Art feed

Curated by Exhibitionary

Kasia Fudakowski & Maria Loboda & Zoë Paul
Kasia Fudakowski & Maria Loboda & Zo Paul
Basel - Hauptstrasse 12
until 19-05-2018

Kasia Fudakowski & Maria Loboda & Zoë Paul – ?Infinity has its Limits Curated by Samuel Leuenberger & Elise Lammer  

Kasia Fudakowski & Maria Loboda & Zoë Paul – ?Infinity has its Limits Curated by Samuel Leuenberger & Elise Lammer  
Atta Kwami
Atta Kwami
Basel - Rosentalstrasse 28
until 28-04-2018

Atta Kwami – Conversation  

Atta Kwami – Conversation  
Yuri Ancarani
Yuri Ancarani
Basel - Steinenberg 7
until 29-04-2018

Yuri Ancarani – Sculture This first solo exhibition in Switzerland and first exhibition ever to survey the output of the Italian artist-filmmaker Yuri Ancarani will span his production from 2010 to the present, including a new film installation conceived for the occasion. Such an exhibition is perfectly poised to highlight this seminal artist’s impressive career and to present an overview of his films in the artistic context for which his films were originally made. It is also a timely moment to allow audiences who might know one or more film to view the precision and poetry of his fascinating vision across the last 10 years of his practice.  

Yuri Ancarani – Sculture This first solo exhibition in Switzerland and first exhibition ever to survey the output of the Italian artist-filmmaker Yuri Ancarani will span his production from 2010 to the present, including a new film installation conceived for the occasion. Such an exhibition is perfectly poised to highlight this seminal artist’s impressive career and to present an overview of his films in the artistic context for which his films were originally made. It is also a timely moment to allow audiences who might know one or more film to view the precision and poetry of his fascinating vision across the last 10 years of his practice.  
Carsten Höller
Carsten Hller
Beijing - Jiuxianqiao Road
until 02-06-2018

