Art feed

Curated by Exhibitionary

Satisfy Me
Satisfy Me
Berlin - Bülowstrasse 90
until 31-03-2018

Satisfy Me. Works from the Wemhöner Collection Nevin Aladag, Kader Attia, Roger Ballen, Monica Bonvicini, Birgit Brenner, Asta Gröting, Isaac Julien, Marc Lafia, Duane Michals, Andreas Mühe, Tim Noble & Sue Webster, Xu Qu, Yang Fudong Curated by Philipp Bollmann Imagine looking into a mirror whose outline forms the words: Satisfy Me! Monica Bonvicini’s eponymous work confronts the viewer with this imperative. Only who is speaking? The mirror as a substitute for the lustful gaze of others, which forms us into an object of desire? Or the re ection? According to Jacques Lacan’s theory of the mirror stage, for example, a person’s becoming a subject begins with the formative primal scene of looking into the mirror. On the one hand this results in the person identifying with their specular image; on the other hand, it causes a split within the subject. In short: Does the perception of the human body by the self or others merely aim at appeasing the lust for esh? Bodies are elds of tension. They pulsate between the poles of total relaxation and complete tension, conveying, for instance, a sense of elegance or insecurity. Bodies are also a source of tension. They have the power, especially in a state of nudity, to cause tension in a viewer, awakening feelings of desire or discomfort. Art that is dedicated to depicting exposed bodies is never only concerned with super cial phenomena, but also with the states of the soul. The Wemhöner Collection, with its two-part exhibition satisfy me, explores the highly charged terrain of an aesthetics of nudity that has been shaped by taboos, norms, and transgressions since antiquity. Featuring the works of Kader Attia, and Duane Michals, the rst part of the exhibition (Körper als Spannungsfeld/Bodies as Fields of Tension) presents contemporary positions of artisti- cally staged nudity, which can be linked to two lines of tradition that persist today: the ancient Greek notion of ideal beauty, and the Christian narrative of the fall of man associated with shame, knowledge, and transience. Against the backdrop of heroic or ideal nudity, the works of the artists Yang Fudong and Xu Qu – Chinese contemporary art is a focal point of the Wemhöner Collection – also gain in contour. The second part of the exhibition (Körper als Spannungserreger/Bodies as a Source of Ten- sion) confronts the omnipresence of nudity conveyed by the media in an increasingly exhibi- tionistic society. Not only have divisions between the private and the public become blurred; the ood of images threatens to unleash a frenzy of immodesty. Seen in this light, the works of Roger Ballen, Monica Bonvicini, Asta Gröting and Andreas Mühe strive for a contemporary relationship with the naked body. By shifting the boundaries of shame its demysti cation is sometimes driven so far that a longing for its reenchantment becomes irrefutable.  

Satisfy Me. Works from the Wemhöner Collection Nevin Aladag, Kader Attia, Roger Ballen, Monica Bonvicini, Birgit Brenner, Asta Gröting, Isaac Julien, Marc Lafia, Duane Michals, Andreas Mühe, Tim Noble & Sue Webster, Xu Qu, Yang Fudong Curated by Philipp Bollmann Imagine looking into a mirror whose outline forms the words: Satisfy Me! Monica Bonvicini’s eponymous work confronts the viewer with this imperative. Only who is speaking? The mirror as a substitute for the lustful gaze of others, which forms us into an object of desire? Or the re ection? According to Jacques Lacan’s theory of the mirror stage, for example, a person’s becoming a subject begins with the formative primal scene of looking into the mirror. On the one hand this results in the person identifying with their specular image; on the other hand, it causes a split within the subject. In short: Does the perception of the human body by the self or others merely aim at appeasing the lust for esh? Bodies are elds of tension. They pulsate between the poles of total relaxation and complete tension, conveying, for instance, a sense of elegance or insecurity. Bodies are also a source of tension. They have the power, especially in a state of nudity, to cause tension in a viewer, awakening feelings of desire or discomfort. Art that is dedicated to depicting exposed bodies is never only concerned with super cial phenomena, but also with the states of the soul. The Wemhöner Collection, with its two-part exhibition satisfy me, explores the highly charged terrain of an aesthetics of nudity that has been shaped by taboos, norms, and transgressions since antiquity. Featuring the works of Kader Attia, and Duane Michals, the rst part of the exhibition (Körper als Spannungsfeld/Bodies as Fields of Tension) presents contemporary positions of artisti- cally staged nudity, which can be linked to two lines of tradition that persist today: the ancient Greek notion of ideal beauty, and the Christian narrative of the fall of man associated with shame, knowledge, and transience. Against the backdrop of heroic or ideal nudity, the works of the artists Yang Fudong and Xu Qu – Chinese contemporary art is a focal point of the Wemhöner Collection – also gain in contour. The second part of the exhibition (Körper als Spannungserreger/Bodies as a Source of Ten- sion) confronts the omnipresence of nudity conveyed by the media in an increasingly exhibi- tionistic society. Not only have divisions between the private and the public become blurred; the ood of images threatens to unleash a frenzy of immodesty. Seen in this light, the works of Roger Ballen, Monica Bonvicini, Asta Gröting and Andreas Mühe strive for a contemporary relationship with the naked body. By shifting the boundaries of shame its demysti cation is sometimes driven so far that a longing for its reenchantment becomes irrefutable.  
Jordan Wolfson
Jordan Wolfson
Berlin - Oberwallstrasse 1
until 01-04-2018

Jordan Wolfson  

Jordan Wolfson  
James Benning
James Benning
Berlin - Linienstrasse 155
until 03-03-2018

James Benning – Found Fragments We are pleased to announce Found Fragments, our fifth exhibition with artist and filmmaker James Benning (b. 1942). Comprising a film installation, painting, sculpture and found objects, the exhibition explores some of the most quietly pervasive narratives of the US political psyche. Benning brings together the struggles of the Navajo people, the Vietnam War, and the life and death of Ernesto ‘Che’ Guevara, weaving them into the story of a recent wild fire, which devastated the Sierra Nevada mountains near the artist’s home. James Benning has created over 25 feature-length films in his 40-year career. Rising to prominence in the late 1970s for his singular work in experimental film, Benning developed a distinct visual language associated with long, real time, single-shot frames, and the use of landscape to convey profound themes. Exploring topics of politics, marginalization of peoples, ecology and technology, Benning often returns to the grand narratives of the US and their hidden undersides. At the center of Found Fragments is a three-channel video installation, discussing the exhibition’s central themes. The left frame, scorched earth (2016), looks into the forest of the Sierra Nevada mountains, California. Here, fire ravaged the land and approached the artist’s home, until the wind finally shifted and took the fire else- where. The scene of burnt timber is almost monochromatic, save for slivers of sunlight passing over it in real time. ‘Scorched earth’ refers in parallel to a military policy, notably used in the 1860s against the Navajo, where- by the US Army burned their crops and homes and stole their livestock to drive them from their land. In the cent- ral frame, Ash 01 (2016), we see the subtitles of the recording from a Boeing B-52, code-named Lilac 02, on its mission on December 26, 1972 – known as ‘the Christmas bombing of Hanoi’. The recording details the cockpit communication as the B-52s strike their targets, dodge anti-aircraft missiles (or SAMs) and discover that one of their planes, code-name Ash 01, has been hit. Meanwhile in the right-most film, RED CLOUD (2016), light from a setting sun passes over a drawing of a Native American figure by an unknown artist, sourced by Benning from a thrift store, and hung on the wall of his home. The natural light illuminates and slowly fades over the work, until it is in complete darkness. Sculptures, paintings and found objects expand Benning’s narratives and their interconnectivity. Monochromatic paintings on the wall correspond to color samples taken from the satellite photos of significant locations: Hanoi, Vietnam; Cedar Creek where the wild fire began in California; Canyon de Chelly, Arizona, from where the Navajo were driven out by the US Army, and La Higuera, Bolivia, where Che Guevera was executed. The paintings were partially burnt by Benning as the fire approached, save for Cedar Creek (2017), which he painted just after the fire. A photograph taken in Vietnam in 1972 records a napalm bomb dropping on the village of Trang Bang. It shows the moment the now-iconic photograph of 9-year-old Kim Phuc was taken, with her skin burning away. Here, Benning reimagines the image of children fleeing, with figures absent. A paper plane, meanwhile, is in- scribed with the words ‘Farmington, NM, April 21, 1974’, which points to the day that three Navajo men were murdered by three, unprovoked high-school students in Farmington, New Mexico. The plane is one of a group made by Benning after Harry Smith (1923 – 1991), an ‘outsider artist’ who amassed a collection of over 250 paper planes, sourced from the streets of New York City. At the Berlin International Film Festival, February 15 – 25, 2018, Benning’s earliest feature film 11 x 14 (1977) is screened in the FORUM section, and a film installation by Benning will be shown as part of the FORUM EXPANDED group exhibition. James Benning lives and works in Val Verde, US. Notable solo exhibitions of his artwork include Decoding Fear, Kunstverein Hamburg, Hamburg (2015) and Kunsthaus Graz, Graz (2014); James Benning, VOX Centre de l’image contemporaine, Montre?al (2014); natural history, Naturhistorisches Museum Wien, Vienna (2014), and One Way Boogie Woogie 2012, Argos, Centre for Art and Media, Brussels (2012). Notable group exhibitions presenting work by James Benning include the Whitney Biennial, New York (1979, 1981, 1983, 1987, 2006, 2014); documenta 12 (2007) and documenta 6 (1977). Screenings of James Benning’s film have been held at numerous institutions worldwide, including Film Society Lincoln Center, New York (2015); Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (2014); Kunstmuseum Basel, Basel (2013); Museum of the Moving Image, New York (2012); Arsenal, Institut fu?r Film und Videokunst, Berlin (2012), and the Whitney Museum of Art, New York (1986).  

James Benning – Found Fragments We are pleased to announce Found Fragments, our fifth exhibition with artist and filmmaker James Benning (b. 1942). Comprising a film installation, painting, sculpture and found objects, the exhibition explores some of the most quietly pervasive narratives of the US political psyche. Benning brings together the struggles of the Navajo people, the Vietnam War, and the life and death of Ernesto ‘Che’ Guevara, weaving them into the story of a recent wild fire, which devastated the Sierra Nevada mountains near the artist’s home. James Benning has created over 25 feature-length films in his 40-year career. Rising to prominence in the late 1970s for his singular work in experimental film, Benning developed a distinct visual language associated with long, real time, single-shot frames, and the use of landscape to convey profound themes. Exploring topics of politics, marginalization of peoples, ecology and technology, Benning often returns to the grand narratives of the US and their hidden undersides. At the center of Found Fragments is a three-channel video installation, discussing the exhibition’s central themes. The left frame, scorched earth (2016), looks into the forest of the Sierra Nevada mountains, California. Here, fire ravaged the land and approached the artist’s home, until the wind finally shifted and took the fire else- where. The scene of burnt timber is almost monochromatic, save for slivers of sunlight passing over it in real time. ‘Scorched earth’ refers in parallel to a military policy, notably used in the 1860s against the Navajo, where- by the US Army burned their crops and homes and stole their livestock to drive them from their land. In the cent- ral frame, Ash 01 (2016), we see the subtitles of the recording from a Boeing B-52, code-named Lilac 02, on its mission on December 26, 1972 – known as ‘the Christmas bombing of Hanoi’. The recording details the cockpit communication as the B-52s strike their targets, dodge anti-aircraft missiles (or SAMs) and discover that one of their planes, code-name Ash 01, has been hit. Meanwhile in the right-most film, RED CLOUD (2016), light from a setting sun passes over a drawing of a Native American figure by an unknown artist, sourced by Benning from a thrift store, and hung on the wall of his home. The natural light illuminates and slowly fades over the work, until it is in complete darkness. Sculptures, paintings and found objects expand Benning’s narratives and their interconnectivity. Monochromatic paintings on the wall correspond to color samples taken from the satellite photos of significant locations: Hanoi, Vietnam; Cedar Creek where the wild fire began in California; Canyon de Chelly, Arizona, from where the Navajo were driven out by the US Army, and La Higuera, Bolivia, where Che Guevera was executed. The paintings were partially burnt by Benning as the fire approached, save for Cedar Creek (2017), which he painted just after the fire. A photograph taken in Vietnam in 1972 records a napalm bomb dropping on the village of Trang Bang. It shows the moment the now-iconic photograph of 9-year-old Kim Phuc was taken, with her skin burning away. Here, Benning reimagines the image of children fleeing, with figures absent. A paper plane, meanwhile, is in- scribed with the words ‘Farmington, NM, April 21, 1974’, which points to the day that three Navajo men were murdered by three, unprovoked high-school students in Farmington, New Mexico. The plane is one of a group made by Benning after Harry Smith (1923 – 1991), an ‘outsider artist’ who amassed a collection of over 250 paper planes, sourced from the streets of New York City. At the Berlin International Film Festival, February 15 – 25, 2018, Benning’s earliest feature film 11 x 14 (1977) is screened in the FORUM section, and a film installation by Benning will be shown as part of the FORUM EXPANDED group exhibition. James Benning lives and works in Val Verde, US. Notable solo exhibitions of his artwork include Decoding Fear, Kunstverein Hamburg, Hamburg (2015) and Kunsthaus Graz, Graz (2014); James Benning, VOX Centre de l’image contemporaine, Montre?al (2014); natural history, Naturhistorisches Museum Wien, Vienna (2014), and One Way Boogie Woogie 2012, Argos, Centre for Art and Media, Brussels (2012). Notable group exhibitions presenting work by James Benning include the Whitney Biennial, New York (1979, 1981, 1983, 1987, 2006, 2014); documenta 12 (2007) and documenta 6 (1977). Screenings of James Benning’s film have been held at numerous institutions worldwide, including Film Society Lincoln Center, New York (2015); Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (2014); Kunstmuseum Basel, Basel (2013); Museum of the Moving Image, New York (2012); Arsenal, Institut fu?r Film und Videokunst, Berlin (2012), and the Whitney Museum of Art, New York (1986).  
Giant Size
Giant Size
Berlin - Bleibtreustrasse 41 / Entrance Mommsenstrasse
until 24-02-2018

Giant Size Feldmann, Sturtevant, Uecker, Roehr, Andre, Afif, White, Braun, Fleury, Manzoni, Rockenschaub, Warhol, Monk, Vaerslev, Opie, Haring, Sixay, Dokoupil  

Giant Size Feldmann, Sturtevant, Uecker, Roehr, Andre, Afif, White, Braun, Fleury, Manzoni, Rockenschaub, Warhol, Monk, Vaerslev, Opie, Haring, Sixay, Dokoupil  
André Butzer
André Butzer
Berlin - Bleibtreustrasse 45
until 03-03-2018

André Butzer – Recent Paintings and an Artist Book Galerie Max Hetzler is pleased to announce the upcoming exhibitions with works by Andre? Butzer in Bleibtreustrasse 45 and Goethestrasse 2/3. For the frst time Galerie Max Hetzler presents such a comprehensive selection of works by Andre? Butzer in two parallel running exhibitions. The gallery space at Bleibtreustrasse displays recent paintings from 2016 and 2017 as well as a new artist book – created in collaboration with Hans Werner Holzwarth (Holzwarth Publications). Whereas the space at Goethestrasse ofers an insight into the early work of the artist with paintings from 1999 to 2008, selected from private collections. Since 2010, Butzer creates the so called “N-Bilder“ (“N-images”). “N” is an artistic measuring conceived by Butzer, which is not a calculable, rational quantity but rather represents a recurring, fertile space. The white, bar-like interstice that clearly determined the buildup of previous “N-Bilder” here is nearly invisible, just vaguely identifable or almost completely closed as a gap. It seems that the “N-Bilder“ approach a fnale, an inevitable target of dissolving the white plane. However, “N“ is an infnite quantity, always incomplete and original. Thus, the now blurry, brownish gap does not describe an end of these images but the potential of a recurring beginning and a continuous recreation. In Butzer's selections of works for Bleibtreustrasse as well as for the artist book a strong parallel can be found. Two works – a more than four meters wide painting (Untitled (Fru?chte), 2016-2017) and a small drawing on paper – clearly stand out. They depict round, colourful faces, recurring “Friedens- Siemens-children“ as Butzer calls them, risen from their coloured background. Vibrant orange and yellow predominate these two works but also blue, green and violet nuances appear. They seem like a returning to the painter's early motifs and are yet very diferent to his previous works. Neither distinct brushwork nor pastose paint application or overlapping areas characterise these paintings. Instead, they continue the painterly achievements of the “N- Bilder“ in total devotion to the liveliness of his work, summon their matured imagery from these and develop them further – images as totalities and “fruits“. While in Goethestrasse selected paintings from private collections introduce into the expressive imagery since 1999, a single new “N-Bild” not only forms the transition to the exhibition at Bleibtreustrasse, but also builds a bridge to the painter's entire creative cosmos (“NASAHEIM“), which resembles a permanent border crossing, thus, experienced from here, determines what makes the work. „Work, ... holds its ground on its own margin; In order to endure, it constantly calls and pulls itself back from an already-no-more into a still-here." - Paul Celan Andre? Butzer (*1973, Stuttgart) lives and works in Rangsdorf near Berlin. His work was presented in several solo shows at institutions, such as Va?xjo? Konsthall (2017); Bayerisches Armeemuseum, Ingoldstadt and Neue Galerie, Gladbeck (both 2016); Kunstverein Reutlingen (2015); Ku?nstlerhaus. Halle fu?r Kunst und Medien, Graz (2014); kestnergesellschaft, Hanover and Kunsthistorisches Museum - CAC Contemporary Art Club im Theseustempel, Vienna (both 2011); Kunsthalle Nu?rnberg (2009) and Kunstverein Heilbronn (2004). Butzer participated in numerous important group exhibitions, most recently at Kunsthalle Krems (2017); Deichtorhallen, Hamburg (2016); Kunsthalle Du?sseldorf (2015); Kunstmuseum Stuttgart (2014); Kunsthalle Emden and MoCA - Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles (both 2013); Museum fu?r Konkrete Kunst, Ingolstadt/Kunstraum Mu?nchen (2012); Kunstmuseum St. Gallen (2011); mumok Wien and ZKM - Museum fu?r Kunst und Medientechnologie, Karlsruhe (both 2008); Carre? d’art – Muse?e d’art contemporain de Ni?mes (2005) as well as Kunsthalle Hamburg (2003). Solo exhibitions at IKOB Museum of Contemporary Art in Eupen and at the Museum of the Light, Yoshii Foundation in Hokuto open in 2018.

