Art feed

Curated by Exhibitionary

Olafur Eliasson
Olafur Eliasson
London - Bankside
until 05-01-2020

Olafur Eliasson – In Real Life Olafur Eliasson (b. 1967) returns to Tate Modern with a major exhibition of his career to date, following his world-renowned installation The weather project in 2003. That moment marked a turning point for contemporary art, transforming the iconic Turbine Hall into a social space where sculpture was bound up with the experience of being together with other visitors. In the 16 years since, Eliasson has been celebrated internationally as one of the most exciting artists working today. Now for the first time, UK audiences can discover the full range of his practice spanning three decades. Bringing together around 40 works – almost all of which have never been seen in this country, including some created especially for the exhibition – Olafur Eliasson: In real life offers unmissable experiences and shows how Eliasson brings to our attention some of today’s most urgent issues. Eliasson spent considerable time in Iceland as a child, and natural phenomena such as water, light and mist have been key areas of investigation throughout his career. On the terrace outside Tate Modern, visitors first encounter Waterfall 2019 – a dramatic new installation measuring over 11 metres in height. Inside the exhibition viewers will find Moss wall 1994, a vast plane 20 metres wide entirely covered with Scandinavian reindeer moss; Beauty 1993, which unexpectedly conjures the natural phenomenon of a rainbow inside the exhibition; and Din blinde passager (Your blind passenger) 2010, which offers a visceral journey through a 39-metre-long corridor full of dense fog. Further works in the show address the impact humans have on the environment, including a series of photographs of Iceland’s glaciers taken by the artist in 1999. This will be replaced in the autumn by a new artwork that incorporates the old series alongside photos taken 20 years on, illustrating the changes in this landscape that are happening now. Eliasson creates works that continually prompt viewers to think about the nature of perception. Many of his installations play with reflections, inversions, after-images and shifting colours, to challenge the way we navigate and perceive our environments. As visitors pass in front of the bright lights of Your uncertain shadow (colour) 2010, they cast unexpected colourful shadows on the wall before them, while the yellow mono-frequency lights used within Room for one colour 1997 reduce viewers’ perception to shades of yellow and black. A selection of the artist’s kaleidoscopic sculptures including Your spiral view 2002 and the newly created Your planetary window 2019, play with light and space to create optical illusions that encourage visitors to see their environment in new ways. The exhibition explores geometry as a major theme that continues to characterise Eliasson’s practice today, with many works, such as Stardust particle 2014, created using complex interlocking shapes and crystalline structures. A focal point is the extensive Model room 2003, bringing together around 450 models, prototypes, and geometrical studies of various sizes that record Eliasson’s collaboration with his studio team and, notably, Icelandic artist, mathematician and architect Einar Thorsteinn (1942–2015). The show culminates with a space called The Expanded Studio, which explores Eliasson’s deep engagement with social and environmental issues. This includes projects such as Little Sun, first launched at Tate Modern in 2012, which provides solar-powered lamps and chargers to communities without access to electricity; Green light – An artistic workshop, in which asylum seekers and refugees, together with members of the public, constructed Green light lamps and took part in accompanying educational programmes; and Ice Watch, an installation of glacial ice from Greenland, most recently staged outside Tate Modern and Bloomberg’s European headquarters, which aims to increase awareness of the climate emergency. Eliasson’s wide-ranging architectural projects are also explored here, including Fjordenhus in Denmark, completed last year. Viewers are offered behind-the-scenes insight into how Studio Olafur Eliasson works day to day and are invited to participate in collaborative making activities. For the duration of the show Studio Olafur Eliasson’s kitchen team, SOE Kitchen, has collaborated with Tate Eats on a special menu for Tate Modern’s Terrace Bar. This is based on organic, vegetarian and locally sourced produce that is central to the Studio’s own kitchen in Berlin. Surrounded by artworks and lamps designed by Eliasson, visitors can eat family-style at tables similar to those at the studio.  

Olafur Eliasson – In Real Life Olafur Eliasson (b. 1967) returns to Tate Modern with a major exhibition of his career to date, following his world-renowned installation The weather project in 2003. That moment marked a turning point for contemporary art, transforming the iconic Turbine Hall into a social space where sculpture was bound up with the experience of being together with other visitors. In the 16 years since, Eliasson has been celebrated internationally as one of the most exciting artists working today. Now for the first time, UK audiences can discover the full range of his practice spanning three decades. Bringing together around 40 works – almost all of which have never been seen in this country, including some created especially for the exhibition – Olafur Eliasson: In real life offers unmissable experiences and shows how Eliasson brings to our attention some of today’s most urgent issues. Eliasson spent considerable time in Iceland as a child, and natural phenomena such as water, light and mist have been key areas of investigation throughout his career. On the terrace outside Tate Modern, visitors first encounter Waterfall 2019 – a dramatic new installation measuring over 11 metres in height. Inside the exhibition viewers will find Moss wall 1994, a vast plane 20 metres wide entirely covered with Scandinavian reindeer moss; Beauty 1993, which unexpectedly conjures the natural phenomenon of a rainbow inside the exhibition; and Din blinde passager (Your blind passenger) 2010, which offers a visceral journey through a 39-metre-long corridor full of dense fog. Further works in the show address the impact humans have on the environment, including a series of photographs of Iceland’s glaciers taken by the artist in 1999. This will be replaced in the autumn by a new artwork that incorporates the old series alongside photos taken 20 years on, illustrating the changes in this landscape that are happening now. Eliasson creates works that continually prompt viewers to think about the nature of perception. Many of his installations play with reflections, inversions, after-images and shifting colours, to challenge the way we navigate and perceive our environments. As visitors pass in front of the bright lights of Your uncertain shadow (colour) 2010, they cast unexpected colourful shadows on the wall before them, while the yellow mono-frequency lights used within Room for one colour 1997 reduce viewers’ perception to shades of yellow and black. A selection of the artist’s kaleidoscopic sculptures including Your spiral view 2002 and the newly created Your planetary window 2019, play with light and space to create optical illusions that encourage visitors to see their environment in new ways. The exhibition explores geometry as a major theme that continues to characterise Eliasson’s practice today, with many works, such as Stardust particle 2014, created using complex interlocking shapes and crystalline structures. A focal point is the extensive Model room 2003, bringing together around 450 models, prototypes, and geometrical studies of various sizes that record Eliasson’s collaboration with his studio team and, notably, Icelandic artist, mathematician and architect Einar Thorsteinn (1942–2015). The show culminates with a space called The Expanded Studio, which explores Eliasson’s deep engagement with social and environmental issues. This includes projects such as Little Sun, first launched at Tate Modern in 2012, which provides solar-powered lamps and chargers to communities without access to electricity; Green light – An artistic workshop, in which asylum seekers and refugees, together with members of the public, constructed Green light lamps and took part in accompanying educational programmes; and Ice Watch, an installation of glacial ice from Greenland, most recently staged outside Tate Modern and Bloomberg’s European headquarters, which aims to increase awareness of the climate emergency. Eliasson’s wide-ranging architectural projects are also explored here, including Fjordenhus in Denmark, completed last year. Viewers are offered behind-the-scenes insight into how Studio Olafur Eliasson works day to day and are invited to participate in collaborative making activities. For the duration of the show Studio Olafur Eliasson’s kitchen team, SOE Kitchen, has collaborated with Tate Eats on a special menu for Tate Modern’s Terrace Bar. This is based on organic, vegetarian and locally sourced produce that is central to the Studio’s own kitchen in Berlin. Surrounded by artworks and lamps designed by Eliasson, visitors can eat family-style at tables similar to those at the studio.  
Alvaro Barrington & Teresa Farrell
Alvaro Barrington & Teresa Farrell
London - Unit 4 Huntingdon Estate, Bethnal Green Rd
until 26-10-2019

Alvaro Barrington & Teresa Farrell – Tall Boys & a Double Espresso  TALL BOYS & A DOUBLE SHOT ESPRESSO is the first exhibition of Tt X AB, a collaboration between Alvaro Barrington and Teresa Farrell. The exhibition presents a new installation by Tt X AB, alongside works from Farrell’s and Barrington’s independent practices.

Alvaro Barrington & Teresa Farrell – Tall Boys & a Double Espresso  TALL BOYS & A DOUBLE SHOT ESPRESSO is the first exhibition of Tt X AB, a collaboration between Alvaro Barrington and Teresa Farrell. The exhibition presents a new installation by Tt X AB, alongside works from Farrell’s and Barrington’s independent practices.
Serpentine Pavilion 2019
Serpentine Pavilion 2019
London - Kensington Gardens
until 06-10-2019

Serpentine Pavilion 2019 Designed by Junya Ishigami The Japanese architect Junya Ishigami, celebrated for his experimental structures that interpret traditional architectural conventions and reflect natural phenomena, has been selected to design the Serpentine Pavilion 2019. Ishigami’s design takes inspiration from roofs, the most common architectural feature used around the world. The design of the 2019 Serpentine Pavilion is made by arranging slates to create a single canopy roof that appears to emerge from the ground of the surrounding park. Within, the interior of the Pavilion is an enclosed cave-like space, a refuge for contemplation. For Ishigami, the Pavilion articulates his ‘free space’ philosophy in which he seeks harmony between man-made structures and those that already exist in nature. Describing his design, Ishigami said: ‘My design for the Pavilion plays with our perspectives of the built environment against the backdrop of a natural landscape, emphasising a natural and organic feel as though it had grown out of the lawn, resembling a hill made out of rocks. This is an attempt to supplement traditional architecture with modern methodologies and concepts, to create in this place an expanse of scenery like never seen before. Possessing the weighty presence of slate roofs seen around the world, and simultaneously appearing so light it could blow away in the breeze, the cluster of scattered rock levitates, like a billowing piece of fabric.’   Junya Ishigami (b. 1974) worked as an architect at SANAA before founding the prize-winning Junya Ishigami + Associates in 2004. Winner of the Golden Lion award at the Venice Biennale of Architecture in 2010, he was the subject of a major and critically acclaimed solo exhibition at the Fondation Cartier pour l’art contemporain in 2018 that is traveling to the Power Station of art in Shanghai later this year. He is known for designs with dream-like qualities that incorporate the natural world, such as landscapes, forests and clouds, in an architectural practice that places humankind as part of nature. He is the nineteenth architect to accept the invitation to design a temporary Pavilion on the Serpentine Gallery’s lawn in Kensington Gardens. This pioneering commission, which began in 2000 with Zaha Hadid, has presented the first UK structures by some of the biggest names in international architecture. In recent years it has grown into a highly-anticipated showcase for emerging talent, from Frida Escobedo of Mexico to Francis Kéré of Burkina Faso and Bjarke Ingels of Denmark, whose 2016 Pavilion was the most visited architectural and design exhibition in the world.

Serpentine Pavilion 2019 Designed by Junya Ishigami The Japanese architect Junya Ishigami, celebrated for his experimental structures that interpret traditional architectural conventions and reflect natural phenomena, has been selected to design the Serpentine Pavilion 2019. Ishigami’s design takes inspiration from roofs, the most common architectural feature used around the world. The design of the 2019 Serpentine Pavilion is made by arranging slates to create a single canopy roof that appears to emerge from the ground of the surrounding park. Within, the interior of the Pavilion is an enclosed cave-like space, a refuge for contemplation. For Ishigami, the Pavilion articulates his ‘free space’ philosophy in which he seeks harmony between man-made structures and those that already exist in nature. Describing his design, Ishigami said: ‘My design for the Pavilion plays with our perspectives of the built environment against the backdrop of a natural landscape, emphasising a natural and organic feel as though it had grown out of the lawn, resembling a hill made out of rocks. This is an attempt to supplement traditional architecture with modern methodologies and concepts, to create in this place an expanse of scenery like never seen before. Possessing the weighty presence of slate roofs seen around the world, and simultaneously appearing so light it could blow away in the breeze, the cluster of scattered rock levitates, like a billowing piece of fabric.’   Junya Ishigami (b. 1974) worked as an architect at SANAA before founding the prize-winning Junya Ishigami + Associates in 2004. Winner of the Golden Lion award at the Venice Biennale of Architecture in 2010, he was the subject of a major and critically acclaimed solo exhibition at the Fondation Cartier pour l’art contemporain in 2018 that is traveling to the Power Station of art in Shanghai later this year. He is known for designs with dream-like qualities that incorporate the natural world, such as landscapes, forests and clouds, in an architectural practice that places humankind as part of nature. He is the nineteenth architect to accept the invitation to design a temporary Pavilion on the Serpentine Gallery’s lawn in Kensington Gardens. This pioneering commission, which began in 2000 with Zaha Hadid, has presented the first UK structures by some of the biggest names in international architecture. In recent years it has grown into a highly-anticipated showcase for emerging talent, from Frida Escobedo of Mexico to Francis Kéré of Burkina Faso and Bjarke Ingels of Denmark, whose 2016 Pavilion was the most visited architectural and design exhibition in the world.
Rirkrit Tiravanija
Rirkrit Tiravanija
London - The Mall
until 06-06-2020

Rirkrit Tiravanija – untitled 2019 (the form of the flower is unknown to the seed)   The Institute of Contemporary Arts is proud to present a newly commissioned permanently sited work by Rirkrit Tiravanija.  Tiravanija is known for a practice that overturns traditional exhibition formats in favour of social interactions through the sharing of everyday activities such as cooking, eating and reading. Creating environments that reject the primacy of the art object, and instead focus on use value and the bringing of people together through simple acts and environments of communal care, Tiravanija’s work challenges expectations around labour and virtuosity.  Open to the public and situated within the ICA’s lower bar, untitled 2019 (the form of the flower is unknown to the seed) comprises a sake bar with communal seating and tables set within a painted sunrise and sunset. Purpose-built for the ICA, the work includes crockery hand-crafted in Tiravanija’s Chiang Mai studio and lighting created in collaboration with artist Rafael Domenech. untitled 2019 (the form of the flower is unknown to the seed) marks Tiravanija’s return to the ICA, following his participation in the landmark exhibition Real Time in 1993.   untitled 2019 (the form of the flower is unknown to the seed) can be visited during regular ICA opening hours.    The sake bar will be open for evenings run by Rochelle Canteen on 7–9, 14, 21, and 28 June 2019 from 6 pm to midnight.