Carsten Höller – Method Galleria Continua is pleased to present Method, an exhibition of new and recent works by Carsten Ho?ller. To inhabit the world is to divide it. For Carsten Ho?ller, this is not so much a political fact as a mathematical reality. Fascinated by partition principles, the artist, who received his training in the natural sciences, explores how lines cut through surfaces and incessantly yield captivating new shapes. In Divisions (Sphere and Carpet), the first line divides the carpet into two parts of the same size, and every following line further divides the subsequent squares of one divided part into equal halves. Ho?ller’s discourse on method is an eminently practical and productive one, giving rise to infinite shades of colour and a panoply of geometrical objects. In Divisions Circle (White Lines on Carmine-red and White Background), white dots placed at strategic intersections open up ever- new subdivisions. The video work Punktefilm reveals that twenty-four dots in motion suffice to capture the flowing movements of a dancing couple. As the dots disappear one by one, the artist challenges the audience to question the foundations and the limits of their own perception. How do we divide the world to make sense of it? And is giving form and meaning to an inchoate mass of sensory data not tantamount to filling in the dark blanks of ignorance between the few luminous spots of serendipity? With its two live canaries in spherical cages revolving around a central axis, the new work Circle Division Canary Mobile (Black) even seems to suggest that life itself follows the logic of an endlessly continuing division that both separates and brings into contact. Yet far from merely observing nature, the scientific mindset continuously transforms it. Science intrudes upon nature, while also competing with it, as evidenced in Birds, a series of two-colored engravings on paper. All birds depicted were bred in captivity; the natural world has never been their habitat, which, like their very existence, is entirely the product of man-made activities. By printing the engravings at a midpoint between color and black and white, Ho?ller articulates the brittle status of these bird hybrids, halfway between nature and culture and not fully belonging to either. If Ho?ller astutely multiplies divisions, he also relishes exploding binary oppositions when they threaten to stymie his inquisitive investigations. In Decimal Clock (White and Pink), Ho?ller’s rationalist instincts turn to the division of time. The functional clock, accounting for 10 hours, 100 minutes and 100 seconds, reminds us that the global homogenization of time occurred only recently as a response to the unprecedented degree of planetary interconnectedness. Decimal Clock (White and Pink) gestures towards experiments with decimal time during the French Revolution and pays tribute to efforts aiming at temporal comparability and regularity. Yet it also acknowledges various non-Western ways of measuring time and, rather than seeing them as a threat to the empire of reason, celebrates them as an enriching expression of the diversity of our existence in time. Ho?ller’s rules for the direction of the mind draw on an expanded concept of insight and discovery. The geometer and the laboratory engineer are only two of the artist’s many incarnations. His quest for knowledge also relies on a psychedelic epistemology: altered states of mind that can enhance our understanding of the world. For Ho?ller, mushrooms embody these sensory journeys, not just because of their supposedly ‘magic’ effects but also because of their complex structure, much of it underground, which sparks the curiosity of this artistic researcher. The polyester Giant Triple Mushroom stands as a towering testament to the wonder felt at those living, meandering organisms science has still not understood. Ho?ller’s enlarged mushroom replicas brim with an Alice-in-Wonderland-like excitement over the brightly-colored worlds to which they give access. A passionate classifier, Ho?ller reintegrates even the mind-expanding fungal universe into a scholarly order of things, as he demonstrates in Double Mushroom Vitrine (Twenty- Fourfold), a meticulously arranged visual taxonomy with a twist: Upon closer inspection, each mushroom specimen turns out to be a montage, with one half representing a variety of wild mushroom and the other the fly agaric known for its poisonous and psychoactive properties. On full display here is the mischievously subversive wit that is one of the indispensable instruments in Ho?ller’s artistic laboratory. The Soma series – each setting composed of representations of a reindeer, a female model, and a fresh fly agaric mushrooms –alludes to the mythical substance mentioned in the Vedic writings. Both a gateway to the world of the gods and a source of spiritual Enlightenment, soma was said to be a crucial component of the ritualistic practices of the Vedic people. Humankind, however, forgot about the plant, which can no longer be identified (even though some believed the Vedic ritualists relied on the fly agaric mushroom to open the doors of their perception). With this series, the artist points to an elective affinity between the researcher and the sage. In the medium of art at least, a reconciliation of modern science and ancient wisdom appears tantalizingly within reach. Ho?ller gives us the Method. Carsten Ho?ller was born in 1961 in Brussels, Belgium and lives in Stockholm, Sweden and Biriwa, Ghana. Collections include Museum of Modern Art, New York; Tate, London; Stedelijk Museum voor Actuele Kunst, Belgium; Muse?e d’Art Contemporain Lyon, France; Museum fu?r Moderne Kunst, Frankfurt; Fondazione Prada, Milan; Cal Cego – Coleccio?n de Arte Contempora?neo, Barcelona; PinchukArtCentre, Ukraine; and 21st Century Museum of Contemporary Art, Japan. Institutional exhibitions include the 50th Biennale di Venezia (2003); “One Day One Day”, Fa?rgfabriken, Stockholm (2003); 7th Biennale de Lyon (2003); “Carsten Ho?ller: Half Fiction”, Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston (2003); “7,8 Hz”, Le Consortium, France (2004); “Une exposition a? Marseille”, Muse?e d'Art Contemporain, Marseille (2004); 51st Biennale di Venezia (2005); “Carsten Ho?ller: Test Site”, Tate Modern, London (2006); “Amusement Park”, MASS MoCA, North Adams, MA (2006); “Carrousel”, Kunsthaus Bregenz, Austria (2008); “The Double Club”, Fondazione Prada, London (2008); 28th Bienal de Sa?o Paulo (2008); “Double Slide”, Museum of Contemporary Art, Croatia (2009); 53th Biennale di Venezia (2009); 8th Gwangju Biennale (2010); “Divided Divided”, Museum Boijmans van Beuningen, Rotterdam (2010); “Soma”, Hamburger Bahnhof, Museum fu?r Gegenwart, Berlin (2010); “Carsten Ho?ller: Double Carousel with Zo?llner Stripes”, MACRO- Museo d’Arte Contemporanea Roma, Italy (2011); “Carsten Ho?ller: Experience”, New Museum of Contemporary Art, New York (2011); 11th Sharjah Biennale (2013); “LEBEN”, Thyssen-Bornemisza Art Contemporary, Vienna (2014); 8th Berlin Biennial for Contemporary Art (2014); 10th Gwangju Biennale (2014); “Golden Mirror Carousel”, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne (2014–15); 56th Biennale di Venezia (2015); “Carsten Ho?ller: Decision”, Hayward Gallery, London (2015); and “Doubt”, Pirelli HangarBicocca, Milan (2016). Henie Onstad Kunstsenter, Høvikodden, Norway (2017), “Reason” at Gagosian Gallery, New York City, United States (2017). Y. Centro Botin, Santander, Spain (2017). Miami ArtBasel, “Prada Double Club Miami”, with Fondazione Prada, Milan. Miami, United States (2017).  

