, and his ceaseless drive to push the limits of convention.

Jason Rhoades – Tijuanatanjierchandelier Making its debut in New York, Jason Rhoades’s large-scale installation Tijuanatanjierchandelier exemplifies the artist’s singular investigation of contemporary consumer culture, his career-long interest in probing both language and identity, and his ceaseless drive to push the limits of convention.
Karen Kilimnik
Karen Kilimnik
New York - 547 West 21st Street
until 20-12-2019

Karen Kilimnik Included in the exhibition is a new video of excerpts from the 19th century ballets, The Awakening of Flora by Marius Petipa, Reconstruction by Sergei Vikharev, music by Riccardo Drigo, with additional excerpts (Le Talisman, Pas D’Esclave and Animated Frescoes), as performed by the graduate students of The Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre School, on the occasion of Opening Day of the 57th Carnegie International, and the 200th anniversary of Petipa’s birth. The video, The World at War, (2018) brings together clips from color and black and white films primarily set during World War II, selected for their music and their depictions of camaraderie between troops and officers singing, seen amid battle as well as off the field.   These works combine the worlds of history, architecture, art, fashion, film and television, music and ballet, animals and nature, science and literature.

Karen Kilimnik Included in the exhibition is a new video of excerpts from the 19th century ballets, The Awakening of Flora by Marius Petipa, Reconstruction by Sergei Vikharev, music by Riccardo Drigo, with additional excerpts (Le Talisman, Pas D’Esclave and Animated Frescoes), as performed by the graduate students of The Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre School, on the occasion of Opening Day of the 57th Carnegie International, and the 200th anniversary of Petipa’s birth. The video, The World at War, (2018) brings together clips from color and black and white films primarily set during World War II, selected for their music and their depictions of camaraderie between troops and officers singing, seen amid battle as well as off the field.   These works combine the worlds of history, architecture, art, fashion, film and television, music and ballet, animals and nature, science and literature.
Jacolby Satterwhite
Jacolby Satterwhite
New York - 159 Pioneer Street
until 24-11-2019

Jacolby Satterwhite – You're at home Jacolby Satterwhite’s exhibition You’re at home is an immersive environment revolving around the artist’s digitally-animated series Birds in Paradise, which constructs mythological, queer universes derived from American consumerism, pop culture, African folklore, ritual, and personal narratives. Inspired by early 90s digital media like Final Fantasy and Daft Punk’s 2003 animated album-length film Interstella 5555, Birds in Paradise is set—in large part—within a giant coliseum, a recurring architectural motif that Satterwhite likens to the archetypal 360° viewing experience of ancient Rome. Satterwhite himself becomes a repetitive presence, dancing alongside multitudes of digital avatars, mythological creatures-turned-machines, geometric architectures that swell and shift, and leather-clad performers and muses—all of which move ritualistically to Satterwhite’s choreography; its machine-like movement is equally influenced by voguing and Anne Teresa De Keersmaeker’s pared down, repetitive gestures, reflecting a kind of banal labor performed by citizens of a theoretical society with no social classes. Alongside these animations, real-life drone footage of forest fires, glacial melt, and other related imagery nod to impending climate catastrophe, while scenes in which Satterwhite is hung upside-down and whipped with drop cloths or baptized in a river nod to African rituals of regeneration and rebirth, over which the artist’s mother, Patricia Satterwhite, sings the lyrics “born to be free.” Suffering from schizophrenia for much of her lifetime, Patricia sought refuge in creative practices, taking up singing and drawing. She longed to be a pop star, leaving behind cassette tapes of a capella recordings, the lyrics of which are derived from folk music, gospel, and spirituals. Satterwhite and Nick Weiss, together forming the band PAT, overlay Patricia’s voice onto propulsive dance tracks that are featured in Birds in Paradise as well as collected into a double LP album, Love Will Find A Way Home, which is stocked on shelves in a gift store replete with VR “listening stations” that conjure 90s music stores, such as Tower Records. The album’s track listing has been turned into neon, which animates the exhibition. Patricia also created hundreds of drawings that portray humdrum objects of domestic material culture, lines of consumer goods she longed to be on the QVC shopping network where she sent them to, as well as patent offices—an avenue for potential fame and fortune that never came to be. The drawings became increasingly abstract and provisional as her condition worsened. Satterwhite has translated them into the digital architectures and environments featured in Birds in Paradise. They have also become 3D printed objects that are displayed in four large shelving units. One, You’re a Winner, features footballs and picture frames. Another, Drugs, contains pill bottles and tabloid magazines touting celebrity scandals. Two more units, Money and The American Dream, contain curios of collective, consumer desire. The raw materials of Patricia’s legacy, meanwhile, stand alone as an adjacent presentation within You’re at home. These drawings and songs were all made inside Patricia’ own home, a place she rarely left for almost 20 years. While Patricia’s work in Birds in Paradise is so altered as to be nearly unidentifiable, her disembodied presence nonetheless creates a thread of continuity, one in which authorship between mother and son is intentionally blurred.

Jacolby Satterwhite – You're at home Jacolby Satterwhite’s exhibition You’re at home is an immersive environment revolving around the artist’s digitally-animated series Birds in Paradise, which constructs mythological, queer universes derived from American consumerism, pop culture, African folklore, ritual, and personal narratives. Inspired by early 90s digital media like Final Fantasy and Daft Punk’s 2003 animated album-length film Interstella 5555, Birds in Paradise is set—in large part—within a giant coliseum, a recurring architectural motif that Satterwhite likens to the archetypal 360° viewing experience of ancient Rome. Satterwhite himself becomes a repetitive presence, dancing alongside multitudes of digital avatars, mythological creatures-turned-machines, geometric architectures that swell and shift, and leather-clad performers and muses—all of which move ritualistically to Satterwhite’s choreography; its machine-like movement is equally influenced by voguing and Anne Teresa De Keersmaeker’s pared down, repetitive gestures, reflecting a kind of banal labor performed by citizens of a theoretical society with no social classes. Alongside these animations, real-life drone footage of forest fires, glacial melt, and other related imagery nod to impending climate catastrophe, while scenes in which Satterwhite is hung upside-down and whipped with drop cloths or baptized in a river nod to African rituals of regeneration and rebirth, over which the artist’s mother, Patricia Satterwhite, sings the lyrics “born to be free.” Suffering from schizophrenia for much of her lifetime, Patricia sought refuge in creative practices, taking up singing and drawing. She longed to be a pop star, leaving behind cassette tapes of a capella recordings, the lyrics of which are derived from folk music, gospel, and spirituals. Satterwhite and Nick Weiss, together forming the band PAT, overlay Patricia’s voice onto propulsive dance tracks that are featured in Birds in Paradise as well as collected into a double LP album, Love Will Find A Way Home, which is stocked on shelves in a gift store replete with VR “listening stations” that conjure 90s music stores, such as Tower Records. The album’s track listing has been turned into neon, which animates the exhibition. Patricia also created hundreds of drawings that portray humdrum objects of domestic material culture, lines of consumer goods she longed to be on the QVC shopping network where she sent them to, as well as patent offices—an avenue for potential fame and fortune that never came to be. The drawings became increasingly abstract and provisional as her condition worsened. Satterwhite has translated them into the digital architectures and environments featured in Birds in Paradise. They have also become 3D printed objects that are displayed in four large shelving units. One, You’re a Winner, features footballs and picture frames. Another, Drugs, contains pill bottles and tabloid magazines touting celebrity scandals. Two more units, Money and The American Dream, contain curios of collective, consumer desire. The raw materials of Patricia’s legacy, meanwhile, stand alone as an adjacent presentation within You’re at home. These drawings and songs were all made inside Patricia’ own home, a place she rarely left for almost 20 years. While Patricia’s work in Birds in Paradise is so altered as to be nearly unidentifiable, her disembodied presence nonetheless creates a thread of continuity, one in which authorship between mother and son is intentionally blurred.
Pope.L
Pope.L
New York - 99 Gansevoort Street
until 31-12-2020

Pope.L – Choir Utilizing both public and private spaces, the expansive presentation will address many elements of the artist’s oeuvre from singular early works, to a monumental new installation, and a new large-scale performative work inspired by the artist’s iconic crawl series on the streets of New York City.

Pope.L – Choir Utilizing both public and private spaces, the expansive presentation will address many elements of the artist’s oeuvre from singular early works, to a monumental new installation, and a new large-scale performative work inspired by the artist’s iconic crawl series on the streets of New York City.
Walead Beshty
Walead Beshty
New York - 456 W 18th Street
until 14-12-2019

Walead Beshty – Abstract of A Partial Disassembling of an Invention Without a Future: Helter-Skelter and Random Notes in Which the Pulleys and Cogwheels Are Lying Around at Random All Over the Workbench The work A Partial Disassembling of an Invention Without a Future: Helter-Skelter and Random Notes in Which the Pulleys and Cogwheels Are Lying Around at Random All Over the Workbench, was originally commissioned by the Barbican Centre, London. The London-born, Los Angeles-based artist first exhibited the work there in 2014, covering the 273 ft long Curve gallery from floor to ceiling in cyanotype prints. The prints were produced over the duration of a year (October 9, 2013–October 8, 2014) and are chronologically installed in proportion to the exhibition space. For its New York première at Petzel, approximately 5,120 cyanotypes (38% of the total 15,616 sq. ft work) will be presented.