Rirkrit Tiravanija – untitled 2019 (the form of the flower is unknown to the seed)   The Institute of Contemporary Arts is proud to present a newly commissioned permanently sited work by Rirkrit Tiravanija.  Tiravanija is known for a practice that overturns traditional exhibition formats in favour of social interactions through the sharing of everyday activities such as cooking, eating and reading. Creating environments that reject the primacy of the art object, and instead focus on use value and the bringing of people together through simple acts and environments of communal care, Tiravanija’s work challenges expectations around labour and virtuosity.  Open to the public and situated within the ICA’s lower bar, untitled 2019 (the form of the flower is unknown to the seed) comprises a sake bar with communal seating and tables set within a painted sunrise and sunset. Purpose-built for the ICA, the work includes crockery hand-crafted in Tiravanija’s Chiang Mai studio and lighting created in collaboration with artist Rafael Domenech. untitled 2019 (the form of the flower is unknown to the seed) marks Tiravanija’s return to the ICA, following his participation in the landmark exhibition Real Time in 1993.   untitled 2019 (the form of the flower is unknown to the seed) can be visited during regular ICA opening hours.    The sake bar will be open for evenings run by Rochelle Canteen on 7–9, 14, 21, and 28 June 2019 from 6 pm to midnight.
Ettore Sottsass
Ettore Sottsass
Miami - 61 NE 41st Street
until 06-10-2019

Ettore Sottsass and the Social Factory Ettore Sottsass and the Social Factory surveys the work of Italian architect and designer Ettore Sottsass (b. 1917, Innsbruck, Austria; d. 2007, Milan), focusing on four decades of his monumental furniture and ceramics, conceptual photography, and speculative drawings. A seminal figure of the postwar period, Sottsass reimagined modern life through design, profoundly influencing his peers and generations of cultural producers. While Sottsass has been frequently touted for his contributions to design and architecture, Ettore Sottsass and the Social Factory investigates his polymathic work through its social and economic contexts, from Italy’s postwar prosperity to the utopianism and social upheaval of the 1960s and ’70s to the conservative turn of the 1980s and the renewed progressive currents of the turn of the millennium. Encompassing more than 50 works organized in four chronological sections, the exhibition presents significant objects that convey the designer’s evolving visions of society. Included in the exhibition are Sottsass’s “Superboxes,” functional cabinets that challenge the traditional scale and role of furniture in order to defy consumerist trends. Ceramic totems of the late 1960s combine sacred architectural forms and pop culture artifacts, while utopian drawings and photographs imagine a world free from tedious work. The exhibition also highlights outstanding examples of Sottsass’s objects for the famed Memphis group he founded in the 1980s, and the baroque and monumental furniture he produced until his passing.  

Ettore Sottsass and the Social Factory Ettore Sottsass and the Social Factory surveys the work of Italian architect and designer Ettore Sottsass (b. 1917, Innsbruck, Austria; d. 2007, Milan), focusing on four decades of his monumental furniture and ceramics, conceptual photography, and speculative drawings. A seminal figure of the postwar period, Sottsass reimagined modern life through design, profoundly influencing his peers and generations of cultural producers. While Sottsass has been frequently touted for his contributions to design and architecture, Ettore Sottsass and the Social Factory investigates his polymathic work through its social and economic contexts, from Italy’s postwar prosperity to the utopianism and social upheaval of the 1960s and ’70s to the conservative turn of the 1980s and the renewed progressive currents of the turn of the millennium. Encompassing more than 50 works organized in four chronological sections, the exhibition presents significant objects that convey the designer’s evolving visions of society. Included in the exhibition are Sottsass’s “Superboxes,” functional cabinets that challenge the traditional scale and role of furniture in order to defy consumerist trends. Ceramic totems of the late 1960s combine sacred architectural forms and pop culture artifacts, while utopian drawings and photographs imagine a world free from tedious work. The exhibition also highlights outstanding examples of Sottsass’s objects for the famed Memphis group he founded in the 1980s, and the baroque and monumental furniture he produced until his passing.  
Sarah Sze
Sarah Sze
New York - 521 West 21st Street
until 19-10-2019

Sarah Sze For more than two decades, Sarah Sze’s work has defied the limitations of artistic media, employing with equal facility sculpture, installation, video, photography, printmaking and painting. Sze has been credited with dismantling and re-envisioning the very potential of objects, simultaneously celebrating the particular relevance of sculpture in contemporary visual culture, while also expanding its definition. However, her focus has been equally tuned to images, considering their materiality, transmutability, and ease of circulation in our increasingly digital existence. Originally trained as a painter, she has consistently looked through the lens of two-dimensionality, including color, line, form and image-making, to consider aspects of sculpture and installation. Sze’s latest body of work frays “the seam between the real and the image” (Smith). Through complex constellations of objects and a proliferation of images, Sze expands upon the never- ending stream of visual narratives that we negotiate daily, from magazines and newspapers, television and iPhones, to cyberspace and outer space. The works evoke the generative and recursive process of image-making in a world where consumption and production are more interdependent, where the beginning of one idea is the ending of another—and where sculpture gives rise to images, and images to sculpture. In this new exhibition, Sze expands her work by embedding her nuanced sculptural language into the material surfaces of painting and into the digital realm through the interplay of cloth, ink, wood, paper, metal, paint, found objects, light, sound and structural supports—collapsing distinctions between two, three and four dimensions. This body of work fundamentally alters our sense of time, place, and memory by transforming our experiences of the physical world around us. Both objects and images, Sze says, are “ultimately reminders of our own ephemerality”.

Sarah Sze For more than two decades, Sarah Sze’s work has defied the limitations of artistic media, employing with equal facility sculpture, installation, video, photography, printmaking and painting. Sze has been credited with dismantling and re-envisioning the very potential of objects, simultaneously celebrating the particular relevance of sculpture in contemporary visual culture, while also expanding its definition. However, her focus has been equally tuned to images, considering their materiality, transmutability, and ease of circulation in our increasingly digital existence. Originally trained as a painter, she has consistently looked through the lens of two-dimensionality, including color, line, form and image-making, to consider aspects of sculpture and installation. Sze’s latest body of work frays “the seam between the real and the image” (Smith). Through complex constellations of objects and a proliferation of images, Sze expands upon the never- ending stream of visual narratives that we negotiate daily, from magazines and newspapers, television and iPhones, to cyberspace and outer space. The works evoke the generative and recursive process of image-making in a world where consumption and production are more interdependent, where the beginning of one idea is the ending of another—and where sculpture gives rise to images, and images to sculpture. In this new exhibition, Sze expands her work by embedding her nuanced sculptural language into the material surfaces of painting and into the digital realm through the interplay of cloth, ink, wood, paper, metal, paint, found objects, light, sound and structural supports—collapsing distinctions between two, three and four dimensions. This body of work fundamentally alters our sense of time, place, and memory by transforming our experiences of the physical world around us. Both objects and images, Sze says, are “ultimately reminders of our own ephemerality”.
Domestic Horror
Domestic Horror
New York - 821 Park Avenue
until 19-10-2019

Domestic Horror Natalie Ball, Louise Bonnet, Ginny Casey, Genieve Figgis, Ewa Juszkiewicz, Tanya Merrill, Cheikh Ndiaye, Rene Ricard, Pauline Shaw, Lucien Smith (with Glenn O’Brien), Vaughn Spann, Chloe Wise Gagosian is pleased to present Domestic Horror, an exhibition organized by Bill Powers. Featuring several young and emerging artists, this exhibition includes many specially commissioned works. Addressing the darker fears that arise when we encounter the unknown, Domestic Horror probes the friction between the civilized world and baser human impulses. The word “domestic” contains a potent double meaning here, alluding to the unintended consequences that can occur—in private life and in a larger national and cultural life—where internalized anxieties meet external pressures. Ndiaye and Spann confront the perils of political turmoil by disrupting familiar images of cultural stability: the office space of the state newspaper of Senegal, in shambles after an anti-government protest; an American flag, deconstructed and reassembled with a single ominous, looming star. Working with structures of concealment and visibility, Figgis and Juszkiewicz construct surreal, discomforting scenes of physical and societal suppression. Figgis’s ghoulish, psychedelic painting of a well-dressed family mocks the ritual of aristocratic portraiture, while Juszkiewicz parodies Louis Léopold Boilly’s Portrait of Madame Saint-Ange Chevrier in a Landscape (1807) by suffocating the titular subject with fabric and foliage wrapped tightly around her head.

Domestic Horror Natalie Ball, Louise Bonnet, Ginny Casey, Genieve Figgis, Ewa Juszkiewicz, Tanya Merrill, Cheikh Ndiaye, Rene Ricard, Pauline Shaw, Lucien Smith (with Glenn O’Brien), Vaughn Spann, Chloe Wise Gagosian is pleased to present Domestic Horror, an exhibition organized by Bill Powers. Featuring several young and emerging artists, this exhibition includes many specially commissioned works. Addressing the darker fears that arise when we encounter the unknown, Domestic Horror probes the friction between the civilized world and baser human impulses. The word “domestic” contains a potent double meaning here, alluding to the unintended consequences that can occur—in private life and in a larger national and cultural life—where internalized anxieties meet external pressures. Ndiaye and Spann confront the perils of political turmoil by disrupting familiar images of cultural stability: the office space of the state newspaper of Senegal, in shambles after an anti-government protest; an American flag, deconstructed and reassembled with a single ominous, looming star. Working with structures of concealment and visibility, Figgis and Juszkiewicz construct surreal, discomforting scenes of physical and societal suppression. Figgis’s ghoulish, psychedelic painting of a well-dressed family mocks the ritual of aristocratic portraiture, while Juszkiewicz parodies Louis Léopold Boilly’s Portrait of Madame Saint-Ange Chevrier in a Landscape (1807) by suffocating the titular subject with fabric and foliage wrapped tightly around her head.
Roe Ethridge
Roe Ethridge
New York - 22 Cortlandt Alley
until 02-11-2019

Roe Ethridge – Sanctuary 2 In Ethridge’s new photograph Oslo Grace at Willets Point, the subject gives a knowing smile, their gaze falling just left of the camera. Sitting on a reflective pink mat, with a vanitas-style bounty of fruits, they appear to be almost copied and pasted into the muddy, tow lot that they turn their back towards. This gesture is seemingly reciprocated by both Citi Field Stadium towering above, with its billboards and LED screens enacting a similar disconnect to their surroundings, and the image itself, which despite its cues, refuses to fit squarely as a meditation on gentrification nor as an uncanny celebration of artifice. This tension is at the core of Ethridge’s practice, and the exhibition, as he assumes the medium’s traditional role as society’s mirror, while simultaneously upending this through an ongoing questioning of the relationship between contemporary images and truth.  Through this framework, Ethridge focuses on the concept of sanctuary and its myriad definitions, the word’s political and personal dimensions - including the supposed insular refuge of artistic practice. Moving from private to public life, and between vernaculars of commercial studio photography, composed still life, and candid cell phone images, his initially divergent subjects work in tandem to create a visual understanding or tenor throughout the exhibition, reflecting our own impulse to build meaning through the aggregation of images. Despite pointed insertions, such as a Penn brand tennis ball in a still life that references the photographer of the same name, Ethridge’s works refuse to assimilate to a prescribed narrative and instead forms an open-ended reflection on nostalgia, sincerity, and desire.

Roe Ethridge – Sanctuary 2 In Ethridge’s new photograph Oslo Grace at Willets Point, the subject gives a knowing smile, their gaze falling just left of the camera. Sitting on a reflective pink mat, with a vanitas-style bounty of fruits, they appear to be almost copied and pasted into the muddy, tow lot that they turn their back towards. This gesture is seemingly reciprocated by both Citi Field Stadium towering above, with its billboards and LED screens enacting a similar disconnect to their surroundings, and the image itself, which despite its cues, refuses to fit squarely as a meditation on gentrification nor as an uncanny celebration of artifice. This tension is at the core of Ethridge’s practice, and the exhibition, as he assumes the medium’s traditional role as society’s mirror, while simultaneously upending this through an ongoing questioning of the relationship between contemporary images and truth.  Through this framework, Ethridge focuses on the concept of sanctuary and its myriad definitions, the word’s political and personal dimensions - including the supposed insular refuge of artistic practice. Moving from private to public life, and between vernaculars of commercial studio photography, composed still life, and candid cell phone images, his initially divergent subjects work in tandem to create a visual understanding or tenor throughout the exhibition, reflecting our own impulse to build meaning through the aggregation of images. Despite pointed insertions, such as a Penn brand tennis ball in a still life that references the photographer of the same name, Ethridge’s works refuse to assimilate to a prescribed narrative and instead forms an open-ended reflection on nostalgia, sincerity, and desire.
John Giorno
John Giorno
New York - 257 Bowery
until 26-10-2019

John Giorno  Giorno’s outsized influence as a poet stems from the expansive and multidisciplinary nature of his work. From his studio on the Bowery, where he has lived and worked for over fifty years, Giorno’s practice has grown beyond poetry to encompass film, painting, sound installation and much more. He began staging multimedia events alongside Andy Warhol’s Exploding Plastic Inevitable in the 1960s, when he also worked with Robert Rauschenberg’s Experiments in Art and Technology (E.A.T) (1966) and with Bob Moog (1967-68). An early pioneer of recorded spoken word projects, he founded the nonprofit Giorno Poetry Systems in 1965, which has produced albums with hundreds of artists and poets. Giorno is best known for his interactive telephone work “Dial-A-Poem,” first presented in 1968, which invited people to call into a dedicated line to hear poems from live recordings by Laurie Anderson, John Ashbery, Frank O’Hara and numerous others. Included in Kynaston McShine’s watershed exhibition “Information” at the Museum of Modern Art in 1970, “Dial-A-Poem” has gone on to several subsequent influential iterations in both analog and digital worlds.

John Giorno  Giorno’s outsized influence as a poet stems from the expansive and multidisciplinary nature of his work. From his studio on the Bowery, where he has lived and worked for over fifty years, Giorno’s practice has grown beyond poetry to encompass film, painting, sound installation and much more. He began staging multimedia events alongside Andy Warhol’s Exploding Plastic Inevitable in the 1960s, when he also worked with Robert Rauschenberg’s Experiments in Art and Technology (E.A.T) (1966) and with Bob Moog (1967-68). An early pioneer of recorded spoken word projects, he founded the nonprofit Giorno Poetry Systems in 1965, which has produced albums with hundreds of artists and poets. Giorno is best known for his interactive telephone work “Dial-A-Poem,” first presented in 1968, which invited people to call into a dedicated line to hear poems from live recordings by Laurie Anderson, John Ashbery, Frank O’Hara and numerous others. Included in Kynaston McShine’s watershed exhibition “Information” at the Museum of Modern Art in 1970, “Dial-A-Poem” has gone on to several subsequent influential iterations in both analog and digital worlds.
Judith Hopf
Judith Hopf
New York - 519 West 24th Street
until 05-10-2019

Judith Hopf – Alifi Comprised of three different sculptural series––Walls, Tongues, and Pears––the works on view further Hopf’s practice of employing everyday construction materials and common manufacturing processes to investigate the social dynamics of the contemporary built environment and its influence on human behavior. 