Carsten Höller – Method Galleria Continua is pleased to present Method, an exhibition of new and recent works by Carsten Ho?ller. To inhabit the world is to divide it. For Carsten Ho?ller, this is not so much a political fact as a mathematical reality. Fascinated by partition principles, the artist, who received his training in the natural sciences, explores how lines cut through surfaces and incessantly yield captivating new shapes. In Divisions (Sphere and Carpet), the first line divides the carpet into two parts of the same size, and every following line further divides the subsequent squares of one divided part into equal halves. Ho?ller’s discourse on method is an eminently practical and productive one, giving rise to infinite shades of colour and a panoply of geometrical objects. In Divisions Circle (White Lines on Carmine-red and White Background), white dots placed at strategic intersections open up ever- new subdivisions. The video work Punktefilm reveals that twenty-four dots in motion suffice to capture the flowing movements of a dancing couple. As the dots disappear one by one, the artist challenges the audience to question the foundations and the limits of their own perception. How do we divide the world to make sense of it? And is giving form and meaning to an inchoate mass of sensory data not tantamount to filling in the dark blanks of ignorance between the few luminous spots of serendipity? With its two live canaries in spherical cages revolving around a central axis, the new work Circle Division Canary Mobile (Black) even seems to suggest that life itself follows the logic of an endlessly continuing division that both separates and brings into contact. Yet far from merely observing nature, the scientific mindset continuously transforms it. Science intrudes upon nature, while also competing with it, as evidenced in Birds, a series of two-colored engravings on paper. All birds depicted were bred in captivity; the natural world has never been their habitat, which, like their very existence, is entirely the product of man-made activities. By printing the engravings at a midpoint between color and black and white, Ho?ller articulates the brittle status of these bird hybrids, halfway between nature and culture and not fully belonging to either. If Ho?ller astutely multiplies divisions, he also relishes exploding binary oppositions when they threaten to stymie his inquisitive investigations. In Decimal Clock (White and Pink), Ho?ller’s rationalist instincts turn to the division of time. The functional clock, accounting for 10 hours, 100 minutes and 100 seconds, reminds us that the global homogenization of time occurred only recently as a response to the unprecedented degree of planetary interconnectedness. Decimal Clock (White and Pink) gestures towards experiments with decimal time during the French Revolution and pays tribute to efforts aiming at temporal comparability and regularity. Yet it also acknowledges various non-Western ways of measuring time and, rather than seeing them as a threat to the empire of reason, celebrates them as an enriching expression of the diversity of our existence in time. Ho?ller’s rules for the direction of the mind draw on an expanded concept of insight and discovery. The geometer and the laboratory engineer are only two of the artist’s many incarnations. His quest for knowledge also relies on a psychedelic epistemology: altered states of mind that can enhance our understanding of the world. For Ho?ller, mushrooms embody these sensory journeys, not just because of their supposedly ‘magic’ effects but also because of their complex structure, much of it underground, which sparks the curiosity of this artistic researcher. The polyester Giant Triple Mushroom stands as a towering testament to the wonder felt at those living, meandering organisms science