Walead Beshty – Abstract of A Partial Disassembling of an Invention Without a Future: Helter-Skelter and Random Notes in Which the Pulleys and Cogwheels Are Lying Around at Random All Over the Workbench The work A Partial Disassembling of an Invention Without a Future: Helter-Skelter and Random Notes in Which the Pulleys and Cogwheels Are Lying Around at Random All Over the Workbench, was originally commissioned by the Barbican Centre, London. The London-born, Los Angeles-based artist first exhibited the work there in 2014, covering the 273 ft long Curve gallery from floor to ceiling in cyanotype prints. The prints were produced over the duration of a year (October 9, 2013–October 8, 2014) and are chronologically installed in proportion to the exhibition space. For its New York première at Petzel, approximately 5,120 cyanotypes (38% of the total 15,616 sq. ft work) will be presented.
Kader Attia
Kader Attia
Vienna - Seilerstätte 16
until 23-11-2019

Kader Attia – 2009:2019 Films This exhibition will present a selection of his most important films and videos. Raised in an Algerian family, Attila grew up in a multi-ethnic setting in a Parisian suburb. Already early in life he showed an interest for socio-cultural phenomena, especially those related to and resulting from colonialism. Kader Attia has explored these phenomena in a variety of disciplines such as psychoanalysis, sociology, architecture and philosophy. His explorations have culminated in the concept of Repair, which means both reparation as well as restitution. Attia’s films, some of which consist of interviews and portraits of individuals and societies, give compelling testimony of the broad spectrum of his research. According to Kader Attia there are numerous processes of repair to be found in each system and in each cultural tradition.

Kader Attia – 2009:2019 Films This exhibition will present a selection of his most important films and videos. Raised in an Algerian family, Attila grew up in a multi-ethnic setting in a Parisian suburb. Already early in life he showed an interest for socio-cultural phenomena, especially those related to and resulting from colonialism. Kader Attia has explored these phenomena in a variety of disciplines such as psychoanalysis, sociology, architecture and philosophy. His explorations have culminated in the concept of Repair, which means both reparation as well as restitution. Attia’s films, some of which consist of interviews and portraits of individuals and societies, give compelling testimony of the broad spectrum of his research. According to Kader Attia there are numerous processes of repair to be found in each system and in each cultural tradition.
Henrike Naumann
Henrike Naumann
Vienna - Arsenalstrasse 1
until 12-01-2020

Henrike Naumann Henrike Naumann was raised in Zwickau at a time when the GDR was drawing to a political close and the state was ultimately absorbed into a reunited Germany. She has transformed the experiences of her youth—between hedonism, consumer culture, and growing right-wing radicalism—into installations for several exhibitions. In an archaeology of zeitgeists she explores the correlations between aesthetics and ideology, which she enables visitors to experience in her walk-in spatial settings. The starting point of her exhibition at the Belvedere 21 is the year 1990: The Reichsbürgerbewegung (“Reich Citizens’ Movement”) does not accept the legitimacy of the Federal Republic of Germany and abruptly takes over control after reunification. Austria soon joins the reestablished German Reich. Henrike Naumann sketches this fictitious scenario in an immersive room installation comprising furniture, home accessories, and videos. Here the Reich (Citizens’) Chancellery, portrayed as a Germanic Stonehenge, meets home videos by the National Socialist underground and by revelers on Ibiza, a 1990s furniture store, Jörg Haider’s office, and all manner of finca chic. Das Reich can be read as a psychogram of an alternative world view, which alarmingly resembles the worlds of thought of today's extreme right.

Henrike Naumann Henrike Naumann was raised in Zwickau at a time when the GDR was drawing to a political close and the state was ultimately absorbed into a reunited Germany. She has transformed the experiences of her youth—between hedonism, consumer culture, and growing right-wing radicalism—into installations for several exhibitions. In an archaeology of zeitgeists she explores the correlations between aesthetics and ideology, which she enables visitors to experience in her walk-in spatial settings. The starting point of her exhibition at the Belvedere 21 is the year 1990: The Reichsbürgerbewegung (“Reich Citizens’ Movement”) does not accept the legitimacy of the Federal Republic of Germany and abruptly takes over control after reunification. Austria soon joins the reestablished German Reich. Henrike Naumann sketches this fictitious scenario in an immersive room installation comprising furniture, home accessories, and videos. Here the Reich (Citizens’) Chancellery, portrayed as a Germanic Stonehenge, meets home videos by the National Socialist underground and by revelers on Ibiza, a 1990s furniture store, Jörg Haider’s office, and all manner of finca chic. Das Reich can be read as a psychogram of an alternative world view, which alarmingly resembles the worlds of thought of today's extreme right.
Heimrad Bäcker
Heimrad Bäcker
Vienna - Museumsplatz 1
until 16-02-2020

Heimrad Bäcker – it is possible that they won’t kill us and they might allow us to live* Curated by Marie-Therese Hochwartner, Nora Linser, and Susanne Neuburger? This exhibition is devoted to the photographic legacy of Heimrad Bäcker, which was given to mumok as a gift in 2015. It includes more than 14,000 items and is a witness to Bäcker’s lifelong critical inquiry of the Holocaust. The exhibition presents a selection of photographs, notes, texts, and found items. Bäcker began to document the sites of the concentration camps at Mauthausen and Gusen in the 1960s. His photographs were taken long before any public reappraisal of the Nazi past in Austria. They show desterted buildings, overgrown by vegetation or used for different purposes. These images and texts provide insight into Bäcker’s approach and methods and can be seen to complement his texts nachschrift (postscript) and nachschrift 2 (postscript 2), which intend to shed light on National Socialism and the Holocaust and to fill in the gaps in history.  

Heimrad Bäcker – it is possible that they won’t kill us and they might allow us to live* Curated by Marie-Therese Hochwartner, Nora Linser, and Susanne Neuburger? This exhibition is devoted to the photographic legacy of Heimrad Bäcker, which was given to mumok as a gift in 2015. It includes more than 14,000 items and is a witness to Bäcker’s lifelong critical inquiry of the Holocaust. The exhibition presents a selection of photographs, notes, texts, and found items. Bäcker began to document the sites of the concentration camps at Mauthausen and Gusen in the 1960s. His photographs were taken long before any public reappraisal of the Nazi past in Austria. They show desterted buildings, overgrown by vegetation or used for different purposes. These images and texts provide insight into Bäcker’s approach and methods and can be seen to complement his texts nachschrift (postscript) and nachschrift 2 (postscript 2), which intend to shed light on National Socialism and the Holocaust and to fill in the gaps in history.  
Thomas Locher & Willem de Rooij
Thomas Locher & Willem de Rooij
Vienna - Schleifmühlgasse 5
until 21-12-2019

Thomas Locher & Willem de Rooij – MODERN ALIBIS  

Thomas Locher & Willem de Rooij – MODERN ALIBIS  
Maria Lassnig
Maria Lassnig
Vienna - Albertinaplatz 1
until 01-12-2019

Maria Lassnig – Ways of Being The Albertina Museum is marking what would have been the hundredth birthday of Maria Lassnig (1919–2014) with a comprehensive look back upon her career, thus showing impressive key works and masterpieces by one of the most important woman artists of the 20th century. Among the multitude of themes to which Maria Lassnig devoted herself over the course of her life (including self-portraits, science fiction, relationships with people, animals, and technology, and how we relate to violence and war), a dominant golden thread running throughout her oeuvre’s content is the act of rendering her body-consciousness visible. As early as the late 1940s, Lassnig placed her own body at the center of her work—long before physical feeling, body language, and gender relations became central themes of the international avant-garde. She thus marked an important turning point in the history of modern art whose echoes can still be heard today. It was humorously and seriously, wistfully and mercilessly that the artist placed her perceptions of her own self on the painting surface. In this, it was not what she saw, but what she felt became the image.