Judith Hopf – Alifi Comprised of three different sculptural series––Walls, Tongues, and Pears––the works on view further Hopf’s practice of employing everyday construction materials and common manufacturing processes to investigate the social dynamics of the contemporary built environment and its influence on human behavior. 
Lucie Stahl
Lucie Stahl
New York - 373 Broadway #C9
until 26-10-2019

Lucie Stahl – Crude Crude It is common knowledge that many supernatural creatures dot the Scottish highlands. They come in various shapes and tempers; some are considered friendly, while others are absolutely evil. I am mainly interested in giants, especially the ones you can find in a bay in northern Scotland. Raw, awful beauties, stoically carrying their massive weight, temporarily on suspension and devoid of purpose, these heavy beasts project sheer industrial magnificence out into the firth, their makeshift habitat, while patiently awaiting their next deployment into deep sea waters. Among seabirds, dolphins, and fisher boats along the shore, these giants do not mimic so much as weirdly flatter their surroundings, evoking ideas of Romanticism: imagine a band of stumpy, heavy-legged Eiffel Towers, coyly hiding their functioning pumps and pipes under the guise of billowed denim-dark skirts–– a valley of the dolls in the sunset. Like vampiric fossil servants, these steel krakens are mining black gold, leeching ancient sunlight, constantly sucking to nurture our every need, our endless hunger, our never ending thirst for fuel. They are feeding our fantasies, transporting our wishes, channeling our ideas of individualism and independence. Purified, tamed and molded into shape, the fluid fruit of their labor allows us to express the feeling we got used to calling freedom. — Lucie Stahl, 2019

Lucie Stahl – Crude Crude It is common knowledge that many supernatural creatures dot the Scottish highlands. They come in various shapes and tempers; some are considered friendly, while others are absolutely evil. I am mainly interested in giants, especially the ones you can find in a bay in northern Scotland. Raw, awful beauties, stoically carrying their massive weight, temporarily on suspension and devoid of purpose, these heavy beasts project sheer industrial magnificence out into the firth, their makeshift habitat, while patiently awaiting their next deployment into deep sea waters. Among seabirds, dolphins, and fisher boats along the shore, these giants do not mimic so much as weirdly flatter their surroundings, evoking ideas of Romanticism: imagine a band of stumpy, heavy-legged Eiffel Towers, coyly hiding their functioning pumps and pipes under the guise of billowed denim-dark skirts–– a valley of the dolls in the sunset. Like vampiric fossil servants, these steel krakens are mining black gold, leeching ancient sunlight, constantly sucking to nurture our every need, our endless hunger, our never ending thirst for fuel. They are feeding our fantasies, transporting our wishes, channeling our ideas of individualism and independence. Purified, tamed and molded into shape, the fluid fruit of their labor allows us to express the feeling we got used to calling freedom. — Lucie Stahl, 2019
John Chamberlain
John Chamberlain
New York - 32 East 69th Street
until 19-10-2019

John Chamberlain – Baby Tycoons An exhibition of work by John Chamberlain, featuring a selection of small-scale sculptures from the artist’s Baby Tycoons series. Baby Tycoons is one of several series of miniature works that punctuates the grandeur and formalism of Chamberlain’s larger sculptural pursuits. Alongside earlier small-scale series, the Baby Tycoons articulate the instinctually playful spirit with which Chamberlain approached material and process at every scale. Masterfully manipulated from automobile scrap-metals, the Baby Tycoons possess all the complexity and power of their larger counterparts. As Chamberlain himself remarked, ‘If the scale is dealt with then the size has nothing to do with it.’

John Chamberlain – Baby Tycoons An exhibition of work by John Chamberlain, featuring a selection of small-scale sculptures from the artist’s Baby Tycoons series. Baby Tycoons is one of several series of miniature works that punctuates the grandeur and formalism of Chamberlain’s larger sculptural pursuits. Alongside earlier small-scale series, the Baby Tycoons articulate the instinctually playful spirit with which Chamberlain approached material and process at every scale. Masterfully manipulated from automobile scrap-metals, the Baby Tycoons possess all the complexity and power of their larger counterparts. As Chamberlain himself remarked, ‘If the scale is dealt with then the size has nothing to do with it.’
Simone Leigh
Simone Leigh
New York - 1071 Fifth Avenue
until 27-10-2019

he Hugo Boss Prize 2018: Simone Leigh – Loophole of Retreat Loophole of Retreat presents a new body of work by Simone Leigh, winner of the Hugo Boss Prize 2018, an award for significant achievement in contemporary art. The exhibition’s title is drawn from the writings of Harriet Jacobs (1813–1897), a formerly enslaved abolitionist who pseudonymously published an account of her life. It refers to the grueling seven years she spent hiding from her master in a tiny crawl space beneath the rafters of her grandmother’s home—an act of astonishing fortitude that carved out a space of sanctuary and autonomy in defiance of an unjust reality. Over the course of a career that spans sculpture, video, and social practice, Leigh has continuously and insistently centered the black female experience. Her forms, rendered in materials such as ceramic, raffia, and bronze, unify a timeless beauty with valences that are both deeply personal and piercingly political. Summoning the ancient archetype of the female nude and inflecting it with vernacular and folk traditions, the artist merges the human body with domestic vessels or architectural elements, evoking the labors of care and protection that have historically fallen to women. Encompassing a suite of sculptures and a sound installation, as well as a text by the renowned historian Saidiya Hartman, Loophole of Retreat explores narratives of communal nurture, resilience, and resistance.

he Hugo Boss Prize 2018: Simone Leigh – Loophole of Retreat Loophole of Retreat presents a new body of work by Simone Leigh, winner of the Hugo Boss Prize 2018, an award for significant achievement in contemporary art. The exhibition’s title is drawn from the writings of Harriet Jacobs (1813–1897), a formerly enslaved abolitionist who pseudonymously published an account of her life. It refers to the grueling seven years she spent hiding from her master in a tiny crawl space beneath the rafters of her grandmother’s home—an act of astonishing fortitude that carved out a space of sanctuary and autonomy in defiance of an unjust reality. Over the course of a career that spans sculpture, video, and social practice, Leigh has continuously and insistently centered the black female experience. Her forms, rendered in materials such as ceramic, raffia, and bronze, unify a timeless beauty with valences that are both deeply personal and piercingly political. Summoning the ancient archetype of the female nude and inflecting it with vernacular and folk traditions, the artist merges the human body with domestic vessels or architectural elements, evoking the labors of care and protection that have historically fallen to women. Encompassing a suite of sculptures and a sound installation, as well as a text by the renowned historian Saidiya Hartman, Loophole of Retreat explores narratives of communal nurture, resilience, and resistance.
Alicja Kwade
Alicja Kwade
New York - 1000 Fifth Avenue
until 27-10-2019

The Roof Garden Commission?: Alicja Kwade – ParaPivot Berlin-based artist Alicja Kwade's (born 1979, Poland) work is elegant, rigorous, and highly experiential. Using a wide range of media, Kwade creates sculptures and installations that reflect on time, perception, and scientific inquiry. With equal parts poetry and critical acumen, she calls into question the systems designed to banish doubt from the world and make sense of an otherwise unfathomable universe. Ultimately, Kwade seeks to heighten both the mystery and the absurdity of the human condition in order to enhance our powers of self-reflection. For The Met, Kwade has created two sculptures using steel and stone to evoke a miniature solar system, a piece of space that will settle temporarily on the Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Roof Garden. This will be Kwade's first solo exhibition at a museum in the United States.

The Roof Garden Commission?: Alicja Kwade – ParaPivot Berlin-based artist Alicja Kwade's (born 1979, Poland) work is elegant, rigorous, and highly experiential. Using a wide range of media, Kwade creates sculptures and installations that reflect on time, perception, and scientific inquiry. With equal parts poetry and critical acumen, she calls into question the systems designed to banish doubt from the world and make sense of an otherwise unfathomable universe. Ultimately, Kwade seeks to heighten both the mystery and the absurdity of the human condition in order to enhance our powers of self-reflection. For The Met, Kwade has created two sculptures using steel and stone to evoke a miniature solar system, a piece of space that will settle temporarily on the Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Roof Garden. This will be Kwade's first solo exhibition at a museum in the United States.
curated by_Joerg Koch
curated by_Joerg Koch
Vienna - Getreidemarkt 14 - Entrance Eschenbachgasse
until 12-10-2019

curated by_Joerg Koch – The Big Flat Now Jonathan Castro, Eli Russell Linnetz, Mike Meiré, Sterling Ruby, Rosemarie Trockel We regret to inform you that there is no future. Nor is there a past. Music, art, technology, pop culture, and fashion have evaporated as well in the consequence of the big global circulation. There is only one thing left: THE BIG FLAT NOW caused and driven by circulation. THE BIG FLAT NOW is the infinite plane on which our culture operates today. Its frictionless surface is composed of the obsolete hierarchies that have been melted by the Internet. Its shallowness belies a seamless texture that allows for the rapid collision of ideas. In a fiberoptic landscape, the difference between next door and next continent is a matter of imperceptible nanoseconds. Northern Baroque paintings, Triassic fossils, and yesterday’s op-eds are tabs on the same browser. Raised by a global chorus of voic- es, our identities are voluntary, malleable, and unprescribed. We are everywhere, anytime, and everyone at once. THE BIG FLAT NOW gesture, friendship, and amateurism have replaced jargon, messaging, and expertise. Product design has become a form of DJing, and vice versa. Contemporary art and luxury fashion have come to operate through the same logic, sharing practitioners who glide freely between each field. Film, music, fashion, visual art, and the marketing machines that support them have been compressed into a unified thing called “content”. At the power core of this ecosystem is circulation, which creates the feedback that serves as an endlessly renewable energy source. If in order to unlock the total potential of a networked society, new languages and strategies for cultural production must be formed, this includes a revisioning of how we circulate – our ideas and their material products, our knowledge and our fictions, our data and our codes, our capital and our bodies. Circulation is the dynamic and the fuel of content in the present day. Like the pro- verbial tree in the forest, it may even be the condition of our creative existence. The exhibition features artistic theses on this new paradigm. — Joerg Koch

curated by_Joerg Koch – The Big Flat Now Jonathan Castro, Eli Russell Linnetz, Mike Meiré, Sterling Ruby, Rosemarie Trockel We regret to inform you that there is no future. Nor is there a past. Music, art, technology, pop culture, and fashion have evaporated as well in the consequence of the big global circulation. There is only one thing left: THE BIG FLAT NOW caused and driven by circulation. THE BIG FLAT NOW is the infinite plane on which our culture operates today. Its frictionless surface is composed of the obsolete hierarchies that have been melted by the Internet. Its shallowness belies a seamless texture that allows for the rapid collision of ideas. In a fiberoptic landscape, the difference between next door and next continent is a matter of imperceptible nanoseconds. Northern Baroque paintings, Triassic fossils, and yesterday’s op-eds are tabs on the same browser. Raised by a global chorus of voic- es, our identities are voluntary, malleable, and unprescribed. We are everywhere, anytime, and everyone at once. THE BIG FLAT NOW gesture, friendship, and amateurism have replaced jargon, messaging, and expertise. Product design has become a form of DJing, and vice versa. Contemporary art and luxury fashion have come to operate through the same logic, sharing practitioners who glide freely between each field. Film, music, fashion, visual art, and the marketing machines that support them have been compressed into a unified thing called “content”. At the power core of this ecosystem is circulation, which creates the feedback that serves as an endlessly renewable energy source. If in order to unlock the total potential of a networked society, new languages and strategies for cultural production must be formed, this includes a revisioning of how we circulate – our ideas and their material products, our knowledge and our fictions, our data and our codes, our capital and our bodies. Circulation is the dynamic and the fuel of content in the present day. Like the pro- verbial tree in the forest, it may even be the condition of our creative existence. The exhibition features artistic theses on this new paradigm. — Joerg Koch
curated by_Florian Pumhösl
curated by_Florian Pumhsl
Vienna - Eschenbachgasse 9
until 25-10-2019

curated by_Florian Pumhösl Ella Bergmann-Michel, Alan Charlton, Christian (Georges Herbiet), Anita Leisz, Henrik Olesen, Florian Pumhösl, Ad Reinhardt, Wac?av Szpakowski Among the graphic musical scores of the 20th century, such as those by Morton Feldman, György Ligeti or Earle Brown, there are certain situations to be found that come close to the intended idea of an art exhibition. Objects are arranged or layered along one or more horizontal lines, which in turn are assigned to a concept (of duration, volume, instrument, etc.). This temporal axis comprises a spectrum of possible tones, and is itself divided by perpendiculars (though not always). A notation (respectively, its horizontal planes) is always limited to the representation of spectra, that is, there are things that are within and things that are beyond these spectra. The incision on such a spectrum is the bar line, the vertical division that indicates the point in this void when something relative to something else occurs.  The musical score bears an obvious formal resemblance to what is referred to in exhibition architecture as “wall treatment.” And yet – significantly for this exhibition – it provides coordinates for something that seems both imagined and defined, and which occurs along an axis relative to the vertical divisions. The exhibition consists of a selection of pieces by Florian Pumhösl entitled Formed Speech (2016-19), in which he explores the possibilities of defining a vertical object that divides a sequence: the directions it refers to, the imagined space that could emerge in between or before, the convergence of such an object with linguistic signs or figures gleaned from architecture. These pieces form the structure for a series of historical and contemporary work.

curated by_Florian Pumhösl Ella Bergmann-Michel, Alan Charlton, Christian (Georges Herbiet), Anita Leisz, Henrik Olesen, Florian Pumhösl, Ad Reinhardt, Wac?av Szpakowski Among the graphic musical scores of the 20th century, such as those by Morton Feldman, György Ligeti or Earle Brown, there are certain situations to be found that come close to the intended idea of an art exhibition. Objects are arranged or layered along one or more horizontal lines, which in turn are assigned to a concept (of duration, volume, instrument, etc.). This temporal axis comprises a spectrum of possible tones, and is itself divided by perpendiculars (though not always). A notation (respectively, its horizontal planes) is always limited to the representation of spectra, that is, there are things that are within and things that are beyond these spectra. The incision on such a spectrum is the bar line, the vertical division that indicates the point in this void when something relative to something else occurs.  The musical score bears an obvious formal resemblance to what is referred to in exhibition architecture as “wall treatment.” And yet – significantly for this exhibition – it provides coordinates for something that seems both imagined and defined, and which occurs along an axis relative to the vertical divisions. The exhibition consists of a selection of pieces by Florian Pumhösl entitled Formed Speech (2016-19), in which he explores the possibilities of defining a vertical object that divides a sequence: the directions it refers to, the imagined space that could emerge in between or before, the convergence of such an object with linguistic signs or figures gleaned from architecture. These pieces form the structure for a series of historical and contemporary work.
curated by_Ed Fornieles
curated by_Ed Fornieles
Vienna - Brucknerstrasse 4
until 12-10-2019

curated by_Ed Fornieles – ?Cursed Images John Bock, VALIE EXPORT, Ann Hirsch, Joey Holder, Rachel Maclean, Otto Muehl, Naked, Hermann Nitsch, Omsk Social Club, Puppies Puppies, Rudolf Schwarzkogler, Anna Uddenberg, Issy Wood, David Wojnarowicz,  For the last few years I have chased, collected and spread cursed images, the curse is a demonic spirit that inhabits certain images and which passes to the viewer on contact, unsettling them, causing confusion, unease or dread. In 2015 the Tumblr account cursedimages.tumblr.com began to define and categorise a type of image that they identified as being cursed, images that produce a disruptive and unsettling effect on the viewer. In each image the root of its disruptive affect varies, although not tied to any specific content, subject or image there is always a sense that the image is illogical, abnormal or wrong in some fundamental way. To speak of the curse, we must mention Sigmund Freud who, at the turn of the 20th century, attempted to describe its effect with his theory of the uncanny, which he identifies as a strangeness in the ordinary, that he traces to unusual repetition, mechanical entities that appear human, or prostheses that invoke a sense of unease. However, we need the French psychoanalyst Jacques Lacan to supply us with a broader definition. Lacan writes that the curse places us “in the field where we do not know how to distinguish bad and good, pleasure from displeasure.” This accurately describes the limbo the curse leaves us in. Unable to reconcile what is in front of us, we hover. The revealing curse: To be cursed by the cursed image is perhaps to reveal something about ourselves and the shaping effects of a more general cultural consumption. Moulded by the visual environment we inhabit we internalise its conventions, its sense of right and wrong, unable to register its effects. In this way the curse takes on the appearance of a cure, allowing us to see the borders of our expectations, a hidden desire for harmony. Symptoms of sustained exposure to the curse: Through ongoing and sustained exposure to the curse, the images strangely lose their potency. One becomes more resilient to their disruptive quality. You become numb to their immediate effect. This does not mean that the curse has ended and that you have developed an immunity. Instead, it is a symptom that you have entered the second stage of the curse. No longer does the curse move into you through the image; instead, it bleeds out into your everyday world, sporing into your home, bringing disruption to your once stable environment. Inanimate objects begin to develop their own agency. A chair begins to reveal its character. Suddenly a forgotten corner of a room begins to demand your attention. Nothing is what it seems.