has still not understood. Ho?ller’s enlarged mushroom replicas brim with an Alice-in-Wonderland-like excitement over the brightly-colored worlds to which they give access. A passionate classifier, Ho?ller reintegrates even the mind-expanding fungal universe into a scholarly order of things, as he demonstrates in Double Mushroom Vitrine (Twenty- Fourfold), a meticulously arranged visual taxonomy with a twist: Upon closer inspection, each mushroom specimen turns out to be a montage, with one half representing a variety of wild mushroom and the other the fly agaric known for its poisonous and psychoactive properties. On full display here is the mischievously subversive wit that is one of the indispensable instruments in Ho?ller’s artistic laboratory. The Soma series – each setting composed of representations of a reindeer, a female model, and a fresh fly agaric mushrooms –alludes to the mythical substance mentioned in the Vedic writings. Both a gateway to the world of the gods and a source of spiritual Enlightenment, soma was said to be a crucial component of the ritualistic practices of the Vedic people. Humankind, however, forgot about the plant, which can no longer be identified (even though some believed the Vedic ritualists relied on the fly agaric mushroom to open the doors of their perception). With this series, the artist points to an elective affinity between the researcher and the sage. In the medium of art at least, a reconciliation of modern science and ancient wisdom appears tantalizingly within reach. Ho?ller gives us the Method. Carsten Ho?ller was born in 1961 in Brussels, Belgium and lives in Stockholm, Sweden and Biriwa, Ghana. Collections include Museum of Modern Art, New York; Tate, London; Stedelijk Museum voor Actuele Kunst, Belgium; Muse?e d’Art Contemporain Lyon, France; Museum fu?r Moderne Kunst, Frankfurt; Fondazione Prada, Milan; Cal Cego – Coleccio?n de Arte Contempora?neo, Barcelona; PinchukArtCentre, Ukraine; and 21st Century Museum of Contemporary Art, Japan. Institutional exhibitions include the 50th Biennale di Venezia (2003); “One Day One Day”, Fa?rgfabriken, Stockholm (2003); 7th Biennale de Lyon (2003); “Carsten Ho?ller: Half Fiction”, Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston (2003); “7,8 Hz”, Le Consortium, France (2004); “Une exposition a? Marseille”, Muse?e d'Art Contemporain, Marseille (2004); 51st Biennale di Venezia (2005); “Carsten Ho?ller: Test Site”, Tate Modern, London (2006); “Amusement Park”, MASS MoCA, North Adams, MA (2006); “Carrousel”, Kunsthaus Bregenz, Austria (2008); “The Double Club”, Fondazione Prada, London (2008); 28th Bienal de Sa?o Paulo (2008); “Double Slide”, Museum of Contemporary Art, Croatia (2009); 53th Biennale di Venezia (2009); 8th Gwangju Biennale (2010); “Divided Divided”, Museum Boijmans van Beuningen, Rotterdam (2010); “Soma”, Hamburger Bahnhof, Museum fu?r Gegenwart, Berlin (2010); “Carsten Ho?ller: Double Carousel with Zo?llner Stripes”, MACRO- Museo d’Arte Contemporanea Roma, Italy (2011); “Carsten Ho?ller: Experience”, New Museum of Contemporary Art, New York (2011); 11th Sharjah Biennale (2013); “LEBEN”, Thyssen-Bornemisza Art Contemporary, Vienna (2014); 8th Berlin Biennial for Contemporary Art (2014); 10th Gwangju Biennale (2014); “Golden Mirror Carousel”, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne (2014–15); 56th Biennale di Venezia (2015); “Carsten Ho?ller: Decision”, Hayward Gallery, London (2015); and “Doubt”, Pirelli HangarBicocca, Milan (2016). Henie Onstad Kunstsenter, Høvikodden, Norway (2017), “Reason” at Gagosian Gallery, New York City, United States (2017). Y. Centro Botin, Santander, Spain (2017). Miami ArtBasel, “Prada Double Club Miami”, with Fondazione Prada, Milan. Miami, United States (2017).  
Olafur Eliasson
Olafur Eliasson
Beijing - Shunbai Road
until 12-08-2018