Maria Lassnig – Ways of Being The Albertina Museum is marking what would have been the hundredth birthday of Maria Lassnig (1919–2014) with a comprehensive look back upon her career, thus showing impressive key works and masterpieces by one of the most important woman artists of the 20th century. Among the multitude of themes to which Maria Lassnig devoted herself over the course of her life (including self-portraits, science fiction, relationships with people, animals, and technology, and how we relate to violence and war), a dominant golden thread running throughout her oeuvre’s content is the act of rendering her body-consciousness visible. As early as the late 1940s, Lassnig placed her own body at the center of her work—long before physical feeling, body language, and gender relations became central themes of the international avant-garde. She thus marked an important turning point in the history of modern art whose echoes can still be heard today. It was humorously and seriously, wistfully and mercilessly that the artist placed her perceptions of her own self on the painting surface. In this, it was not what she saw, but what she felt became the image.
Maskulinitäten
Maskulinitäten
Cologne - Hahnenstrasse 6
until 24-11-2019

Maskulinitäten. A Cooperation between Bonner Kunstverein, Kölnischer Kunstverein and Kunstverein für die Rheinlande und Westfalen, Düsseldorf Georgia Anderson & David Doherty & Morag Keil & Henry Stringer, Louis Backhouse, Olga Balema, Gerry Bibby, Juliette Blightman, Anders Clausen, Enrico David, Jonathas de Andrade, Jimmy DeSana, Jenny Holzer, Hedi El Kholti, Hilary Lloyd, Sarah Lucas, Shahryar Nashat, Puppies Puppies (Jade Kuriki Olivo), Carol Rama, Bea Schlingelhoff, Heji Shin, Evelyn Taocheng Wang, Carrie Mae Weems, Marianne Wex, Martin Wong, Katharina Wulff Curated by Nikola Dietrich Organised in collaboration by Bonner Kunstverein, Kölnischer Kunstverein and Kunstverein für die Rheinlande und Westfalen, Düsseldorf, “Maskulinitäten” is an international exhibition with a series of events and accompanying publication project that explores the subject of masculinity via contemporary art. The tripartite presentation is premised by an interest in questioning how a feminist exhibition on masculinity could look. Conceived within the context of prominent and reactionary manifestations of masculinity and with an irreverent, uncompromising critique of its hegemonic forms, the collaboration aims to destabilise patriarchal and heteronormative notions of gender. Including public artworks, performances, plays, readings, lectures, screenings, and workshops, the exhibition seeks to open up alternative spaces of agency and bring performative and transgressive conceptions of identity, sexuality, gender and the body to the fore. The three institutions share a history in variously presenting radical, feminist and queer exhibitions. Whilst many of these focused on reclaiming femininity and female experience from a history of male authorship, this project turns its attention instead to the male subject. The exhibition and the accompanying programme explores shifting perspectives on the representation of the body, the associated politics of power and visibility, and how these are negotiated and deconstructed in art from the 1960s to the present. Encompassing artistic and art-theoretical perspectives from different contexts and periods, masculinity is encountered as a complex, evolving, social construct that remains in continual flux.  

Maskulinitäten. A Cooperation between Bonner Kunstverein, Kölnischer Kunstverein and Kunstverein für die Rheinlande und Westfalen, Düsseldorf Georgia Anderson & David Doherty & Morag Keil & Henry Stringer, Louis Backhouse, Olga Balema, Gerry Bibby, Juliette Blightman, Anders Clausen, Enrico David, Jonathas de Andrade, Jimmy DeSana, Jenny Holzer, Hedi El Kholti, Hilary Lloyd, Sarah Lucas, Shahryar Nashat, Puppies Puppies (Jade Kuriki Olivo), Carol Rama, Bea Schlingelhoff, Heji Shin, Evelyn Taocheng Wang, Carrie Mae Weems, Marianne Wex, Martin Wong, Katharina Wulff Curated by Nikola Dietrich Organised in collaboration by Bonner Kunstverein, Kölnischer Kunstverein and Kunstverein für die Rheinlande und Westfalen, Düsseldorf, “Maskulinitäten” is an international exhibition with a series of events and accompanying publication project that explores the subject of masculinity via contemporary art. The tripartite presentation is premised by an interest in questioning how a feminist exhibition on masculinity could look. Conceived within the context of prominent and reactionary manifestations of masculinity and with an irreverent, uncompromising critique of its hegemonic forms, the collaboration aims to destabilise patriarchal and heteronormative notions of gender. Including public artworks, performances, plays, readings, lectures, screenings, and workshops, the exhibition seeks to open up alternative spaces of agency and bring performative and transgressive conceptions of identity, sexuality, gender and the body to the fore. The three institutions share a history in variously presenting radical, feminist and queer exhibitions. Whilst many of these focused on reclaiming femininity and female experience from a history of male authorship, this project turns its attention instead to the male subject. The exhibition and the accompanying programme explores shifting perspectives on the representation of the body, the associated politics of power and visibility, and how these are negotiated and deconstructed in art from the 1960s to the present. Encompassing artistic and art-theoretical perspectives from different contexts and periods, masculinity is encountered as a complex, evolving, social construct that remains in continual flux.  
Thomas Zipp
Thomas Zipp
Cologne - Moltkestrasse 81, rear building, 1st floor
until 14-12-2019

Thomas Zipp – The Unknown (Flowers) & the Other Side  The exhibition includes drawings by Thomas Zipp that have seldom been seen before, it provides an artistic view of the creation of the human as a prosthetic god, who constantly shifts the threshold of the feasible to inexhaustible precariousness.

Thomas Zipp – The Unknown (Flowers) & the Other Side  The exhibition includes drawings by Thomas Zipp that have seldom been seen before, it provides an artistic view of the creation of the human as a prosthetic god, who constantly shifts the threshold of the feasible to inexhaustible precariousness.
Anna Gaskell
Anna Gaskell
Cologne - St. Apern Strasse 26
until 21-12-2019

Anna Gaskell 

Anna Gaskell 
Avery Singer
Avery Singer
Cologne - Hein­rich-Böll-Platz
until 04-10-2020

Schultze Projects #2 – Avery Singer For the se­cond edi­tion of the se­ries Schultze Pro­jects, the Amer­i­can artist Av­ery Singer has cre­at­ed a new, site-spe­cif­ic work for the stair­well at the Mu­se­um Lud­wig. The sev­en-part work is over sev­en­teen me­ters long and three and a half me­ters high. The name of the se­ries re­fers to Ber­nard Schultze and his wife Ur­su­la (Schultze-Bluhm), whose es­tate is ma­n­aged by the Mu­se­um Lud­wig, and in whose me­m­o­ry ev­ery two years since 2017 an artist has been in­vit­ed to cre­ate a ma­jor work for the pro­mi­nent front wall of the stair­well.

Schultze Projects #2 – Avery Singer For the se­cond edi­tion of the se­ries Schultze Pro­jects, the Amer­i­can artist Av­ery Singer has cre­at­ed a new, site-spe­cif­ic work for the stair­well at the Mu­se­um Lud­wig. The sev­en-part work is over sev­en­teen me­ters long and three and a half me­ters high. The name of the se­ries re­fers to Ber­nard Schultze and his wife Ur­su­la (Schultze-Bluhm), whose es­tate is ma­n­aged by the Mu­se­um Lud­wig, and in whose me­m­o­ry ev­ery two years since 2017 an artist has been in­vit­ed to cre­ate a ma­jor work for the pro­mi­nent front wall of the stair­well.
Nschotschi Haslinger
Nschotschi Haslinger
Cologne - Albertusstrasse 4
until 30-11-2019

Nschotschi Haslinger – DER GEHEIME DIENST

Nschotschi Haslinger – DER GEHEIME DIENST
Analog Histories in Primary Colors
Analog Histories in Primary Colors
Berlin - Linienstrasse 155
until 30-11-2019