curated by_Ed Fornieles – ?Cursed Images John Bock, VALIE EXPORT, Ann Hirsch, Joey Holder, Rachel Maclean, Otto Muehl, Naked, Hermann Nitsch, Omsk Social Club, Puppies Puppies, Rudolf Schwarzkogler, Anna Uddenberg, Issy Wood, David Wojnarowicz,  For the last few years I have chased, collected and spread cursed images, the curse is a demonic spirit that inhabits certain images and which passes to the viewer on contact, unsettling them, causing confusion, unease or dread. In 2015 the Tumblr account cursedimages.tumblr.com began to define and categorise a type of image that they identified as being cursed, images that produce a disruptive and unsettling effect on the viewer. In each image the root of its disruptive affect varies, although not tied to any specific content, subject or image there is always a sense that the image is illogical, abnormal or wrong in some fundamental way. To speak of the curse, we must mention Sigmund Freud who, at the turn of the 20th century, attempted to describe its effect with his theory of the uncanny, which he identifies as a strangeness in the ordinary, that he traces to unusual repetition, mechanical entities that appear human, or prostheses that invoke a sense of unease. However, we need the French psychoanalyst Jacques Lacan to supply us with a broader definition. Lacan writes that the curse places us “in the field where we do not know how to distinguish bad and good, pleasure from displeasure.” This accurately describes the limbo the curse leaves us in. Unable to reconcile what is in front of us, we hover. The revealing curse: To be cursed by the cursed image is perhaps to reveal something about ourselves and the shaping effects of a more general cultural consumption. Moulded by the visual environment we inhabit we internalise its conventions, its sense of right and wrong, unable to register its effects. In this way the curse takes on the appearance of a cure, allowing us to see the borders of our expectations, a hidden desire for harmony. Symptoms of sustained exposure to the curse: Through ongoing and sustained exposure to the curse, the images strangely lose their potency. One becomes more resilient to their disruptive quality. You become numb to their immediate effect. This does not mean that the curse has ended and that you have developed an immunity. Instead, it is a symptom that you have entered the second stage of the curse. No longer does the curse move into you through the image; instead, it bleeds out into your everyday world, sporing into your home, bringing disruption to your once stable environment. Inanimate objects begin to develop their own agency. A chair begins to reveal its character. Suddenly a forgotten corner of a room begins to demand your attention. Nothing is what it seems.
curated by_Kendell Geers
curated by_Kendell Geers
Vienna - Weihburggasse 26
until 12-10-2019

curated by_Kendell Geers – MERDELAMERDELAMERDELAMERDELAMERDELAMER In a letter that Man Ray wrote and posted to Tristan Tzara on the 18 June 1921, the American artist writes in capital letters across the entire top of the page “MERDELAMERDELAMERDELAMERDELAMERDELAMER” The hapax legomenon is a play on the punning words “MERDE” [shit], “LA MER” [the sea], “AMER” [bitter], “LAME” [blade], “MER DE LA MERDE” [sea of shit]. Beneath these letters, Ray collaged a photograph of a man with his penis tucked between his legs above a nude woman making a strange performative pose with her legs miming the shape of a capital letter “A”. To the left of the woman are the letters “de l’a” and to the right the letters “merique!” making the rebus “de l’Amerique!” [from America]. The woman in the photo was not just any woman, but the eccentric Baroness Elsa von Freytag-Loringhoven, who has largely been forgotten from mainstream art history, her work forgotten and voice silenced by her male accomplices. The right to speak is the most basic of all human rights and, when denied, that right turns to rage and the voice of protest. History is a dictator written by the winners. History is but another mythology that is not fixed and, with time, is edited as the silent and oppressed find their voice. The news and social media streams are alive today with a new generation of voices – feminist, LGBT, women’s rights, freedom of speech and expression, and more. The land rights claims in South Africa, the fence along the US border, abortion rights in Alabama, the European refugee crisis, gilets jaunes in Paris, #MeToo, #BlackLivesMatter, anti-pollution and climate change are not separate problems, but all simply facets of one larger problem of disintegration, dis- solution, alienation, denial, segmentation, prejudice and bigotry in the name of profit “ME*****ME*****ME*****ME*****ME*****ME” might just as well be the war cry of our contemporary age, the warble of cynical surrender, or the sign that hangs of the horizon of ecological disaster as the sun sets one last time on the sea of shit! Your body, that temple of the nine holes, is key to your own emancipation and libera- tion. Your body is also at the centre of the revolution for climate change because you are what you eat, spit, cry, hear, smell, shit, fuck, piss and bite. As you breathe in the air that someone else just breathed out, the borders between you and the world you live in disappear and the oxygen becomes every body’s problem. The street food that you eat was cooked by someone else’s hands after it had been delivered by another’s who had taken it from yet another, whose green fingers seeded, sewed, nurtured and harvested their crop with love. Every time you eat and drink to live and grow with enough energy to love, think, feel and fuck, you are filling your synaesthetic senses with the emotions of every body in the chain of love and matrix of spirit we call reality. Fuck Descartes; now is not the time to think – it’s time to ProTest. iPROtest, therefore I am!! — Kendell Geers  

curated by_Kendell Geers – MERDELAMERDELAMERDELAMERDELAMERDELAMER In a letter that Man Ray wrote and posted to Tristan Tzara on the 18 June 1921, the American artist writes in capital letters across the entire top of the page “MERDELAMERDELAMERDELAMERDELAMERDELAMER” The hapax legomenon is a play on the punning words “MERDE” [shit], “LA MER” [the sea], “AMER” [bitter], “LAME” [blade], “MER DE LA MERDE” [sea of shit]. Beneath these letters, Ray collaged a photograph of a man with his penis tucked between his legs above a nude woman making a strange performative pose with her legs miming the shape of a capital letter “A”. To the left of the woman are the letters “de l’a” and to the right the letters “merique!” making the rebus “de l’Amerique!” [from America]. The woman in the photo was not just any woman, but the eccentric Baroness Elsa von Freytag-Loringhoven, who has largely been forgotten from mainstream art history, her work forgotten and voice silenced by her male accomplices. The right to speak is the most basic of all human rights and, when denied, that right turns to rage and the voice of protest. History is a dictator written by the winners. History is but another mythology that is not fixed and, with time, is edited as the silent and oppressed find their voice. The news and social media streams are alive today with a new generation of voices – feminist, LGBT, women’s rights, freedom of speech and expression, and more. The land rights claims in South Africa, the fence along the US border, abortion rights in Alabama, the European refugee crisis, gilets jaunes in Paris, #MeToo, #BlackLivesMatter, anti-pollution and climate change are not separate problems, but all simply facets of one larger problem of disintegration, dis- solution, alienation, denial, segmentation, prejudice and bigotry in the name of profit “ME*****ME*****ME*****ME*****ME*****ME” might just as well be the war cry of our contemporary age, the warble of cynical surrender, or the sign that hangs of the horizon of ecological disaster as the sun sets one last time on the sea of shit! Your body, that temple of the nine holes, is key to your own emancipation and libera- tion. Your body is also at the centre of the revolution for climate change because you are what you eat, spit, cry, hear, smell, shit, fuck, piss and bite. As you breathe in the air that someone else just breathed out, the borders between you and the world you live in disappear and the oxygen becomes every body’s problem. The street food that you eat was cooked by someone else’s hands after it had been delivered by another’s who had taken it from yet another, whose green fingers seeded, sewed, nurtured and harvested their crop with love. Every time you eat and drink to live and grow with enough energy to love, think, feel and fuck, you are filling your synaesthetic senses with the emotions of every body in the chain of love and matrix of spirit we call reality. Fuck Descartes; now is not the time to think – it’s time to ProTest. iPROtest, therefore I am!! — Kendell Geers  
Korakrit Arunanondchai
Korakrit Arunanondchai
Vienna - Friedrichstrasse 12
until 10-11-2019

Korakrit Arunanondchai The artist and filmmaker Korakrit Arunanondchai works on one large body of work that focuses on the idea of a “living archive.” His on-going video series with history in a room filled with people with funny names (2012—) features a fictional denim painter as its recurring central character alongside the artist’s long-time collaborators and family members – most notably his grandparents. The protagonists perform in a variety of surroundings and situations that reflect upon the natural environment in the Anthropocene, technological evolution, politics, traditional beliefs and culture in transition. His multidisciplinary practice encompasses film, performance, painting, and sculpture, which he frequently combines to form lush, immersive installations. He is interested in relationships that pass through time and mutate with bodies of people, something that parallels the development of recorded history but sidesteps its linearity and single point of perspective in storytelling. Recently, he has used the method of overlaying the structural relationships that form animistic beliefs with those of the global information network. The story of the near future becomes a version of a narrative from a far imagined past, and the dichotomy between spirituality and technology increasingly seems to fall apart into a spectrum of greyness that produces a multiple “shared present.” While Korakrit Arunanondchai turns Secession’s Grafisches Kabinett into a black box to present the three videos 2556 (2013), Painting with history in a room filled with people with funny names 3 (2015), and with history in a room filled with people with funny names 4 (2017), he uses the staircase leading up to the screening room for a floral wallpaper, using wild flowers and weeds collected in Vienna as an ode to the golden dome on the top of the Secession building. Hung above the floral wallpaper is a series of new paintings, each referencing a still from one of Arunanondchai’s videos.

Korakrit Arunanondchai The artist and filmmaker Korakrit Arunanondchai works on one large body of work that focuses on the idea of a “living archive.” His on-going video series with history in a room filled with people with funny names (2012—) features a fictional denim painter as its recurring central character alongside the artist’s long-time collaborators and family members – most notably his grandparents. The protagonists perform in a variety of surroundings and situations that reflect upon the natural environment in the Anthropocene, technological evolution, politics, traditional beliefs and culture in transition. His multidisciplinary practice encompasses film, performance, painting, and sculpture, which he frequently combines to form lush, immersive installations. He is interested in relationships that pass through time and mutate with bodies of people, something that parallels the development of recorded history but sidesteps its linearity and single point of perspective in storytelling. Recently, he has used the method of overlaying the structural relationships that form animistic beliefs with those of the global information network. The story of the near future becomes a version of a narrative from a far imagined past, and the dichotomy between spirituality and technology increasingly seems to fall apart into a spectrum of greyness that produces a multiple “shared present.” While Korakrit Arunanondchai turns Secession’s Grafisches Kabinett into a black box to present the three videos 2556 (2013), Painting with history in a room filled with people with funny names 3 (2015), and with history in a room filled with people with funny names 4 (2017), he uses the staircase leading up to the screening room for a floral wallpaper, using wild flowers and weeds collected in Vienna as an ode to the golden dome on the top of the Secession building. Hung above the floral wallpaper is a series of new paintings, each referencing a still from one of Arunanondchai’s videos.
Maria Lassnig
Maria Lassnig
Vienna - Albertinaplatz 1
until 01-12-2019

Maria Lassnig – Ways of Being The Albertina Museum is marking what would have been the hundredth birthday of Maria Lassnig (1919–2014) with a comprehensive look back upon her career, thus showing impressive key works and masterpieces by one of the most important woman artists of the 20th century. Among the multitude of themes to which Maria Lassnig devoted herself over the course of her life (including self-portraits, science fiction, relationships with people, animals, and technology, and how we relate to violence and war), a dominant golden thread running throughout her oeuvre’s content is the act of rendering her body-consciousness visible. As early as the late 1940s, Lassnig placed her own body at the center of her work—long before physical feeling, body language, and gender relations became central themes of the international avant-garde. She thus marked an important turning point in the history of modern art whose echoes can still be heard today. It was humorously and seriously, wistfully and mercilessly that the artist placed her perceptions of her own self on the painting surface. In this, it was not what she saw, but what she felt became the image.

Maria Lassnig – Ways of Being The Albertina Museum is marking what would have been the hundredth birthday of Maria Lassnig (1919–2014) with a comprehensive look back upon her career, thus showing impressive key works and masterpieces by one of the most important woman artists of the 20th century. Among the multitude of themes to which Maria Lassnig devoted herself over the course of her life (including self-portraits, science fiction, relationships with people, animals, and technology, and how we relate to violence and war), a dominant golden thread running throughout her oeuvre’s content is the act of rendering her body-consciousness visible. As early as the late 1940s, Lassnig placed her own body at the center of her work—long before physical feeling, body language, and gender relations became central themes of the international avant-garde. She thus marked an important turning point in the history of modern art whose echoes can still be heard today. It was humorously and seriously, wistfully and mercilessly that the artist placed her perceptions of her own self on the painting surface. In this, it was not what she saw, but what she felt became the image.
Vertigo. Op Art and a History of Deception 1520—1970
Vertigo. Op Art and a History of Deception 1520?1970
Vienna - Museumsplatz 1
until 26-10-2019

Vertigo. Op Art and a History of Deception 1520—1970 – ?Marc Adrian, Josef Albers, Giovanni Anceschi, Richard Anuszkiewicz, Marina Apollonio, Alberto Biasi, Hartmut Böhm, Martha Boto, Gianni Colombo, Tony Conrad, Carlos Cruz-Diez, Dadamaino, Gabriele De Vecchi, Lucia di Luciano, Jean Du Breuil, Marcel Duchamp, Roland K. Fuchshuber, Giuseppe Galli-Bibiena, Heinrich Göding, Gerhard von Graevenitz, Franco Grignani, Matthias Grünewald, Brion Gysin, Athanasius Kircher, Erika Giovanna Klien, Edoardo Landi, Julio Le Parc, Adolf Luther, Enzo Mari, Almir Mavignier, Francesco Mazzola gen. Parmigianino, Claude Mellan, Richard S. Meryman, Desiderio Monsù, François Morellet, Gotthart Joe Müller, Georg Nees, Jean François Niceron, Lev Nussberg, Ivan Picelj, Helga Philipp, Giovanni Battista Piranesi, Karl Reinhartz, Circle of Guido Reni, Vjenceslav Richter, Bridget Riley, Dieter Roth, Nicolas Schöffer, Erhard Schön, Vyacheslav Shcherbakov, Lorenz Stör, Jesús Raphael Soto, Aleksandar Srnec, Kerry Strand, Paul Talman, Abbott Handerson Thayer, Hans Tröschel, Gracia Varisco, Victor Vasarely, After Johann Christian Vollaert, Hans Vredeman de Vries, Edward Wadsworth, James Whitney, Ludwig Wilding Of all the groundbreaking art movements of the 1950s and 60s, Op Art has received the least amount of attention to date. It has often been discounted as too spectacular and showy and therefore not very profound. But this attitude fails to recognize Op Art’s unique ability to raise our awareness for the ambivalence of reality as it tangibly demonstrates that perception is far from objective but rather quite easy to destabilize and deceive. It shows us that how we see things always depends on our point of view. The exhibition Vertigo. Op Art and a History of Deception 1520—1970 unfurls a whole panorama of artistic works that confound the senses, ranging from panel paintings, reliefs, and (kinetic) objects to installations and experiential spaces, to film and computer-generated or computer-controlled art. The title of the exhibition was taken from Alfred Hitchcock’s famous 1958 film. In the show, as in the film, the term vertigo is ambiguous, meaning both a physical phenomenon and a sensory and cognitive deception.  