Olafur Eliasson – The Unspeakable Openness of Things  

Olafur Eliasson – The Unspeakable Openness of Things  
5 x Berlin
5 x Berlin
Beijing - Jiuxianqiao Road
until 29-04-2018

5 x Berlin Thomas Kiesewetter, Jonathan Meese, Anselm Reyle, Thomas Scheibitz, Katja Strunz Curated by Jean Gid Lee Boers-Li Gallery is delighted to announce the group exhibition, 5 X BERLIN, which presents a series of paintings by Jonathan Meese and Thomas Scheibitz, reliefs by Anselm Reyle, paper based works by Katja Strunz, and sculptures by Thomas Kiesewetter. The practices of these five mid-career artists foregrounded the genres that defined contemporary art in Berlin since the 1990s and continue to challenge modernist notions in the visual field.  After the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989 and the re-unification of the East and West, Berlin was a city replete of empty spaces and shattered housing blocks with historical eminence and symbolism. Its “ruin-chic” had an unprecedented appeal that drew many artists from outside to set up studios in the city. In the aftermath of its isolation from the Cold War, Berlin was a treasure trove of remnants of its recent past, where the “objet-trouvé” – rummaged out of the growing appeal of the “trash culture” of being poor but sexy – offered many artists the stomping ground of visual resources for their artistic practice in Germany’s new capital. Furthermore, as the city embraced its recovery with a clean slate, its art world became a melting pot for contesting artistic notions prevalent in other regions of former East and West Germany, and beyond. Among them, there were the articulated figuration traditions from the Dresden and Leipzig School in the East, as well as the artistic conceptions developed in prominent art schools in the West, like Duesseldorf, Karlsruhe, Hamburg and Berlin itself. To which, artists attributed their personal interpretations of the social, political, and economic realities of the city into their practices. It is this diversity of artistic schools of thoughts that gave Berlin its identity of being a dynamic cultural center of the world.  Thomas Kiesewetter, educated at the Hochschule der Künste in Berlin, is the most prominent sculptor among these five artists. His three dimensional abstractions are made of cast industrial materials, in particular sheet metal with its somewhat “trashy” to exemplify the visual quality of “models,” or being in the “unfinished” stage. His work process does not begin with assigning any preconceived form to the piece’s finale, instead, the artist bends and folds metallic sheets playfully, then bolts the individual pieces together before he paints them in bold colors so the final sculpture is rendered with organic coherence based on its curves and edges. Kiesewetter’s goal is not only to generate a form, but also to provoke feelings and emotions felt at different vantage points of the piece.  With their distinctive colors, Kiesewetter’s sculptures refer to constructivist and cubist elements, reminiscent of modernist architecture, as much as they make us conscious of the solidity of their single material. These anthropomorphic pieces signal that although the pathos of abstraction and its former purity requirements may not have survived, abstraction itself has.  In a similar vein, Thomas Scheibitz recognizes the impossibility of inventing new artistic forms on canvas. Yet the artist’s goal is to approximate the conception of a surprised vision by drawing from allusions, elusive visual memories and familiar images through uncanny combinations, as well as by unlocking precisely determined compositions made up of recurring figures. Representative of the acclaimed Dresden School of Arts known for its tradition in figuration, where artists like Gerhard Richter attended, Scheibitz’ steady artistic career challenges the boundary between figuration and abstraction. His work method consists of looking at visual materials in parallel, and from the pairings of these found images, magazine cutouts, architectural forms — often known as “secondary material” — he generates a haptic, or what he considers the legitimate potential for a subliminal experience. Scheibitz paintings and sculptures are glyphs fabricated from the artist’s visual repositories, which serve as substitutes for the “figurative”, magnified tectonically to create the layers and multi-dimensional visual rendition. Given the “culture of transition” in Berlin in the 1990s, Anselm Reyle, a graduate of Staatliche Akademie der Bildenen Künste Karlsruhe, developed an unmatched sophistication in his assemblages and sculptures by using striking memorabilia from “modernistic” design ubiquitously found on the streets of Berlin and its architecture in decline. Inspired by the stylistic richness of the last century, Reyle reintroduces movements as dissimilar or even contrary to each other as Informel, Hard Edge, Op Art, and Minimal, and making them disturbingly simultaneous. His forms are drawn from the aesthetics of artificial colors and poor or “trashy” materials such as tin foil, polyester film, car parts, abandoned computer parts, scrap metal wires, neon lights etc., to create glossy and reflexive surfaces, or pulsating and flashy colors encased in plexiglass. The multifarious textures of his work defiantly reject the standard for fine art with regard to surface, composition, or even the boundary between painting and sculpture. This is how the artist attempts to establish, a seemingly cheap pop-kitsch aesthetic that speaks to its social and political environment.  Riffing on postwar abstraction, Reyle pokes “contemporary” fun at formalist conceits. The artist critically reflects not only upon the prevailing codes of taste but also the sometimes, utopian ideals of modern abstraction, creating something like fun house aesthetic.  Katja Strunz’ practice in painting and sculptures is rooted in the constructivist and the avant-garde, while the artist traces life experience through recycled materials. With an interest in exploring the unfolding structures in constructivism, where both the conceptual totality and the realism of the objects are present, the artist creates sculptures and works on paper that solicit a relationship with temporality and spatiality.     The series, “Pulp Friction”, presented in this exhibition, its colors extracted from the recycled and ground fabric and clothing (second-hand, each piece with a past) in which space, time, and history are condensed on paper. The notion of free-falling, central to Strunz’ practice, encapsulates the conceptions of time and space. Here, the artist’s works captures a specific moment in its unfolding movement.  Among these five artists, Jonathan Meese compelling works of art are the most striking in their visual references and connotations. Often known for his controversial and ambiguous political statements issued through paintings, sculptures, installations, and performances, Meese’s practice is routed in the German traditions of Dada and Fluxus, drawing inspirations from artists like Joseph Beuys. His provocateur disposition and the proclamation of “Dictatorship of Art”, often walk the fine line between provocation and blasphemy, catharsis and exorcism, or personal idolization and political criticism.   Meese’s paintings, drawings, and installations, indebted to the German Neo-expressionism of the 1980s, are stylistically garish. His seemingly careless technique feigns the naivete of an enfant terrible. On his canvas, Meese applies tubes of acrylics, crayons, graphite, ink, and watercolor with complete rejection to preconceived notions of painting. His images are often collaged with found objects, original photographs of political figures (or of himself), and written as graffiti of political manifestos (or his own) in untranslatable German and English neologisms.   In presenting this group exhibition 5 X BERLIN, the works of these five artists will serve as a prism into the context out of which their artistic practices emerged, and the ideological notions, in art and otherwise, that informed their enquiries on the boundaries of abstraction in relation to figuration in the post-war era. The works of these five artists have set the tone for artistic merits in the 21st century. In addition, the exhibition 5 X BERLIN aspires to provide inspirations to the art world of Beijing, a city that shares many parallels, historical, cultural and political, with its German counterpart.   