André Butzer – Recent Paintings and an Artist Book Galerie Max Hetzler is pleased to announce the upcoming exhibitions with works by Andre? Butzer in Bleibtreustrasse 45 and Goethestrasse 2/3. For the frst time Galerie Max Hetzler presents such a comprehensive selection of works by Andre? Butzer in two parallel running exhibitions. The gallery space at Bleibtreustrasse displays recent paintings from 2016 and 2017 as well as a new artist book – created in collaboration with Hans Werner Holzwarth (Holzwarth Publications). Whereas the space at Goethestrasse ofers an insight into the early work of the artist with paintings from 1999 to 2008, selected from private collections. Since 2010, Butzer creates the so called “N-Bilder“ (“N-images”). “N” is an artistic measuring conceived by Butzer, which is not a calculable, rational quantity but rather represents a recurring, fertile space. The white, bar-like interstice that clearly determined the buildup of previous “N-Bilder” here is nearly invisible, just vaguely identifable or almost completely closed as a gap. It seems that the “N-Bilder“ approach a fnale, an inevitable target of dissolving the white plane. However, “N“ is an infnite quantity, always incomplete and original. Thus, the now blurry, brownish gap does not describe an end of these images but the potential of a recurring beginning and a continuous recreation. In Butzer's selections of works for Bleibtreustrasse as well as for the artist book a strong parallel can be found. Two works – a more than four meters wide painting (Untitled (Fru?chte), 2016-2017) and a small drawing on paper – clearly stand out. They depict round, colourful faces, recurring “Friedens- Siemens-children“ as Butzer calls them, risen from their coloured background. Vibrant orange and yellow predominate these two works but also blue, green and violet nuances appear. They seem like a returning to the painter's early motifs and are yet very diferent to his previous works. Neither distinct brushwork nor pastose paint application or overlapping areas characterise these paintings. Instead, they continue the painterly achievements of the “N- Bilder“ in total devotion to the liveliness of his work, summon their matured imagery from these and develop them further – images as totalities and “fruits“. While in Goethestrasse selected paintings from private collections introduce into the expressive imagery since 1999, a single new “N-Bild” not only forms the transition to the exhibition at Bleibtreustrasse, but also builds a bridge to the painter's entire creative cosmos (“NASAHEIM“), which resembles a permanent border crossing, thus, experienced from here, determines what makes the work. „Work, ... holds its ground on its own margin; In order to endure, it constantly calls and pulls itself back from an already-no-more into a still-here." - Paul Celan Andre? Butzer (*1973, Stuttgart) lives and works in Rangsdorf near Berlin. His work was presented in several solo shows at institutions, such as Va?xjo? Konsthall (2017); Bayerisches Armeemuseum, Ingoldstadt and Neue Galerie, Gladbeck (both 2016); Kunstverein Reutlingen (2015); Ku?nstlerhaus. Halle fu?r Kunst und Medien, Graz (2014); kestnergesellschaft, Hanover and Kunsthistorisches Museum - CAC Contemporary Art Club im Theseustempel, Vienna (both 2011); Kunsthalle Nu?rnberg (2009) and Kunstverein Heilbronn (2004). Butzer participated in numerous important group exhibitions, most recently at Kunsthalle Krems (2017); Deichtorhallen, Hamburg (2016); Kunsthalle Du?sseldorf (2015); Kunstmuseum Stuttgart (2014); Kunsthalle Emden and MoCA - Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles (both 2013); Museum fu?r Konkrete Kunst, Ingolstadt/Kunstraum Mu?nchen (2012); Kunstmuseum St. Gallen (2011); mumok Wien and ZKM - Museum fu?r Kunst und Medientechnologie, Karlsruhe (both 2008); Carre? d’art – Muse?e d’art contemporain de Ni?mes (2005) as well as Kunsthalle Hamburg (2003). Solo exhibitions at IKOB Museum of Contemporary Art in Eupen and at the Museum of the Light, Yoshii Foundation in Hokuto open in 2018.
Mischa Kuball
Mischa Kuball
Berlin - Lindenstrasse 9?14
until 31-12-2018

Mischa Kuball – res•o•nant  The Jewish Museum Berlin is exhibiting res·o·nant—a walk-through light and sound installation by conceptual artist Mischa Kuball. Kuball created the installation specially for the new exhibition space on the lower ground floor of the Libeskind building. Covering a total floor space of more than 350 square meters, res·o·nant incorporates two of the five voids that perforate the museum building. These symbolically laden empty spaces form the starting point for the artist’s work, which refers to the materiality, effect and signification of the voids. Museum visitors will thus have the opportunity to re-discover these two voids, which have become something of a Museum trademark since the opening of the Museum in 2001. In these rooms with 24-meter-high ceilings, rotating projectors cast light fields in the shape of the outline of the voids onto walls and ceiling. By means of rotating mirror elements and stroboscopic light impulses, there arises, in the words of the artist, a "resonance between architecture and skin." As an important element of the installation, several loudspeakers, distributed throughout the room, loop a series of 60-second-long sound clips—so-called skits—which were composed specially for res·o·nant by more than 50 musicians. From now through the summer of 2019, various interventions are also planned in several popular outdoor spaces throughout the city of Berlin. Besides performances and concerts, the outlines of the Museum voids will also be projected onto public spaces; and the physical borders of the Museum thus blurred or displaced. Mischa Kuball, born 1959 in Düsseldorf, has worked since 1977 in public and institutional spaces. Using the medium of light, he explores architectural spaces and their social and political discourses. He takes up and manipulates various aspects of a public space, from its cultural and social structures through architectural intrusions, in order to emphasize or re-code the trademark effect they produce or the position they have assumed in an art- and architecture-historical context. Since 2007, Mischa Kuball has been Professor for Public Art at the Academy of Media Arts Cologne (Kunsthochschule für Medien Köln), Associate Professor of Media Arts at the Karlsruhe University of Arts and Design (Hochschule für Gestaltung/ZKM, Karlsruhe), and since 2015 a member of the Academy of Arts and Sciences of North Rhine- Westphalia in Düsseldorf. In January 2016, he was awarded the German Prize for Light Art.

Mischa Kuball – res•o•nant  The Jewish Museum Berlin is exhibiting res·o·nant—a walk-through light and sound installation by conceptual artist Mischa Kuball. Kuball created the installation specially for the new exhibition space on the lower ground floor of the Libeskind building. Covering a total floor space of more than 350 square meters, res·o·nant incorporates two of the five voids that perforate the museum building. These symbolically laden empty spaces form the starting point for the artist’s work, which refers to the materiality, effect and signification of the voids. Museum visitors will thus have the opportunity to re-discover these two voids, which have become something of a Museum trademark since the opening of the Museum in 2001. In these rooms with 24-meter-high ceilings, rotating projectors cast light fields in the shape of the outline of the voids onto walls and ceiling. By means of rotating mirror elements and stroboscopic light impulses, there arises, in the words of the artist, a "resonance between architecture and skin." As an important element of the installation, several loudspeakers, distributed throughout the room, loop a series of 60-second-long sound clips—so-called skits—which were composed specially for res·o·nant by more than 50 musicians. From now through the summer of 2019, various interventions are also planned in several popular outdoor spaces throughout the city of Berlin. Besides performances and concerts, the outlines of the Museum voids will also be projected onto public spaces; and the physical borders of the Museum thus blurred or displaced. Mischa Kuball, born 1959 in Düsseldorf, has worked since 1977 in public and institutional spaces. Using the medium of light, he explores architectural spaces and their social and political discourses. He takes up and manipulates various aspects of a public space, from its cultural and social structures through architectural intrusions, in order to emphasize or re-code the trademark effect they produce or the position they have assumed in an art- and architecture-historical context. Since 2007, Mischa Kuball has been Professor for Public Art at the Academy of Media Arts Cologne (Kunsthochschule für Medien Köln), Associate Professor of Media Arts at the Karlsruhe University of Arts and Design (Hochschule für Gestaltung/ZKM, Karlsruhe), and since 2015 a member of the Academy of Arts and Sciences of North Rhine- Westphalia in Düsseldorf. In January 2016, he was awarded the German Prize for Light Art.
Sofia Hultén
Sofia Hultén
Basel - Paul Sacher-Anlage 2
until 01-05-2018

Sofia Hultén – Here’s the Answer, What’s the Question? As its first exhibition of 2018, Museum Tinguely is showing sculptures, installations and videos by Berlin-based artist Sofia Hultén (born 1972 in Stockholm). Hultén’s works start with found objects – unremarkable everyday items or materials from the world of DIY stores and workshops. Via a series of methodical manipulations that sometimes verge on the absurd, she examines these things that are marked by their previous lives or processes them into new arrangements.   In many cases, she sticks to minimal surface interventions that focus on the object’s (supposed) past of usage and decay, shaking up the sequence of these phases. With forensic precision she replicates the wear and tear on a weather-beaten chest of drawers, for example, pulps discarded sections of particle board only to immediately cast them back into their original form, or uses the props from a tennis match to reconstruct the various possible outcomes of a situation on the side-lines. The shifts she imposes on these objects are sometimes based on fantastic notions from science fiction, but more often they point to concepts from philosophy and quantum physics that cast doubt on the constant, linear nature of time and matter. n Hultén’s hands, such banal things as a broken cup, the contents of a found toolbox, a graffiti-covered rolling shutter, or a collection of used scissor jacks cause major questions to be addressed to a material world that may not be as solid as it looks. Her play on space and time is never free of (self-)irony and, besides a sense of rhythm and poetry, in its almost megalomaniac implications it displays an absurd sense of humour. With a feel for detail and the magnificence of the easily overlooked, Hultén’s works also encourage us to engage more closely with things that usually remain on the margins of our attention but which exert a decisive influence on our everyday lives.  

Sofia Hultén – Here’s the Answer, What’s the Question? As its first exhibition of 2018, Museum Tinguely is showing sculptures, installations and videos by Berlin-based artist Sofia Hultén (born 1972 in Stockholm). Hultén’s works start with found objects – unremarkable everyday items or materials from the world of DIY stores and workshops. Via a series of methodical manipulations that sometimes verge on the absurd, she examines these things that are marked by their previous lives or processes them into new arrangements.   In many cases, she sticks to minimal surface interventions that focus on the object’s (supposed) past of usage and decay, shaking up the sequence of these phases. With forensic precision she replicates the wear and tear on a weather-beaten chest of drawers, for example, pulps discarded sections of particle board only to immediately cast them back into their original form, or uses the props from a tennis match to reconstruct the various possible outcomes of a situation on the side-lines. The shifts she imposes on these objects are sometimes based on fantastic notions from science fiction, but more often they point to concepts from philosophy and quantum physics that cast doubt on the constant, linear nature of time and matter. n Hultén’s hands, such banal things as a broken cup, the contents of a found toolbox, a graffiti-covered rolling shutter, or a collection of used scissor jacks cause major questions to be addressed to a material world that may not be as solid as it looks. Her play on space and time is never free of (self-)irony and, besides a sense of rhythm and poetry, in its almost megalomaniac implications it displays an absurd sense of humour. With a feel for detail and the magnificence of the easily overlooked, Hultén’s works also encourage us to engage more closely with things that usually remain on the margins of our attention but which exert a decisive influence on our everyday lives.  
Bob & Robertha Smith
Bob & Robertha Smith
Basel - Kannenfeldplatz 6
until 24-03-2018

Bob & Robertha Smith – The Whole World Is an Art School!  

Bob & Robertha Smith – The Whole World Is an Art School!  
Future Love
Future Love
Basel - Freilager-Platz 9
until 15-04-2018

Future Love. Desire and Kinship in Hypernature Micha Cárdenas (US), Chloé Delarue (CH), Olga Fedorova (RU), Ed Fornieles (UK), Joey Holder (UK), Karen Lancel & Hermen Maat (NL),  Mary Maggic (US), Dmitry Morozov (RU), Špela Petri? (SI), Wong Ping (HK), Tabita Rezaire (FR), Una Szeemann (CH), Pinar Yoldas (TR/US), !Mediengruppe Bitnik (CH) The group exhibition "Future Love" examines the impact of new technologies and social media on our affective relationships and sexuality. Never has the future of our emotional, sexual and familial relationships appeared more exciting, promising and troubled as today. Biotechnologies are presenting alternative means of reproduction, altering gender roles and their biological boundaries, while also challenging the traditional structures of family ties. New industrial products offer to fulfill unconventional sexual fantasies, which can be realised through both physical and virtual realties. Global connectivity allows for the circulation of alternative models of love and sexuality, which continue to provoke ideological debates among puritans and liberals, but are increasingly accepted by the wider population. This new interdependance of technology, engineering and environment constitutes a new concept: hypernature, an enhanced version of the ecosystem including artificial bodies and their correlations. In this context, some of the most farsighted theorists question our predominating role in the ecosphere, inciting us to go beyond the common discourses about the Anthropocene, while discussing our imperative instincts for reproduction and survival.  This debate prompts us to rethink our identities and our behaviours. Have the recent developments of new technologies and social media fundamentally changed our relationships and sexualities? What influence do they have on our ideas of love, family, and gender roles? Moving from a postdigital background, the international artists participating in this exhibition tackle these questions through a variety of media, from biotechnologies to virtual reality. They give shape to diverse, personal visions regarding our current sexual and romantic inclinations, including aspects not only related to personal romance, but also to sexuality as a sign of affection, a reproductive process or a recreational act. Tabita Rezaire, for instance, creates videos installations in which she merges elements of traditional African culture with cyberfuturism to generate healing mantras subverting the western, patriarchal positions on sexuality, while Wong Ping’s flashing animations touch upon sexual repressions and frustrations. Una Szeemann produces 3D printed sculptures that are the result of her meditations, under hypnosis, of modern-day romance in the age of dating-apps, while !Mediengruppe Bitnik display the cynical mechanics underlying precisely these online services. Artist and activist Micha Cardenas has developed apps that are specifically conceived for transgender users, to fill a gap in a market heavily determined by heteronormative models. Correspondingly, Mary Maggic creates fictional documentaries describing DIY protocols for hacking oestrogen, to discuss trans and women's access to such hormones. Some artists, such as Pinar Yoldas and Špela Petri?, speculate about biotechnologies and the possibility of giving birth to designer children or even new species, while the works of Dmitry Morozov (alias ::vtol::) and Karen Lancel & Hermen Maat explore how bio-feedback and wearable devices offer a means to record, analyse and possibly enhance our sexual behaviours. Works of virtual reality such as the ones by Ed Fornieles allow for the experience of unsettling encounters with unexpected partners. Lastly, the compound installations by Joey Holder, Chloé Delarue and Olga Fedorova give shape to visionary and emblematic representations of our modern-day troubled sexuality.  The exhibition "Future Love" offers critical, unconventional and imaginative views on our impending life while commenting on the present evolution of society and the imminent changes, challenges and opportunities that might affect our behaviours. The works on display are speculative, critical and at times utopic, inviting us to contemplate our models of affective relationships that define our condition as human beings and our presence in the ecosphere.  Curator: Boris Magrini

Future Love. Desire and Kinship in Hypernature Micha Cárdenas (US), Chloé Delarue (CH), Olga Fedorova (RU), Ed Fornieles (UK), Joey Holder (UK), Karen Lancel & Hermen Maat (NL),  Mary Maggic (US), Dmitry Morozov (RU), Špela Petri? (SI), Wong Ping (HK), Tabita Rezaire (FR), Una Szeemann (CH), Pinar Yoldas (TR/US), !Mediengruppe Bitnik (CH) The group exhibition "Future Love" examines the impact of new technologies and social media on our affective relationships and sexuality. Never has the future of our emotional, sexual and familial relationships appeared more exciting, promising and troubled as today. Biotechnologies are presenting alternative means of reproduction, altering gender roles and their biological boundaries, while also challenging the traditional structures of family ties. New industrial products offer to fulfill unconventional sexual fantasies, which can be realised through both physical and virtual realties. Global connectivity allows for the circulation of alternative models of love and sexuality, which continue to provoke ideological debates among puritans and liberals, but are increasingly accepted by the wider population. This new interdependance of technology, engineering and environment constitutes a new concept: hypernature, an enhanced version of the ecosystem including artificial bodies and their correlations. In this context, some of the most farsighted theorists question our predominating role in the ecosphere, inciting us to go beyond the common discourses about the Anthropocene, while discussing our imperative instincts for reproduction and survival.  This debate prompts us to rethink our identities and our behaviours. Have the recent developments of new technologies and social media fundamentally changed our relationships and sexualities? What influence do they have on our ideas of love, family, and gender roles? Moving from a postdigital background, the international artists participating in this exhibition tackle these questions through a variety of media, from biotechnologies to virtual reality. They give shape to diverse, personal visions regarding our current sexual and romantic inclinations, including aspects not only related to personal romance, but also to sexuality as a sign of affection, a reproductive process or a recreational act. Tabita Rezaire, for instance, creates videos installations in which she merges elements of traditional African culture with cyberfuturism to generate healing mantras subverting the western, patriarchal positions on sexuality, while Wong Ping’s flashing animations touch upon sexual repressions and frustrations. Una Szeemann produces 3D printed sculptures that are the result of her meditations, under hypnosis, of modern-day romance in the age of dating-apps, while !Mediengruppe Bitnik display the cynical mechanics underlying precisely these online services. Artist and activist Micha Cardenas has developed apps that are specifically conceived for transgender users, to fill a gap in a market heavily determined by heteronormative models. Correspondingly, Mary Maggic creates fictional documentaries describing DIY protocols for hacking oestrogen, to discuss trans and women's access to such hormones. Some artists, such as Pinar Yoldas and Špela Petri?, speculate about biotechnologies and the possibility of giving birth to designer children or even new species, while the works of Dmitry Morozov (alias ::vtol::) and Karen Lancel & Hermen Maat explore how bio-feedback and wearable devices offer a means to record, analyse and possibly enhance our sexual behaviours. Works of virtual reality such as the ones by Ed Fornieles allow for the experience of unsettling encounters with unexpected partners. Lastly, the compound installations by Joey Holder, Chloé Delarue and Olga Fedorova give shape to visionary and emblematic representations of our modern-day troubled sexuality.  The exhibition "Future Love" offers critical, unconventional and imaginative views on our impending life while commenting on the present evolution of society and the imminent changes, challenges and opportunities that might affect our behaviours. The works on display are speculative, critical and at times utopic, inviting us to contemplate our models of affective relationships that define our condition as human beings and our presence in the ecosphere.  Curator: Boris Magrini
Yuri Ancarani
Yuri Ancarani
Basel - Steinenberg 7
until 29-04-2018

Yuri Ancarani – Sculture This first solo exhibition in Switzerland and first exhibition ever to survey the output of the Italian artist-filmmaker Yuri Ancarani will span his production from 2010 to the present, including a new film installation conceived for the occasion. Such an exhibition is perfectly poised to highlight this seminal artist’s impressive career and to present an overview of his films in the artistic context for which his films were originally made. It is also a timely moment to allow audiences who might know one or more film to view the precision and poetry of his fascinating vision across the last 10 years of his practice.  

Yuri Ancarani – Sculture This first solo exhibition in Switzerland and first exhibition ever to survey the output of the Italian artist-filmmaker Yuri Ancarani will span his production from 2010 to the present, including a new film installation conceived for the occasion. Such an exhibition is perfectly poised to highlight this seminal artist’s impressive career and to present an overview of his films in the artistic context for which his films were originally made. It is also a timely moment to allow audiences who might know one or more film to view the precision and poetry of his fascinating vision across the last 10 years of his practice.  
Liu Xiaohui
Liu Xiaohui
Beijing - Airport Side Road
until 09-04-2018

Liu Xiaohui – Movements ShanghART Beijing is pleased to present Liu Xiaohui's first solo exhibition "Movements" at the gallery, opening on 4th March, 2018. The exhibition showcases the artist's latest works in recent three years. Liu Xiaohui's new works have gradually switched from a painting style with a hint of narrative to an exploration of the ontology of painting which is more reliable and realistic. The distinct order he has once established are at once challenged. In his recent works, the movement of dressing or undressing makes the overall compositions destabilized for the first time. Abrupt plants (in other words, the color blocks in green, yellow and black) "grow" in a paradoxical world where truth and falsehood are hard to distinguish. They are alienating object that competed for space on his canvas. For the artist, the subjects of paintings are not clearly constructed by himself; they are more like the outcome of the artist's accumulation of experiences. Before touching on the "truthfulness", he continues to confront the struggles and breakthroughs of the individual from the external world, which also reflect his repetitive query of "truthfulness". From this perspective, every brushstroke on canvas becomes a self-imposed mystery. Liu Xiaohui was born in Shandong Province, China, in 1975, and moved to Beijing in 1991. He graduated from Central Academy of Fine Arts (CAFA) High School, and subsequently got his bachelor and master degrees from CAFA. In 2007, he was invited to London for an exchange program. He currently teaches at the Mural Painting Department of CAFA. Practicing primarily as a painter, Liu centers the structure of his practice closely around life, taking it as the source of clue (or path). By employing a painterly language and tireless repeating analysis of color, the artist both affirms and denies perennially the immediate experience. He constantly deliberates and refines non-referring subject matters and ordinary scenes. Finally, Liu aims at accurate expression of truth from an oriental view via permeating effect of quality and quantity.