Vertigo. Op Art and a History of Deception 1520—1970 – ?Marc Adrian, Josef Albers, Giovanni Anceschi, Richard Anuszkiewicz, Marina Apollonio, Alberto Biasi, Hartmut Böhm, Martha Boto, Gianni Colombo, Tony Conrad, Carlos Cruz-Diez, Dadamaino, Gabriele De Vecchi, Lucia di Luciano, Jean Du Breuil, Marcel Duchamp, Roland K. Fuchshuber, Giuseppe Galli-Bibiena, Heinrich Göding, Gerhard von Graevenitz, Franco Grignani, Matthias Grünewald, Brion Gysin, Athanasius Kircher, Erika Giovanna Klien, Edoardo Landi, Julio Le Parc, Adolf Luther, Enzo Mari, Almir Mavignier, Francesco Mazzola gen. Parmigianino, Claude Mellan, Richard S. Meryman, Desiderio Monsù, François Morellet, Gotthart Joe Müller, Georg Nees, Jean François Niceron, Lev Nussberg, Ivan Picelj, Helga Philipp, Giovanni Battista Piranesi, Karl Reinhartz, Circle of Guido Reni, Vjenceslav Richter, Bridget Riley, Dieter Roth, Nicolas Schöffer, Erhard Schön, Vyacheslav Shcherbakov, Lorenz Stör, Jesús Raphael Soto, Aleksandar Srnec, Kerry Strand, Paul Talman, Abbott Handerson Thayer, Hans Tröschel, Gracia Varisco, Victor Vasarely, After Johann Christian Vollaert, Hans Vredeman de Vries, Edward Wadsworth, James Whitney, Ludwig Wilding Of all the groundbreaking art movements of the 1950s and 60s, Op Art has received the least amount of attention to date. It has often been discounted as too spectacular and showy and therefore not very profound. But this attitude fails to recognize Op Art’s unique ability to raise our awareness for the ambivalence of reality as it tangibly demonstrates that perception is far from objective but rather quite easy to destabilize and deceive. It shows us that how we see things always depends on our point of view. The exhibition Vertigo. Op Art and a History of Deception 1520—1970 unfurls a whole panorama of artistic works that confound the senses, ranging from panel paintings, reliefs, and (kinetic) objects to installations and experiential spaces, to film and computer-generated or computer-controlled art. The title of the exhibition was taken from Alfred Hitchcock’s famous 1958 film. In the show, as in the film, the term vertigo is ambiguous, meaning both a physical phenomenon and a sensory and cognitive deception.  
Monica Bonvicini
Monica Bonvicini
Vienna - Arsenalstrasse 1
until 27-10-2019

Monica Bonvicini – I Cannot Hide My Anger Since the mid-1990s Monica Bonvicini has been exploring political, social, and institutional situations and their impact on society, as well as on the conditions of artistic production. Her work is direct, merciless, political, and not without a dry sense of humor. In the process, she focuses on the relationship between architecture, gender roles, control mechanisms, and devices of power. Bonvicini has a multimedia approach, using drawing, sculpture, installation, video, and photography. For the Belvedere 21—originally the Austrian pavilion at the World’s Fair in Brussels in 1958—she has developed a site-specific and space-consuming installation that reacts radically to Karl Schwanzer’s architecture. As such, it reflects male-dominated power structures, which are expressed just as much in the constructed space as in art history, politics and language.  

Monica Bonvicini – I Cannot Hide My Anger Since the mid-1990s Monica Bonvicini has been exploring political, social, and institutional situations and their impact on society, as well as on the conditions of artistic production. Her work is direct, merciless, political, and not without a dry sense of humor. In the process, she focuses on the relationship between architecture, gender roles, control mechanisms, and devices of power. Bonvicini has a multimedia approach, using drawing, sculpture, installation, video, and photography. For the Belvedere 21—originally the Austrian pavilion at the World’s Fair in Brussels in 1958—she has developed a site-specific and space-consuming installation that reacts radically to Karl Schwanzer’s architecture. As such, it reflects male-dominated power structures, which are expressed just as much in the constructed space as in art history, politics and language.  
Gelatin & Liam Gillick
Gelatin & Liam Gillick
Vienna - Museumsplatz 1
until 06-10-2019

Gelatin & Liam Gillick – ?Stinking Dawn Stinking Dawn is an exhibition that represents the production process for a full-length feature film by Gelatin and Liam Gillick. During the first ten days of the exhibition, Gelatin perform in the modular stage setting they designed. The experimental film is directed by Liam Gillick and based on his script. Stinking Dawn deals with the limits of human tolerance in the face of oppression, political crisis and excessive self-deception. While Gelatin play the leading roles of the four young, rich and revolutionary protagonists, invited artist friends as well as exhibition visitors become potential participants during the shooting days. After shooting, the post-production of the film begins outside of the exhibition, whose interim results are projected onto the sculptural scenery as sequences. This permanent change of the installation setting corresponds to the process-based and improvisational quality of the exhibition and production of the film Stinking Dawn.

Gelatin & Liam Gillick – ?Stinking Dawn Stinking Dawn is an exhibition that represents the production process for a full-length feature film by Gelatin and Liam Gillick. During the first ten days of the exhibition, Gelatin perform in the modular stage setting they designed. The experimental film is directed by Liam Gillick and based on his script. Stinking Dawn deals with the limits of human tolerance in the face of oppression, political crisis and excessive self-deception. While Gelatin play the leading roles of the four young, rich and revolutionary protagonists, invited artist friends as well as exhibition visitors become potential participants during the shooting days. After shooting, the post-production of the film begins outside of the exhibition, whose interim results are projected onto the sculptural scenery as sequences. This permanent change of the installation setting corresponds to the process-based and improvisational quality of the exhibition and production of the film Stinking Dawn.
Mathis Gasser
Mathis Gasser
Cologne - Kyffhuserstrasse 31
until 26-10-2019

Mathis Gasser – Structures and Institutions 2 The exhibition will be comprised of paintings and collages that draw comparisons between real and fictional institutions – from museum buildings to space stations. "Structures and Institutions 2“ is a continuation of the artist‘s solo show with Weiss Falk in Basel last year. Mathis Gasser (*1984, Zurich) lives and works in London.

Mathis Gasser – Structures and Institutions 2 The exhibition will be comprised of paintings and collages that draw comparisons between real and fictional institutions – from museum buildings to space stations. "Structures and Institutions 2“ is a continuation of the artist‘s solo show with Weiss Falk in Basel last year. Mathis Gasser (*1984, Zurich) lives and works in London.
Lutz Bacher
Lutz Bacher
Cologne - Neven-Du Mont-Strasse 17
until 26-10-2019

Lutz Bacher – Firearms  

Lutz Bacher – Firearms  
Sophie von Hellermann, David Ostrowski, Andreas Schulze
Sophie von Hellermann, David Ostrowski, Andreas Schulze
Cologne - Geisselstrasse 84-86
until 07-12-2019

Sophie von Hellermann, David Ostrowski, Andreas Schulze – 3 Zimmer, Küche, Bad

Sophie von Hellermann, David Ostrowski, Andreas Schulze – 3 Zimmer, Küche, Bad
Corinna Schnitt
Corinna Schnitt
Cologne - Aachener Strae 65
until 19-10-2019

Corinna Schnitt – Futures "Futures. Selected Work (2003–2015) of Corinna Schnitt," is devoted to the theme that gives the show its title. These include three films from 2003 (Next Time), 2004 (Living a Beautiful Life) and 2015 (Future Perfect). They prove how Schnitt is dealing continuously with the "Future"-topic in her oeuvre. All works present us with a possible or desired or experienced future. The film Future Perfect is shown in a suitable forum for the first time by being projected in large scale in our lower exhibition space.

Corinna Schnitt – Futures "Futures. Selected Work (2003–2015) of Corinna Schnitt," is devoted to the theme that gives the show its title. These include three films from 2003 (Next Time), 2004 (Living a Beautiful Life) and 2015 (Future Perfect). They prove how Schnitt is dealing continuously with the "Future"-topic in her oeuvre. All works present us with a possible or desired or experienced future. The film Future Perfect is shown in a suitable forum for the first time by being projected in large scale in our lower exhibition space.
The Sculptural View
The Sculptural View
Cologne - Erftstrasse 29
until 25-10-2019

The Sculptural View 19th century photography / Clegg & Guttmann / HGEsch / Jürgen Klauke The exhibition The Sculptural View investigates and questions the photographic concept of sculpture. Sculptures have been photographed and staged with the camera since the invention of photography. From the pure documentation to the lucky snapshot of a temporary situation, sculptures, components or technical devices appear in the photographs from the Rolf Mayer collection in Stuttgart, which only contains photographs from the 19th century. One can only guess how far these still lifes were staged or found. The selection of these 10 unique and very rare photographs communicates with recent works by the artists Clegg & Guttmann and Jürgen Klauke.

The Sculptural View 19th century photography / Clegg & Guttmann / HGEsch / Jürgen Klauke The exhibition The Sculptural View investigates and questions the photographic concept of sculpture. Sculptures have been photographed and staged with the camera since the invention of photography. From the pure documentation to the lucky snapshot of a temporary situation, sculptures, components or technical devices appear in the photographs from the Rolf Mayer collection in Stuttgart, which only contains photographs from the 19th century. One can only guess how far these still lifes were staged or found. The selection of these 10 unique and very rare photographs communicates with recent works by the artists Clegg & Guttmann and Jürgen Klauke.
Ai Weiwei
Ai Weiwei
Berlin - Linienstrasse 155
until 19-10-2019

Ai Weiwei – Roots One tree another tree Each standing alone and erect The wind and air Tell their distance apart But beneath the cover of earth Their roots reach out And at depths that cannot be seen The roots of the trees intertwine — Ai Qing, Trees, spring 1940 neugerriemschneider is pleased to present our third solo exhibition with Ai Weiwei. At the core of Roots are seven large-scale iron sculptures, each of which are casts from long- deceased roots of pequi trees (Caryocar coriaceum) native to Brazil. During the preparation of his comprehensive survey exhibition Raiz at the OCA Pavilion in São Paulo (2018), Ai Weiwei visited the rainforests of Bahia and came across monumentally sized roots and trunks, some of which are over a century old, of the endangered pequi tree. Along with a team of local and Chinese craftspeople, the artist fused these root fragments to form sculptural compositions. The resultant wooden sculptures were first shown in the OCA exhibition, with their molds then being transported to China to create iron castings. These hand-cast iron hybrids of nature and culture represent a society uprooted by industrialization and modernization, illustrating how environmental degradation can follow in the wake of progress. The poem Trees by Ai Weiwei’s father Ai Qing (1910-1996) served as inspiration for these at once abstract and figural sculptures. The wealth of detail in these metal casts mirrors Ai Weiwei’s deep reverence for nature, which first manifested itself during his childhood while in exile in the Gobi Desert, where he would take dried tree roots and arrange them into small sculptures. His cast iron Roots are reminiscent of archaic beasts or fantastical creatures and mirror the timelessness of South American forests, simultaneously hinting at the contemplation of natural phenomena that is deeply engrained in Chinese culture. In collaboration with Lisson Gallery, this new group of Ai Weiwei’s Roots is shown for the first time at neugerriemschneider (September 7 to October 19, 2019) and in London (October 2 to November 2, 2019). A comprehensive catalogue accompanies Roots, featuring texts by Marcello Dantas, Robert Macfarlane, Lilia Moritz Schwarcz, Peter-Klaus Schuster, Günther Vogt, Christina Yu Yu and others exploring anthropology, sociology, Chinese and European history, botany and ecology. Ai Weiwei (b. 1957, Beijing, China) was a founding member of the Chinese avant-garde group Stars in Beijing and later moved to New York in the 1980s. Upon his return to China in 1993, he began conceptually focusing on China’s cultural heritage and quickly became a leading figure in Chinese contemporary art and architecture. His work has been shown internationally since the mid-2000s. By 2008 he began to experience increasing repression by the Chinese government, ultimately resulting in 81 days of incarceration. An artist, filmmaker, author and highly influential political activist, Ai Weiwei moved to Berlin in 2015 where he currently lives and works. Ai Weiwei has exhibited extensively at museums and institutions worldwide. Solo exhibitions and special projects devoted to his work include Ai Weiwei: Bare Life, Kemper Art Museum, St. Louis (2019, upcoming); Ai Weiwei, Kunstsammlung Nordrhein Westfalen, Dusseldorf (2019); Raiz - Ai Weiwei, OCA – Ibirapuera Park, Sa?o Paulo (2018); Good Fences Make Good Neighbors, Public Art Fund, New York (2017); Ai Weiwei On Porcelain, Sabanci University Sakip Sabanci Museum, Istanbul (2017); Ai Weiwei: Maybe, Maybe Not, Israel Museum, Jerusalem (2017); Ai Weiwei. Law of the Journey, The National Gallery in Prague, Prague (2017); Andy Warhol / Ai Weiwei, Andy Warhol Museum, Pittsburgh, the National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne (2016, 2015); Ai Weiwei, Royal Academy of Arts, London (2015); @Large: Ai Weiwei on Alcatraz, Alcatraz, San Francisco (2014); Ai Weiwei - Evidence, Martin-Gropius-Bau, Berlin (2014); Ai Weiwei: According to What?, Brooklyn Museum, New York, Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto and Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington (2014-2012); Ai Weiwei, Romuald Karmakar, Santu Mofokeng, Dayanita Singh. German Pavillon, 55th International Art Exhibition, La Biennale di Venezia, 55. Esposizione Internazionale d'Arte, Venice (2013); The Unilever Series: Ai Weiwei, Turbine Hall, Tate Modern, London (2010); So sorry, Haus der Kunst, Munich, (2009); dOCUMENTA 12, Kassel (2007) and Ai Weiwei, Kunsthalle Bern, Bern (2004). For further press information and imagery, please contact Jan Salewski at neugerriemschneider: +49 30 288 77277 or [email protected]