Analog Histories in Primary Colors Sharon Lockhart, Mike Nelson, Simon Starling The group exhibition is featuring photographs by Sharon Lockhart (b. 1964), as well as sculptural work by Mike Nelson (b. 1967) and Simon Starling (b. 1967). With portrayals of industry as points of departure, the works on view explore the shift from a manufacturing-based society to one centered around the service industry, engaging with the art historical canon, regional traditions, narrative devices and questions of identity. Sharon Lockhart’s filmic and photographic work explores the everyday lives of her subjects and draws upon a socio-anthropological, research-based process to shape compositionally precise tableaux. Her series Lunch Break (2008), created at a shipyard in Bath, Maine, is a striking portrait of American labor. Evocative of the documentary photography of August Sander and Walker Evans, the series is a meditation on work, time, its passage and the transactional nature of leisure. The large-scale portrait Old Boiler Shop: Proud and Shaun depicts two workers on their lunch break, formally recalling the format, composition and lighting of classical painting. In the same vein, the diptych Panel Line Break Room: Roland, Phil, John and Shermie shows four people in a moment of pause that starkly contrasts the industrial sector’s efficiency-driven nature. The triptych Stephen Bade, Electrician consists of three views of a red lunch box that constitute veritable still lifes and function allegorically as a representative portrait of the worker to whom it belongs. Its patina testifies to daily use, while the stickers that it bears hint at the personality of its owner. Mike Nelson’s work is shaped by a fascination for understanding societies based on what they leave behind and, in turn, the materiality and sociocultural implications embedded in those selected objects. His monumental sculpture The Asset Strippers (staddle stones on double scales ... metric and imperial) (2019) is part of The Asset Strippers, a body of work created for the Tate Britain Commission 2019. For this presentation, Nelson sourced machines from bankruptcy auctions and salvage yards, transforming the neoclassical Duveen Galleries of Tate Britain into a warehouse for objects from Britain’s industrial past. These relics from the era before the rise of the digital service industry were displayed to draw attention to the decline of British manufacturing and to lament the welfare state’s shifting standing. Decommissioned by becoming sculpture, The Asset Strippers (staddle stones on double scales ... metric and imperial) takes on an uncanny anthropomorphic quality and transcends its original purpose. Nelson’s construction of bright red scales placed upon blue trestle legs is exemplary of a symbiotic relationship between machine and sculpture, acting as a monument to post-war Britain and the lost vision of society once held by those who came into contact with these objects. Simon Starling’s practice has engaged with the history of production and presentation of technical processes since the early 1990s, with a particular focus on image reproduction techniques and their role as a link between past and present. Half A4 (or King and Queen) (2018-2019) is a Heidelberger “Windmill” printing press—a machine produced in the 1960s during the heyday of German industry—split into equal halves. Its two-part composition evokes parallels with paired figures from throughout the history of sculpture. The bisected surface of the 1,300-kilogram apparatus is highlighted with yellow paint—in concert with the now clear view of the device’s inner workings, the object becomes reminiscent of displays in science museums where a viewer’s understanding of how a machine operates takes center stage. In addition to Starling’s interest in the materiality and aesthetic qualities of the machine itself, he also positions it as an indicator of societal development. The sculptures on view portray not only their own pasts, but also those of the people who once used them on a daily basis. Complemented by Lockhart’s photographic work, these works pay tribute to a way of life gradually falling victim to structural shifts and the growth of global capitalism. Coinciding with the exhibition at neugerriemschneider, Sharon Lockhart’s film EXIT (2008) will be screened at Kino Arsenal in Berlin on November 14 at 8 pm. In this film, Lockhart uses fixed-frame shots to document five consecutive days of workers leaving the shipyard after their shifts. The 41-minute work recalls Louis Lumière’s short film Leaving the Lumiere Factory (1895) and emphasizes the passage of time by way of a recurring everyday event. For further press information and imagery, please contact Alexia Timmermans at neugerriemschneider: +49 30 288 77277 or [email protected]

Analog Histories in Primary Colors Sharon Lockhart, Mike Nelson, Simon Starling The group exhibition is featuring photographs by Sharon Lockhart (b. 1964), as well as sculptural work by Mike Nelson (b. 1967) and Simon Starling (b. 1967). With portrayals of industry as points of departure, the works on view explore the shift from a manufacturing-based society to one centered around the service industry, engaging with the art historical canon, regional traditions, narrative devices and questions of identity. Sharon Lockhart’s filmic and photographic work explores the everyday lives of her subjects and draws upon a socio-anthropological, research-based process to shape compositionally precise tableaux. Her series Lunch Break (2008), created at a shipyard in Bath, Maine, is a striking portrait of American labor. Evocative of the documentary photography of August Sander and Walker Evans, the series is a meditation on work, time, its passage and the transactional nature of leisure. The large-scale portrait Old Boiler Shop: Proud and Shaun depicts two workers on their lunch break, formally recalling the format, composition and lighting of classical painting. In the same vein, the diptych Panel Line Break Room: Roland, Phil, John and Shermie shows four people in a moment of pause that starkly contrasts the industrial sector’s efficiency-driven nature. The triptych Stephen Bade, Electrician consists of three views of a red lunch box that constitute veritable still lifes and function allegorically as a representative portrait of the worker to whom it belongs. Its patina testifies to daily use, while the stickers that it bears hint at the personality of its owner. Mike Nelson’s work is shaped by a fascination for understanding societies based on what they leave behind and, in turn, the materiality and sociocultural implications embedded in those selected objects. His monumental sculpture The Asset Strippers (staddle stones on double scales ... metric and imperial) (2019) is part of The Asset Strippers, a body of work created for the Tate Britain Commission 2019. For this presentation, Nelson sourced machines from bankruptcy auctions and salvage yards, transforming the neoclassical Duveen Galleries of Tate Britain into a warehouse for objects from Britain’s industrial past. These relics from the era before the rise of the digital service industry were displayed to draw attention to the decline of British manufacturing and to lament the welfare state’s shifting standing. Decommissioned by becoming sculpture, The Asset Strippers (staddle stones on double scales ... metric and imperial) takes on an uncanny anthropomorphic quality and transcends its original purpose. Nelson’s construction of bright red scales placed upon blue trestle legs is exemplary of a symbiotic relationship between machine and sculpture, acting as a monument to post-war Britain and the lost vision of society once held by those who came into contact with these objects. Simon Starling’s practice has engaged with the history of production and presentation of technical processes since the early 1990s, with a particular focus on image reproduction techniques and their role as a link between past and present. Half A4 (or King and Queen) (2018-2019) is a Heidelberger “Windmill” printing press—a machine produced in the 1960s during the heyday of German industry—split into equal halves. Its two-part composition evokes parallels with paired figures from throughout the history of sculpture. The bisected surface of the 1,300-kilogram apparatus is highlighted with yellow paint—in concert with the now clear view of the device’s inner workings, the object becomes reminiscent of displays in science museums where a viewer’s understanding of how a machine operates takes center stage. In addition to Starling’s interest in the materiality and aesthetic qualities of the machine itself, he also positions it as an indicator of societal development. The sculptures on view portray not only their own pasts, but also those of the people who once used them on a daily basis. Complemented by Lockhart’s photographic work, these works pay tribute to a way of life gradually falling victim to structural shifts and the growth of global capitalism. Coinciding with the exhibition at neugerriemschneider, Sharon Lockhart’s film EXIT (2008) will be screened at Kino Arsenal in Berlin on November 14 at 8 pm. In this film, Lockhart uses fixed-frame shots to document five consecutive days of workers leaving the shipyard after their shifts. The 41-minute work recalls Louis Lumière’s short film Leaving the Lumiere Factory (1895) and emphasizes the passage of time by way of a recurring everyday event. For further press information and imagery, please contact Alexia Timmermans at neugerriemschneider: +49 30 288 77277 or [email protected]
Stan Douglas
Stan Douglas
Berlin - Leipziger Str. 60, entrance: Jerusalemer Str.
until 01-03-2020

Stan Douglas – Splicing Block The exhibition SPLICING BLOCK examines the relationship between music and society, and is at the same time a reflection on the media of film and photography. The works reconstruct and imagine the 1960s and 70s–an era distinguished by (de-)colonization and migration, but one equally permeated by jazz, underground disco, and Afrobeat.

Stan Douglas – Splicing Block The exhibition SPLICING BLOCK examines the relationship between music and society, and is at the same time a reflection on the media of film and photography. The works reconstruct and imagine the 1960s and 70s–an era distinguished by (de-)colonization and migration, but one equally permeated by jazz, underground disco, and Afrobeat.
Thomas Grünfeld
Thomas Grünfeld
Berlin - Knesebeckstrasse 95
until 07-12-2019

Thomas Grünfeld – jene Wentrup is pleased to announce the inaugural exhibition at the gallery of Cologne-based artist Thomas Grünfeld. The artists' sculptural oeuvre is characterized by the use of unusual materials and a complexity rich in allusions and references. Since 2004, Grünfeld has been professor of sculpture at Kunstakademie Düsseldorf. For the exhibition, Grünfeld conceived sculptures that draw on his so-called fireplace series. These transfer the architecture of domestic open fireplaces into minimalistic  upholstered sculptures. They were shown in 2016 at Massimo die Carlo Gallery in London and in 2017 in the private Dusseldorf museum Philara. The new works in this show are entitled jene (them) and intentionally refer to something specific that is, as it were, unspecific. This open reference becomes directly legible when we behold the sculptures, which bring back memories that cannot be quite grasped. The reliefs, made of upholstery in graphic shapes, are not located in the middle of the space, but hang on the wall, connect to the space, and in their formal vocabulary are reminiscent of wall shelves and sideboards. The impression of functional furniture is reinforced by other fixtures such as a ball-shaped lamp, potted plant, horsehair (sealing brush for doors) and wooden logs, referencing the objects of a bourgeois home furnished to create coziness, order, and straightforwardness.  The home environments of Verner Panton, where the lava lamp replaces the ball-shaped lamp, also want to be soft and round. His fantastic furniture space Visiona was conceived as a commission of the chemical corporation Bayer in Leverkusen—where Thomas Grünfeld was born—in order to propagate the use of new synthetic fabrics.  Once we engage with Thomas Grünfeld’s works at length, we cannot help but see faces in them. Lamps become pupils, brushes become eyelids, and thick hemp ropes become hair. Not last because of their mustard-yellow coloring and round shapes, the works are also reminiscent of the quirky faces of the minions, a horde of animated figures created at the Pixar animation studios. The minions are characterized by their playful, insane behavior, their own language, and their different personalities: characteristics that might also be ascribed to the new reliefs by Thomas Grünfeld.  