Liu Xiaohui – Movements ShanghART Beijing is pleased to present Liu Xiaohui's first solo exhibition "Movements" at the gallery, opening on 4th March, 2018. The exhibition showcases the artist's latest works in recent three years. Liu Xiaohui's new works have gradually switched from a painting style with a hint of narrative to an exploration of the ontology of painting which is more reliable and realistic. The distinct order he has once established are at once challenged. In his recent works, the movement of dressing or undressing makes the overall compositions destabilized for the first time. Abrupt plants (in other words, the color blocks in green, yellow and black) "grow" in a paradoxical world where truth and falsehood are hard to distinguish. They are alienating object that competed for space on his canvas. For the artist, the subjects of paintings are not clearly constructed by himself; they are more like the outcome of the artist's accumulation of experiences. Before touching on the "truthfulness", he continues to confront the struggles and breakthroughs of the individual from the external world, which also reflect his repetitive query of "truthfulness". From this perspective, every brushstroke on canvas becomes a self-imposed mystery. Liu Xiaohui was born in Shandong Province, China, in 1975, and moved to Beijing in 1991. He graduated from Central Academy of Fine Arts (CAFA) High School, and subsequently got his bachelor and master degrees from CAFA. In 2007, he was invited to London for an exchange program. He currently teaches at the Mural Painting Department of CAFA. Practicing primarily as a painter, Liu centers the structure of his practice closely around life, taking it as the source of clue (or path). By employing a painterly language and tireless repeating analysis of color, the artist both affirms and denies perennially the immediate experience. He constantly deliberates and refines non-referring subject matters and ordinary scenes. Finally, Liu aims at accurate expression of truth from an oriental view via permeating effect of quality and quantity.
Wolfgang Tillmans
Wolfgang Tillmans
Cologne - Neven-Du Mont-Strasse 17
until 07-04-2018

Wolfgang Tillmans – Fest Galerie Buchholz is delighted to announce a new exhibition by Wolfgang Tillmans coinciding with the 25th anniversary of our collaboration with the artist. This collaboration began in 1993 with Wolfgang Tillmans’ exhibition at Buchholz & Buchholz in Cologne, his very first solo gallery exhibition. Even then, Tillmans brought together in one installation the various mediums and formats which his work inhabits – c-prints, alongside magazine pages and photocopies – thus developing the unique, multifaceted hanging scheme that has become a key signature of his work. Fest is Wolfgang Tillmans’ eleventh solo exhibition at Galerie Buchholz, which will once again be held in our Cologne gallery on the occasion of this anniversary. Tillmans will be presenting a diverse spectrum of works from his current practice, including new still lifes, landscape photographs, (self-) portraits, and a new video work. Wolfgang Tillmans (born 1968 in Remscheid) lives and works in Berlin and London. From 1990 to 1992, he studied at the Bournemouth & Poole College of Art and Design. In 2000, he was the first photographer and first non-British artist to win the Turner Prize. In 2015, he was awarded the Hasselblad Foundation International Award in Photography. In 2018, Tillmans will be the recipient of the Kaiserring, the prestigious art prize awarded by the city of Goslar. In recent years, his work has been the subject of solo exhibitions at a number of institutions, including Kunsthalle Zürich (2012), Moderna Museet in Stockholm (2012/2013), K21 in Düsseldorf (2013), the National Museum of Art in Osaka (2015), Serralves Museum in Porto (2016), Tate Modern in London (2017), Fondation Beyeler in Basel (2017), and Kunstverein Hamburg (2017). In January 2018, Tillmans opened a solo exhibition at Musée d’Art Contemporain et de Multimédias in Kinshasa, the first stop of an exhibition tour of Africa and Asia organized by the Institut für Auslandsbeziehungen (ifa). Since the 1990s, Wolfgang Tillmans has produced numerous publications and editorials, nearly all conceived and designed by the artist himself. The latest of these (released in December 2017) is the 64th Jahresring. Entitled What is Different?, the book is guest-edited by Tillmans and published by the Association of Arts and Culture of the German Economy (Kulturkreis der Deutschen Wirtschaft). Since 2016, Wolfgang Tillmans has put renewed focus on his enduring interest in music, producing his own songs and music videos, as well as making live appearances as a musician and DJ. The artist’s fourth vinyl 12-inch, Heute Will Ich Frei Sein EP, will be released on his label Fragile concurrently with this exhibition and will be presented in the shop window of Antiquariat Buchholz.

Wolfgang Tillmans – Fest Galerie Buchholz is delighted to announce a new exhibition by Wolfgang Tillmans coinciding with the 25th anniversary of our collaboration with the artist. This collaboration began in 1993 with Wolfgang Tillmans’ exhibition at Buchholz & Buchholz in Cologne, his very first solo gallery exhibition. Even then, Tillmans brought together in one installation the various mediums and formats which his work inhabits – c-prints, alongside magazine pages and photocopies – thus developing the unique, multifaceted hanging scheme that has become a key signature of his work. Fest is Wolfgang Tillmans’ eleventh solo exhibition at Galerie Buchholz, which will once again be held in our Cologne gallery on the occasion of this anniversary. Tillmans will be presenting a diverse spectrum of works from his current practice, including new still lifes, landscape photographs, (self-) portraits, and a new video work. Wolfgang Tillmans (born 1968 in Remscheid) lives and works in Berlin and London. From 1990 to 1992, he studied at the Bournemouth & Poole College of Art and Design. In 2000, he was the first photographer and first non-British artist to win the Turner Prize. In 2015, he was awarded the Hasselblad Foundation International Award in Photography. In 2018, Tillmans will be the recipient of the Kaiserring, the prestigious art prize awarded by the city of Goslar. In recent years, his work has been the subject of solo exhibitions at a number of institutions, including Kunsthalle Zürich (2012), Moderna Museet in Stockholm (2012/2013), K21 in Düsseldorf (2013), the National Museum of Art in Osaka (2015), Serralves Museum in Porto (2016), Tate Modern in London (2017), Fondation Beyeler in Basel (2017), and Kunstverein Hamburg (2017). In January 2018, Tillmans opened a solo exhibition at Musée d’Art Contemporain et de Multimédias in Kinshasa, the first stop of an exhibition tour of Africa and Asia organized by the Institut für Auslandsbeziehungen (ifa). Since the 1990s, Wolfgang Tillmans has produced numerous publications and editorials, nearly all conceived and designed by the artist himself. The latest of these (released in December 2017) is the 64th Jahresring. Entitled What is Different?, the book is guest-edited by Tillmans and published by the Association of Arts and Culture of the German Economy (Kulturkreis der Deutschen Wirtschaft). Since 2016, Wolfgang Tillmans has put renewed focus on his enduring interest in music, producing his own songs and music videos, as well as making live appearances as a musician and DJ. The artist’s fourth vinyl 12-inch, Heute Will Ich Frei Sein EP, will be released on his label Fragile concurrently with this exhibition and will be presented in the shop window of Antiquariat Buchholz.
Talia Chetrit
Talia Chetrit
Cologne - Hahnenstrasse 6
until 25-03-2018

Talia Chetrit – Showcaller The photographic work of Talia Chetrit (B.1982, Washington D.C.) is characterized by a remarkable compositional sophistication and visual power, accompanied by a stringent programmatic objective. Her work includes self-portraits, portraits of family members, lovers, and friends, nudes, still lifes, and cityscapes that continuously reveal various intentional references to art history. Chetrit occasionally draws from photographs taken during her youth and re-contextualizes these images by inserting them into her current practice through a selective editing process. Regardless of the respective subject matter or approach to the development of each image, her interest resides in researching and disclosing the basic social, conceptual, and technical conditions of the genre of photography. As a result, her work is imbued with the desire to control the physical and historical limitations of the camera, to follow its manipulative potential, and to call the relationship between the photographer and the image into question. The exhibition Showcaller, which Chetrit conceived especially for the Kölnischer Kunstverein, comprises a group of predominately new and revisited works that give exemplary insight into her practice. The presentation includes an extensive series of pictures titled Streets, which depict lively and inhabited views of New York City. Through the use of tight cropping of grainy negatives, the city and its people become an unknowing and abstracted network of bodies over which Chetrit can command her own manipulated narratives. Taken from afar and through the windows of various buildings, the distance between Chetrit’s pervasive lens and her unwitting subjects’ anonymity is further emphasized.   In the context of the exhibition, this series of works is juxtaposed with photographs that convey an alternative perspective, and instead instill a pronounced sense of intimacy through the conspicuous disclosure of private moments. A large-format diptych, for example, depicts the artist and her partner having sex. Imaged against a blooming landscape, neither of the subjects seem aware of the camera’s austere gaze. The viewer is tethered to the scene by the twisting cord of the camera's cable release, in such a way that we are reminded, once again, of our own position in the construction of images.  

Talia Chetrit – Showcaller The photographic work of Talia Chetrit (B.1982, Washington D.C.) is characterized by a remarkable compositional sophistication and visual power, accompanied by a stringent programmatic objective. Her work includes self-portraits, portraits of family members, lovers, and friends, nudes, still lifes, and cityscapes that continuously reveal various intentional references to art history. Chetrit occasionally draws from photographs taken during her youth and re-contextualizes these images by inserting them into her current practice through a selective editing process. Regardless of the respective subject matter or approach to the development of each image, her interest resides in researching and disclosing the basic social, conceptual, and technical conditions of the genre of photography. As a result, her work is imbued with the desire to control the physical and historical limitations of the camera, to follow its manipulative potential, and to call the relationship between the photographer and the image into question. The exhibition Showcaller, which Chetrit conceived especially for the Kölnischer Kunstverein, comprises a group of predominately new and revisited works that give exemplary insight into her practice. The presentation includes an extensive series of pictures titled Streets, which depict lively and inhabited views of New York City. Through the use of tight cropping of grainy negatives, the city and its people become an unknowing and abstracted network of bodies over which Chetrit can command her own manipulated narratives. Taken from afar and through the windows of various buildings, the distance between Chetrit’s pervasive lens and her unwitting subjects’ anonymity is further emphasized.   In the context of the exhibition, this series of works is juxtaposed with photographs that convey an alternative perspective, and instead instill a pronounced sense of intimacy through the conspicuous disclosure of private moments. A large-format diptych, for example, depicts the artist and her partner having sex. Imaged against a blooming landscape, neither of the subjects seem aware of the camera’s austere gaze. The viewer is tethered to the scene by the twisting cord of the camera's cable release, in such a way that we are reminded, once again, of our own position in the construction of images.  
Artist's Rooms
Artist's Rooms
Düsseldorf - Ständehausstrasse 1
until 31-03-2018

Artist's Rooms Alexandra Bircken, Christian Boltanski, Ulla von Brandenburg, Janet Cardiff/George Bures Miller, Hans-Peter Feldmann, Diango Hernández, Thomas Hirschhorn, Imi Knoebel, Peter Kogler, Eva Kot´átková, Inge Mahn, Pamela Rosenkranz, Tomás Saraceno, James Turrell, Franz West? Since 2010, the K21 has served as a forum for international artists and a venue for contemporary works from the collection. Intensive encounters with space-specificart are offered by 22 continuously changing rooms which are distributed throughout three levels. Selected contemporary artists are invited to show projects for a period of one year, thereby entering into a dialogue with the architecture and with works from the permanent collection. The new installations, which will be on view throughout 2017, will emphasize quasi-theatrical staging and architectural extensions of the surrounding space.

Artist's Rooms Alexandra Bircken, Christian Boltanski, Ulla von Brandenburg, Janet Cardiff/George Bures Miller, Hans-Peter Feldmann, Diango Hernández, Thomas Hirschhorn, Imi Knoebel, Peter Kogler, Eva Kot´átková, Inge Mahn, Pamela Rosenkranz, Tomás Saraceno, James Turrell, Franz West? Since 2010, the K21 has served as a forum for international artists and a venue for contemporary works from the collection. Intensive encounters with space-specificart are offered by 22 continuously changing rooms which are distributed throughout three levels. Selected contemporary artists are invited to show projects for a period of one year, thereby entering into a dialogue with the architecture and with works from the permanent collection. The new installations, which will be on view throughout 2017, will emphasize quasi-theatrical staging and architectural extensions of the surrounding space.
Generation Loss
Generation Loss
Düsseldorf - Schanzenstrasse 54
until 10-07-2018

Generation Loss. 10 Years of the Julia Stoschek Collection Eleanor Antin, Ed Atkins & Simon Thompson, Charles Atlas, Lutz Bacher, Lynda Benglis, Bernadette Corporation, Johanna Billing, Dara Birnbaum, Hannah Black, Chris Burden, Matt Calderwood, Patty Chang, Ian Cheng, Jen DeNike, Nathalie Djurberg & Hans Berg, Cheryl Donegan, Trisha Donnelly, Cao Fei, Peter Fischli & David Weiss, Dara Friedman, Cyprien Gaillard, Douglas Gordon, Barbara Hammer, Christian Jankowski, Joan Jonas, Jesper Just, Imi Knoebel, Mark Leckey, Klara Lidén, Gordon Matta-Clark, Paul McCarthy, Lutz Mommartz, Bruce Nauman, Jon Rafman, Lucy Raven, Reynold Reynolds & Patrick Jolley, James Richards, Rachel Rose, Jack Smith, Wolfgang Tillmans, Ulay & Marina Abramovi?, Steina Vasulka, Klaus vom Bruch, Hannah Wilke, Jordan Wolfson, Tobias Zielony After more than 15 exhibitions and eight international collaborative projects attracting over 100,000 visitors, JULIA STOSCHEK COLLECTION is now celebrating its 10th anniversary in June this year. The anniversary exhibition titled “Generation Loss” is being conceived in collaboration with British artist Ed Atkins. As a singularly holistic technology, video has maintained its status as the most popular medium. In the last decade the distribution of video has become simpler in terms of access, and more complex as regards the mode of distribution itself.The technological advances that account for these changes pervade artistic practice particularly, pragmatically as well as conceptually: Not only new reflexively approached formats abound, but new modes of behavior, communication and forms of representation, forms that are able to decisively alter our perception. Unique among art forms, artist moving image has always been singularly driven by the medium, as it moves within the mainstream – cleaving, albeit critically, to the technologies’ processes of fidelity and capitalistic progress. The term “Generation Loss” generally refers to the process of a qualitative loss in successively copied data. Everything that reduces the representative quality as copies of data are made, can be regarded as a form of ‘generation loss’. However, this holds true not just for data formats or material media, but also manifests itself in an ideological sense in politics, culture, nature, from one generation to the next. The basic idea of the exhibition concept is to show the ways in which generations of artists affect one another; the discourses that awkwardly straddle technology-specific periods of artists’ moving image makers; how influence may auger revolt, revision, renewed accord; how artists’ moving image is a uniquely reactive, dependent medium whose intimacy with the vicissitudes of mainstream tech confers a kind of automatic collusion with the culture at large that is pretty much unique to it – to moving image works. Formally, the exhibition will very visibly connect works, in a sort of straightforward, socially demonstrative way: projected works will be screened in choreographed sequences and in proximity to one another. This will be partially achieved using acoustic glass to divide the works and effectively block sound leaks, but allows you to see through to other spaces, works. We plan to pretty much do away with the preeminent, isolated black box of video installation. No work alone, all works in relation.  

Generation Loss. 10 Years of the Julia Stoschek Collection Eleanor Antin, Ed Atkins & Simon Thompson, Charles Atlas, Lutz Bacher, Lynda Benglis, Bernadette Corporation, Johanna Billing, Dara Birnbaum, Hannah Black, Chris Burden, Matt Calderwood, Patty Chang, Ian Cheng, Jen DeNike, Nathalie Djurberg & Hans Berg, Cheryl Donegan, Trisha Donnelly, Cao Fei, Peter Fischli & David Weiss, Dara Friedman, Cyprien Gaillard, Douglas Gordon, Barbara Hammer, Christian Jankowski, Joan Jonas, Jesper Just, Imi Knoebel, Mark Leckey, Klara Lidén, Gordon Matta-Clark, Paul McCarthy, Lutz Mommartz, Bruce Nauman, Jon Rafman, Lucy Raven, Reynold Reynolds & Patrick Jolley, James Richards, Rachel Rose, Jack Smith, Wolfgang Tillmans, Ulay & Marina Abramovi?, Steina Vasulka, Klaus vom Bruch, Hannah Wilke, Jordan Wolfson, Tobias Zielony After more than 15 exhibitions and eight international collaborative projects attracting over 100,000 visitors, JULIA STOSCHEK COLLECTION is now celebrating its 10th anniversary in June this year. The anniversary exhibition titled “Generation Loss” is being conceived in collaboration with British artist Ed Atkins. As a singularly holistic technology, video has maintained its status as the most popular medium. In the last decade the distribution of video has become simpler in terms of access, and more complex as regards the mode of distribution itself.The technological advances that account for these changes pervade artistic practice particularly, pragmatically as well as conceptually: Not only new reflexively approached formats abound, but new modes of behavior, communication and forms of representation, forms that are able to decisively alter our perception. Unique among art forms, artist moving image has always been singularly driven by the medium, as it moves within the mainstream – cleaving, albeit critically, to the technologies’ processes of fidelity and capitalistic progress. The term “Generation Loss” generally refers to the process of a qualitative loss in successively copied data. Everything that reduces the representative quality as copies of data are made, can be regarded as a form of ‘generation loss’. However, this holds true not just for data formats or material media, but also manifests itself in an ideological sense in politics, culture, nature, from one generation to the next. The basic idea of the exhibition concept is to show the ways in which generations of artists affect one another; the discourses that awkwardly straddle technology-specific periods of artists’ moving image makers; how influence may auger revolt, revision, renewed accord; how artists’ moving image is a uniquely reactive, dependent medium whose intimacy with the vicissitudes of mainstream tech confers a kind of automatic collusion with the culture at large that is pretty much unique to it – to moving image works. Formally, the exhibition will very visibly connect works, in a sort of straightforward, socially demonstrative way: projected works will be screened in choreographed sequences and in proximity to one another. This will be partially achieved using acoustic glass to divide the works and effectively block sound leaks, but allows you to see through to other spaces, works. We plan to pretty much do away with the preeminent, isolated black box of video installation. No work alone, all works in relation.  
Ellen Gallagher
Ellen Gallagher
Düsseldorf - Ackerstrasse 26
until 24-02-2018

Ellen Gallagher – Nu-Nile Ellen Gallagher focuses her gaze on the way social myths manifest themselves in images, signs and symbols. She collects and combines historically-charged photos, magazine cutouts and other narrative materials, transforming them into paper collages, prints, paintings and films in a way that compels the viewer to question the supposed facts. Racism, identity and the transformations within culture play central roles in this process. Gallagher draws her figuration from mid century American "race" magazines. In Ebony, Our World and Sepia, advertisements for hair styles, wigs and skin products were specifically targeted at African American women. In her recirculating of these publications, Gallagher reveals recurring threads of narrative that haunt black identities. In the process, Gallagher’s own biography as a Black American woman with Irish roots also comes to play a role. At CAPRI, Gallagher will present two works. "DeLuxe" (2004–05) is one of her most significant and widely-regarded works. The sixty prints that comprise DeLuxe use the most diverse techniques such as photogravure, aquatint, silkscreen, embossing, tattoo needle engraving and laser cutting, while being supplemented with plasticine, watercolors, glitter, crystals, toy eyes and gold leaf. "DeLuxe" directly draws on advertisements from mid century "race" magazines from the 1940’s up to the 1970s, which aimed at the projection of the “New Negro”. Using both traditional printing techniques and more recent technologies, Gallagher transforms the contents of the original ads into a new topography . Its serialized presentation form allows “DeLuxe” to almost be read like a book, where each page charts a chapter in Gallagher’s distinct "Afro-Aerial" cartography. Symbols of power and reassembled myths and structures have long been of interest to Gallagher. The collage "Abu Simbel" (2005) is based on a photogravure of Ramses II’s temple in Egypt that once hung in Sigmund Freud’s library. Gallagher reworked the faces of the pharaoh statues using snippets from old magazines and added elements from Sun Ra’s film "Space is the Place" (1974). She builds a correlation between Freud’s fascination with Egypt and Sun Ra’s - who named himself after the Egyptian sun god. She layers the image, embellishing the four colossi as well as Ra's interstellar machine with gold leaf, blue fur, plasticine and crystals, even inserting a Cadillac grille into the scene. There are also figures of nurses stationed at the temples entrance, symbolizing militant care and healing, in addition to protective resistance against the kinds of optical violence prevalent in representations of blackness and the tendency for misrecognition that accompanies them. Ellen Gallagher (b. 1965 in Providence, Rhode Island) lives and works in New York and Rotterdam. She has had solo shows at the Haus der Kunst, Munich (2014); New Museum, New York (2013); and Tate Liverpool (2007). She exhibited at the Venice Biennial in 2003 and 2015. In 2018 she will mount a major solo show at The Power Plant, Toronto and will be joining the painting department at Kunstakademie Düsseldorf. – Gesine Borcherdt, curator of CAPRI  