Ai Weiwei – Roots One tree another tree Each standing alone and erect The wind and air Tell their distance apart But beneath the cover of earth Their roots reach out And at depths that cannot be seen The roots of the trees intertwine — Ai Qing, Trees, spring 1940 neugerriemschneider is pleased to present our third solo exhibition with Ai Weiwei. At the core of Roots are seven large-scale iron sculptures, each of which are casts from long- deceased roots of pequi trees (Caryocar coriaceum) native to Brazil. During the preparation of his comprehensive survey exhibition Raiz at the OCA Pavilion in São Paulo (2018), Ai Weiwei visited the rainforests of Bahia and came across monumentally sized roots and trunks, some of which are over a century old, of the endangered pequi tree. Along with a team of local and Chinese craftspeople, the artist fused these root fragments to form sculptural compositions. The resultant wooden sculptures were first shown in the OCA exhibition, with their molds then being transported to China to create iron castings. These hand-cast iron hybrids of nature and culture represent a society uprooted by industrialization and modernization, illustrating how environmental degradation can follow in the wake of progress. The poem Trees by Ai Weiwei’s father Ai Qing (1910-1996) served as inspiration for these at once abstract and figural sculptures. The wealth of detail in these metal casts mirrors Ai Weiwei’s deep reverence for nature, which first manifested itself during his childhood while in exile in the Gobi Desert, where he would take dried tree roots and arrange them into small sculptures. His cast iron Roots are reminiscent of archaic beasts or fantastical creatures and mirror the timelessness of South American forests, simultaneously hinting at the contemplation of natural phenomena that is deeply engrained in Chinese culture. In collaboration with Lisson Gallery, this new group of Ai Weiwei’s Roots is shown for the first time at neugerriemschneider (September 7 to October 19, 2019) and in London (October 2 to November 2, 2019). A comprehensive catalogue accompanies Roots, featuring texts by Marcello Dantas, Robert Macfarlane, Lilia Moritz Schwarcz, Peter-Klaus Schuster, Günther Vogt, Christina Yu Yu and others exploring anthropology, sociology, Chinese and European history, botany and ecology. Ai Weiwei (b. 1957, Beijing, China) was a founding member of the Chinese avant-garde group Stars in Beijing and later moved to New York in the 1980s. Upon his return to China in 1993, he began conceptually focusing on China’s cultural heritage and quickly became a leading figure in Chinese contemporary art and architecture. His work has been shown internationally since the mid-2000s. By 2008 he began to experience increasing repression by the Chinese government, ultimately resulting in 81 days of incarceration. An artist, filmmaker, author and highly influential political activist, Ai Weiwei moved to Berlin in 2015 where he currently lives and works. Ai Weiwei has exhibited extensively at museums and institutions worldwide. Solo exhibitions and special projects devoted to his work include Ai Weiwei: Bare Life, Kemper Art Museum, St. Louis (2019, upcoming); Ai Weiwei, Kunstsammlung Nordrhein Westfalen, Dusseldorf (2019); Raiz - Ai Weiwei, OCA – Ibirapuera Park, Sa?o Paulo (2018); Good Fences Make Good Neighbors, Public Art Fund, New York (2017); Ai Weiwei On Porcelain, Sabanci University Sakip Sabanci Museum, Istanbul (2017); Ai Weiwei: Maybe, Maybe Not, Israel Museum, Jerusalem (2017); Ai Weiwei. Law of the Journey, The National Gallery in Prague, Prague (2017); Andy Warhol / Ai Weiwei, Andy Warhol Museum, Pittsburgh, the National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne (2016, 2015); Ai Weiwei, Royal Academy of Arts, London (2015); @Large: Ai Weiwei on Alcatraz, Alcatraz, San Francisco (2014); Ai Weiwei - Evidence, Martin-Gropius-Bau, Berlin (2014); Ai Weiwei: According to What?, Brooklyn Museum, New York, Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto and Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington (2014-2012); Ai Weiwei, Romuald Karmakar, Santu Mofokeng, Dayanita Singh. German Pavillon, 55th International Art Exhibition, La Biennale di Venezia, 55. Esposizione Internazionale d'Arte, Venice (2013); The Unilever Series: Ai Weiwei, Turbine Hall, Tate Modern, London (2010); So sorry, Haus der Kunst, Munich, (2009); dOCUMENTA 12, Kassel (2007) and Ai Weiwei, Kunsthalle Bern, Bern (2004). For further press information and imagery, please contact Jan Salewski at neugerriemschneider: +49 30 288 77277 or [email protected]
Micro Era
Micro Era
Berlin - Matthikirchplatz 6
until 26-01-2020

Micro Era. ?Media Art from China Cao Fei, Lu Yang, Fang Di, Zhang Peili Curated by Anna-Catharina Gebbers with Victor Wang, and Yang Beichen / Curatorial Advisor: Pi Li From documentary film pictures, and the adapted use of classic film language to the aesthetics of Japanese anime, the works of art in this exhibition focus on and explore relationships between mind, body and technology, with installations and single-channel-videos ranging from the 1980s to the present. Historically, within a Euro-American context, video art is often regarded as a democratising art form – through the rapid circulation of information and global events by fast-access technologies. The artists participating in the exhibition, Cao Fei (*1978), Fang Di (*1987), Lu Yang (*1984) and Zhang Peili (*1957), scrutinise this thesis of democratisation by reflecting in their visual language the mass production of goods as well as how images and virtual subjectivities are produced and consumed, and how we understand our world through imaging technology.  

Micro Era. ?Media Art from China Cao Fei, Lu Yang, Fang Di, Zhang Peili Curated by Anna-Catharina Gebbers with Victor Wang, and Yang Beichen / Curatorial Advisor: Pi Li From documentary film pictures, and the adapted use of classic film language to the aesthetics of Japanese anime, the works of art in this exhibition focus on and explore relationships between mind, body and technology, with installations and single-channel-videos ranging from the 1980s to the present. Historically, within a Euro-American context, video art is often regarded as a democratising art form – through the rapid circulation of information and global events by fast-access technologies. The artists participating in the exhibition, Cao Fei (*1978), Fang Di (*1987), Lu Yang (*1984) and Zhang Peili (*1957), scrutinise this thesis of democratisation by reflecting in their visual language the mass production of goods as well as how images and virtual subjectivities are produced and consumed, and how we understand our world through imaging technology.  
WangShui
WangShui
Berlin - Leipziger Str. 60, entrance: Jerusalemer Str.
until 15-12-2019

WangShui This exhibition marks the first presentation of WangShui in Europe. On the ground floor of the collection’s Berlin space, WangShui will exhibit a body of time-based work started in 2016, concluding with a new video work commissioned by the Julia Stoschek Collection. WangShui, which operates as a polyvalent studio, engages the practice of queer world-building and its politics, be it through art, film, and/or architecture. In search of intimacy, autonomy, and sanctuary, WangShui explores individual/collective modes of transformation and elusion. WangShui calls for a haptic cinema where touch, atmosphere, and desire become highly charged techno-sensual political fields. The exhibition will open during Berlin Art Week. WangShui, b. 1986 in USA, lives in New York.

WangShui This exhibition marks the first presentation of WangShui in Europe. On the ground floor of the collection’s Berlin space, WangShui will exhibit a body of time-based work started in 2016, concluding with a new video work commissioned by the Julia Stoschek Collection. WangShui, which operates as a polyvalent studio, engages the practice of queer world-building and its politics, be it through art, film, and/or architecture. In search of intimacy, autonomy, and sanctuary, WangShui explores individual/collective modes of transformation and elusion. WangShui calls for a haptic cinema where touch, atmosphere, and desire become highly charged techno-sensual political fields. The exhibition will open during Berlin Art Week. WangShui, b. 1986 in USA, lives in New York.
Speaking Images
Speaking Images
Berlin - Clayallee 174
until 16-11-2019

Speaking Images For this first presentation of works from the collection, Fluentum asked the Berlin-based gallerists and curators Alexander Koch and Nikolaus Oberhuber to compile a thematically focused selection. Titled Speaking Images, the exhibition they put together presents a dense and tightly organized sequence of works, in which language and text play a prominent role. It encourages the visitors to immerse themselves in the art and does not shy away from audiovisual clashes between works. Including works by Frank Heath, Hiwa K, Sven Johne, Stefan Panhans, Hito Steyerl, Vibeke Tandberg, and Katarina Zdjelar.

Speaking Images For this first presentation of works from the collection, Fluentum asked the Berlin-based gallerists and curators Alexander Koch and Nikolaus Oberhuber to compile a thematically focused selection. Titled Speaking Images, the exhibition they put together presents a dense and tightly organized sequence of works, in which language and text play a prominent role. It encourages the visitors to immerse themselves in the art and does not shy away from audiovisual clashes between works. Including works by Frank Heath, Hiwa K, Sven Johne, Stefan Panhans, Hito Steyerl, Vibeke Tandberg, and Katarina Zdjelar.
No Photos on the Dance Floor!
No Photos on the Dance Floor!
Berlin - Hardenbergstrasse 22?24
until 30-11-2019

No Photos on the Dance Floor! Camille Blake, Tilman Brembs, Ben de Biel, Salvatore di Gregorio, Martin Eberle, Matthias Fritsch, Dan Halter, Erez Israeli, Romuald Karmakar, Steffen Köhn, Tillman Künzel, Sven Marquardt and Marcel Dettmann, George Nebieridze, Alva Noto, Pfadfinderei, Mike Riemel, Carolin Saage, Giovanna Silva, Wolfgang Tillmans, Lisa Wassmann, Michael Wesely Curated by Felix Hoffmann and Heiko Hoffmann After the Berlin Wall fell in 1989, young squatters, artists, gallery owners, and DJs from East and West took over the city, filling empty buildings, factories, and vacant lots with life. Clubs, bars, galleries, and studios began popping up everywhere. The club and cultural scene became the driving force behind the city’s rejuvenation, pointing the way for a new generation of young creatives. And while techno was not invented in Berlin, what was happening in the city during this period at events like Tekknozid and in clubs like Ufo, Tresor, and Planet can be seen as a kind of >big bang<—the inception of the last major youth culture movement in Europe to date. The visual effects and new artistic approaches of Berlin’s club life occupied a boundary zone at the intersection of video, film, projections, and music. For many aspiring artists, the connection with art offered diverse possibilities for collaboration and new perspectives and spaces for communication, interaction, and celebration—outside the confines of reason and everyday life. The Berlin club scene gained new momentum at the turn of the millennium. Cheap flights in Europe, together with a new wave of clubs like Bar 25, Watergate, and Berghain and parties that never seemed to stop drew increasing numbers of techno fans to the capital city. Artists, party promoters, and record labels from around the world moved to Berlin, bringing new influences to the city’s sound—a process that continues to this day. But today the spaces of seemingly infinite possibilities are narrowing, and the party appears to be coming to an end. The exhibition project >No Photos on the Dancefloor! Berlin 1989–Today< documents the history of Berlin’s club scene since the fall of the Wall and at the same time brings that history to life. During the day the exhibition will showcase photographs, videos, films, and documentary material that offer insights into the evolution of Berlin’s club culture over the past thirty years. At night part of the C/O Berlin exhibition space will be transformed into a club. Surrounded by the pictures in the exhibition, visitors can dance the night away to a series of live performances by acclaimed DJs and sound and visual artists from Berlin’s club scene, both past and present, transforming the experience into art. The title of the exhibition, >No Photos on the Dance Floor<, refers to a unique feature of Berlin’s club scene. While photography is a central part of nightlife in other cities, in Berlin, most clubs have strict rules against taking pictures. There are two reasons for this rule: to allow dancers to lose themselves in the music without distraction from cameras and to protect clubgoers’ freedom and privacy.  

No Photos on the Dance Floor! Camille Blake, Tilman Brembs, Ben de Biel, Salvatore di Gregorio, Martin Eberle, Matthias Fritsch, Dan Halter, Erez Israeli, Romuald Karmakar, Steffen Köhn, Tillman Künzel, Sven Marquardt and Marcel Dettmann, George Nebieridze, Alva Noto, Pfadfinderei, Mike Riemel, Carolin Saage, Giovanna Silva, Wolfgang Tillmans, Lisa Wassmann, Michael Wesely Curated by Felix Hoffmann and Heiko Hoffmann After the Berlin Wall fell in 1989, young squatters, artists, gallery owners, and DJs from East and West took over the city, filling empty buildings, factories, and vacant lots with life. Clubs, bars, galleries, and studios began popping up everywhere. The club and cultural scene became the driving force behind the city’s rejuvenation, pointing the way for a new generation of young creatives. And while techno was not invented in Berlin, what was happening in the city during this period at events like Tekknozid and in clubs like Ufo, Tresor, and Planet can be seen as a kind of >big bang<—the inception of the last major youth culture movement in Europe to date. The visual effects and new artistic approaches of Berlin’s club life occupied a boundary zone at the intersection of video, film, projections, and music. For many aspiring artists, the connection with art offered diverse possibilities for collaboration and new perspectives and spaces for communication, interaction, and celebration—outside the confines of reason and everyday life. The Berlin club scene gained new momentum at the turn of the millennium. Cheap flights in Europe, together with a new wave of clubs like Bar 25, Watergate, and Berghain and parties that never seemed to stop drew increasing numbers of techno fans to the capital city. Artists, party promoters, and record labels from around the world moved to Berlin, bringing new influences to the city’s sound—a process that continues to this day. But today the spaces of seemingly infinite possibilities are narrowing, and the party appears to be coming to an end. The exhibition project >No Photos on the Dancefloor! Berlin 1989–Today< documents the history of Berlin’s club scene since the fall of the Wall and at the same time brings that history to life. During the day the exhibition will showcase photographs, videos, films, and documentary material that offer insights into the evolution of Berlin’s club culture over the past thirty years. At night part of the C/O Berlin exhibition space will be transformed into a club. Surrounded by the pictures in the exhibition, visitors can dance the night away to a series of live performances by acclaimed DJs and sound and visual artists from Berlin’s club scene, both past and present, transforming the experience into art. The title of the exhibition, >No Photos on the Dance Floor<, refers to a unique feature of Berlin’s club scene. While photography is a central part of nightlife in other cities, in Berlin, most clubs have strict rules against taking pictures. There are two reasons for this rule: to allow dancers to lose themselves in the music without distraction from cameras and to protect clubgoers’ freedom and privacy.  
Walking Through Walls
Walking Through Walls
Berlin - Niederkirchnerstrasse 7
until 19-01-2020

Walking Through Walls Marina Abramovi? und Ulay, José Bechara, Sibylle Bergemann, Tagreed Darghouth, Jose Dávila, Willie Doherty, Smadar Dreyfus, Melvin Edwards, Dara Friedman, Dora García, Zahrah Al Ghamdi, Mona Hatoum, Nadia Kaabi-Linke, Michael Kvium, Gustav Metzger, Reem Al Nasser, Christian Odzuck, Emeka Ogboh, Anri Sala, Fred Sandback, Aki Sasamoto, Regina Silveira, Siska, Javier Téllez, Samson Young, Yuan Yuan, Héctor Zamora Curated by Sam Bardaouil and Till Fellrath The thematic exhibition Walking Through Walls presents a contemporary panorama of the artistic responses made to the detrimental effects of human-made barriers, divisions and walls, showcasing works by Jose Dávila, Mona Hatoum, Nadia Kaabi-Linke, Christian Odzuck, Anri Sala, Regina Silveira, alongside many others. Acknowledging the location of the Gropius Bau alongside the former Berlin Wall, the exhibition offers a global perspective on the physical and psychological repercussions of coexisting in divided societies. On the occasion of the 30th anniversary of the fall of the Wall, the exhibition is a timely exploration of how barriers can articulate feelings of vulnerability and anxiety, and represent individual and collective identities.  