5 x Berlin Thomas Kiesewetter, Jonathan Meese, Anselm Reyle, Thomas Scheibitz, Katja Strunz Curated by Jean Gid Lee Boers-Li Gallery is delighted to announce the group exhibition, 5 X BERLIN, which presents a series of paintings by Jonathan Meese and Thomas Scheibitz, reliefs by Anselm Reyle, paper based works by Katja Strunz, and sculptures by Thomas Kiesewetter. The practices of these five mid-career artists foregrounded the genres that defined contemporary art in Berlin since the 1990s and continue to challenge modernist notions in the visual field.  After the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989 and the re-unification of the East and West, Berlin was a city replete of empty spaces and shattered housing blocks with historical eminence and symbolism. Its “ruin-chic” had an unprecedented appeal that drew many artists from outside to set up studios in the city. In the aftermath of its isolation from the Cold War, Berlin was a treasure trove of remnants of its recent past, where the “objet-trouvé” – rummaged out of the growing appeal of the “trash culture” of being poor but sexy – offered many artists the stomping ground of visual resources for their artistic practice in Germany’s new capital. Furthermore, as the city embraced its recovery with a clean slate, its art world became a melting pot for contesting artistic notions prevalent in other regions of former East and West Germany, and beyond. Among them, there were the articulated figuration traditions from the Dresden and Leipzig School in the East, as well as the artistic conceptions developed in prominent art schools in the West, like Duesseldorf, Karlsruhe, Hamburg and Berlin itself. To which, artists attributed their personal interpretations of the social, political, and economic realities of the city into their practices. It is this diversity of artistic schools of thoughts that gave Berlin its identity of being a dynamic cultural center of the world.  Thomas Kiesewetter, educated at the Hochschule der Künste in Berlin, is the most prominent sculptor among these five artists. His three dimensional abstractions are made of cast industrial materials, in particular sheet metal with its somewhat “trashy” to exemplify the visual quality of “models,” or being in the “unfinished” stage. His work process does not begin with assigning any preconceived form to the piece’s finale, instead, the artist bends and folds metallic sheets playfully, then bolts the individual pieces together before he paints them in bold colors so the final sculpture is rendered with organic coherence based on its curves and edges. Kiesewetter’s goal is not only to generate a form, but also to provoke feelings and emotions felt at different vantage points of the piece.  With their distinctive colors, Kiesewetter’s sculptures refer to constructivist and cubist elements, reminiscent of modernist architecture, as much as they make us conscious of the solidity of their single material. These anthropomorphic pieces signal that although the pathos of abstraction and its former purity requirements may not have survived, abstraction itself has.  In a similar vein, Thomas Scheibitz recognizes the impossibility of inventing new artistic forms on canvas. Yet the artist’s goal is to approximate the conception of a surprised vision by drawing from allusions, elusive visual memories and familiar images through uncanny combinations, as well as by unlocking precisely determined compositions made up of recurring figures. Representative of the acclaimed Dresden School of Arts known for its tradition in figuration, where artists like Gerhard Richter attended, Scheibitz’ steady artistic career challenges the boundary between figuration and abstraction. His work method consists of looking at visual materials in parallel, and from the pairings of these found images, magazine cutouts, architectural forms — often known as “secondary material” — he generates a haptic, or what he considers the legitimate potential for a subliminal experience. Scheibitz paintings and sculptures are glyphs fabricated from the artist’s visual repositories, which serve as substitutes for the “figurative”, magnified tectonically to create the layers and multi-dimensional visual rendition. Given the “culture of transition” in Berlin in the 1990s, Anselm Reyle, a graduate of Staatliche Akademie der Bildenen Künste Karlsruhe, developed an unmatched sophistication in his assemblages and sculptures by using striking memorabilia from “modernistic” design ubiquitously found on the streets of Berlin and its architecture in decline. Inspired by the stylistic richness of the last century, Reyle reintroduces movements as dissimilar or even contrary to each other as Informel, Hard Edge, Op Art, and Minimal, and making them disturbingly simultaneous. His forms are drawn from the aesthetics of artificial colors and poor or “trashy” materials such as tin foil, polyester film, car parts, abandoned computer parts, scrap metal wires, neon lights etc., to create glossy and reflexive surfaces, or pulsating and flashy colors encased in plexiglass. The multifarious textures of his work defiantly reject the standard for fine art with regard to surface, composition, or even the boundary between painting and sculpture. This is how the artist attempts to establish, a seemingly cheap pop-kitsch aesthetic that speaks to its social and political environment.  Riffing on postwar abstraction, Reyle pokes “contemporary” fun at formalist conceits. The artist critically reflects not only upon the prevailing codes of taste but also the sometimes, utopian ideals of modern abstraction, creating something like fun house aesthetic.  Katja Strunz’ practice in painting and sculptures is rooted in the constructivist and the avant-garde, while the artist traces life experience through recycled materials. With an interest in exploring the unfolding structures in constructivism, where both the conceptual totality and the realism of the objects are present, the artist creates sculptures and works on paper that solicit a relationship with temporality and spatiality.     The series, “Pulp Friction”, presented in this exhibition, its colors extracted from the recycled and ground fabric and clothing (second-hand, each piece with a past) in which space, time, and history are condensed on paper. The notion of free-falling, central to Strunz’ practice, encapsulates the conceptions of time and space. Here, the artist’s works captures a specific moment in its unfolding movement.  Among these five artists, Jonathan Meese compelling works of art are the most striking in their visual references and connotations. Often known for his controversial and ambiguous political statements issued through paintings, sculptures, installations, and performances, Meese’s practice is routed in the German traditions of Dada and Fluxus, drawing inspirations from artists like Joseph Beuys. His provocateur disposition and the proclamation of “Dictatorship of Art”, often walk the fine line between provocation and blasphemy, catharsis and exorcism, or personal idolization and political criticism.   Meese’s paintings, drawings, and installations, indebted to the German Neo-expressionism of the 1980s, are stylistically garish. His seemingly careless technique feigns the naivete of an enfant terrible. On his canvas, Meese applies tubes of acrylics, crayons, graphite, ink, and watercolor with complete rejection to preconceived notions of painting. His images are often collaged with found objects, original photographs of political figures (or of himself), and written as graffiti of political manifestos (or his own) in untranslatable German and English neologisms.   In presenting this group exhibition 5 X BERLIN, the works of these five artists will serve as a prism into the context out of which their artistic practices emerged, and the ideological notions, in art and otherwise, that informed their enquiries on the boundaries of abstraction in relation to figuration in the post-war era. The works of these five artists have set the tone for artistic merits in the 21st century. In addition, the exhibition 5 X BERLIN aspires to provide inspirations to the art world of Beijing, a city that shares many parallels, historical, cultural and political, with its German counterpart.   
Paul McCarthy
Paul McCarthy
Beijing - Jiuxianqiao Road
until 17-06-2018