Thomas Grünfeld – jene Wentrup is pleased to announce the inaugural exhibition at the gallery of Cologne-based artist Thomas Grünfeld. The artists' sculptural oeuvre is characterized by the use of unusual materials and a complexity rich in allusions and references. Since 2004, Grünfeld has been professor of sculpture at Kunstakademie Düsseldorf. For the exhibition, Grünfeld conceived sculptures that draw on his so-called fireplace series. These transfer the architecture of domestic open fireplaces into minimalistic  upholstered sculptures. They were shown in 2016 at Massimo die Carlo Gallery in London and in 2017 in the private Dusseldorf museum Philara. The new works in this show are entitled jene (them) and intentionally refer to something specific that is, as it were, unspecific. This open reference becomes directly legible when we behold the sculptures, which bring back memories that cannot be quite grasped. The reliefs, made of upholstery in graphic shapes, are not located in the middle of the space, but hang on the wall, connect to the space, and in their formal vocabulary are reminiscent of wall shelves and sideboards. The impression of functional furniture is reinforced by other fixtures such as a ball-shaped lamp, potted plant, horsehair (sealing brush for doors) and wooden logs, referencing the objects of a bourgeois home furnished to create coziness, order, and straightforwardness.  The home environments of Verner Panton, where the lava lamp replaces the ball-shaped lamp, also want to be soft and round. His fantastic furniture space Visiona was conceived as a commission of the chemical corporation Bayer in Leverkusen—where Thomas Grünfeld was born—in order to propagate the use of new synthetic fabrics.  Once we engage with Thomas Grünfeld’s works at length, we cannot help but see faces in them. Lamps become pupils, brushes become eyelids, and thick hemp ropes become hair. Not last because of their mustard-yellow coloring and round shapes, the works are also reminiscent of the quirky faces of the minions, a horde of animated figures created at the Pixar animation studios. The minions are characterized by their playful, insane behavior, their own language, and their different personalities: characteristics that might also be ascribed to the new reliefs by Thomas Grünfeld.  
The Making of Husbands
The Making of Husbands
Berlin - Auguststrasse 69
until 05-01-2020

The Making of Husbands: Christina Ramberg in Dialogue Alexandra Bircken, Sara Deraedt, Gaylen Gerber, Frieda Toranzo Jaeger, Konrad Klapheck, Ghislaine Leung, Hans-Christian Lotz, Senga Nengudi, Ana Pellicer, Christina Ramberg, Richard Rezac, Diane Simpson, Terre Thaemlitz, Kathleen White? Curated by Anna Gritz “Containing, restraining, reforming, hurting, compressing, binding, transforming a lumpy shape into a clean smooth line,” is how American artist Christina Ramberg (1946–1995) once described the drawings of corsets in her sketchbooks. Ramberg was one of the most intriguing painters to emerge within a generation of Chicago Imagists. She left a significant body of comic, formally elegant, erotically sinister paintings. Operating under the influences of Surrealism, her cropped torsi, sharply delineated and bound in bizarre variations of corsets, bandages, and textures exude an unnerving calm burdened with a conflicted desire. Ramberg’s understanding of the body as an environment that is closely intertwined with its surrounding, shaped by corsets, hairdos as well as behavioral conventions is central to the exhibition at KW Institute for Contemporary Art that summons an analysis of conduct based on her approach as something constructed by the structures that externally and internally determine our existence. A selection of paintings and drawings by Christina Ramberg will form the core of the exhibition, alongside of which other artistic positions such as Alexandra Bircken, Sara Deraedt, Gaylen Gerber, Frieda Toranzo Jaeger, Konrad Klapheck, Ghislaine Leung, Hans Christian Lotz, Senga Nengudi, Ana Pellicer, Richard Rezac, Diane Simpson, Terre Thaemlitz, Kathleen White will expand the conversation and extend the understanding of the type of framing devices that can be identified as having an impact on and condition performance, behavior, and physical expression.

The Making of Husbands: Christina Ramberg in Dialogue Alexandra Bircken, Sara Deraedt, Gaylen Gerber, Frieda Toranzo Jaeger, Konrad Klapheck, Ghislaine Leung, Hans-Christian Lotz, Senga Nengudi, Ana Pellicer, Christina Ramberg, Richard Rezac, Diane Simpson, Terre Thaemlitz, Kathleen White? Curated by Anna Gritz “Containing, restraining, reforming, hurting, compressing, binding, transforming a lumpy shape into a clean smooth line,” is how American artist Christina Ramberg (1946–1995) once described the drawings of corsets in her sketchbooks. Ramberg was one of the most intriguing painters to emerge within a generation of Chicago Imagists. She left a significant body of comic, formally elegant, erotically sinister paintings. Operating under the influences of Surrealism, her cropped torsi, sharply delineated and bound in bizarre variations of corsets, bandages, and textures exude an unnerving calm burdened with a conflicted desire. Ramberg’s understanding of the body as an environment that is closely intertwined with its surrounding, shaped by corsets, hairdos as well as behavioral conventions is central to the exhibition at KW Institute for Contemporary Art that summons an analysis of conduct based on her approach as something constructed by the structures that externally and internally determine our existence. A selection of paintings and drawings by Christina Ramberg will form the core of the exhibition, alongside of which other artistic positions such as Alexandra Bircken, Sara Deraedt, Gaylen Gerber, Frieda Toranzo Jaeger, Konrad Klapheck, Ghislaine Leung, Hans Christian Lotz, Senga Nengudi, Ana Pellicer, Richard Rezac, Diane Simpson, Terre Thaemlitz, Kathleen White will expand the conversation and extend the understanding of the type of framing devices that can be identified as having an impact on and condition performance, behavior, and physical expression.
Ryan Trecartin
Ryan Trecartin
Berlin - Oranienburger Strasse 18
until 21-12-2019

Ryan Trecartin – Re'Search Wait’S    Ryan Trecartin is widely known for his influential videos, sculptures, and installations. His highly inventive and prescient work has been crucial to understanding the mutability of language and the totalizing effects of technology and social media on subject formation in the twenty-first century.  The current exhibition Re’Search Wait’S comes from the ambitious multi-movie project, Any Ever. Trecartin uses poetic, formal, and structural elaborations of new forms of technology, language narrative, identity, and humanity, to portray an extra-dimensional world that channels the existentia dramas of our own. Any Ever’s core material is the perpetual flux of relationships among characters patterned to form constellations of meaning across the videos. 

Ryan Trecartin – Re'Search Wait’S    Ryan Trecartin is widely known for his influential videos, sculptures, and installations. His highly inventive and prescient work has been crucial to understanding the mutability of language and the totalizing effects of technology and social media on subject formation in the twenty-first century.  The current exhibition Re’Search Wait’S comes from the ambitious multi-movie project, Any Ever. Trecartin uses poetic, formal, and structural elaborations of new forms of technology, language narrative, identity, and humanity, to portray an extra-dimensional world that channels the existentia dramas of our own. Any Ever’s core material is the perpetual flux of relationships among characters patterned to form constellations of meaning across the videos. 
Bettina Pousttchi
Bettina Pousttchi
Berlin - Alte Jakobstrasse 124?128
until 06-04-2020

Bettina Pousttchi – In Recent Years Bettina Pousttchi works at the interface of sculpture, photography and architecture. Her site-specific photographic interventions in the public space often occupy entire facades of buildings and reference the urban or historical context of a place. Pousttchi reflects the role of photography in the digital age and questions the relationship between memory and history. Her sculptures are an extension of her interest in the political and social structures of the urban fabric, often transforming objects from public space such as crowd barriers, street bollards or bicycle racks. The artist will present a selection of sculptures as well as a site-specific façade work at the entrance of the museum. 