Walking Through Walls Marina Abramovi? und Ulay, José Bechara, Sibylle Bergemann, Tagreed Darghouth, Jose Dávila, Willie Doherty, Smadar Dreyfus, Melvin Edwards, Dara Friedman, Dora García, Zahrah Al Ghamdi, Mona Hatoum, Nadia Kaabi-Linke, Michael Kvium, Gustav Metzger, Reem Al Nasser, Christian Odzuck, Emeka Ogboh, Anri Sala, Fred Sandback, Aki Sasamoto, Regina Silveira, Siska, Javier Téllez, Samson Young, Yuan Yuan, Héctor Zamora Curated by Sam Bardaouil and Till Fellrath The thematic exhibition Walking Through Walls presents a contemporary panorama of the artistic responses made to the detrimental effects of human-made barriers, divisions and walls, showcasing works by Jose Dávila, Mona Hatoum, Nadia Kaabi-Linke, Christian Odzuck, Anri Sala, Regina Silveira, alongside many others. Acknowledging the location of the Gropius Bau alongside the former Berlin Wall, the exhibition offers a global perspective on the physical and psychological repercussions of coexisting in divided societies. On the occasion of the 30th anniversary of the fall of the Wall, the exhibition is a timely exploration of how barriers can articulate feelings of vulnerability and anxiety, and represent individual and collective identities.  
Bettina Pousttchi
Bettina Pousttchi
Berlin - Am Sudhaus 2
until 10-05-2020

Bettina Pousttchi – Panorama Curated by Andreas Fiedler Bettina Pousttchi will realise her largest interior photographic installation to date in the Kesselhaus at the KINDL. With a height of twenty meters, the cube-shaped Kesselhaus is a unique exhibition venue in Berlin. Bettina Pousttchi continues the series of artists who have developed a site-specific work for this spectacular space. For the site-specific photographic installation Panorama, Bettina Pousttchi will work with photography at an architectural scale. Panorama consists of eight floor-to-ceiling photographs distributed across three walls of the space. At a scale of 1:1, these prints in different variations show a view through the windowed facade of the Kesselhaus to the exterior. Reality and photography are simultaneously shifted and integrated.  

Bettina Pousttchi – Panorama Curated by Andreas Fiedler Bettina Pousttchi will realise her largest interior photographic installation to date in the Kesselhaus at the KINDL. With a height of twenty meters, the cube-shaped Kesselhaus is a unique exhibition venue in Berlin. Bettina Pousttchi continues the series of artists who have developed a site-specific work for this spectacular space. For the site-specific photographic installation Panorama, Bettina Pousttchi will work with photography at an architectural scale. Panorama consists of eight floor-to-ceiling photographs distributed across three walls of the space. At a scale of 1:1, these prints in different variations show a view through the windowed facade of the Kesselhaus to the exterior. Reality and photography are simultaneously shifted and integrated.  
Tobias Rehberger
Tobias Rehberger
Berlin - Argentinische Allee 30
until 17-11-2019

Tobias Rehberger – Inspiration is a little town in China – in paper In his first solo exhibition in an art institution in Berlin, Tobias Rehberger (*1966) takes complete possession of Haus am Waldsee and changes it spectacularly. For the first time ever, his intensive use of paper becomes visible  – a material developed 2000 years ago in China. As usually, his work sets new standards for what art could be. In addition to drawings and watercolours from the early 1990s, diary-like collages and series of large-scale computer prints, the exhibition also features three-dimensional works, in which the sculptor last sold his authorship to termites. For 250 million years, they have been building man-high ventilation towers that look like modern 1950s sculptures. Rehberger’s continuously pursued approach is to question certainties about the familiar. In the field of the examination of paper, this becomes evident with a lot of subtle humour. 

Tobias Rehberger – Inspiration is a little town in China – in paper In his first solo exhibition in an art institution in Berlin, Tobias Rehberger (*1966) takes complete possession of Haus am Waldsee and changes it spectacularly. For the first time ever, his intensive use of paper becomes visible  – a material developed 2000 years ago in China. As usually, his work sets new standards for what art could be. In addition to drawings and watercolours from the early 1990s, diary-like collages and series of large-scale computer prints, the exhibition also features three-dimensional works, in which the sculptor last sold his authorship to termites. For 250 million years, they have been building man-high ventilation towers that look like modern 1950s sculptures. Rehberger’s continuously pursued approach is to question certainties about the familiar. In the field of the examination of paper, this becomes evident with a lot of subtle humour. 
Preis der Nationalgalerie 2019
Preis der Nationalgalerie 2019
Berlin - Invalidenstrasse 50/51
until 16-02-2020

Preis der Nationalgalerie 2019 Pauline Curnier Jardin, Simon Fujiwara, Flaka Haliti, Katja Novitskova  This March, Pauline Curnier Jardin (born 1980 in Marseille), Simon Fujiwara (born 1982 in London), Flaka Haliti (born 1982 in Pristina) and Katja Novitskova (born 1984 in Tallinn) have been nominated for the Preis der Nationalgalerie 2019 by an international jury. The museum prize is awarded every two years and pays tribute to artists under 40 who live and work in Germany. The four artists show spatial ensembles in which they combine existing and new works. The tonality and handwriting of the four spatial work presentations is very different; what they have in common is an explicit reference to aspects of our contemporary European society.   With her transgressive artistic approach, which combines visual and narrative elements of theatre and cinema, Pauline Curnier Jardin creates a stage space for the shortlist exhibition; a walk-in installation in which cinematic and sculptural work intermesh in Curnier Jardin’s characteristic manner. Her often humorous works are the result of a very personal examination of historical circumstances, our historical background, our religious and cultural traditions as well as common gender roles and connotations.   With his works, which include painting, video, sculpture, installations and performances, Simon Fujiwara comments on very different levels on the situation of the human being in the medialized 21st century, starting from his own person and generation. His works, which have been selected for the exhibition and in part newly created, are the result of Fujiwara's interest in contemporary mass phe-nomena and their economic and socio-political aspects. The very different works illustrate the extent to which these phenomena have an emotional component of their own.   Flaka Haliti's sculpture and installation work refers to themes of current political importance; she addresses war and peace, migration, borders and their permeability. Often and explicitly, the artist focuses on Europe. Her works have a clear statement and at the same time a strong metaphorical and poetic quality. With two sculptural installations, she refers to the recent past of her country of origin. She continues her series of works "Is it you, Joe?" with large wall works, playing with identity and schematization.   As one of the pioneers of an artistic language known as "Post-Internet Art", Katja Novitskova will create a virtuoso, multi-part and multi-layered "environment" for the exhibition, that encompasses and captures the visitors and blurs the boundaries between the individual works. The works are the result of Novitskova's ongoing interest in current biotechnological research and revolve around the question of the future existence of the organic as a component of technological processes.  

Preis der Nationalgalerie 2019 Pauline Curnier Jardin, Simon Fujiwara, Flaka Haliti, Katja Novitskova  This March, Pauline Curnier Jardin (born 1980 in Marseille), Simon Fujiwara (born 1982 in London), Flaka Haliti (born 1982 in Pristina) and Katja Novitskova (born 1984 in Tallinn) have been nominated for the Preis der Nationalgalerie 2019 by an international jury. The museum prize is awarded every two years and pays tribute to artists under 40 who live and work in Germany. The four artists show spatial ensembles in which they combine existing and new works. The tonality and handwriting of the four spatial work presentations is very different; what they have in common is an explicit reference to aspects of our contemporary European society.   With her transgressive artistic approach, which combines visual and narrative elements of theatre and cinema, Pauline Curnier Jardin creates a stage space for the shortlist exhibition; a walk-in installation in which cinematic and sculptural work intermesh in Curnier Jardin’s characteristic manner. Her often humorous works are the result of a very personal examination of historical circumstances, our historical background, our religious and cultural traditions as well as common gender roles and connotations.   With his works, which include painting, video, sculpture, installations and performances, Simon Fujiwara comments on very different levels on the situation of the human being in the medialized 21st century, starting from his own person and generation. His works, which have been selected for the exhibition and in part newly created, are the result of Fujiwara's interest in contemporary mass phe-nomena and their economic and socio-political aspects. The very different works illustrate the extent to which these phenomena have an emotional component of their own.   Flaka Haliti's sculpture and installation work refers to themes of current political importance; she addresses war and peace, migration, borders and their permeability. Often and explicitly, the artist focuses on Europe. Her works have a clear statement and at the same time a strong metaphorical and poetic quality. With two sculptural installations, she refers to the recent past of her country of origin. She continues her series of works "Is it you, Joe?" with large wall works, playing with identity and schematization.   As one of the pioneers of an artistic language known as "Post-Internet Art", Katja Novitskova will create a virtuoso, multi-part and multi-layered "environment" for the exhibition, that encompasses and captures the visitors and blurs the boundaries between the individual works. The works are the result of Novitskova's ongoing interest in current biotechnological research and revolve around the question of the future existence of the organic as a component of technological processes.  
Kaari Upson
Kaari Upson
Basel - Steinenberg 7
until 10-11-2019

Kaari Upson – Go Back the Way You Came Kaari Upson presents a new body of wood and latex sculptures that continue her ongoing exploration of both the figure of the mother and the uncanny double. The US-American artist casts, cuts down, or replicates natural and architectural elements that she grew up with, fusing home and mother, body and object, desire and trauma. The gripping result interrogates family, consumer culture, and “Americanness,” all while literally eviscerating parts of her childhood environment to do so.

Kaari Upson – Go Back the Way You Came Kaari Upson presents a new body of wood and latex sculptures that continue her ongoing exploration of both the figure of the mother and the uncanny double. The US-American artist casts, cuts down, or replicates natural and architectural elements that she grew up with, fusing home and mother, body and object, desire and trauma. The gripping result interrogates family, consumer culture, and “Americanness,” all while literally eviscerating parts of her childhood environment to do so.
Rirkrit Tiravanija
Rirkrit Tiravanija
Basel - Drahtzugstrasse 67
until 31-05-2020

Rirkrit Tiravanija – The Odious Smell of Truth This is the second work of a ten-year programme of public installations produced by Beat Raeber, Galerie at Drahtzugstrasse 67 in Basel. Rirkrit Tiravanija's work is characterised by great versatility and a constant involvement of the viewer – exchange and freedom of interpretation are essential components of his practice. Since the late 1980s, he has been experimenting with open, sometimes surprising formats that question how the classical conceptions of art can be extended, how the boundaries of an exhibition space broadened, and its limiting barriers circumvented. Creating spaces for relationships, encounters and reactions forms the basis of his works. He works with different cultural contexts, linking them and using them as references. As a modern nomad – the Thai artist was born in Buenos Aires and lives between New York, Berlin and Chiang Mai – he uses the distinctive and connecting aspects of Western and Eastern ways of life and philosophies and integrates them into his work. Further influences come from literature, pop and news culture. Exploiting the mechanisms of propaganda or advertising, utilising their effect patterns, such as the oscillation between promises, deception, and applied truths, are key part of his work.  

Rirkrit Tiravanija – The Odious Smell of Truth This is the second work of a ten-year programme of public installations produced by Beat Raeber, Galerie at Drahtzugstrasse 67 in Basel. Rirkrit Tiravanija's work is characterised by great versatility and a constant involvement of the viewer – exchange and freedom of interpretation are essential components of his practice. Since the late 1980s, he has been experimenting with open, sometimes surprising formats that question how the classical conceptions of art can be extended, how the boundaries of an exhibition space broadened, and its limiting barriers circumvented. Creating spaces for relationships, encounters and reactions forms the basis of his works. He works with different cultural contexts, linking them and using them as references. As a modern nomad – the Thai artist was born in Buenos Aires and lives between New York, Berlin and Chiang Mai – he uses the distinctive and connecting aspects of Western and Eastern ways of life and philosophies and integrates them into his work. Further influences come from literature, pop and news culture. Exploiting the mechanisms of propaganda or advertising, utilising their effect patterns, such as the oscillation between promises, deception, and applied truths, are key part of his work.  
Rudolf Stingel
Rudolf Stingel
Basel - Baselstrasse 101
until 06-10-2019

Rudolf Stingel From his very beginnings in the late 1980s, Rudolf Stingel (*1956) has approached painting in a conceptual and self-reflexive manner, exploring its possibilities and media-specific limits through the interplay of artistic strategies, materials and shapes. Based on his confrontation with classic pictorial themes, he develops a wealth of motif variations. Alongside various series of abstract and photorealist paintings, he creates large-scale works made of Styrofoam or cast metal, as well as spaces covered in carpets or reflective silver insulation panels. Notwithstanding their material disparities, all these works share the random or deliberate painterly traces that appear on their surface. Certain brand new paintings created only this year will be on view for the very first time. The show will also present new site-specific works using carpets and insulation panels in the museum’s exhibition and restaurant spaces. The exhibition has been conceived in close collaboration between the artist and guest curator Udo Kittelmann, a long-standing expert of Rudolf Stingel’s work.

Rudolf Stingel From his very beginnings in the late 1980s, Rudolf Stingel (*1956) has approached painting in a conceptual and self-reflexive manner, exploring its possibilities and media-specific limits through the interplay of artistic strategies, materials and shapes. Based on his confrontation with classic pictorial themes, he develops a wealth of motif variations. Alongside various series of abstract and photorealist paintings, he creates large-scale works made of Styrofoam or cast metal, as well as spaces covered in carpets or reflective silver insulation panels. Notwithstanding their material disparities, all these works share the random or deliberate painterly traces that appear on their surface. Certain brand new paintings created only this year will be on view for the very first time. The show will also present new site-specific works using carpets and insulation panels in the museum’s exhibition and restaurant spaces. The exhibition has been conceived in close collaboration between the artist and guest curator Udo Kittelmann, a long-standing expert of Rudolf Stingel’s work.
William Kentridge
William Kentridge
Basel - St. Alban-Rheinweg 60
until 13-10-2019

William Kentridge – A Poem That Is Not Our Own William Kentridge (b. 1955) is internationally celebrated as one of today’s leading artists. In addition to creating visual art, he is also a filmmaker and stage director. In more than three decades, he has built a sizable oeuvre spanning diverse media including animated film, drawing, printmaking, stage production, and sculpture. The Kunstmuseum Basel | Gegenwart now presents a grand exhibition surveying the South African artist’s work; several key pieces in the show have never been seen in Europe. Designed in close collaboration with the artist, A Poem That Is Not Our Own sheds light on his early graphic art and films from the 1980s and 1990s and brings the thematic complex of migration, flight, and processions in his oeuvre into focus. It illustrates how these themes first emerge in Kentridge’s early graphic work and grow more prominent over the years as he explores their potential in ever more opulent creations.