Paul McCarthy – Innocence M WOODS is proud to present a solo exhibition by American master Paul McCarthy (b. 1945), a veteran of the Los Angeles scene and hugely influential to scores of artists across the world. McCarthy has dedicated his career to experimental practices, examining the shortfalls of conventional language and shining a light on the dark side of contemporary culture — specifically consumerism and mainstream media as they are experienced in America.   McCarthy’s 50 years of artmaking have seen him work in nearly every conceivable medium, from painting and sculpture, to performance, video, feature-length film and recently virtual reality. The medium of video at once preserves and informs McCarthy's performances and other creative endeavors, serving as a core part of his practice. For the exhibition at M WOODS, the artist has chosen to present a survey of video, which he has worked with since the beginning and consistently returned to over the course of his career. From his early black and white documentations of actions like Whipping a Wall and a Window with Paint (1974), to the seven-hour epic White Snow (2013), McCarthy’s own trajectory reflects the evolution of video art in production and address towards audiences. Showing publicly for the first time in China are 43 works by McCarthy and selected collaborators, made between 1970 and 2013.   Innocence is inseparable from narratives of its loss. The exhibition title suggests a state of mind and spirit of inquiry that run throughout McCarthy’s practice. M WOODS has worked closely with the artist and his studio team to design the exhibition. For its duration, the museum is flipped from beginning to end and accessed from the back entrance — an organizational restructuring that echoes McCarthy’s inversion of social norms. In considering the nature of certain content, the exhibition will be restricted to those over the age of 18. Identification is required. Admission is granted under visitors’ discretion.  