Bettina Pousttchi – In Recent Years Bettina Pousttchi works at the interface of sculpture, photography and architecture. Her site-specific photographic interventions in the public space often occupy entire facades of buildings and reference the urban or historical context of a place. Pousttchi reflects the role of photography in the digital age and questions the relationship between memory and history. Her sculptures are an extension of her interest in the political and social structures of the urban fabric, often transforming objects from public space such as crowd barriers, street bollards or bicycle racks. The artist will present a selection of sculptures as well as a site-specific façade work at the entrance of the museum. 
Micro Era
Micro Era
Berlin - Matthäikirchplatz 6
until 26-01-2020

Micro Era. ?Media Art from China Cao Fei, Lu Yang, Fang Di, Zhang Peili Curated by Anna-Catharina Gebbers with Victor Wang, and Yang Beichen / Curatorial Advisor: Pi Li From documentary film pictures, and the adapted use of classic film language to the aesthetics of Japanese anime, the works of art in this exhibition focus on and explore relationships between mind, body and technology, with installations and single-channel-videos ranging from the 1980s to the present. Historically, within a Euro-American context, video art is often regarded as a democratising art form – through the rapid circulation of information and global events by fast-access technologies. The artists participating in the exhibition, Cao Fei (*1978), Fang Di (*1987), Lu Yang (*1984) and Zhang Peili (*1957), scrutinise this thesis of democratisation by reflecting in their visual language the mass production of goods as well as how images and virtual subjectivities are produced and consumed, and how we understand our world through imaging technology.  

Micro Era. ?Media Art from China Cao Fei, Lu Yang, Fang Di, Zhang Peili Curated by Anna-Catharina Gebbers with Victor Wang, and Yang Beichen / Curatorial Advisor: Pi Li From documentary film pictures, and the adapted use of classic film language to the aesthetics of Japanese anime, the works of art in this exhibition focus on and explore relationships between mind, body and technology, with installations and single-channel-videos ranging from the 1980s to the present. Historically, within a Euro-American context, video art is often regarded as a democratising art form – through the rapid circulation of information and global events by fast-access technologies. The artists participating in the exhibition, Cao Fei (*1978), Fang Di (*1987), Lu Yang (*1984) and Zhang Peili (*1957), scrutinise this thesis of democratisation by reflecting in their visual language the mass production of goods as well as how images and virtual subjectivities are produced and consumed, and how we understand our world through imaging technology.  
Tjorg Douglas Beer
Tjorg Douglas Beer
Berlin - Prinzenallee 78-79
until 03-12-2019

Tjorg Douglas Beer – Under the Octopus Tree Grzegorzki Shows Berlin presents new works by the German artist Tjorg Douglas Beer, who works in various fields and creates collages, paintings, and sculptures. The exhibition title, Under the Octopus Tree, is a reference to the artist’s interest in escape scenarios: since 2019, Beer has spent a lot of time in Greece, and the Octopus Tree is a synonym for the fantasma of utopian life. Beer generates his work from life experiences rather than from a conceptual point of view. In his paintings, he mixes ink, markers, lacquer, acrylic, oil paint, and oil stick and develops arrangements and sceneries out of the process of painting. As a result, faces and figures appear from the transition of overlapping colors. These figures are preserved and then arranged in fragmented scenarios that could be landscapes, interiors, or sculptures. Unfinished figures, squares, and color transitions lead to collage-like paintings.   In the exhibition, Beer also shows ceramic sculptures made in collaboration with a Greek ceramist. After the series of figure paintings, Beer has developed a more technical form of figures and heads in the ceramic works. Here, the shapes also resemble rockets and bombs: a symbiosis of human and thing. These sculptures are then stamped with various objects from the artist’s studio. Describing his work, Beer says: “Some people write songs. I make things.”  

Tjorg Douglas Beer – Under the Octopus Tree Grzegorzki Shows Berlin presents new works by the German artist Tjorg Douglas Beer, who works in various fields and creates collages, paintings, and sculptures. The exhibition title, Under the Octopus Tree, is a reference to the artist’s interest in escape scenarios: since 2019, Beer has spent a lot of time in Greece, and the Octopus Tree is a synonym for the fantasma of utopian life. Beer generates his work from life experiences rather than from a conceptual point of view. In his paintings, he mixes ink, markers, lacquer, acrylic, oil paint, and oil stick and develops arrangements and sceneries out of the process of painting. As a result, faces and figures appear from the transition of overlapping colors. These figures are preserved and then arranged in fragmented scenarios that could be landscapes, interiors, or sculptures. Unfinished figures, squares, and color transitions lead to collage-like paintings.   In the exhibition, Beer also shows ceramic sculptures made in collaboration with a Greek ceramist. After the series of figure paintings, Beer has developed a more technical form of figures and heads in the ceramic works. Here, the shapes also resemble rockets and bombs: a symbiosis of human and thing. These sculptures are then stamped with various objects from the artist’s studio. Describing his work, Beer says: “Some people write songs. I make things.”  
Resonating Spaces
Resonating Spaces
Basel - Baselstrasse 101
until 26-01-2020

Resonating Spaces Leonor Antunes, Silvia Bächli, Toba Khedoori, Susan Philipsz, Rachel Whiteread "Resonating Spaces" is the title of the exhibition at Fondation Beyeler at the end of this year. The artists featured in the exhibition are Leonor Antunes, Silvia Bächli, Toba Khedoori, Susan Philipsz and Rachel Whiteread. Instead of making a comprehensive group show with numerous works, the exhibition will present exemplary works by a few internationally renowned contemporary artists.

Resonating Spaces Leonor Antunes, Silvia Bächli, Toba Khedoori, Susan Philipsz, Rachel Whiteread "Resonating Spaces" is the title of the exhibition at Fondation Beyeler at the end of this year. The artists featured in the exhibition are Leonor Antunes, Silvia Bächli, Toba Khedoori, Susan Philipsz and Rachel Whiteread. Instead of making a comprehensive group show with numerous works, the exhibition will present exemplary works by a few internationally renowned contemporary artists.
Rirkrit Tiravanija
Rirkrit Tiravanija
Basel - Drahtzugstrasse 67
until 31-05-2020

Rirkrit Tiravanija – The Odious Smell of Truth This is the second work of a ten-year programme of public installations produced by Beat Raeber, Galerie at Drahtzugstrasse 67 in Basel. Rirkrit Tiravanija's work is characterised by great versatility and a constant involvement of the viewer – exchange and freedom of interpretation are essential components of his practice. Since the late 1980s, he has been experimenting with open, sometimes surprising formats that question how the classical conceptions of art can be extended, how the boundaries of an exhibition space broadened, and its limiting barriers circumvented. Creating spaces for relationships, encounters and reactions forms the basis of his works. He works with different cultural contexts, linking them and using them as references. As a modern nomad – the Thai artist was born in Buenos Aires and lives between New York, Berlin and Chiang Mai – he uses the distinctive and connecting aspects of Western and Eastern ways of life and philosophies and integrates them into his work. Further influences come from literature, pop and news culture. Exploiting the mechanisms of propaganda or advertising, utilising their effect patterns, such as the oscillation between promises, deception, and applied truths, are key part of his work.  

Rirkrit Tiravanija – The Odious Smell of Truth This is the second work of a ten-year programme of public installations produced by Beat Raeber, Galerie at Drahtzugstrasse 67 in Basel. Rirkrit Tiravanija's work is characterised by great versatility and a constant involvement of the viewer – exchange and freedom of interpretation are essential components of his practice. Since the late 1980s, he has been experimenting with open, sometimes surprising formats that question how the classical conceptions of art can be extended, how the boundaries of an exhibition space broadened, and its limiting barriers circumvented. Creating spaces for relationships, encounters and reactions forms the basis of his works. He works with different cultural contexts, linking them and using them as references. As a modern nomad – the Thai artist was born in Buenos Aires and lives between New York, Berlin and Chiang Mai – he uses the distinctive and connecting aspects of Western and Eastern ways of life and philosophies and integrates them into his work. Further influences come from literature, pop and news culture. Exploiting the mechanisms of propaganda or advertising, utilising their effect patterns, such as the oscillation between promises, deception, and applied truths, are key part of his work.  
Lutz Bacher, Barbara Hammer, Carolee Schneemann
Lutz Bacher, Barbara Hammer, Carolee Schneemann
Düsseldorf - Schanzenstrasse 54
until 22-12-2019

Lutz Bacher, Barbara Hammer, Carolee Schneemann

Lutz Bacher, Barbara Hammer, Carolee Schneemann
Carsten Nicolai
Carsten Nicolai
Düsseldorf - Ständehausstrasse 1
until 19-01-2020

Carsten Nicolai – Parallax Symmetry The exhibition provides an overview of the work of the artist and musician Carsten Nicolai, who has been working at the interface of visual art, music, and science since the early 1990s. As a musician under the pseudonym Alva Noto, Nicolai is one of the best-known representatives of contemporary electronic music of his generation. Since his participation in documenta X (1997), his visual artworks have also been exhibited worldwide.  Using electronic sound and light, Nicolai creates minimalist installations, sound performances, and visualizations of physical phenomena that reflect systems and structures of the media world. In K21, Nicolai will organize the expansive space on the lower floor as an open, dually laid out set for the presentation of roughly forty multimedia works, many of which are designed for interaction.