William Kentridge – A Poem That Is Not Our Own William Kentridge (b. 1955) is internationally celebrated as one of today’s leading artists. In addition to creating visual art, he is also a filmmaker and stage director. In more than three decades, he has built a sizable oeuvre spanning diverse media including animated film, drawing, printmaking, stage production, and sculpture. The Kunstmuseum Basel | Gegenwart now presents a grand exhibition surveying the South African artist’s work; several key pieces in the show have never been seen in Europe. Designed in close collaboration with the artist, A Poem That Is Not Our Own sheds light on his early graphic art and films from the 1980s and 1990s and brings the thematic complex of migration, flight, and processions in his oeuvre into focus. It illustrates how these themes first emerge in Kentridge’s early graphic work and grow more prominent over the years as he explores their potential in ever more opulent creations.
A.K. Burns
A.K. Burns
Dsseldorf - Schanzenstrasse 54
until 15-12-2019

A.K. Burns – Negative Space  

A.K. Burns – Negative Space  
Klaus Merkel
Klaus Merkel
Dsseldorf - Worringer Strasse 64
until 31-10-2019

Klaus Merkel – mews

Klaus Merkel – mews
Doreen Garner
Doreen Garner
Dsseldorf - Ackerstrasse 26
until 26-10-2019

Doreen Garner

Doreen Garner
Banu Cennetoğlu
Banu Cenneto?lu
Dsseldorf - Stndehausstrasse 1
until 10-11-2019

Banu Cenneto?lu The exhibition by Banu Cenneto?lu at the K21 is a moving image work that presents her complete image-based archive from 10 June 2006 to 21 March 2018. The unedited stream of content, presented chronologically over a period of time of 128 hours and 22 minutes, shows the artist’s personal experiences intertwined with events that have become elements of public memory.

Banu Cenneto?lu The exhibition by Banu Cenneto?lu at the K21 is a moving image work that presents her complete image-based archive from 10 June 2006 to 21 March 2018. The unedited stream of content, presented chronologically over a period of time of 128 hours and 22 minutes, shows the artist’s personal experiences intertwined with events that have become elements of public memory.
Vanessa Conte, Stefanie Heinze, Zsófia Keresztes
Vanessa Conte, Stefanie Heinze, Zsfia Keresztes
Dsseldorf - Birkenstrasse 47
until 27-10-2019

Vanessa Conte, Stefanie Heinze, Zsófia Keresztes – Liquid Bodies  

Vanessa Conte, Stefanie Heinze, Zsófia Keresztes – Liquid Bodies  
Judy Chicago
Judy Chicago
Los Angeles - 925 North Orange Drive
until 02-11-2019

Judy Chicago – Los Angeles Judy Chicago created a remarkable body of work in Los Angeles and Fresno from 1965 - 72 that has been largely unseen for fifty years. Jeffrey Deitch, Los Angeles will present a full survey of these early works from September 7 – November 2, 2019. The exhibition will feature paintings, drawings, sculpture, installations, and documentation of Chicago’s environmental and fireworks projects. Los Angeles was inhospitable to women artists during this period, but the city’s spirit of self-invention and the lack of art market pressure gave Judy Chicago the freedom to create an innovative and original approach to making art. Intent on learning more about industrial techniques that were not taught at art school, Chicago enrolled in auto body painting school, the only woman out of two hundred fifty men in her class. Chicago talks about how she had to struggle to be taken seriously, and as a result “had to get tough.” Her first group of works coming out of auto body school were her car hoods with their bold female centric imagery, hung on the wall like paintings. The paintings and sculptures that followed drew on her experience with industrial techniques combined with her developing feminist approach to color and form. The work fuses her minimalist forms with a feminine sensibility. The lacquering techniques that she learned in auto body school allowed her to merge color and surface. The color is infused into the material. Chicago’s 1965 sculpture Rainbow Pickett was included in the legendary Primary Structures show at the Jewish Museum in New York in 1966, but the structure of the art world at the time made it difficult for a young woman to enter the art discourse. Partly in reaction to the challenge of getting her work to be taken seriously, she began her Feminist art project which changed the course of contemporary art. The impact of this project, and her immensely influential work, The Dinner Party, 1974-79, had the effect of partially eclipsing her earlier work. When several of her Los Angeles works were included in the Getty Foundation’s Pacific Standard Time exhibition program in 2011-12, it was a revelation. Since then, her Los Angeles and Fresno works have been shown at museums in Brooklyn, Nice, Chicago, and Miami, but the presentation at Jeffrey Deitch, Los Angeles will be the first time that the full body of work from this period will be presented. The exhibition will also feature Chicago's Lifesavers and Fan paintings and major sculptures such as Rainbow Pickett, Trinity, and the participatory work 10 Part Cylinders.

Judy Chicago – Los Angeles Judy Chicago created a remarkable body of work in Los Angeles and Fresno from 1965 - 72 that has been largely unseen for fifty years. Jeffrey Deitch, Los Angeles will present a full survey of these early works from September 7 – November 2, 2019. The exhibition will feature paintings, drawings, sculpture, installations, and documentation of Chicago’s environmental and fireworks projects. Los Angeles was inhospitable to women artists during this period, but the city’s spirit of self-invention and the lack of art market pressure gave Judy Chicago the freedom to create an innovative and original approach to making art. Intent on learning more about industrial techniques that were not taught at art school, Chicago enrolled in auto body painting school, the only woman out of two hundred fifty men in her class. Chicago talks about how she had to struggle to be taken seriously, and as a result “had to get tough.” Her first group of works coming out of auto body school were her car hoods with their bold female centric imagery, hung on the wall like paintings. The paintings and sculptures that followed drew on her experience with industrial techniques combined with her developing feminist approach to color and form. The work fuses her minimalist forms with a feminine sensibility. The lacquering techniques that she learned in auto body school allowed her to merge color and surface. The color is infused into the material. Chicago’s 1965 sculpture Rainbow Pickett was included in the legendary Primary Structures show at the Jewish Museum in New York in 1966, but the structure of the art world at the time made it difficult for a young woman to enter the art discourse. Partly in reaction to the challenge of getting her work to be taken seriously, she began her Feminist art project which changed the course of contemporary art. The impact of this project, and her immensely influential work, The Dinner Party, 1974-79, had the effect of partially eclipsing her earlier work. When several of her Los Angeles works were included in the Getty Foundation’s Pacific Standard Time exhibition program in 2011-12, it was a revelation. Since then, her Los Angeles and Fresno works have been shown at museums in Brooklyn, Nice, Chicago, and Miami, but the presentation at Jeffrey Deitch, Los Angeles will be the first time that the full body of work from this period will be presented. The exhibition will also feature Chicago's Lifesavers and Fan paintings and major sculptures such as Rainbow Pickett, Trinity, and the participatory work 10 Part Cylinders.
Donna Huanca
Donna Huanca
Los Angeles - 4357 Wilshire Boulevard
until 01-12-2019

Donna Huanca – Obsidian Ladder Huanca’s site-specific installation for MAF’s 13,000-square-foot Theater Gallery will reveal a new topography of triggered senses, combining sound, scent, and live performance. These elements will be experienced together against a constellation of carved steel sculptures and skin paintings.

Donna Huanca – Obsidian Ladder Huanca’s site-specific installation for MAF’s 13,000-square-foot Theater Gallery will reveal a new topography of triggered senses, combining sound, scent, and live performance. These elements will be experienced together against a constellation of carved steel sculptures and skin paintings.
Nayland Blake
Nayland Blake
Los Angeles - 1062 North Orange Grove
until 19-10-2019

Nayland Blake – Nayland Blake’s Opening

Nayland Blake – Nayland Blake’s Opening
Anna Uddenberg
Anna Uddenberg
Los Angeles - 4357 Wilshire Boulevard
until 22-12-2019

Anna Uddenberg – Privé "Privé," the first solo show in Los Angeles and first institutional show in the United States by the Berlin-based Swedish artist Anna Uddenberg, will open on July 25, 2019. Through the lens of the feedback loop that is social media, Uddenberg analyzes systems of representation, the performativity of femme expressions and its cross-connection to consumer culture and gender studies.

Anna Uddenberg – Privé "Privé," the first solo show in Los Angeles and first institutional show in the United States by the Berlin-based Swedish artist Anna Uddenberg, will open on July 25, 2019. Through the lens of the feedback loop that is social media, Uddenberg analyzes systems of representation, the performativity of femme expressions and its cross-connection to consumer culture and gender studies.
Forever Young
Forever Young
Munich - Trkenstrasse 19
until 26-04-2020

Forever Young: 10 Years Museum Brandhorst A lot has happened at the Museum Brandhorst since it opened in May 2009. Along with numerous exhibitions, the Brandhorst Collection has grown dramatically—from 700 to more than 1,200 artworks. It now ranks among the most important museum collections of contemporary art in Europe. The museum’s tenth birthday in May 2019 is the occasion for a large-scale exhibition drawn entirely from this expanded collection. Forever Young—10 Years Museum Brandhorst traces an arc ranging from the 1960s to the present day. Alongside renowned and popular highlights from the collection, a particular focus is placed on acquisitions from recent years—including major works by Charline von Heyl, Louise Lawler, Amy Sillman, Seth Price, Wolfgang Tillmans, Arthur Jafa, Alexandra Bircken, and Monika Baer, among others—many of which have never been shown in Munich. The exhibition includes some 250 works by 45 artists and has three main themes, each of which can stand alone and yet also make reference to one another. The first focuses on Andy Warhol and the ongoing legacy of Pop art, especially its often overlooked political and socio-critical dimensions. Unconventional lifestyles, the experience of marginalization due to skin color and sexual orientation, interventions in public space, and the intersection of art, fashion, and music all emerge as central concerns. The second strand concentrates on the controversial topic of subjectivity in contemporary society—and therefore also on the effects of late capitalism on identity formation. The third section presents a short history of painting since the 1960s, and specifically how this traditional artistic genre has expanded and adapted itself in recent decades through an engagement with emerging digital technologies and media dissemination, developments that have also been examined in a series of recent exhibitions at the museum, including Painting 2.0: Expression in the Information Age, Wade Guyton – The New York Studio, Kerstin Brätsch: Innovation and Jutta Koether – Tour de Madame.

Forever Young: 10 Years Museum Brandhorst A lot has happened at the Museum Brandhorst since it opened in May 2009. Along with numerous exhibitions, the Brandhorst Collection has grown dramatically—from 700 to more than 1,200 artworks. It now ranks among the most important museum collections of contemporary art in Europe. The museum’s tenth birthday in May 2019 is the occasion for a large-scale exhibition drawn entirely from this expanded collection. Forever Young—10 Years Museum Brandhorst traces an arc ranging from the 1960s to the present day. Alongside renowned and popular highlights from the collection, a particular focus is placed on acquisitions from recent years—including major works by Charline von Heyl, Louise Lawler, Amy Sillman, Seth Price, Wolfgang Tillmans, Arthur Jafa, Alexandra Bircken, and Monika Baer, among others—many of which have never been shown in Munich. The exhibition includes some 250 works by 45 artists and has three main themes, each of which can stand alone and yet also make reference to one another. The first focuses on Andy Warhol and the ongoing legacy of Pop art, especially its often overlooked political and socio-critical dimensions. Unconventional lifestyles, the experience of marginalization due to skin color and sexual orientation, interventions in public space, and the intersection of art, fashion, and music all emerge as central concerns. The second strand concentrates on the controversial topic of subjectivity in contemporary society—and therefore also on the effects of late capitalism on identity formation. The third section presents a short history of painting since the 1960s, and specifically how this traditional artistic genre has expanded and adapted itself in recent decades through an engagement with emerging digital technologies and media dissemination, developments that have also been examined in a series of recent exhibitions at the museum, including Painting 2.0: Expression in the Information Age, Wade Guyton – The New York Studio, Kerstin Brätsch: Innovation and Jutta Koether – Tour de Madame.
At Night. Between Dream and Reality
At Night. Between Dream and Reality
Munich - Prinzregentenstrasse 1
until 06-01-2020

At Night. Between Dream and Reality  Christoph Brech, Olaf Breuning, Janet Cardiff, George Bures Miller, Thomas Demand, Stan Douglas, Ed van der Elsken, Teresa Hubbard, Alexander Birchler, Jochen Kuhn, Sam Taylor-Johnson, Hans Op de Beeck, Clement Page, Paul Pfeiffer, Andro Wekua The exhibition takes visitors on a journey through the night, that time between dreams and reality. On display are films, videos, installations and photographs from the Sammlung Goetz that reflect different facets of a nighttime foray.

At Night. Between Dream and Reality  Christoph Brech, Olaf Breuning, Janet Cardiff, George Bures Miller, Thomas Demand, Stan Douglas, Ed van der Elsken, Teresa Hubbard, Alexander Birchler, Jochen Kuhn, Sam Taylor-Johnson, Hans Op de Beeck, Clement Page, Paul Pfeiffer, Andro Wekua The exhibition takes visitors on a journey through the night, that time between dreams and reality. On display are films, videos, installations and photographs from the Sammlung Goetz that reflect different facets of a nighttime foray.
Five Artists: Sites Encountered
Five Artists: Sites Encountered
Hong Kong - West Kowloon Cultural District
until 20-10-2019

Five Artists: Sites Encountered May Fung, Lee Bul, Ana Mendieta, Charlotte Posenenske, Lara Almarcegui Five Artists: Sites Encountered brings together a group of international artists whose varied approaches invite us to rethink notions of site and place. The exhibition features sculptures, installations, and films by May Fung, Lee Bul, Ana Mendieta, and Charlotte Posenenske, as well as a specially commissioned project by Lara Almarcegui. This all-female line-up spans multiple generations and geographies. The exhibition demonstrates the artists’ individual perspectives on the idea of “site” – from the intangible to the tangible and the imagined to the real. Viewed collectively, these works provoke a thoughtful dialogue with the physical site around the soon-to-be-completed M+ building and also prompt us to explore our own sense of belonging in the world.

Five Artists: Sites Encountered May Fung, Lee Bul, Ana Mendieta, Charlotte Posenenske, Lara Almarcegui Five Artists: Sites Encountered brings together a group of international artists whose varied approaches invite us to rethink notions of site and place. The exhibition features sculptures, installations, and films by May Fung, Lee Bul, Ana Mendieta, and Charlotte Posenenske, as well as a specially commissioned project by Lara Almarcegui. This all-female line-up spans multiple generations and geographies. The exhibition demonstrates the artists’ individual perspectives on the idea of “site” – from the intangible to the tangible and the imagined to the real. Viewed collectively, these works provoke a thoughtful dialogue with the physical site around the soon-to-be-completed M+ building and also prompt us to explore our own sense of belonging in the world.