Ellen Gallagher – Nu-Nile Ellen Gallagher focuses her gaze on the way social myths manifest themselves in images, signs and symbols. She collects and combines historically-charged photos, magazine cutouts and other narrative materials, transforming them into paper collages, prints, paintings and films in a way that compels the viewer to question the supposed facts. Racism, identity and the transformations within culture play central roles in this process. Gallagher draws her figuration from mid century American "race" magazines. In Ebony, Our World and Sepia, advertisements for hair styles, wigs and skin products were specifically targeted at African American women. In her recirculating of these publications, Gallagher reveals recurring threads of narrative that haunt black identities. In the process, Gallagher’s own biography as a Black American woman with Irish roots also comes to play a role. At CAPRI, Gallagher will present two works. "DeLuxe" (2004–05) is one of her most significant and widely-regarded works. The sixty prints that comprise DeLuxe use the most diverse techniques such as photogravure, aquatint, silkscreen, embossing, tattoo needle engraving and laser cutting, while being supplemented with plasticine, watercolors, glitter, crystals, toy eyes and gold leaf. "DeLuxe" directly draws on advertisements from mid century "race" magazines from the 1940’s up to the 1970s, which aimed at the projection of the “New Negro”. Using both traditional printing techniques and more recent technologies, Gallagher transforms the contents of the original ads into a new topography . Its serialized presentation form allows “DeLuxe” to almost be read like a book, where each page charts a chapter in Gallagher’s distinct "Afro-Aerial" cartography. Symbols of power and reassembled myths and structures have long been of interest to Gallagher. The collage "Abu Simbel" (2005) is based on a photogravure of Ramses II’s temple in Egypt that once hung in Sigmund Freud’s library. Gallagher reworked the faces of the pharaoh statues using snippets from old magazines and added elements from Sun Ra’s film "Space is the Place" (1974). She builds a correlation between Freud’s fascination with Egypt and Sun Ra’s - who named himself after the Egyptian sun god. She layers the image, embellishing the four colossi as well as Ra's interstellar machine with gold leaf, blue fur, plasticine and crystals, even inserting a Cadillac grille into the scene. There are also figures of nurses stationed at the temples entrance, symbolizing militant care and healing, in addition to protective resistance against the kinds of optical violence prevalent in representations of blackness and the tendency for misrecognition that accompanies them. Ellen Gallagher (b. 1965 in Providence, Rhode Island) lives and works in New York and Rotterdam. She has had solo shows at the Haus der Kunst, Munich (2014); New Museum, New York (2013); and Tate Liverpool (2007). She exhibited at the Venice Biennial in 2003 and 2015. In 2018 she will mount a major solo show at The Power Plant, Toronto and will be joining the painting department at Kunstakademie Düsseldorf. – Gesine Borcherdt, curator of CAPRI  
Jorge Pardo
Jorge Pardo
London - 16 Wharf Road
until 24-03-2018

Jorge Pardo An exhibition by the Mexico-based Cuban-American artist Jorge Pardo comprising paintings and large-scale chandeliers. The installation is conceived by the artist to explore light’s potential as a means of shaping our experience of architecture, while creating an immersive visual spectacle during winter’s darkest months. Celebrated for his use of vibrant colours, eclectic patterns, natural and industrial materials, and craftsmanship and computer-aided production, Pardo, a MacArthur Fellowship recipient, has since the 1990s questioned distinctions between fine art, architecture and design. Characterised by its fluidity between genres, his diverse work ranges from sculptures and murals to home furnishings and even entire buildings and public spaces.   The exhibition will feature seven unique chandeliers, ranging in scale from 1 to 1.7 metres tall, suspended at various heights throughout the first-floor gallery of Wharf Road. While distinct in terms of their materials, colour and texture, the chandeliers share certain natural forms – including those derived from the gallery’s canalside garden and the verdant jungle landscape of Mérida, Mexico, where the artist lives and works. In addition, new paintings made of layers of laser-cut birch wood and MDF, perforated and painted to give an indication of landscapes partially veiled by moiré-like interference patterns, will be displayed in the ground-floor gallery.   Leading the viewer through the space, the works offer an extended consideration of physicality and immateriality, the visible and invisible. While the chandeliers themselves possess sculptural form as objects, demanding a physical encounter, the light they emit, variously controlled and directed, is less tangible, experienced in the spaces between each work and the surrounding architecture, set aglow and appearing to change throughout the day according to ambient light conditions. Similarly, the paintings are installed to optimise a sense of light passing through them and the play of shadows on the gallery walls. The gallery itself – its walls, floors and ceilings – becomes part of an overall composition, a space shaped by the artist to play with expectations and offer a shifting meditation on form, function, texture and colour.   Born in Havana, Cuba, in 1963, Jorge Pardo relocated to Chicago, USA, with his family as a child. He studied at the University of Illinois, Chicago and received his BFA from Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, California. Pardo’s work has been the subject of numerous solo exhibitions at international institutional venues including Irish Museum of Modern Art, Dublin (2010); K21 Kunstsammlung Nordrhein-Westfalen, Du?sseldorf (2009); Los Angeles County Museum of Art (2008); and Museum of Contemporary Art, North Miami (2007). He has been included in numerous significant group exhibitions including Display – between art and arts & crafts, Applied Arts Pavillion, the 57th Biennale di Venezia (2017); Okoyama Art Summit (2016), Viehof Collection: International Contemporary Art, Deichtorhallen, Hamburg (2016); You’ve Got to Know the Rules … to Break Them, de la Cruz Collection, Miami (2015); Beyond the Supersquare, The Bronx Museum of Arts, New York, US (2014); KölnSkulptur #7, Skulpturenpark Köln, Cologne (2013); Print/Out, MoMA Museum of Modern Art, New York (2012); Art of Communication: Anri Sala, Yang Ah Ham, Philippe Parreno, Jorge Pardo, National Museum of Art, Deoksugung (2011); The Jewel Thief, The Frances Young Tang Teaching Museum and Art Gallery, Skidmore College, Saratoga Springs, (2010); theanyspacewhatever, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York (2008); Index. Conceptualism in California from the Permanent Collection, The Geffen Contemporary, Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles (2008); Birth of the Cool. California Art, Design, and Culture at Midcentury, Orange County Museum of Art, Newport Beach, US and tour (2007); Works from the Tate Collection, Tate Modern, London (2006). In 1996, along with artists including Carsten Höller, Pierre Huyghe and Rirkrit Tiravanija, Pardo was featured in Nicolas Bourriaud’s exhibition Traffic at CAPC Musée d’Art Contemporain de Bordeaux, in the catalogue for which Bourriaud coined the term ‘Relational Aesthetics’.   Permanent works and public projects include Streetcar Stop for Portland, Regional Arts and Culture Council, Portland (2014); Plat 99, Bar and Lounge designed for The Alexander Hotel, Indianapolis, (2013); Tecoh, private residence, Yucatán (2012); Untitled (reinstallation of the Latin American Galleries), LACMA Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Los Angeles, US (2008); Untitled (Guadalajara Light Piece), Solares Foundation, Guadalajara (2005); House for Cesar and Mimi Reyes, Old San Juan (2004); Project, a reimagining of the lobby and new bookshop for Dia Art Foundation Chelsea, New York, US (2000); 4166 Sea View Lane, a proposal as part of an exhibition for LA MoCA to build an artist’s house on a hillside in Mount Washington, Los Angeles, for which Pardo designed every element of the building (completed 1998).    Pardo’s work is part of numerous public collections including the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles; Museum of Modern Art, New York; and Tate, UK. He has been the recipient of many awards including the MacArthur Fellowship Award (2010); the Smithsonian American Art Museum Lucelia Artist Award (2001); the Louis Comfort Tiffany Foundation Award (1995).   Jorge Pardo lives and works in Mérida, Mexico.  

Jorge Pardo An exhibition by the Mexico-based Cuban-American artist Jorge Pardo comprising paintings and large-scale chandeliers. The installation is conceived by the artist to explore light’s potential as a means of shaping our experience of architecture, while creating an immersive visual spectacle during winter’s darkest months. Celebrated for his use of vibrant colours, eclectic patterns, natural and industrial materials, and craftsmanship and computer-aided production, Pardo, a MacArthur Fellowship recipient, has since the 1990s questioned distinctions between fine art, architecture and design. Characterised by its fluidity between genres, his diverse work ranges from sculptures and murals to home furnishings and even entire buildings and public spaces.   The exhibition will feature seven unique chandeliers, ranging in scale from 1 to 1.7 metres tall, suspended at various heights throughout the first-floor gallery of Wharf Road. While distinct in terms of their materials, colour and texture, the chandeliers share certain natural forms – including those derived from the gallery’s canalside garden and the verdant jungle landscape of Mérida, Mexico, where the artist lives and works. In addition, new paintings made of layers of laser-cut birch wood and MDF, perforated and painted to give an indication of landscapes partially veiled by moiré-like interference patterns, will be displayed in the ground-floor gallery.   Leading the viewer through the space, the works offer an extended consideration of physicality and immateriality, the visible and invisible. While the chandeliers themselves possess sculptural form as objects, demanding a physical encounter, the light they emit, variously controlled and directed, is less tangible, experienced in the spaces between each work and the surrounding architecture, set aglow and appearing to change throughout the day according to ambient light conditions. Similarly, the paintings are installed to optimise a sense of light passing through them and the play of shadows on the gallery walls. The gallery itself – its walls, floors and ceilings – becomes part of an overall composition, a space shaped by the artist to play with expectations and offer a shifting meditation on form, function, texture and colour.   Born in Havana, Cuba, in 1963, Jorge Pardo relocated to Chicago, USA, with his family as a child. He studied at the University of Illinois, Chicago and received his BFA from Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, California. Pardo’s work has been the subject of numerous solo exhibitions at international institutional venues including Irish Museum of Modern Art, Dublin (2010); K21 Kunstsammlung Nordrhein-Westfalen, Du?sseldorf (2009); Los Angeles County Museum of Art (2008); and Museum of Contemporary Art, North Miami (2007). He has been included in numerous significant group exhibitions including Display – between art and arts & crafts, Applied Arts Pavillion, the 57th Biennale di Venezia (2017); Okoyama Art Summit (2016), Viehof Collection: International Contemporary Art, Deichtorhallen, Hamburg (2016); You’ve Got to Know the Rules … to Break Them, de la Cruz Collection, Miami (2015); Beyond the Supersquare, The Bronx Museum of Arts, New York, US (2014); KölnSkulptur #7, Skulpturenpark Köln, Cologne (2013); Print/Out, MoMA Museum of Modern Art, New York (2012); Art of Communication: Anri Sala, Yang Ah Ham, Philippe Parreno, Jorge Pardo, National Museum of Art, Deoksugung (2011); The Jewel Thief, The Frances Young Tang Teaching Museum and Art Gallery, Skidmore College, Saratoga Springs, (2010); theanyspacewhatever, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York (2008); Index. Conceptualism in California from the Permanent Collection, The Geffen Contemporary, Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles (2008); Birth of the Cool. California Art, Design, and Culture at Midcentury, Orange County Museum of Art, Newport Beach, US and tour (2007); Works from the Tate Collection, Tate Modern, London (2006). In 1996, along with artists including Carsten Höller, Pierre Huyghe and Rirkrit Tiravanija, Pardo was featured in Nicolas Bourriaud’s exhibition Traffic at CAPC Musée d’Art Contemporain de Bordeaux, in the catalogue for which Bourriaud coined the term ‘Relational Aesthetics’.   Permanent works and public projects include Streetcar Stop for Portland, Regional Arts and Culture Council, Portland (2014); Plat 99, Bar and Lounge designed for The Alexander Hotel, Indianapolis, (2013); Tecoh, private residence, Yucatán (2012); Untitled (reinstallation of the Latin American Galleries), LACMA Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Los Angeles, US (2008); Untitled (Guadalajara Light Piece), Solares Foundation, Guadalajara (2005); House for Cesar and Mimi Reyes, Old San Juan (2004); Project, a reimagining of the lobby and new bookshop for Dia Art Foundation Chelsea, New York, US (2000); 4166 Sea View Lane, a proposal as part of an exhibition for LA MoCA to build an artist’s house on a hillside in Mount Washington, Los Angeles, for which Pardo designed every element of the building (completed 1998).    Pardo’s work is part of numerous public collections including the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles; Museum of Modern Art, New York; and Tate, UK. He has been the recipient of many awards including the MacArthur Fellowship Award (2010); the Smithsonian American Art Museum Lucelia Artist Award (2001); the Louis Comfort Tiffany Foundation Award (1995).   Jorge Pardo lives and works in Mérida, Mexico.  
Marguerite Humeau
Marguerite Humeau
London - Millbank
until 15-04-2018

Marguerite Humeau – Echoes Marguerite Humeau is a French artist living and working in London. Her research led process usually takes the form of large scale installations involving sound and sculpture in which she challenges key issues of the day using complex narratives that synthesise the past with the present. Humeau’s installation is conceived as a confrontation between life and death, with the gallery transformed into part temple, part laboratory for the industrial production of an elixir for eternal life. At the heart of the space, two semi-abstracted white polystyrene sculptures based on Ancient Egyptian gods, Wadjet (King Cobra) 2015 and Taweret 2015, merge the organic nature of the human body with biological engineering. Accompanied by the synthetic sound of Cleopatra’s ethereal voice, this hypnotic yellow environment devised from poisonous black mamba python venom, evokes Cleopatra’s death and acts as a reminder of nature’s lethal powers.  

Marguerite Humeau – Echoes Marguerite Humeau is a French artist living and working in London. Her research led process usually takes the form of large scale installations involving sound and sculpture in which she challenges key issues of the day using complex narratives that synthesise the past with the present. Humeau’s installation is conceived as a confrontation between life and death, with the gallery transformed into part temple, part laboratory for the industrial production of an elixir for eternal life. At the heart of the space, two semi-abstracted white polystyrene sculptures based on Ancient Egyptian gods, Wadjet (King Cobra) 2015 and Taweret 2015, merge the organic nature of the human body with biological engineering. Accompanied by the synthetic sound of Cleopatra’s ethereal voice, this hypnotic yellow environment devised from poisonous black mamba python venom, evokes Cleopatra’s death and acts as a reminder of nature’s lethal powers.  
Andreas Gursky
Andreas Gursky
London - Southbank Centre, Belvedere Rd
until 22-04-2018

Andreas Gursky Hayward Gallery reopens with the first major UK retrospective of the work of Andreas Gursky, widely regarded as one of the most significant photographers of our time. Andreas Gursky marks the beginning of the Hayward Gallery’s 50th anniversary year and is the first exhibition to take place in the gallery following its two-year refurbishment. Andreas Gursky explores four decades of the artist’s work, ranging from pioneering photographs created in the early 1980s to major new pictures made in the past year. Whether depicting vast landscapes, teeming crowds or massive man-made structures, Gursky’s art has been driven by his insight into forms of collective existence and his curiosity about "the way that the world is constituted." Often taken from a distant vantage point, his photographs make use of a "democratic" perspective that gives equal importance to all elements of his highly detailed scenes. Rather than simply depicting particular places or situations, these works comprise visual metaphors that reflect on particular cultural attitudes and relationships. This exhibition aims to illuminate the ways in which Gursky’s approach to photography has developed along a number of parallel tracks while engaging a wide range of pictorial traditions. From early in his career, the artist has engaged with the paradoxical character of the photograph as something tied to a worldly referent and yet strangely independent of it. As a result many of his pictures remain surprisingly ambiguous, despite their impressive technical precision. Even as they chronicle emblematic sites of global capitalism and contemporary life, these images disrupt our preconceived ideas about how photographs represent reality, and shape and package our perceptions. In later works that evoke "transcendent" abstract painting or depict semi-fictional scenarios, Gursky defies simplistic readings of his imagery by conflating the medium’s documentary character with its capacity for invention and formal play. Andreas Gursky concludes with several recent photographs that suggest a new direction in the artist’s work. While many of his pictures look at how architectural structures organise perceptual space, photographs such as Amazon (2016) comment on the ways in which digital technologies have introduced profound changes to our notions of visual order, and epic new works such as Tokyo and Utah (both 2017) consider the changing status of photography in the era of mobile phone imagery. Works such as these not only reflect upon the world in which we live but also comment on the fashion in which they engage that world. Demonstrating that there is more than one valid or "authentic" use of the medium, Gursky’s art challenges our thinking and invites us to look afresh at how we make sense of images. As this four-decade survey makes clear, his work continues to expand the possibilities for photography in ways unmatched by any other artist of his generation. The accompanying exhibition catalogue Andreas Gursky provides an indispensable overview of the artist’s work, and includes never-before-published photographs. In a landmark conversation between two major figures in contemporary photography, Gursky talks with Jeff Wall about his influences and development while an essay by Hayward Gallery Director Ralph Rugoff explores important but often neglected areas of the artist’s work. Gerald Schröder and Brian Sholis contribute essays that provide new insight into key pictures and motifs, and artist Katharina Fritsch shares personal recollections of her Du?sseldorf colleague.  

Andreas Gursky Hayward Gallery reopens with the first major UK retrospective of the work of Andreas Gursky, widely regarded as one of the most significant photographers of our time. Andreas Gursky marks the beginning of the Hayward Gallery’s 50th anniversary year and is the first exhibition to take place in the gallery following its two-year refurbishment. Andreas Gursky explores four decades of the artist’s work, ranging from pioneering photographs created in the early 1980s to major new pictures made in the past year. Whether depicting vast landscapes, teeming crowds or massive man-made structures, Gursky’s art has been driven by his insight into forms of collective existence and his curiosity about "the way that the world is constituted." Often taken from a distant vantage point, his photographs make use of a "democratic" perspective that gives equal importance to all elements of his highly detailed scenes. Rather than simply depicting particular places or situations, these works comprise visual metaphors that reflect on particular cultural attitudes and relationships. This exhibition aims to illuminate the ways in which Gursky’s approach to photography has developed along a number of parallel tracks while engaging a wide range of pictorial traditions. From early in his career, the artist has engaged with the paradoxical character of the photograph as something tied to a worldly referent and yet strangely independent of it. As a result many of his pictures remain surprisingly ambiguous, despite their impressive technical precision. Even as they chronicle emblematic sites of global capitalism and contemporary life, these images disrupt our preconceived ideas about how photographs represent reality, and shape and package our perceptions. In later works that evoke "transcendent" abstract painting or depict semi-fictional scenarios, Gursky defies simplistic readings of his imagery by conflating the medium’s documentary character with its capacity for invention and formal play. Andreas Gursky concludes with several recent photographs that suggest a new direction in the artist’s work. While many of his pictures look at how architectural structures organise perceptual space, photographs such as Amazon (2016) comment on the ways in which digital technologies have introduced profound changes to our notions of visual order, and epic new works such as Tokyo and Utah (both 2017) consider the changing status of photography in the era of mobile phone imagery. Works such as these not only reflect upon the world in which we live but also comment on the fashion in which they engage that world. Demonstrating that there is more than one valid or "authentic" use of the medium, Gursky’s art challenges our thinking and invites us to look afresh at how we make sense of images. As this four-decade survey makes clear, his work continues to expand the possibilities for photography in ways unmatched by any other artist of his generation. The accompanying exhibition catalogue Andreas Gursky provides an indispensable overview of the artist’s work, and includes never-before-published photographs. In a landmark conversation between two major figures in contemporary photography, Gursky talks with Jeff Wall about his influences and development while an essay by Hayward Gallery Director Ralph Rugoff explores important but often neglected areas of the artist’s work. Gerald Schröder and Brian Sholis contribute essays that provide new insight into key pictures and motifs, and artist Katharina Fritsch shares personal recollections of her Du?sseldorf colleague.  
Günter Förg
Günter Förg
London - Grosvenor Hill, Broadbent House
until 24-03-2018