Carsten Nicolai – Parallax Symmetry The exhibition provides an overview of the work of the artist and musician Carsten Nicolai, who has been working at the interface of visual art, music, and science since the early 1990s. As a musician under the pseudonym Alva Noto, Nicolai is one of the best-known representatives of contemporary electronic music of his generation. Since his participation in documenta X (1997), his visual artworks have also been exhibited worldwide.  Using electronic sound and light, Nicolai creates minimalist installations, sound performances, and visualizations of physical phenomena that reflect systems and structures of the media world. In K21, Nicolai will organize the expansive space on the lower floor as an open, dually laid out set for the presentation of roughly forty multimedia works, many of which are designed for interaction.
A.K. Burns
A.K. Burns
Düsseldorf - Schanzenstrasse 54
until 15-12-2019

A.K. Burns – Negative Space  

A.K. Burns – Negative Space  
In the Spotlight of the Night
In the Spotlight of the Night
Düsseldorf - Kaistrasse 10
until 09-02-2020

In the Spotlight of the Night – Cities never Sleep Andreas Bunte, Fort, Matthias Lahme, Klara Lidén, Ann Lislegaard, Claus Richter, Alona Rodeh, Norbert Schwontkowski, Tobias Zielony The exhibition In the Spotlight of the Night – Cities never Sleep follows various protagonists roaming through the city by night. Before the backdrop of a persistent commercialization of all aspects of life, failing to spare even one’s sleep, the exhibition project seeks out the more marginalized areas of society, the parallel worlds, where one still finds an uncontrollable nocturnal space as a counterfort to daytime.

In the Spotlight of the Night – Cities never Sleep Andreas Bunte, Fort, Matthias Lahme, Klara Lidén, Ann Lislegaard, Claus Richter, Alona Rodeh, Norbert Schwontkowski, Tobias Zielony The exhibition In the Spotlight of the Night – Cities never Sleep follows various protagonists roaming through the city by night. Before the backdrop of a persistent commercialization of all aspects of life, failing to spare even one’s sleep, the exhibition project seeks out the more marginalized areas of society, the parallel worlds, where one still finds an uncontrollable nocturnal space as a counterfort to daytime.
Julie Mehretu
Julie Mehretu
Los Angeles - 5905 Wilshire Boulevard
until 22-03-2020

Julie Mehretu The first-ever comprehensive retrospective of Mehretu’s career, it covers over two decades of her examination of history, colonialism, capitalism, geopolitics, war, global uprising, diaspora, and displacement through the artistic strategies of abstraction, architecture, landscape, movement, and, most recently, figuration. Mehretu’s play with scale, as evident in her intimate drawings and large canvases and complex techniques in printmaking, will be explored in depth.

Julie Mehretu The first-ever comprehensive retrospective of Mehretu’s career, it covers over two decades of her examination of history, colonialism, capitalism, geopolitics, war, global uprising, diaspora, and displacement through the artistic strategies of abstraction, architecture, landscape, movement, and, most recently, figuration. Mehretu’s play with scale, as evident in her intimate drawings and large canvases and complex techniques in printmaking, will be explored in depth.
Nathalie Djurberg & Hans Berg
Nathalie Djurberg & Hans Berg
Los Angeles - 1010 North Highland Avenue
until 20-12-2019

Nathalie Djurberg & Hans Berg – One Last Trip to the Underworld Djurberg and Berg’s collaborative works conjure surreal landscapes that explore the shadows of human subconsciousness. Using sculpture, stop-motion film, sound, and immersive installation the artists construct narratives that speak to emotional tension, confliction, sexual impulse, and violence.

Nathalie Djurberg & Hans Berg – One Last Trip to the Underworld Djurberg and Berg’s collaborative works conjure surreal landscapes that explore the shadows of human subconsciousness. Using sculpture, stop-motion film, sound, and immersive installation the artists construct narratives that speak to emotional tension, confliction, sexual impulse, and violence.
Edward & Nancy Kienholz
Edward & Nancy Kienholz
Los Angeles - 45 North Venice Boulevard
until 18-01-2020

Edward & Nancy Kienholz – The Merry-Go-World or Begat by Chance and the Wonder Horse Trigger Considered one of the artists’ most ambitious tableaux, the large-scale, multi-media assemblage environment examines what Ed described as “the random accident of birth, the mystery involved, and the importance of all life.” The impetus to create the work came from Nancy, who developed the concept after an incidental encounter with a woman beggar on the streets of El Paso, Texas. Nancy recalled, “She disgusted me. I did not give her any money. The memory of this woman preyed heavily on my mind. I was ashamed of my reaction… Over the next years, this image kept coming back to me, and the thought of the accident of birth and one’s destiny because of it, took shape in my mind.” With their mission firmly established, the Kienholzes chose to construct a stationary carousel, complete with the customary trappings of a carnival attraction – calliope music, dancing lights, mirrored panels, baroque ornamentations; along with atypical inclusions – household objects, wooden chairs, various gewgaws and plush monkeys – that ornament the brightly colored procession of animals that circle the merry-go-round. Assembled from taxidermic parts and fabricated forms, the hybridized creatures are equal parts horrifying, comical and endearing – a chimeric union of a tiger’s head on the body of a lynx, a gilded giraffe held aloft with crutches, a roaring lion dressed with a serape and a western saddle, a leaping pig with the head of a boar, a show pony swathed in saccharine hues. With its grandiose façade, the thrust of the work lies at its interior core. When encountering The Merry-Go-World, the viewer is asked to spin a wheel of fortune and enter the tableau, only to be immersed in one of eight lives, each born into different cultural and socioeconomic realities. You can be placed in the life of an impoverished Oglala Sioux couple in South Dakota, a chairmaker in Egypt, a street barber in Bombay, a young Maasai woman in Kenya, a Houston child living in abject poverty, a Chinese taxi cab driver in Beijing, a wealthy woman in Paris, or a little girl from a hillside favela in Rio de Janeiro. To distribute the fortunes of the individuals in the tableau, Ed and Nancy “determined that if you divided the world into eighths by monetary considerations, you would end up with one section wealthy, two parts middle class and five sections poor or extremely poor.”  

Edward & Nancy Kienholz – The Merry-Go-World or Begat by Chance and the Wonder Horse Trigger Considered one of the artists’ most ambitious tableaux, the large-scale, multi-media assemblage environment examines what Ed described as “the random accident of birth, the mystery involved, and the importance of all life.” The impetus to create the work came from Nancy, who developed the concept after an incidental encounter with a woman beggar on the streets of El Paso, Texas. Nancy recalled, “She disgusted me. I did not give her any money. The memory of this woman preyed heavily on my mind. I was ashamed of my reaction… Over the next years, this image kept coming back to me, and the thought of the accident of birth and one’s destiny because of it, took shape in my mind.” With their mission firmly established, the Kienholzes chose to construct a stationary carousel, complete with the customary trappings of a carnival attraction – calliope music, dancing lights, mirrored panels, baroque ornamentations; along with atypical inclusions – household objects, wooden chairs, various gewgaws and plush monkeys – that ornament the brightly colored procession of animals that circle the merry-go-round. Assembled from taxidermic parts and fabricated forms, the hybridized creatures are equal parts horrifying, comical and endearing – a chimeric union of a tiger’s head on the body of a lynx, a gilded giraffe held aloft with crutches, a roaring lion dressed with a serape and a western saddle, a leaping pig with the head of a boar, a show pony swathed in saccharine hues. With its grandiose façade, the thrust of the work lies at its interior core. When encountering The Merry-Go-World, the viewer is asked to spin a wheel of fortune and enter the tableau, only to be immersed in one of eight lives, each born into different cultural and socioeconomic realities. You can be placed in the life of an impoverished Oglala Sioux couple in South Dakota, a chairmaker in Egypt, a street barber in Bombay, a young Maasai woman in Kenya, a Houston child living in abject poverty, a Chinese taxi cab driver in Beijing, a wealthy woman in Paris, or a little girl from a hillside favela in Rio de Janeiro. To distribute the fortunes of the individuals in the tableau, Ed and Nancy “determined that if you divided the world into eighths by monetary considerations, you would end up with one section wealthy, two parts middle class and five sections poor or extremely poor.”  
Skin Stealers
Skin Stealers
Los Angeles - 571 South Anderson Street Suite 2
until 07-12-2019

Skin Stealers Isabelle Albuquerque, Mattia Biagi, Dominique Fung, Georgina Gratrix, Keith Haring, Devin B. Johnson, Philipp Kremer, Hugo Wilson, Robert Yarber Curated by Ben Lee Ritchie Handler SKIN STEALERS is an exhibition of figurative artists who inhabit the bodies of others, documenting, bearing witness to, and forcing themselves into their subjects’ more intimate and occasionally dangerous behaviors. The exhibition emerges from the respective wombs of two large paintings: Keith Haring’s massive, pregnant female form, and Hugo Wilson’s Boschian (or perhaps Rube Goldbergian) machination of an organic, sexless conception and birth. Isabelle Albuquerque casts her own skin in bronze in the role of Leda from “Leda and the Swan”—in her telling, Zeus assumes the shape of a violating saxophone—while Dominique Fung’s similarly headless, nude figure grasps, strangles, and beheads a bevy of ill-intentioned fowl. Devin B. Johnson inhabits the body of a mother turning a blind-eye to her chubby, sock and diaper-clad child as he wanders into Philipp Kremer’s orgy of primary and secondary colors, and Georgina Gratrix’s textured, playfully layered portraits look-on in amusement. Mattia Biagi’s animated black cats scurry throughout the proceedings, simultaneously picking up scraps with the roombas that carry them and altering the luck of all who enter. Watching it all from a safe distance is Robert Yarber’s naughty voyeur, emerging from her black underpainting with a cocktail and a pair of binoculars.