Günter Förg  After studying at the Academy of Fine Arts in Munich during the mid to late 1970s, Günther Förg started producing monochromatic wall paintings, which echoed colours found in their immediate surroundings. Thus integrating the environment into his practice from the very beginning, whereas architecture would eventually become one of the main components of his oeuvre and allow him to rethink not only the context of the exhibition space, but also the wider context of 20th century art. Organized with the Estate of Günther Förg, this new exhibition at Almine Rech Gallery in London follows the artist’s reflexive principles. Förg’s works could be regarded as windows opening onto the history of Modern Art. Indeed, the artist somewhat reflects on its continuum, and sometimes even literally when he installed real mirrors in his shows. He revisits a pantheon of references ranging from Edvard Munch, Piet Mondrian and Paul Klee to Barnett Newman. The series of paintings displayed in the gallery’s first room evoke the aesthetics of Ernst Wilhelm Nay (1902-1968), one of the most renowned German painters whose art was considered ‘degenerate’ by the Nazis. This selection of blue, orange, green and black dot paintings is all the more significant here as the previous exhibition in Grosvenor Hill was actually that of similar works by Nay. Installed on pedestals in the middle of this room, bronze masks further reinforce the museum quality of the overall display by evoking last century’s early modernism. The artist’s sculptural experimentation helped in forging the complex extent of his vocabulary. Just like his drawings, watercolours and etchings, his sculptures and bas-reliefs show how he played with different kinds of materials outside of material hierarchies. During the 1980s, Förg diversified his practice. He began a photographic body of works, which mostly documented modernist architecture such as the legacy of Bauhaus in Israel or that of monumental political architecture in Italy. Hanging on a bicolour wall painting, the 1990 series of five large-scale pictures taken in a University campus forms a unique and indivisible pictorial-photographic ensemble. They represent parts of buildings at the Sapienza University of Rome, among which are the Mineralogy and the Chemistry departments. The overall campus or “Città Universitaria” was designed by the Rationalist architect Marcello Piacentini in what became a mainstay of fascist style under Mussolini’s dictatorship. Around the same time, Förg also introduced what is perhaps his most famous series of works, which he realised by covering wooden frames with lead sheets that he then painted with acrylic. In a conversation with David Ryan in 1997, he further explained: ‘I like very much the qualities of lead – the surface, the heaviness… I like to react on things, with the normal canvas you often have to kill the ground, give it something to react against. With the metal you already have something – its scratches, scrapes.’ Förg’s use of lead blurred the boundaries between painting and sculpture. While playing with the materiality of the metal, he made his pictorial practice reach a sculptural dimension. Thus, the series of small lead paintings presented in the show appears like a frieze of a bas-relief in front of the artist’s architectural photographs. At the beginning of his career, Förg had painted many black monochromes, the surface of which produced a milky effect. What is one of the most important canons in the history of painting actually became a constant in his practice. He even realised monochromatic works without paint, such as the colourful textiles he made in homage to the German artist Blinky Palermo, who died in 1977 at the age of 33. In the gallery’s last room, paintings that seem black at first glance actually represent the walls of an apartment. They were inspired after works by Auguste Chabaud (1882-1955), a French Modern painter who depicted scenes of rural life in Provence. Leaving minimalism behind, Förg’s painting changed in the 2000s. He adopted a brighter colour palette and a more expressionist touch to explore various grid motifs in a way that is reminiscent of Cy Twombly’s graphic outbursts. The intent of this “retrospective” exhibition at Almine Rech Gallery is to present the different facets of his oeuvre, which reactivates – all the while questioning the relevance of – modernist canons through painting, photography and sculpture.   – Nicolas Trembley (Translated from French by Violaine Boutet de Monvel)

Günter Förg  After studying at the Academy of Fine Arts in Munich during the mid to late 1970s, Günther Förg started producing monochromatic wall paintings, which echoed colours found in their immediate surroundings. Thus integrating the environment into his practice from the very beginning, whereas architecture would eventually become one of the main components of his oeuvre and allow him to rethink not only the context of the exhibition space, but also the wider context of 20th century art. Organized with the Estate of Günther Förg, this new exhibition at Almine Rech Gallery in London follows the artist’s reflexive principles. Förg’s works could be regarded as windows opening onto the history of Modern Art. Indeed, the artist somewhat reflects on its continuum, and sometimes even literally when he installed real mirrors in his shows. He revisits a pantheon of references ranging from Edvard Munch, Piet Mondrian and Paul Klee to Barnett Newman. The series of paintings displayed in the gallery’s first room evoke the aesthetics of Ernst Wilhelm Nay (1902-1968), one of the most renowned German painters whose art was considered ‘degenerate’ by the Nazis. This selection of blue, orange, green and black dot paintings is all the more significant here as the previous exhibition in Grosvenor Hill was actually that of similar works by Nay. Installed on pedestals in the middle of this room, bronze masks further reinforce the museum quality of the overall display by evoking last century’s early modernism. The artist’s sculptural experimentation helped in forging the complex extent of his vocabulary. Just like his drawings, watercolours and etchings, his sculptures and bas-reliefs show how he played with different kinds of materials outside of material hierarchies. During the 1980s, Förg diversified his practice. He began a photographic body of works, which mostly documented modernist architecture such as the legacy of Bauhaus in Israel or that of monumental political architecture in Italy. Hanging on a bicolour wall painting, the 1990 series of five large-scale pictures taken in a University campus forms a unique and indivisible pictorial-photographic ensemble. They represent parts of buildings at the Sapienza University of Rome, among which are the Mineralogy and the Chemistry departments. The overall campus or “Città Universitaria” was designed by the Rationalist architect Marcello Piacentini in what became a mainstay of fascist style under Mussolini’s dictatorship. Around the same time, Förg also introduced what is perhaps his most famous series of works, which he realised by covering wooden frames with lead sheets that he then painted with acrylic. In a conversation with David Ryan in 1997, he further explained: ‘I like very much the qualities of lead – the surface, the heaviness… I like to react on things, with the normal canvas you often have to kill the ground, give it something to react against. With the metal you already have something – its scratches, scrapes.’ Förg’s use of lead blurred the boundaries between painting and sculpture. While playing with the materiality of the metal, he made his pictorial practice reach a sculptural dimension. Thus, the series of small lead paintings presented in the show appears like a frieze of a bas-relief in front of the artist’s architectural photographs. At the beginning of his career, Förg had painted many black monochromes, the surface of which produced a milky effect. What is one of the most important canons in the history of painting actually became a constant in his practice. He even realised monochromatic works without paint, such as the colourful textiles he made in homage to the German artist Blinky Palermo, who died in 1977 at the age of 33. In the gallery’s last room, paintings that seem black at first glance actually represent the walls of an apartment. They were inspired after works by Auguste Chabaud (1882-1955), a French Modern painter who depicted scenes of rural life in Provence. Leaving minimalism behind, Förg’s painting changed in the 2000s. He adopted a brighter colour palette and a more expressionist touch to explore various grid motifs in a way that is reminiscent of Cy Twombly’s graphic outbursts. The intent of this “retrospective” exhibition at Almine Rech Gallery is to present the different facets of his oeuvre, which reactivates – all the while questioning the relevance of – modernist canons through painting, photography and sculpture.   – Nicolas Trembley (Translated from French by Violaine Boutet de Monvel)
Eddie Peake
Eddie Peake
London - 144 ? 152 Bermondsey Street
until 08-04-2018

Eddie Peake – Concrete Pitch White Cube Bermondsey is pleased to present a solo exhibition by Eddie Peake, featuring new paintings, sculpture, installation and sound. Peake will be working and performing in the gallery throughout the show. The exhibition takes its title, ‘Concrete Pitch’, from the bare, concrete recreation ground in Finsbury Park in North London, where Peake grew up. The pitch served as a playground, a sports field, a stage for encounters and dramas, and a meeting place for people of every age, class and ethnicity from the surrounding area. For the duration of the exhibition, the concrete expanse of White Cube’s South Gallery becomes Peake’s stage. There, he orchestrates his drama of the everyday, creating a rich portrait of his childhood neighbourhood as a microcosm of London. A new sculpture, titled Stroud Green Road, is named after the area’s main high street, which links Seven Sisters Road and Crouch Hill, and carries objects Peake gathered from local shops, abstract sculptures in jesmonite, speakers and DJ equipment. The metal structure reverberates with deep, low sounds collaged from field recordings and looped compositions. During the exhibition Peake will be based in the gallery, following a simple daily routine. DJs from koollondon.com will join him, broadcasting an online radio show for the duration. Formerly known as Kool FM, the station was the leading pirate radio station of the 1990s, broadcasting from East London’s tower blocks and providing the soundtrack to Peake's adolescence.   

Eddie Peake – Concrete Pitch White Cube Bermondsey is pleased to present a solo exhibition by Eddie Peake, featuring new paintings, sculpture, installation and sound. Peake will be working and performing in the gallery throughout the show. The exhibition takes its title, ‘Concrete Pitch’, from the bare, concrete recreation ground in Finsbury Park in North London, where Peake grew up. The pitch served as a playground, a sports field, a stage for encounters and dramas, and a meeting place for people of every age, class and ethnicity from the surrounding area. For the duration of the exhibition, the concrete expanse of White Cube’s South Gallery becomes Peake’s stage. There, he orchestrates his drama of the everyday, creating a rich portrait of his childhood neighbourhood as a microcosm of London. A new sculpture, titled Stroud Green Road, is named after the area’s main high street, which links Seven Sisters Road and Crouch Hill, and carries objects Peake gathered from local shops, abstract sculptures in jesmonite, speakers and DJ equipment. The metal structure reverberates with deep, low sounds collaged from field recordings and looped compositions. During the exhibition Peake will be based in the gallery, following a simple daily routine. DJs from koollondon.com will join him, broadcasting an online radio show for the duration. Formerly known as Kool FM, the station was the leading pirate radio station of the 1990s, broadcasting from East London’s tower blocks and providing the soundtrack to Peake's adolescence.   
The Everywhere Studio
The Everywhere Studio
Miami - 61 NE 41st Street
until 26-02-2018

The Everywhere Studio The Institute of Contemporary Art, Miami will open its new permanent home on December 1, 2017 with a major group exhibition exploring the significance of the artist’s studio, from the post-war period to the present day. Encompassing some 100 works in painting, sculpture, video, and installation, “The Everywhere Studio” brings together over 50 artists from the past five decades to reveal the artist’s studio as a charged site that has both predicted and responded to broader social and economic changes of our time. “The Everywhere Studio” interprets the works of post-war artists and emerging practitioners through the lens of the social and historical conditions in which they were made. Organized chronologically, the exhibition examines the changing relationships that artists have had to their sites of production. From the studio as a site of labor, to one that blurs production, performance, and spectacle, to a concept that defines the artist’s own identity, the exhibition features artists who, in response to changing socioeconomic influences, represented new modes of working and living that would subsequently spread across society.

The Everywhere Studio The Institute of Contemporary Art, Miami will open its new permanent home on December 1, 2017 with a major group exhibition exploring the significance of the artist’s studio, from the post-war period to the present day. Encompassing some 100 works in painting, sculpture, video, and installation, “The Everywhere Studio” brings together over 50 artists from the past five decades to reveal the artist’s studio as a charged site that has both predicted and responded to broader social and economic changes of our time. “The Everywhere Studio” interprets the works of post-war artists and emerging practitioners through the lens of the social and historical conditions in which they were made. Organized chronologically, the exhibition examines the changing relationships that artists have had to their sites of production. From the studio as a site of labor, to one that blurs production, performance, and spectacle, to a concept that defines the artist’s own identity, the exhibition features artists who, in response to changing socioeconomic influences, represented new modes of working and living that would subsequently spread across society.
Mark Handforth
Mark Handforth
Miami - 61 NE 41st Street
until 26-06-2021

Mark Handforth Dr Pepper (2017) by Mark Handforth marks a major public commission for this leading Miami-based artist. Alluding to a lantern form, the totemic standing star shape describes a continuous, inevitable, and even chaotic movement through space—a process writ large in crumpled aluminum. The composition expresses an implicit relationship between the looseness of the gesture and the physicality of the work—the grounded, weighted reality of objecthood, which is a common theme in Handforth’s practice. The color palette, which borrows from a chromate yellow aircraft primer, is set against deep blacks that reflect a peculiar duality, as does the webbing of the leg, and the structural plates crisscrossing the languid form. In his sculptural installations, Handforth often transplants familiar objects found in civic infrastructure— such as municipal signs, motor scooters, hydrants, street lamps, wheels, and traffic cones—into unfamiliar surroundings and transforms them, by reworking or deforming their structures and configurations, in order to reveal something new about the ways in which these objects function in our everyday lives. He revels in the skewed perspectives and unintended consequences that result from cultural exchange and displacement. Handforth (b. 1969, Hong Kong) was raised in London and has been based in Miami since 1992. His work has appeared in exhibitions worldwide, including solo presentations and outdoor public sculptures at the Museo d’Arte Contemporanea, Villa Croce, Genova, Italy (2016); Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago (2011); Dallas Museum of Art (2007); Kunsthaus Zu?rich (2005); and the Hammer Museum, Los Angeles (2002).

Mark Handforth Dr Pepper (2017) by Mark Handforth marks a major public commission for this leading Miami-based artist. Alluding to a lantern form, the totemic standing star shape describes a continuous, inevitable, and even chaotic movement through space—a process writ large in crumpled aluminum. The composition expresses an implicit relationship between the looseness of the gesture and the physicality of the work—the grounded, weighted reality of objecthood, which is a common theme in Handforth’s practice. The color palette, which borrows from a chromate yellow aircraft primer, is set against deep blacks that reflect a peculiar duality, as does the webbing of the leg, and the structural plates crisscrossing the languid form. In his sculptural installations, Handforth often transplants familiar objects found in civic infrastructure— such as municipal signs, motor scooters, hydrants, street lamps, wheels, and traffic cones—into unfamiliar surroundings and transforms them, by reworking or deforming their structures and configurations, in order to reveal something new about the ways in which these objects function in our everyday lives. He revels in the skewed perspectives and unintended consequences that result from cultural exchange and displacement. Handforth (b. 1969, Hong Kong) was raised in London and has been based in Miami since 1992. His work has appeared in exhibitions worldwide, including solo presentations and outdoor public sculptures at the Museo d’Arte Contemporanea, Villa Croce, Genova, Italy (2016); Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago (2011); Dallas Museum of Art (2007); Kunsthaus Zu?rich (2005); and the Hammer Museum, Los Angeles (2002).
Pop Art
Pop Art
Miami - 591 NW 27th Street
until 28-04-2018

Pop Art Jasper Johns, Roy Lichtenstein, Claes Oldenburg, James Rosenquist, George Segal, Andy Warhol, Tom Wesselmann  

Pop Art Jasper Johns, Roy Lichtenstein, Claes Oldenburg, James Rosenquist, George Segal, Andy Warhol, Tom Wesselmann  
Allison Zuckerman
Allison Zuckerman
Miami - 95 NW 29th Street
until 25-08-2018

Allison Zuckerman – Stranger in Paradise Allison Zuckerman, the foundation's 2017 artist-in-residence, has created large format paintings and sculptures using the foundation’s main gallery as her studio this summer. These new works take historical paintings and internet culture as their point of departure and utilize paint and digitally manipulated printed images to create hybridized portraits suffused with cultural and societal critiques. ?  

Allison Zuckerman – Stranger in Paradise Allison Zuckerman, the foundation's 2017 artist-in-residence, has created large format paintings and sculptures using the foundation’s main gallery as her studio this summer. These new works take historical paintings and internet culture as their point of departure and utilize paint and digitally manipulated printed images to create hybridized portraits suffused with cultural and societal critiques. ?  
Danh Vo
Danh Vo
New York - 1071 Fifth Avenue
until 09-05-2018

Danh Vo – Take My Breath Away The first comprehensive survey in the United States of work by Danish artist Danh Vo (b. 1975, Bà Ria, Vietnam) will fill the ramps of the Guggenheim’s rotunda, offering an illuminating overview of Vo’s production from the past 15 years, including a number of new projects created on the occasion of the exhibition. Vo’s installations dissect the power structures, cultural forces, and private desires that shape our experience of the world. His work addresses themes of religion, colonialism, capitalism, and artistic authorship, but refracts these sweeping subjects through intimate personal narratives—what the artist calls “the tiny diasporas of a person’s life.” Each project grows out of a period of intense research in which historical study, fortuitous encounters, and personal relationships are woven into psychologically potent tableaux. Subjected to Vo’s vivid processes of deconstruction and recombination, found objects, documents, and images become registers of latent histories and sociopolitical fissures. Ranging the full spectrum of Vo’s oeuvre—from early conceptual works such as Vo Rosasco Rasmussen (2003–05), in which he married and divorced acquaintances in order to add their surnames to his own, to his recent sculptural hybrids of classical and Christian statuary—the exhibition will interweave installations, photographs, and works on paper from various points in the artist’s career to amplify their thematic resonances. Significant subjects include the legacy of colonialism and the fraught status of the refugee. In particular, Vo has focused on European and U.S. influences in Southeast Asia and Latin America, examining the relationship between military interventions and more diffuse cultural incursions from forces such as evangelical Catholicism and consumer brands. Objects absorbed into the work are frequently charged by knowledge of their former ownership or their status as historical bystanders. Whether presenting the intimate possessions of his family members, a series of thank-you notes from Henry Kissinger, or the chandeliers that glittered above the signing of the 1973 Paris Peace Accords that ended the Vietnam War, Vo subtly excavates the internal contradictions and veiled tensions embedded in his material. Repeatedly, he has probed the myths that frame entrenched cultural ideals and aspirations, from the Grimms’ Cinderella to the Statue of Liberty and the Kennedys’ “Camelot.” A sustained focus of the work has been the image of the United States in its own collective imagination and in that of the world—a topic that will be central to this exhibition.  

Danh Vo – Take My Breath Away The first comprehensive survey in the United States of work by Danish artist Danh Vo (b. 1975, Bà Ria, Vietnam) will fill the ramps of the Guggenheim’s rotunda, offering an illuminating overview of Vo’s production from the past 15 years, including a number of new projects created on the occasion of the exhibition. Vo’s installations dissect the power structures, cultural forces, and private desires that shape our experience of the world. His work addresses themes of religion, colonialism, capitalism, and artistic authorship, but refracts these sweeping subjects through intimate personal narratives—what the artist calls “the tiny diasporas of a person’s life.” Each project grows out of a period of intense research in which historical study, fortuitous encounters, and personal relationships are woven into psychologically potent tableaux. Subjected to Vo’s vivid processes of deconstruction and recombination, found objects, documents, and images become registers of latent histories and sociopolitical fissures. Ranging the full spectrum of Vo’s oeuvre—from early conceptual works such as Vo Rosasco Rasmussen (2003–05), in which he married and divorced acquaintances in order to add their surnames to his own, to his recent sculptural hybrids of classical and Christian statuary—the exhibition will interweave installations, photographs, and works on paper from various points in the artist’s career to amplify their thematic resonances. Significant subjects include the legacy of colonialism and the fraught status of the refugee. In particular, Vo has focused on European and U.S. influences in Southeast Asia and Latin America, examining the relationship between military interventions and more diffuse cultural incursions from forces such as evangelical Catholicism and consumer brands. Objects absorbed into the work are frequently charged by knowledge of their former ownership or their status as historical bystanders. Whether presenting the intimate possessions of his family members, a series of thank-you notes from Henry Kissinger, or the chandeliers that glittered above the signing of the 1973 Paris Peace Accords that ended the Vietnam War, Vo subtly excavates the internal contradictions and veiled tensions embedded in his material. Repeatedly, he has probed the myths that frame entrenched cultural ideals and aspirations, from the Grimms’ Cinderella to the Statue of Liberty and the Kennedys’ “Camelot.” A sustained focus of the work has been the image of the United States in its own collective imagination and in that of the world—a topic that will be central to this exhibition.  
Robert Indiana
Robert Indiana
New York - 515 West 27th Street
until 03-03-2018

Robert Indiana “People don’t stop to think about how beautiful numbers are. Perhaps for the same reason that they don’t stop to think about how beautiful words are. […] It’s the role of the artist—my particular role, if you will—to make words and numbers very, very special.” —Robert Indiana. Paul Kasmin Gallery is pleased to announce the forthcoming solo presentation of sculpture by Robert Indiana.  The exhibition, which honors the artist in his 90th year and celebrates over 15 years of representation by the gallery, will include two iconic works: LOVE WALL and ONE through ZERO. Indiana’s archetypal stacked LOVE composition, with its bold serif lettering of VE stacked beneath the L and off-kilter O, is one of the most ubiquitous works of art of the 20th century. LOVE WALL (1966-2006) consists of four of Indiana’s classic LOVE compositions arranged in mirrored orientations with the four Os joined at the center, constructing an impressive 12ft high, Cor-ten steel monument. LOVE WALL is a monumental and superlative example of Indiana’s practice. Belonging to a series of iconic paintings, sculptures, and prints dedicated to the theme of love that the artist commenced in the mid-1960s, the work is both accessible and complex in meaning. Layered with personal references, erotic metaphors, religious underpinnings, and socio-political commentary—particularly as a symbol of 1960s idealism—Indiana’s use of the word LOVE goes beyond the confines of cultures and language. Cor-ten steel, noted for its distinct rust color and durability, represents a particularly meaningful medium for Indiana.  Initially developed for its industrial use, it was first employed by the artist in 1970 for his first monumental LOVE sculpture, which was installed at the entrance of Central Park in Doris C. Freedman Plaza and is now held in the permanent collection of the Indianapolis Museum of Art.  Its inaugural presentation in New York marked a watershed moment for public art and generated universal enthusiasm for large-scale outdoor sculpture—the significance of which persists today. Indiana’s impulse to appropriate industrial materials was influenced, in part, by the alternative zeitgeist of the rising generation of artists in late 1950s New York, who (whilst Abstract Expressionism was flourishing uptown) developed a burgeoning interest for a different kind of art in Lower Manhattan’s deserted shipping lofts at Coenties Slip.  In his waterfront studio there, surrounded by relics of the old seaport including shipping equipment and metal stencils for signage from the seafaring days, Indiana began to incorporate the language and symbols that would become his signature elements.  These new forms tapped into the American experience in a mode both immediate and poetic and further built upon questions of national identity as propositioned by American modernists such as Charles Demuth, Marsden Hartley and Edward Hopper—all of whom transformed the vernacular, including industrial sources, into fine art. Indiana’s ONE through ZERO articulates the artist’s fascination with numbers as the most fundamental organizing principles of the world.  “Numbers fill my life,” he has said.  “We are immersed in numbers from the day we are born.”  Comprised of ten individual sculptures, ONE through ZERO takes on a multitude of references that simultaneously hones in on autobiographical significances and conjures universal metaphors related to the sequential nature of life and death.  Many of these references manifest in Indiana’s dramatic use of contrasting colors—an impetus that was heavily influenced by his close friend and peer Ellsworth Kelly.  With ONE through ZERO, vivid greens, blues, yellows, reds and whites vie for attention, shining in high gloss, standing as pillars that the artist distinctly associates with the various stages of life from birth, infancy, youth and adolescence to the autumn of life, a sense of warning and ultimately the end of the cycle in ZERO. Robert Indiana (b. 1928, New Castle, IN) currently lives and works in Vinalhaven, Maine. Indiana’s work has been featured in numerous solo and group exhibitions around the world, including a 2013 retrospective at the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York.  Recently, ONE through ZERO’s Cor-ten steel counterpart was exhibited at Philip Johnson’s historic Glass House landmark in Connecticut (2017) and LOVE WALL was installed on Park Avenue, 57th Street, New York (2008) as well as at the Duomo in Milan (2008). Indiana’s work is represented in prominent institutional collections worldwide, including the Museum of Modern Art, New York; Whitney Museum of Art, New York; Art Institute of Chicago; Los Angeles County Museum of Art; Philadelphia Museum of Art; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; National Gallery of Art, the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden and the Smithsonian Museum of American Art in Washington, D.C.; Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; Menil Collection, Houston; Cleveland Museum of Art; The Israel Museum, Jerusalem; and Tate, London, among many other institutions.

Robert Indiana “People don’t stop to think about how beautiful numbers are. Perhaps for the same reason that they don’t stop to think about how beautiful words are. […] It’s the role of the artist—my particular role, if you will—to make words and numbers very, very special.” —Robert Indiana. Paul Kasmin Gallery is pleased to announce the forthcoming solo presentation of sculpture by Robert Indiana.  The exhibition, which honors the artist in his 90th year and celebrates over 15 years of representation by the gallery, will include two iconic works: LOVE WALL and ONE through ZERO. Indiana’s archetypal stacked LOVE composition, with its bold serif lettering of VE stacked beneath the L and off-kilter O, is one of the most ubiquitous works of art of the 20th century. LOVE WALL (1966-2006) consists of four of Indiana’s classic LOVE compositions arranged in mirrored orientations with the four Os joined at the center, constructing an impressive 12ft high, Cor-ten steel monument. LOVE WALL is a monumental and superlative example of Indiana’s practice. Belonging to a series of iconic paintings, sculptures, and prints dedicated to the theme of love that the artist commenced in the mid-1960s, the work is both accessible and complex in meaning. Layered with personal references, erotic metaphors, religious underpinnings, and socio-political commentary—particularly as a symbol of 1960s idealism—Indiana’s use of the word LOVE goes beyond the confines of cultures and language. Cor-ten steel, noted for its distinct rust color and durability, represents a particularly meaningful medium for Indiana.  Initially developed for its industrial use, it was first employed by the artist in 1970 for his first monumental LOVE sculpture, which was installed at the entrance of Central Park in Doris C. Freedman Plaza and is now held in the permanent collection of the Indianapolis Museum of Art.  Its inaugural presentation in New York marked a watershed moment for public art and generated universal enthusiasm for large-scale outdoor sculpture—the significance of which persists today. Indiana’s impulse to appropriate industrial materials was influenced, in part, by the alternative zeitgeist of the rising generation of artists in late 1950s New York, who (whilst Abstract Expressionism was flourishing uptown) developed a burgeoning interest for a different kind of art in Lower Manhattan’s deserted shipping lofts at Coenties Slip.  In his waterfront studio there, surrounded by relics of the old seaport including shipping equipment and metal stencils for signage from the seafaring days, Indiana began to incorporate the language and symbols that would become his signature elements.  These new forms tapped into the American experience in a mode both immediate and poetic and further built upon questions of national identity as propositioned by American modernists such as Charles Demuth, Marsden Hartley and Edward Hopper—all of whom transformed the vernacular, including industrial sources, into fine art. Indiana’s ONE through ZERO articulates the artist’s fascination with numbers as the most fundamental organizing principles of the world.  “Numbers fill my life,” he has said.  “We are immersed in numbers from the day we are born.”  Comprised of ten individual sculptures, ONE through ZERO takes on a multitude of references that simultaneously hones in on autobiographical significances and conjures universal metaphors related to the sequential nature of life and death.  Many of these references manifest in Indiana’s dramatic use of contrasting colors—an impetus that was heavily influenced by his close friend and peer Ellsworth Kelly.  With ONE through ZERO, vivid greens, blues, yellows, reds and whites vie for attention, shining in high gloss, standing as pillars that the artist distinctly associates with the various stages of life from birth, infancy, youth and adolescence to the autumn of life, a sense of warning and ultimately the end of the cycle in ZERO. Robert Indiana (b. 1928, New Castle, IN) currently lives and works in Vinalhaven, Maine. Indiana’s work has been featured in numerous solo and group exhibitions around the world, including a 2013 retrospective at the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York.  Recently, ONE through ZERO’s Cor-ten steel counterpart was exhibited at Philip Johnson’s historic Glass House landmark in Connecticut (2017) and LOVE WALL was installed on Park Avenue, 57th Street, New York (2008) as well as at the Duomo in Milan (2008). Indiana’s work is represented in prominent institutional collections worldwide, including the Museum of Modern Art, New York; Whitney Museum of Art, New York; Art Institute of Chicago; Los Angeles County Museum of Art; Philadelphia Museum of Art; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; National Gallery of Art, the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden and the Smithsonian Museum of American Art in Washington, D.C.; Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; Menil Collection, Houston; Cleveland Museum of Art; The Israel Museum, Jerusalem; and Tate, London, among many other institutions.
Cathy Wilkes
Cathy Wilkes
New York - 22-25 Jackson Avenue
until 11-03-2018

Cathy Wilkes MoMA PS1 presents the first monographic exhibition of Cathy Wilkes (Irish, b. 1966) in New York. The largest exhibition of the artist’s work to date, Cathy Wilkes features approximately 50 works from public and private collections throughout Europe and North America as well as new pieces created for the show, offering a broad view of Wilkes’s work since 2004. The exhibition is organized in conjunction with Wilkes’s receipt of the first Maria Lassnig Prize, awarded by the Maria Lassnig Foundation in 2016. Over more than two decades, Cathy Wilkes has created a body of work that engages with the rituals of life, combining paintings, drawings, sculptures and objects both found and altered. Regularly employing materials drawn from her domestic life and environment in Glasgow, Wilkes’s installations connect the banalities of daily existence to larger archetypes of birth, marriage, child-rearing, and death. This combination of the personal and universal parallels a meditation at the heart of her work, in which Wilkes’s art enacts an exercise in empathy, exposing deeply felt subjective experiences while also insisting upon the fundamentally private nature of artmaking. Wilkes is one of the most important artists of her generation, having emerged in the late 1990s and exhibited with greater frequently over the past fifteen years. Her individual installations and larger exhibitions are marked by arrangements of objects that appear both precarious and precise, vulnerable and brutal. She often recomposes older pieces into new variations, and has more recently applied a similar approach to the design of her solo exhibitions. Repurposing select elements of extant works and combining them into new installations, Wilkes passes by the “retrospective” structure of a mid-career exhibition, confounding our experiences of past and present and challenging conventions of art history that would seek to interpret her work in a clear progression. Eschewing the framing or supports typical to exhibition display, Wilkes emphasizes a direct interaction with her work. There are no pedestals for her work; vitrines are inverted into open containers. As such, limited numbers of visitors are invited to carefully wander among installations whose boundaries are not always obvious or easily discernable, heightening our attention to the shifting relationships she creates between the various elements that comprise her works. In Wilkes’s practice, the process through which art transforms the commonplace has less to do with modern displacements of the readymade than with more cyclical, ancient systems of magical belief. “All objects can become transcendental,” she has noted, even though she feels there is “no need for someone to fully understand.” Wilkes’s art is best approached as a markedly subjective and singular vision—a private world that nevertheless evokes common instabilities and human vulnerabilities recognizable far beyond the confines of her studio.  

Cathy Wilkes MoMA PS1 presents the first monographic exhibition of Cathy Wilkes (Irish, b. 1966) in New York. The largest exhibition of the artist’s work to date, Cathy Wilkes features approximately 50 works from public and private collections throughout Europe and North America as well as new pieces created for the show, offering a broad view of Wilkes’s work since 2004. The exhibition is organized in conjunction with Wilkes’s receipt of the first Maria Lassnig Prize, awarded by the Maria Lassnig Foundation in 2016. Over more than two decades, Cathy Wilkes has created a body of work that engages with the rituals of life, combining paintings, drawings, sculptures and objects both found and altered. Regularly employing materials drawn from her domestic life and environment in Glasgow, Wilkes’s installations connect the banalities of daily existence to larger archetypes of birth, marriage, child-rearing, and death. This combination of the personal and universal parallels a meditation at the heart of her work, in which Wilkes’s art enacts an exercise in empathy, exposing deeply felt subjective experiences while also insisting upon the fundamentally private nature of artmaking. Wilkes is one of the most important artists of her generation, having emerged in the late 1990s and exhibited with greater frequently over the past fifteen years. Her individual installations and larger exhibitions are marked by arrangements of objects that appear both precarious and precise, vulnerable and brutal. She often recomposes older pieces into new variations, and has more recently applied a similar approach to the design of her solo exhibitions. Repurposing select elements of extant works and combining them into new installations, Wilkes passes by the “retrospective” structure of a mid-career exhibition, confounding our experiences of past and present and challenging conventions of art history that would seek to interpret her work in a clear progression. Eschewing the framing or supports typical to exhibition display, Wilkes emphasizes a direct interaction with her work. There are no pedestals for her work; vitrines are inverted into open containers. As such, limited numbers of visitors are invited to carefully wander among installations whose boundaries are not always obvious or easily discernable, heightening our attention to the shifting relationships she creates between the various elements that comprise her works. In Wilkes’s practice, the process through which art transforms the commonplace has less to do with modern displacements of the readymade than with more cyclical, ancient systems of magical belief. “All objects can become transcendental,” she has noted, even though she feels there is “no need for someone to fully understand.” Wilkes’s art is best approached as a markedly subjective and singular vision—a private world that nevertheless evokes common instabilities and human vulnerabilities recognizable far beyond the confines of her studio.  
Sondra Perry
Sondra Perry
New York - 99 Bowery
until 25-02-2018

Sondra Perry  

Sondra Perry  
Alex Da Corte
Alex Da Corte
New York - 188 East 2nd Street
until 18-03-2018

Alex Da Corte – C-A-T Spells Murder There’s a shutter at the door and your cat’s your best friend but everything is fine because you just know that but did you leave the window upstairs open? Was it supposed to rain tonight? I can’t remember It’s just the wind I live in an old house No, there’s definitely, definitely something upstairs Is my sister home early? Or is it the ghost of my sister? Is that chain? A chainsaw? What will I do with Dylan? What will I do with my cat? Are they here to take his other eye? What about my eye? Are they here to take my eye? All I can think about is that scene where they cut up that guys eye in that movie You know the one? Actual shaking Actual screaming He’s coming for me There’s no way out of this room This is it Fear, like any emotion, is much larger when the immediate threat is not present. When it arrives personified it is often familiar. When we try to escape it, only strangeness awaits. Karma is pleased to present Alex Da Corte’s C-A-T Spells Murder, for which the artist has employed video, sculpture, and painting to create an immersive environment. Alex Da Corte (b. 1980, Camden, New Jersey) received a BFA from the University of the Arts, Philadelphia, and an MFA from the Yale University School of Art. His first survey exhibition, Free Roses, was held at MASS MoCA, North Adams in 2016. He will mount a solo exhibition at Kölnischer Kunstverein in April. Other recent solo exhibitions include BAD LAND, Josh Lilley Gallery, London; Slow Graffiti, Secession Building, Vienna, Austria; A Man Full Of Trouble at Maccarone Gallery, New York; 50 Wigs at the Herning Museum of Contemporary Art, Herning, Denmark; A Season in He’ll at Art + Practice, Hammer Museum, Los Angeles (2016); Le Miroir Vivant at The Museum Boijmans van Beuningen, Rotterdam, Netherlands (2015). In 2012, Da Corte was awarded a Pew Fellowship in the Arts from the Pew Center for Arts & Heritage. He lives and works in Philadelphia. An eponymous book of 24 spooky essays and short stories has been published on the occasion of the exhibition.

Alex Da Corte – C-A-T Spells Murder There’s a shutter at the door and your cat’s your best friend but everything is fine because you just know that but did you leave the window upstairs open? Was it supposed to rain tonight? I can’t remember It’s just the wind I live in an old house No, there’s definitely, definitely something upstairs Is my sister home early? Or is it the ghost of my sister? Is that chain? A chainsaw? What will I do with Dylan? What will I do with my cat? Are they here to take his other eye? What about my eye? Are they here to take my eye? All I can think about is that scene where they cut up that guys eye in that movie You know the one? Actual shaking Actual screaming He’s coming for me There’s no way out of this room This is it Fear, like any emotion, is much larger when the immediate threat is not present. When it arrives personified it is often familiar. When we try to escape it, only strangeness awaits. Karma is pleased to present Alex Da Corte’s C-A-T Spells Murder, for which the artist has employed video, sculpture, and painting to create an immersive environment. Alex Da Corte (b. 1980, Camden, New Jersey) received a BFA from the University of the Arts, Philadelphia, and an MFA from the Yale University School of Art. His first survey exhibition, Free Roses, was held at MASS MoCA, North Adams in 2016. He will mount a solo exhibition at Kölnischer Kunstverein in April. Other recent solo exhibitions include BAD LAND, Josh Lilley Gallery, London; Slow Graffiti, Secession Building, Vienna, Austria; A Man Full Of Trouble at Maccarone Gallery, New York; 50 Wigs at the Herning Museum of Contemporary Art, Herning, Denmark; A Season in He’ll at Art + Practice, Hammer Museum, Los Angeles (2016); Le Miroir Vivant at The Museum Boijmans van Beuningen, Rotterdam, Netherlands (2015). In 2012, Da Corte was awarded a Pew Fellowship in the Arts from the Pew Center for Arts & Heritage. He lives and works in Philadelphia. An eponymous book of 24 spooky essays and short stories has been published on the occasion of the exhibition.
Tina Barney
Tina Barney
New York - 293 10th Avenue
until 03-03-2018

Tina Barney – Landscapes Paul Kasmin Gallery is pleased to announce Landscapes, an exhibition of new and never-before-seen works by Tina Barney.  The exhibition will be on view from January 17 through March 3, 2018, at 297 Tenth Avenue.  This is the artist’s first New York solo exhibition in the past three years, and her second at the gallery, following major recent exhibitions at the Kunsthalle Wien in 2017 and the New Orleans Museum of Art in 2015.  In September 2017 Rizzoli USA published Tina Barney, a comprehensive monograph spanning her four-decade international career.  Alongside her oeuvre of portraits portraying the daily life of the social elite that Barney is most known for, exists an entire series of landscape photographs taken by Barney using her 8 by 10-inch view camera.  Barney first began her experimentation with landscape photography in the late 1980s and would not revisit the subject again until the summer of 2017.  Returning to her familiar New England backdrop, Barney champions distant views of shingled houses, rocky coastlines, small town thoroughfares and main street squares, challenging herself out-of-doors to refine and build upon her mastery of compositional tactics.  With these landscapes, Barney takes new ownership over the large format medium of color photography, employing the same sophisticated devices but with an expanded field of vision. Perhaps at first glance, these outdoor scenes appear as a radical departure by Barney, but upon closer observation, one perceives the intimate candidness and strong sense of American nostalgia that are all hallmarks of her work.  Capturing families and friends at informal moments of American, predominantly Northeastern, society through her humanist lens, Barney consistently demonstrates that life in this rarified world is idiosyncratic and spontaneous in its own way.  These landscapes encapsulate the ‘fly-on-the-wall’ sensation of her portraits, and perhaps offer a parallel picture of these same families outside of their home, and in their immediate, acquainted surroundings.  Tina Barney began photographing in the mid-1970s in Sun Valley, Idaho, and in 1983 shifted to a large format camera upon returning to New York City.  Her photographs are in numerous public collections, including the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Los Angeles County Museum of Art; and the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; among many others.  Barney's works were included in the 1987 Whitney Biennial, and recent solo exhibitions include The Europeans at the Frist Center in Nashville; and The Europeans at the Barbican Art Gallery, London, which traveled to the Museum of Art, Salzburg, Austria.  In 2015, along with fellow American Photographer Stephen Shore, Barney spent many hours over an 18-month period photographing the Noguchi Museum and its visitors for a Phaidon book, The Noguchi Museum: A Portrait.  This past year, Barney was awarded the distinctive honor of participating as a lecturer and the sole photographer for the Museum of Modern Art, New York’s The August Sander Project; a collaboration with Columbia University.  Barney (b. 1945) currently lives and works in New York City and Westerly, Rhode Island.  