Skin Stealers Isabelle Albuquerque, Mattia Biagi, Dominique Fung, Georgina Gratrix, Keith Haring, Devin B. Johnson, Philipp Kremer, Hugo Wilson, Robert Yarber Curated by Ben Lee Ritchie Handler SKIN STEALERS is an exhibition of figurative artists who inhabit the bodies of others, documenting, bearing witness to, and forcing themselves into their subjects’ more intimate and occasionally dangerous behaviors. The exhibition emerges from the respective wombs of two large paintings: Keith Haring’s massive, pregnant female form, and Hugo Wilson’s Boschian (or perhaps Rube Goldbergian) machination of an organic, sexless conception and birth. Isabelle Albuquerque casts her own skin in bronze in the role of Leda from “Leda and the Swan”—in her telling, Zeus assumes the shape of a violating saxophone—while Dominique Fung’s similarly headless, nude figure grasps, strangles, and beheads a bevy of ill-intentioned fowl. Devin B. Johnson inhabits the body of a mother turning a blind-eye to her chubby, sock and diaper-clad child as he wanders into Philipp Kremer’s orgy of primary and secondary colors, and Georgina Gratrix’s textured, playfully layered portraits look-on in amusement. Mattia Biagi’s animated black cats scurry throughout the proceedings, simultaneously picking up scraps with the roombas that carry them and altering the luck of all who enter. Watching it all from a safe distance is Robert Yarber’s naughty voyeur, emerging from her black underpainting with a cocktail and a pair of binoculars.
Shirin Neshat
Shirin Neshat
Los Angeles - 221 South Grand Avenue
until 16-02-2020

Shirin Neshat – I Will Greet the Sun Again "Shirin Neshat: I Will Greet the Sun Again" is the largest exhibition to date of internationally acclaimed artist Shirin Neshat’s approximately 30-year career. Taking its title from a poem by Iranian poet Forugh Farrokhzad, the exhibition (which presents approximately 230 photographs and eight video works) offers a rare glimpse into the evolution of Neshat’s artistic journey as she explores topics of exile, displacement, and identity with beauty, dynamic formal invention, and poetic grace. Beginning with her early photograph series, Women of Allah, the exhibition also features iconic video works such as Rapture, Turbulent, and Passage, monumental photography installations including The Book of Kings and The Home of My Eyes, and Land of Dreams, a new, ambitious work encompassing a body of photographs and two immersive videos that will make its global debut in the exhibition.

Shirin Neshat – I Will Greet the Sun Again "Shirin Neshat: I Will Greet the Sun Again" is the largest exhibition to date of internationally acclaimed artist Shirin Neshat’s approximately 30-year career. Taking its title from a poem by Iranian poet Forugh Farrokhzad, the exhibition (which presents approximately 230 photographs and eight video works) offers a rare glimpse into the evolution of Neshat’s artistic journey as she explores topics of exile, displacement, and identity with beauty, dynamic formal invention, and poetic grace. Beginning with her early photograph series, Women of Allah, the exhibition also features iconic video works such as Rapture, Turbulent, and Passage, monumental photography installations including The Book of Kings and The Home of My Eyes, and Land of Dreams, a new, ambitious work encompassing a body of photographs and two immersive videos that will make its global debut in the exhibition.
Forever Young
Forever Young
Munich - Türkenstrasse 19
until 26-04-2020

Forever Young: 10 Years Museum Brandhorst A lot has happened at the Museum Brandhorst since it opened in May 2009. Along with numerous exhibitions, the Brandhorst Collection has grown dramatically—from 700 to more than 1,200 artworks. It now ranks among the most important museum collections of contemporary art in Europe. The museum’s tenth birthday in May 2019 is the occasion for a large-scale exhibition drawn entirely from this expanded collection. Forever Young—10 Years Museum Brandhorst traces an arc ranging from the 1960s to the present day. Alongside renowned and popular highlights from the collection, a particular focus is placed on acquisitions from recent years—including major works by Charline von Heyl, Louise Lawler, Amy Sillman, Seth Price, Wolfgang Tillmans, Arthur Jafa, Alexandra Bircken, and Monika Baer, among others—many of which have never been shown in Munich. The exhibition includes some 250 works by 45 artists and has three main themes, each of which can stand alone and yet also make reference to one another. The first focuses on Andy Warhol and the ongoing legacy of Pop art, especially its often overlooked political and socio-critical dimensions. Unconventional lifestyles, the experience of marginalization due to skin color and sexual orientation, interventions in public space, and the intersection of art, fashion, and music all emerge as central concerns. The second strand concentrates on the controversial topic of subjectivity in contemporary society—and therefore also on the effects of late capitalism on identity formation. The third section presents a short history of painting since the 1960s, and specifically how this traditional artistic genre has expanded and adapted itself in recent decades through an engagement with emerging digital technologies and media dissemination, developments that have also been examined in a series of recent exhibitions at the museum, including Painting 2.0: Expression in the Information Age, Wade Guyton – The New York Studio, Kerstin Brätsch: Innovation and Jutta Koether – Tour de Madame.

Forever Young: 10 Years Museum Brandhorst A lot has happened at the Museum Brandhorst since it opened in May 2009. Along with numerous exhibitions, the Brandhorst Collection has grown dramatically—from 700 to more than 1,200 artworks. It now ranks among the most important museum collections of contemporary art in Europe. The museum’s tenth birthday in May 2019 is the occasion for a large-scale exhibition drawn entirely from this expanded collection. Forever Young—10 Years Museum Brandhorst traces an arc ranging from the 1960s to the present day. Alongside renowned and popular highlights from the collection, a particular focus is placed on acquisitions from recent years—including major works by Charline von Heyl, Louise Lawler, Amy Sillman, Seth Price, Wolfgang Tillmans, Arthur Jafa, Alexandra Bircken, and Monika Baer, among others—many of which have never been shown in Munich. The exhibition includes some 250 works by 45 artists and has three main themes, each of which can stand alone and yet also make reference to one another. The first focuses on Andy Warhol and the ongoing legacy of Pop art, especially its often overlooked political and socio-critical dimensions. Unconventional lifestyles, the experience of marginalization due to skin color and sexual orientation, interventions in public space, and the intersection of art, fashion, and music all emerge as central concerns. The second strand concentrates on the controversial topic of subjectivity in contemporary society—and therefore also on the effects of late capitalism on identity formation. The third section presents a short history of painting since the 1960s, and specifically how this traditional artistic genre has expanded and adapted itself in recent decades through an engagement with emerging digital technologies and media dissemination, developments that have also been examined in a series of recent exhibitions at the museum, including Painting 2.0: Expression in the Information Age, Wade Guyton – The New York Studio, Kerstin Brätsch: Innovation and Jutta Koether – Tour de Madame.
At Night. Between Dream and Reality
At Night. Between Dream and Reality
Munich - Prinzregentenstrasse 1
until 06-01-2020

At Night. Between Dream and Reality  Christoph Brech, Olaf Breuning, Janet Cardiff, George Bures Miller, Thomas Demand, Stan Douglas, Ed van der Elsken, Teresa Hubbard, Alexander Birchler, Jochen Kuhn, Sam Taylor-Johnson, Hans Op de Beeck, Clement Page, Paul Pfeiffer, Andro Wekua The exhibition takes visitors on a journey through the night, that time between dreams and reality. On display are films, videos, installations and photographs from the Sammlung Goetz that reflect different facets of a nighttime foray.

At Night. Between Dream and Reality  Christoph Brech, Olaf Breuning, Janet Cardiff, George Bures Miller, Thomas Demand, Stan Douglas, Ed van der Elsken, Teresa Hubbard, Alexander Birchler, Jochen Kuhn, Sam Taylor-Johnson, Hans Op de Beeck, Clement Page, Paul Pfeiffer, Andro Wekua The exhibition takes visitors on a journey through the night, that time between dreams and reality. On display are films, videos, installations and photographs from the Sammlung Goetz that reflect different facets of a nighttime foray.