Tina Barney – Landscapes Paul Kasmin Gallery is pleased to announce Landscapes, an exhibition of new and never-before-seen works by Tina Barney.  The exhibition will be on view from January 17 through March 3, 2018, at 297 Tenth Avenue.  This is the artist’s first New York solo exhibition in the past three years, and her second at the gallery, following major recent exhibitions at the Kunsthalle Wien in 2017 and the New Orleans Museum of Art in 2015.  In September 2017 Rizzoli USA published Tina Barney, a comprehensive monograph spanning her four-decade international career.  Alongside her oeuvre of portraits portraying the daily life of the social elite that Barney is most known for, exists an entire series of landscape photographs taken by Barney using her 8 by 10-inch view camera.  Barney first began her experimentation with landscape photography in the late 1980s and would not revisit the subject again until the summer of 2017.  Returning to her familiar New England backdrop, Barney champions distant views of shingled houses, rocky coastlines, small town thoroughfares and main street squares, challenging herself out-of-doors to refine and build upon her mastery of compositional tactics.  With these landscapes, Barney takes new ownership over the large format medium of color photography, employing the same sophisticated devices but with an expanded field of vision. Perhaps at first glance, these outdoor scenes appear as a radical departure by Barney, but upon closer observation, one perceives the intimate candidness and strong sense of American nostalgia that are all hallmarks of her work.  Capturing families and friends at informal moments of American, predominantly Northeastern, society through her humanist lens, Barney consistently demonstrates that life in this rarified world is idiosyncratic and spontaneous in its own way.  These landscapes encapsulate the ‘fly-on-the-wall’ sensation of her portraits, and perhaps offer a parallel picture of these same families outside of their home, and in their immediate, acquainted surroundings.  Tina Barney began photographing in the mid-1970s in Sun Valley, Idaho, and in 1983 shifted to a large format camera upon returning to New York City.  Her photographs are in numerous public collections, including the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Los Angeles County Museum of Art; and the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; among many others.  Barney's works were included in the 1987 Whitney Biennial, and recent solo exhibitions include The Europeans at the Frist Center in Nashville; and The Europeans at the Barbican Art Gallery, London, which traveled to the Museum of Art, Salzburg, Austria.  In 2015, along with fellow American Photographer Stephen Shore, Barney spent many hours over an 18-month period photographing the Noguchi Museum and its visitors for a Phaidon book, The Noguchi Museum: A Portrait.  This past year, Barney was awarded the distinctive honor of participating as a lecturer and the sole photographer for the Museum of Modern Art, New York’s The August Sander Project; a collaboration with Columbia University.  Barney (b. 1945) currently lives and works in New York City and Westerly, Rhode Island.  
Robin Rhode
Robin Rhode
New York - 536 West 22nd Street
until 24-02-2018

Robin Rhode – The Geometry of Colour In order to save himself from this chaos, in order to provide himself with a bearable, acceptable framework for his existence, one productive of human well-being and control, man has projected the laws of nature into a system that is a manifestation of the human spirit itself: geometry. —Le Corbusier   New York, December 19, 2017—Lehmann Maupin is pleased to present The Geometry of Colour, an exhibition of new work by South Africa-born, Berlin-based artist Robin Rhode. This recent series culminates Rhode’s well-known work engaging the public through cooperative visual and performance art, documented through c-print photographs, at a wall in Johannesburg where he and his team have worked since 2011. In The Geometry of Colour, Rhode sets forth to make a case for the role of art in developing the skepticism and spirituality he views as necessary to challenge a surge of global divisiveness. The gallery will host an opening reception for the artist on Thursday, January 18, from 6 to 8 PM at 536 West 22nd Street.   Rhode has established his unique practice with a multifold approach, working across media, including drawing, performance, photography, video, and music. As a young artist inspired by the rebellion and possibility of graffiti, he was first drawn to working in public, unsanctioned spaces. Since then, his practice has evolved to become more closely aligned with and influenced by the minimal wall drawings of Sol Lewitt, and the 1970s performance work of artists such as Vito Acconci and Bruce Nauman, as well as earlier art historical references such as Eadweard Muybridge’s stop-motion photography.   In The Geometry of Colour, Rhode utilizes geometric articulation of space, together with color theory—another optical science—to visualize the complexities of human nature and the political and economic systems established in its image. Under the Sun (2017) was inspired by the artist’s trip to Israel and the Palestinian territories last year while he was preparing for his current exhibition at the Tel Aviv Museum of Art. Struck by the similarity of today’s treatment of Palestinians to the divisive history of South Africa, Rhode was inspired to produce images of the sun’s rays as metaphor for both the political and atmospheric climates that the regions share. In a nod to religious architecture and spiritual associations with the sun, Rhode treats the squares of color representing gradients of sunlight as stained glass or a mosaic across 36 photographs. A doppelgänger of the artist alternates between basking in and shielding himself from the light depicted in the shifting spectrum. Rhode’s sun rays are an additional contribution to the long representational history of the sun, both as a benevolent father figure, and a symbol of victory and might, found throughout monotheistic religions. The rays also revisit the theme of light as a sociopolitical issue—the expansion of the electrical grid to serve black townships was an early achievement of the African National Congress under Nelson Mandela—that he has addressed in previous works.   Coming of age among the first generation of post-apartheid South Africans, Rhode has long made it his mission to engage with the realities of poverty, crime, and violence that plague many developing and postcolonial societies. However, Rhode approaches this grim subject matter with consummate whimsy and play, capturing the sentiments of spontaneity and freedom that accompanied the legal and civic opening of South Africa. He is dedicated to producing works within Johannesburg—specifically returning to the same wall within a gang-controlled territory at risk to himself and his team—to introduce material that is nuanced, politically aware, and relevant to art history. This underscores his commitment to return the resources and recognition he has received abroad to the community and local artists he identifies with and works alongside. Rhode emphasizes the reciprocal and collaborative nature of his work, saying, “The reactions and responses of the people on the street, the conditions pervading that particular process—that's part of the narrative."   Robin Rhode (b. 1976, Cape Town, South Africa; lives and works in Berlin) studied at the University of Johannesburg as well as at the Association of Film and Dramatic Arts (AFDA), from 1996 to 2001. Solo exhibitions of his work have been organized by the Tel Aviv Museum of Art, Israel (2017); Savannah College of Art and Design Museum of Art, GA (2016); The Drawing Center, New York (2015); Neuberger Museum of Art, Purchase, NY (2014); National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, Australia (2013); Los Angeles County Museum of Art (2010); Wexner Center for the Arts, Columbus, OH (2009); Hayward Gallery, London (2008); and Haus der Kunst, Munich, Germany (2007). Select group exhibitions featuring his work include Synthesize: Art + Music, Museum of Contemporary Art Jacksonville, FL (2017); Shifting Views: People and Politics in Contemporary African Art, Baltimore Museum of Art, MD (2016-2017); PERFORMA 15, Arnold Schönberg’s Erwartung - A Performance by Robin Rhode, New York (2015), Making Africa. A Continent of Contemporary Design, Vitra Design Museum, Weil am Rhein, Germany, traveled to the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao, Spain (2015); DRAWING NOW. Albertina, Vienna, Austria (2015), GOLD, Bass Museum of Art, Miami (2014); Staging Action: Performance in Photography Since 1960, The Museum of Modern Art, New York (2011); and New Photography, The Museum of Modern Art, New York (2005). Rhode has participated in multiple biennials and triennials, including the Busan Biennale (2017), 56th Venice Biennale (2015); 18th Biennale of Sydney (2012); Yokohama Triennial, Yokohama Museum of Art, Japan (2005); and the 51st Venice Biennale (2005). His work is included in numerous public collections, including the Castello di Rivoli, Turin; Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris; Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington, D.C.; Miami Art Museum; Musée d'Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris, France; The Museum of Modern Art, New York; Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York; and Walker Art Center, Minneapolis.  

Robin Rhode – The Geometry of Colour In order to save himself from this chaos, in order to provide himself with a bearable, acceptable framework for his existence, one productive of human well-being and control, man has projected the laws of nature into a system that is a manifestation of the human spirit itself: geometry. —Le Corbusier   New York, December 19, 2017—Lehmann Maupin is pleased to present The Geometry of Colour, an exhibition of new work by South Africa-born, Berlin-based artist Robin Rhode. This recent series culminates Rhode’s well-known work engaging the public through cooperative visual and performance art, documented through c-print photographs, at a wall in Johannesburg where he and his team have worked since 2011. In The Geometry of Colour, Rhode sets forth to make a case for the role of art in developing the skepticism and spirituality he views as necessary to challenge a surge of global divisiveness. The gallery will host an opening reception for the artist on Thursday, January 18, from 6 to 8 PM at 536 West 22nd Street.   Rhode has established his unique practice with a multifold approach, working across media, including drawing, performance, photography, video, and music. As a young artist inspired by the rebellion and possibility of graffiti, he was first drawn to working in public, unsanctioned spaces. Since then, his practice has evolved to become more closely aligned with and influenced by the minimal wall drawings of Sol Lewitt, and the 1970s performance work of artists such as Vito Acconci and Bruce Nauman, as well as earlier art historical references such as Eadweard Muybridge’s stop-motion photography.   In The Geometry of Colour, Rhode utilizes geometric articulation of space, together with color theory—another optical science—to visualize the complexities of human nature and the political and economic systems established in its image. Under the Sun (2017) was inspired by the artist’s trip to Israel and the Palestinian territories last year while he was preparing for his current exhibition at the Tel Aviv Museum of Art. Struck by the similarity of today’s treatment of Palestinians to the divisive history of South Africa, Rhode was inspired to produce images of the sun’s rays as metaphor for both the political and atmospheric climates that the regions share. In a nod to religious architecture and spiritual associations with the sun, Rhode treats the squares of color representing gradients of sunlight as stained glass or a mosaic across 36 photographs. A doppelgänger of the artist alternates between basking in and shielding himself from the light depicted in the shifting spectrum. Rhode’s sun rays are an additional contribution to the long representational history of the sun, both as a benevolent father figure, and a symbol of victory and might, found throughout monotheistic religions. The rays also revisit the theme of light as a sociopolitical issue—the expansion of the electrical grid to serve black townships was an early achievement of the African National Congress under Nelson Mandela—that he has addressed in previous works.   Coming of age among the first generation of post-apartheid South Africans, Rhode has long made it his mission to engage with the realities of poverty, crime, and violence that plague many developing and postcolonial societies. However, Rhode approaches this grim subject matter with consummate whimsy and play, capturing the sentiments of spontaneity and freedom that accompanied the legal and civic opening of South Africa. He is dedicated to producing works within Johannesburg—specifically returning to the same wall within a gang-controlled territory at risk to himself and his team—to introduce material that is nuanced, politically aware, and relevant to art history. This underscores his commitment to return the resources and recognition he has received abroad to the community and local artists he identifies with and works alongside. Rhode emphasizes the reciprocal and collaborative nature of his work, saying, “The reactions and responses of the people on the street, the conditions pervading that particular process—that's part of the narrative."   Robin Rhode (b. 1976, Cape Town, South Africa; lives and works in Berlin) studied at the University of Johannesburg as well as at the Association of Film and Dramatic Arts (AFDA), from 1996 to 2001. Solo exhibitions of his work have been organized by the Tel Aviv Museum of Art, Israel (2017); Savannah College of Art and Design Museum of Art, GA (2016); The Drawing Center, New York (2015); Neuberger Museum of Art, Purchase, NY (2014); National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, Australia (2013); Los Angeles County Museum of Art (2010); Wexner Center for the Arts, Columbus, OH (2009); Hayward Gallery, London (2008); and Haus der Kunst, Munich, Germany (2007). Select group exhibitions featuring his work include Synthesize: Art + Music, Museum of Contemporary Art Jacksonville, FL (2017); Shifting Views: People and Politics in Contemporary African Art, Baltimore Museum of Art, MD (2016-2017); PERFORMA 15, Arnold Schönberg’s Erwartung - A Performance by Robin Rhode, New York (2015), Making Africa. A Continent of Contemporary Design, Vitra Design Museum, Weil am Rhein, Germany, traveled to the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao, Spain (2015); DRAWING NOW. Albertina, Vienna, Austria (2015), GOLD, Bass Museum of Art, Miami (2014); Staging Action: Performance in Photography Since 1960, The Museum of Modern Art, New York (2011); and New Photography, The Museum of Modern Art, New York (2005). Rhode has participated in multiple biennials and triennials, including the Busan Biennale (2017), 56th Venice Biennale (2015); 18th Biennale of Sydney (2012); Yokohama Triennial, Yokohama Museum of Art, Japan (2005); and the 51st Venice Biennale (2005). His work is included in numerous public collections, including the Castello di Rivoli, Turin; Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris; Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington, D.C.; Miami Art Museum; Musée d'Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris, France; The Museum of Modern Art, New York; Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York; and Walker Art Center, Minneapolis.  
Optik Schröder II
Optik Schröder II
Vienna - Museumsplatz 1
until 27-05-2018

Optik Schröder II. Works from the Alexander Schröder Collection Kai Althoff, Lutz Bacher, Cosima von Bonin, KP Brehmer, Tom Burr, Merlin Carpenter, Marc Camille Chaimowicz, Anne Collier, Bernadette Corporation, Lukas Duwenhögger, Jana Euler, Cerith Wyn Evans, Claire Fontaine, Gelitin, Isa Genzken, Ull Hohn, Karl Holmqvist, Alex Hubbard, Peter Hujar, Anne Imhof, Sergej Jensen, Martin Kippenberger, Pierre Klossowski, John Knight, Michael Krebber, Mark Leckey, Klara Lidén, Lucy McKenzie, Christian Philipp Müller, Henrik Olesen, Paulina Olowska, Dietrich Orth, Manfred Pernice, Josephine Pryde, Martha Rosler, Cameron Rowland, Andreas Slominski, Reena Spaulings, Katja Strunz, Philippe Thomas, Danh Vo, Peter Wächtler The exhibition Optik Schröder II presents a representative selection from the collection of Alexander Schröder. This includes important works by Kai Althoff, Tom Burr, Bernadette Corporation, Claire Fontaine, Gelitin, Isa Genzken, Anne Imhof, Sergej Jensen, Pierre Klossowski, Manfred Pernice, Martha Rosler, and Reena Spaulings, and is one of the most important German private collections of contemporary art. These works illustrate some of the key conceptual trends and positions in the development of Western art in the past three decades, including references to social issues, queer lifestyles, the critique of institutions and the economy, critical investigation of public spaces and architecture, poetry, and contemporary forms of critical painting. The prominently represented artists’ collectives exemplify endeavors to challenge and transform the traditional roles and systems of the artist, of art production, and of the sale of art. This comprehensive overview shows a collection built up consistently since the mid-1990s and based on close proximity to the artists and sensitivity for new developments. The collection illustrates an exemplary philosophy of collecting focusing on the nature of the contemporary, on curiosity, expertise, humor, independence, and outstanding aesthetic judgement. Curated by Karola Kraus  

Optik Schröder II. Works from the Alexander Schröder Collection Kai Althoff, Lutz Bacher, Cosima von Bonin, KP Brehmer, Tom Burr, Merlin Carpenter, Marc Camille Chaimowicz, Anne Collier, Bernadette Corporation, Lukas Duwenhögger, Jana Euler, Cerith Wyn Evans, Claire Fontaine, Gelitin, Isa Genzken, Ull Hohn, Karl Holmqvist, Alex Hubbard, Peter Hujar, Anne Imhof, Sergej Jensen, Martin Kippenberger, Pierre Klossowski, John Knight, Michael Krebber, Mark Leckey, Klara Lidén, Lucy McKenzie, Christian Philipp Müller, Henrik Olesen, Paulina Olowska, Dietrich Orth, Manfred Pernice, Josephine Pryde, Martha Rosler, Cameron Rowland, Andreas Slominski, Reena Spaulings, Katja Strunz, Philippe Thomas, Danh Vo, Peter Wächtler The exhibition Optik Schröder II presents a representative selection from the collection of Alexander Schröder. This includes important works by Kai Althoff, Tom Burr, Bernadette Corporation, Claire Fontaine, Gelitin, Isa Genzken, Anne Imhof, Sergej Jensen, Pierre Klossowski, Manfred Pernice, Martha Rosler, and Reena Spaulings, and is one of the most important German private collections of contemporary art. These works illustrate some of the key conceptual trends and positions in the development of Western art in the past three decades, including references to social issues, queer lifestyles, the critique of institutions and the economy, critical investigation of public spaces and architecture, poetry, and contemporary forms of critical painting. The prominently represented artists’ collectives exemplify endeavors to challenge and transform the traditional roles and systems of the artist, of art production, and of the sale of art. This comprehensive overview shows a collection built up consistently since the mid-1990s and based on close proximity to the artists and sensitivity for new developments. The collection illustrates an exemplary philosophy of collecting focusing on the nature of the contemporary, on curiosity, expertise, humor, independence, and outstanding aesthetic judgement. Curated by Karola Kraus  
Guy Mees
Guy Mees
Vienna - Treitlstrasse 2
until 29-04-2018

Guy Mees – The Weather is Quiet, Cool and Soft The Belgian artist Guy Mees has been a central figure of Antwerp’s art scene since the 1970s. For the first time in Austria, an exhibition is devoted to his work, rarely shown internationally. Guy Mees’ photographs, videos, and above all his fragile paper-works characterize formal rigor combined with sensitivity and delicacy. He left behind an outstanding œuvre that transgresses geometric abstraction, minimal and conceptual art, kinetic and applied art. With emblematic work examples from creative phases between the 1960s and 2000s, supplemented by selected archive material from his estate, the exhibition emphasizes the continuing significance of the artist, who has recently become an important reference figure for a younger generation of artists. Guy Mees was born in 1935 in Mechelen, Belgium, and died in 2003 in Antwerp. He has been represented with solo and group exhibitions in many major museums, including Palais des Beaux-Arts, Brussels; M HKA Museum van Hedendaagse Kunst, Antwerp; S.M.A.K. Stedelijk Museum voor Actuele Kunst, Gent; as well as at the 9th Shanghai Biennial, 2012. Curator: Lilou Vidal

Guy Mees – The Weather is Quiet, Cool and Soft The Belgian artist Guy Mees has been a central figure of Antwerp’s art scene since the 1970s. For the first time in Austria, an exhibition is devoted to his work, rarely shown internationally. Guy Mees’ photographs, videos, and above all his fragile paper-works characterize formal rigor combined with sensitivity and delicacy. He left behind an outstanding œuvre that transgresses geometric abstraction, minimal and conceptual art, kinetic and applied art. With emblematic work examples from creative phases between the 1960s and 2000s, supplemented by selected archive material from his estate, the exhibition emphasizes the continuing significance of the artist, who has recently become an important reference figure for a younger generation of artists. Guy Mees was born in 1935 in Mechelen, Belgium, and died in 2003 in Antwerp. He has been represented with solo and group exhibitions in many major museums, including Palais des Beaux-Arts, Brussels; M HKA Museum van Hedendaagse Kunst, Antwerp; S.M.A.K. Stedelijk Museum voor Actuele Kunst, Gent; as well as at the 9th Shanghai Biennial, 2012. Curator: Lilou Vidal
Justin Fitzpatrick
Justin Fitzpatrick
Vienna - Volkertstraße 17
until 04-03-2018

Justin Fitzpatrick – Underworld  In the modern image of the individual body, sexual life, eating, drinking, and defecation have radically changed their meaning: they have been transferred to the private and psychological level where their connotation becomes narrow and specific, torn away from the direct relation to the life of society and to the cosmic whole. In this new connotation they can no longer carry on their former philosophical functions.  (Mikhail Bakhtin, Rabelais and his world, 1965) In ‘Rabelais and his world’, Bakhtin discusses the idea of the ‘Grotesque’, a collectivist idea of medieval life where the body itself was of the public domain, and group feasting, public defecation, urination and sex characterised an open and porous social body. He discusses the psychological changes that occurred when people became removed from the direct fruits of their labour, with their own produce sold back to them by the ruling classes at inflated prices, and when the church restructured the social body around the family unit, around the production of new bodies. This abstraction in turn created psychological abstraction, with the body becoming individuated, removed from its social mass, and privatised. In this way the excesses of the open porous social body were to disappear or become codified and closeted into carnivals or other similar feast days. The ‘Grotesque’ is summed up in the image of a gaping open mouth, the idea of consuming the world through absorption into the body. Metaphors of incorporation emerge from the physics of the body and its relationship to the world, and in this show the body’s physicality is compared to its economic value. The exhibition presents us with three paintings depicting a table, the site of incorporation. One of them shows a construction worker imagined as part of an anatomical diagram, a filtration system which begins to turn into almost text like forms. Two ‘tabletop’ paintings show two figures at a cafe intertwining and abstracting into Art Nouveau-like ornament. Ornament is what is decorative, or non-essential to an object. Here ornament is related to excess, to idle chat, sexual frisson. The sculptures also refer to the table and to excess: here Thomas Aquinas has been incarnated as four Art Nouveau table legs attached to sweeping brushes and dustpans. Aquinas catalogued a taxonomy of sexual sins and these sculptures are allegorical depictions of the sins of wastefulness: Coitus Interruptus, Self Love and Sodomy - spilled seed needing to be swept up. Non-normative and non ‘productive’ sex acts are one of the ways the church attempted to structure sexuality solely around the production of subsequent generations of workers. Our attitudes towards sexuality in general were thus formed under social and economic principles which have been internalised into our bodies as shame and guilt. Sexual feeling and pleasure have been pathologised. Fitzpatrick in this show suggests that the physics of our bodies are metonymic models for social structure and as these structures abstracted over time into forms of religion and state control, they subsequently restructured and alienated ourselves from our own bodies. Justin Fitzpatrick, born in 1985 in Dublin, lives and works in London and Brussels. Recent solo exhibitions include F-R-O-N-T-I-S-P-I-E-C-E (Seventeen, London) and Uranus (Sultana, Paris). His works have been shown in the following group exhibitions: Whisky et Tabou, Musée Estrine, Saint-Rémy-de-Provence (2017); Amazing girls / It’s complicated, Kevin Space, Vienna, (2017); Streams of Warm Impermanence, DRAF, London (2016); Animal Mundi, Barbican Arts Trust, London (2016); Life is On, Jakob Kroon Galerie, Stockholm (2016); Caput Medusae, Westminster Waste, London (2016); I would have done everything for you…Gimme more!, London (2016); Bloomberg New Contemporaries, ICA, London (2015).  

Justin Fitzpatrick – Underworld  In the modern image of the individual body, sexual life, eating, drinking, and defecation have radically changed their meaning: they have been transferred to the private and psychological level where their connotation becomes narrow and specific, torn away from the direct relation to the life of society and to the cosmic whole. In this new connotation they can no longer carry on their former philosophical functions.  (Mikhail Bakhtin, Rabelais and his world, 1965) In ‘Rabelais and his world’, Bakhtin discusses the idea of the ‘Grotesque’, a collectivist idea of medieval life where the body itself was of the public domain, and group feasting, public defecation, urination and sex characterised an open and porous social body. He discusses the psychological changes that occurred when people became removed from the direct fruits of their labour, with their own produce sold back to them by the ruling classes at inflated prices, and when the church restructured the social body around the family unit, around the production of new bodies. This abstraction in turn created psychological abstraction, with the body becoming individuated, removed from its social mass, and privatised. In this way the excesses of the open porous social body were to disappear or become codified and closeted into carnivals or other similar feast days. The ‘Grotesque’ is summed up in the image of a gaping open mouth, the idea of consuming the world through absorption into the body. Metaphors of incorporation emerge from the physics of the body and its relationship to the world, and in this show the body’s physicality is compared to its economic value. The exhibition presents us with three paintings depicting a table, the site of incorporation. One of them shows a construction worker imagined as part of an anatomical diagram, a filtration system which begins to turn into almost text like forms. Two ‘tabletop’ paintings show two figures at a cafe intertwining and abstracting into Art Nouveau-like ornament. Ornament is what is decorative, or non-essential to an object. Here ornament is related to excess, to idle chat, sexual frisson. The sculptures also refer to the table and to excess: here Thomas Aquinas has been incarnated as four Art Nouveau table legs attached to sweeping brushes and dustpans. Aquinas catalogued a taxonomy of sexual sins and these sculptures are allegorical depictions of the sins of wastefulness: Coitus Interruptus, Self Love and Sodomy - spilled seed needing to be swept up. Non-normative and non ‘productive’ sex acts are one of the ways the church attempted to structure sexuality solely around the production of subsequent generations of workers. Our attitudes towards sexuality in general were thus formed under social and economic principles which have been internalised into our bodies as shame and guilt. Sexual feeling and pleasure have been pathologised. Fitzpatrick in this show suggests that the physics of our bodies are metonymic models for social structure and as these structures abstracted over time into forms of religion and state control, they subsequently restructured and alienated ourselves from our own bodies. Justin Fitzpatrick, born in 1985 in Dublin, lives and works in London and Brussels. Recent solo exhibitions include F-R-O-N-T-I-S-P-I-E-C-E (Seventeen, London) and Uranus (Sultana, Paris). His works have been shown in the following group exhibitions: Whisky et Tabou, Musée Estrine, Saint-Rémy-de-Provence (2017); Amazing girls / It’s complicated, Kevin Space, Vienna, (2017); Streams of Warm Impermanence, DRAF, London (2016); Animal Mundi, Barbican Arts Trust, London (2016); Life is On, Jakob Kroon Galerie, Stockholm (2016); Caput Medusae, Westminster Waste, London (2016); I would have done everything for you…Gimme more!, London (2016); Bloomberg New Contemporaries, ICA, London (2015).  
James Turrell
James Turrell
Zürich - Stampfenbachstrasse 59
until 24-03-2018

James Turrell – The Elliptical Glass Ha?usler Contemporary Zu?rich is pleased to present for the first time James Turrell’s new light work «Elliptical Glass» along with historical projections from 1968. With these two groups of works that embrace fifty years of the artist’s oeuvre, it becomes clear how skillfull he uses light as a material to show vision itself. James Turrell (* 1943, Los Angeles, lives in Flagstaff, US) is considered one of the most important international artists of our time. His entire oeuvre is dedicated to dealing with natural and artificial light and its spatial manifestations. Like no other artist, he moves people from very different cultural backgrounds. We are delighted to now present the latest and earliest results of James Turrell's artistic approach in our gallery in Zurich with a spatial light work and projections. For the first time ever we present the new work type «Elliptical Glass». This atmospheric architectural intervention, which also works in everyday spatial conditions, appears as an oval, colored luminous plane in the wall – at once seemingly dense and permeable. In a course precisely programmed by the artist, the colorfulness of the lighting slowly changes from the center. This subtle dynamic creates a captivating effect on the viewer’s eye, which soon loses itself between a seemingly infinite depth and the unfathomable planarity. As in James Turrell's highly acclaimed, expansive installations, the usual understanding of light and space is put to test and the observer is led to the borderlines of perception. In parallel, as am early example of his work we show selected historical projections which James Turrell developed in the mid-1960s at the Mendota Hotel and which could not be seen in Switzerland for a long time. The artist hired the hotel building in Santa Monica (US) as a studio from 1966 to 1968 and began experimenting with darkened rooms and controlled lighting. In this early investigations, Turrell laid the foundation for his entire, future oeuvre by appropriating light as a malleable material, as he says. The legendary projections such as «Carn Green» or «Sloan Red» (both 1968) were created, in which light manifests itself as a radiant, geometric body in space. Our exhibition spans over fifty years of James Turrell’s work, from the beginning to the present. It visualizes how the artist succeeds in revealing something «ordinary» – the light – as a breathtaking phenomenon that provides insights into one's own perception. – Deborah Keller

James Turrell – The Elliptical Glass Ha?usler Contemporary Zu?rich is pleased to present for the first time James Turrell’s new light work «Elliptical Glass» along with historical projections from 1968. With these two groups of works that embrace fifty years of the artist’s oeuvre, it becomes clear how skillfull he uses light as a material to show vision itself. James Turrell (* 1943, Los Angeles, lives in Flagstaff, US) is considered one of the most important international artists of our time. His entire oeuvre is dedicated to dealing with natural and artificial light and its spatial manifestations. Like no other artist, he moves people from very different cultural backgrounds. We are delighted to now present the latest and earliest results of James Turrell's artistic approach in our gallery in Zurich with a spatial light work and projections. For the first time ever we present the new work type «Elliptical Glass». This atmospheric architectural intervention, which also works in everyday spatial conditions, appears as an oval, colored luminous plane in the wall – at once seemingly dense and permeable. In a course precisely programmed by the artist, the colorfulness of the lighting slowly changes from the center. This subtle dynamic creates a captivating effect on the viewer’s eye, which soon loses itself between a seemingly infinite depth and the unfathomable planarity. As in James Turrell's highly acclaimed, expansive installations, the usual understanding of light and space is put to test and the observer is led to the borderlines of perception. In parallel, as am early example of his work we show selected historical projections which James Turrell developed in the mid-1960s at the Mendota Hotel and which could not be seen in Switzerland for a long time. The artist hired the hotel building in Santa Monica (US) as a studio from 1966 to 1968 and began experimenting with darkened rooms and controlled lighting. In this early investigations, Turrell laid the foundation for his entire, future oeuvre by appropriating light as a malleable material, as he says. The legendary projections such as «Carn Green» or «Sloan Red» (both 1968) were created, in which light manifests itself as a radiant, geometric body in space. Our exhibition spans over fifty years of James Turrell’s work, from the beginning to the present. It visualizes how the artist succeeds in revealing something «ordinary» – the light – as a breathtaking phenomenon that provides insights into one's own perception. – Deborah Keller
Zanele Muholi
Zanele Muholi
Zürich - Löwenbräu Areal, Limmatstrasse 270
until 13-05-2018

Zanele Muholi In her first institutional solo exhibition in Switzerland, Zanele Muholi presents a comprehensive selection of works from three different ongoing series: Faces and Phases, Brave Beauties and Somnyama Ngonyama (‘Hail the Dark Lioness’), which was previously shown at LUMA Arles in France in 2016.  

Zanele Muholi In her first institutional solo exhibition in Switzerland, Zanele Muholi presents a comprehensive selection of works from three different ongoing series: Faces and Phases, Brave Beauties and Somnyama Ngonyama (‘Hail the Dark Lioness’), which was previously shown at LUMA Arles in France in 2016.  
Alicja Kwade
Alicja Kwade
Zürich - ewz-Unterwerk Selnau, Selnaustrasse 25
until 06-05-2018

Alicja Kwade – LinienLand Museum Haus Konstruktiv begins its annual program with a comprehensive solo exhibition by Alicja Kwade (b. 1979 in Katowice, Poland, lives in Berlin). This renowned sculptor and conceptual artist is a relativist who skeptically questions what is supposedly our reality. In her multimedia oeuvre, Kwade takes this approach as a basis for addressing a wide range of very different phenomena and conceptual models from physics, philosophy and sociology, translating these into her distinctive art. This results in works with a conceptual background, which are as sensorially poetic as they are formally stringent. For the current exhibition the artist has conceived a new, extensive installation: a walk-through grid structure, in which differently sized solid balls of natural stone float above the observers’ heads in apparent weightlessness. With LinienLand (LineLand) as the title of the exhibition at Museum Haus Konstruktiv, Alicja Kwade makes reference to Edwin Abbott’s 1884 novella Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions, in which a square describes its life in Flatland and reports on its excursions into Lineland and Spaceland. To this day, the text is still received as a ma- thematical essay on the fourth dimension. LinienLand is also the title chosen by Kwade for her latest work, made specially for the 1st floor at Museum Haus Konstruktiv: a walk-through three-dimensional grid structure, in which differently sized solid spheres of natural stone float in apparent weightless- ness. Here, the artist refers to the idea of parallel worlds, which has been the subject of much discussion since antiquity. Against this backdrop, the extensive structure, based on a system of 5 x 5 x 11 squares, is to be read as a multiverse, whereby each individu- al cubic metal boundary implies a distinct reality. The grid’s steel system correlates with the stones: Kwade adheres to a strict self-imposed principle, according to which, via the shifting within the system, the individual bars form the spheres’ supports. The resulting gateways invite the visitors to enter a multiverse and to experience the gravity of the large stone spheres, which bring to mind a gravitational field. The natural stones come from the various continents of our Earth and also symbolize them. The stone ma- terial itself, with its various layers that have formed over several million years and make it possible to determine its age, acts as a kind of timescale. In LinienLand, Alicja Kwade has managed to implement her thoughts on space, gravity and time in a fascinating way. Idols, a twelve-part piece that shows brass clock hands arranged on paper, is based on Einstein's findings regarding the existence of gravitational waves in spacetime, trigge- red by an accelerated mass. The twelve variations capture various rotational stages of wave motion. In the installation Gegebenenfalls die Wirklichkeit (Possibly Reality), presented on the 2nd floor, the artist addresses the concept of reality once again. Here, Kwade asks what actually constitutes an object, what means of description are at our disposal, and what the relationship is between a body’s material presence and our knowledge about it. A granite sculpture rests in the middle of the exhibition space: This is a partial copy of a boulder found in nature, the surface of which was measured in a 3D scanning process. The collected data was then digitally transferred to a milling machine that autonomous- ly created the exhibited object – from the same stone material as the original. Kwade caused the milling process to halt, so that the sculpture appears to pause in a state between natural and technological form. Hanging on the walls, there are over 2,000 printouts with the coordinates of the object’s topography, described in numerical se- quences based on the X, Y and Z axes proceeding from the middle of the stone. Of the 30,000 pages in total, the rest are stored in copper time capsules or lie stacked on the floor. The question arises as to what is being observed here (the real, or merely the de- piction of the real) and how information about the world of things is shown. On the 4th floor, phenomena of chance and spacetime are thematized. A copper pipe, with funnels at its ends, passes through two walls and connects two deceptively similar halves of the space. If the observer looks through the funnels, they find an almost iden- tical situation at the opposite end. In each instance, the random flickering of a flu- orescent tube is seen. This is connected to a loudspeaker, so the gas discharge can al- so be experienced acoustically. Thus, the absurd duplication of random occurrences is perceived both acoustically and visually. Alicja Kwade studied at the Berlin University of the Arts. Her works have already been featured in nume- rous solo and group exhibitions: in 2017, for instance, at the 57th Biennale di Venezia, at ARoS Aarhus Art Museum, at the Eli and Edythe Broad Art Museum in Michigan, and at Museum Frieder Burda – Salon Berlin; in 2016 at the Kochi-Muziris Biennale, at the Whitechapel Gallery in London, and at De Appel Arts Centre in Amsterdam; in 2015 at Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt, and in 2014 at Kunstmuseum St. Gallen.  

Alicja Kwade – LinienLand Museum Haus Konstruktiv begins its annual program with a comprehensive solo exhibition by Alicja Kwade (b. 1979 in Katowice, Poland, lives in Berlin). This renowned sculptor and conceptual artist is a relativist who skeptically questions what is supposedly our reality. In her multimedia oeuvre, Kwade takes this approach as a basis for addressing a wide range of very different phenomena and conceptual models from physics, philosophy and sociology, translating these into her distinctive art. This results in works with a conceptual background, which are as sensorially poetic as they are formally stringent. For the current exhibition the artist has conceived a new, extensive installation: a walk-through grid structure, in which differently sized solid balls of natural stone float above the observers’ heads in apparent weightlessness. With LinienLand (LineLand) as the title of the exhibition at Museum Haus Konstruktiv, Alicja Kwade makes reference to Edwin Abbott’s 1884 novella Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions, in which a square describes its life in Flatland and reports on its excursions into Lineland and Spaceland. To this day, the text is still received as a ma- thematical essay on the fourth dimension. LinienLand is also the title chosen by Kwade for her latest work, made specially for the 1st floor at Museum Haus Konstruktiv: a walk-through three-dimensional grid structure, in which differently sized solid spheres of natural stone float in apparent weightless- ness. Here, the artist refers to the idea of parallel worlds, which has been the subject of much discussion since antiquity. Against this backdrop, the extensive structure, based on a system of 5 x 5 x 11 squares, is to be read as a multiverse, whereby each individu- al cubic metal boundary implies a distinct reality. The grid’s steel system correlates with the stones: Kwade adheres to a strict self-imposed principle, according to which, via the shifting within the system, the individual bars form the spheres’ supports. The resulting gateways invite the visitors to enter a multiverse and to experience the gravity of the large stone spheres, which bring to mind a gravitational field. The natural stones come from the various continents of our Earth and also symbolize them. The stone ma- terial itself, with its various layers that have formed over several million years and make it possible to determine its age, acts as a kind of timescale. In LinienLand, Alicja Kwade has managed to implement her thoughts on space, gravity and time in a fascinating way. Idols, a twelve-part piece that shows brass clock hands arranged on paper, is based on Einstein's findings regarding the existence of gravitational waves in spacetime, trigge- red by an accelerated mass. The twelve variations capture various rotational stages of wave motion. In the installation Gegebenenfalls die Wirklichkeit (Possibly Reality), presented on the 2nd floor, the artist addresses the concept of reality once again. Here, Kwade asks what actually constitutes an object, what means of description are at our disposal, and what the relationship is between a body’s material presence and our knowledge about it. A granite sculpture rests in the middle of the exhibition space: This is a partial copy of a boulder found in nature, the surface of which was measured in a 3D scanning process. The collected data was then digitally transferred to a milling machine that autonomous- ly created the exhibited object – from the same stone material as the original. Kwade caused the milling process to halt, so that the sculpture appears to pause in a state between natural and technological form. Hanging on the walls, there are over 2,000 printouts with the coordinates of the object’s topography, described in numerical se- quences based on the X, Y and Z axes proceeding from the middle of the stone. Of the 30,000 pages in total, the rest are stored in copper time capsules or lie stacked on the floor. The question arises as to what is being observed here (the real, or merely the de- piction of the real) and how information about the world of things is shown. On the 4th floor, phenomena of chance and spacetime are thematized. A copper pipe, with funnels at its ends, passes through two walls and connects two deceptively similar halves of the space. If the observer looks through the funnels, they find an almost iden- tical situation at the opposite end. In each instance, the random flickering of a flu- orescent tube is seen. This is connected to a loudspeaker, so the gas discharge can al- so be experienced acoustically. Thus, the absurd duplication of random occurrences is perceived both acoustically and visually. Alicja Kwade studied at the Berlin University of the Arts. Her works have already been featured in nume- rous solo and group exhibitions: in 2017, for instance, at the 57th Biennale di Venezia, at ARoS Aarhus Art Museum, at the Eli and Edythe Broad Art Museum in Michigan, and at Museum Frieder Burda – Salon Berlin; in 2016 at the Kochi-Muziris Biennale, at the Whitechapel Gallery in London, and at De Appel Arts Centre in Amsterdam; in 2015 at Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt, and in 2014 at Kunstmuseum St. Gallen.  
Charles Atlas
Charles Atlas
Zürich - Löwenbräu Areal, Limmatstrasse 270
until 13-05-2018

Charles Atlas – Scary, Scary, Community Fun, Death The American artist Charles Atlas (b. St. Louis, Missouri, 1949) has been a leading figure in the domain of film and video art for almost fifty years, creating complex video installations and seminal films documenting dance and performance art. Atlas rose to renown with collaborative projects involving choreographers like Merce Cunningham (1919–2009) and Michael Clark (b. 1962) as well as the fashion designer and performance artist Leigh Bowery (1961–1994). His network of creative collaborators and associates largely coincides with his circle of friends: many of his works from the 1980s and 1990s are portraits of fellow protagonists of the New York underground scene and the contemporary milieu, employing a sub- and pop-cultural idiom to scrutinize aspects of biopower and the politics of bodies and identity. To this day, younger generations of filmmakers regard Atlas’s visual language as a key reference; a prominent example is his cinematography in the fictionalized documentary Hail the New Puritan (1986), in which the camera becomes the subject’s active counterpart. One defining feature of Atlas’s work is his ongoing investigation of the expressive potentials of time-based media. He started experimenting with the defamiliarizing impact of techniques such as chroma key compositing back in the late 1970s. His more recent video installations, which are often highly technically complex, are abstract and playful explorations of an iconography of geometric series or numerical sequences, examining questions of the segmentation and structuring of the visual space as well as contemporary issues in the politics of representation. The artist’s exhibition, curated by Raphael Gygax, will be his first solo show in Switzerland. It will feature a selection of works from the last 20 years as well as one recent piece. An accompanying monograph will be published by JRP|Ringier in 2018. Charles Atlas lives and works in New York City. Over the decades, his work has been presented in numerous exhibitions in the U.S. and abroad, including, most recently, at the Museum of Modern Art (2017); the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis (2017); the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (2016); and the Tate Modern, London (2013). His contribution to the 57th Venice Biennale in 2017 was honored with a Special Mention Award.

Charles Atlas – Scary, Scary, Community Fun, Death The American artist Charles Atlas (b. St. Louis, Missouri, 1949) has been a leading figure in the domain of film and video art for almost fifty years, creating complex video installations and seminal films documenting dance and performance art. Atlas rose to renown with collaborative projects involving choreographers like Merce Cunningham (1919–2009) and Michael Clark (b. 1962) as well as the fashion designer and performance artist Leigh Bowery (1961–1994). His network of creative collaborators and associates largely coincides with his circle of friends: many of his works from the 1980s and 1990s are portraits of fellow protagonists of the New York underground scene and the contemporary milieu, employing a sub- and pop-cultural idiom to scrutinize aspects of biopower and the politics of bodies and identity. To this day, younger generations of filmmakers regard Atlas’s visual language as a key reference; a prominent example is his cinematography in the fictionalized documentary Hail the New Puritan (1986), in which the camera becomes the subject’s active counterpart. One defining feature of Atlas’s work is his ongoing investigation of the expressive potentials of time-based media. He started experimenting with the defamiliarizing impact of techniques such as chroma key compositing back in the late 1970s. His more recent video installations, which are often highly technically complex, are abstract and playful explorations of an iconography of geometric series or numerical sequences, examining questions of the segmentation and structuring of the visual space as well as contemporary issues in the politics of representation. The artist’s exhibition, curated by Raphael Gygax, will be his first solo show in Switzerland. It will feature a selection of works from the last 20 years as well as one recent piece. An accompanying monograph will be published by JRP|Ringier in 2018. Charles Atlas lives and works in New York City. Over the decades, his work has been presented in numerous exhibitions in the U.S. and abroad, including, most recently, at the Museum of Modern Art (2017); the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis (2017); the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (2016); and the Tate Modern, London (2013). His contribution to the 57th Venice Biennale in 2017 was honored with a Special Mention Award.
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