Paul McCarthy – Innocence M WOODS is proud to present a solo exhibition by American master Paul McCarthy (b. 1945), a veteran of the Los Angeles scene and hugely influential to scores of artists across the world. McCarthy has dedicated his career to experimental practices, examining the shortfalls of conventional language and shining a light on the dark side of contemporary culture — specifically consumerism and mainstream media as they are experienced in America.   McCarthy’s 50 years of artmaking have seen him work in nearly every conceivable medium, from painting and sculpture, to performance, video, feature-length film and recently virtual reality. The medium of video at once preserves and informs McCarthy's performances and other creative endeavors, serving as a core part of his practice. For the exhibition at M WOODS, the artist has chosen to present a survey of video, which he has worked with since the beginning and consistently returned to over the course of his career. From his early black and white documentations of actions like Whipping a Wall and a Window with Paint (1974), to the seven-hour epic White Snow (2013), McCarthy’s own trajectory reflects the evolution of video art in production and address towards audiences. Showing publicly for the first time in China are 43 works by McCarthy and selected collaborators, made between 1970 and 2013.   Innocence is inseparable from narratives of its loss. The exhibition title suggests a state of mind and spirit of inquiry that run throughout McCarthy’s practice. M WOODS has worked closely with the artist and his studio team to design the exhibition. For its duration, the museum is flipped from beginning to end and accessed from the back entrance — an organizational restructuring that echoes McCarthy’s inversion of social norms. In considering the nature of certain content, the exhibition will be restricted to those over the age of 18. Identification is required. Admission is granted under visitors’ discretion.  
Ragnar Kjartansson
Ragnar Kjartansson
Beijing - 2 Jiuxuanquao Road
until 05-08-2018

Ragnar Kjartansson – A Lot of Sorrow Faurschou Foundation Beijing has the pleasure of presenting A Lot of Sorrow — a video performance by the Icelandic artist, Ragnar Kjartansson. The work, A Lot of Sorrow, is a single channel video, showing a six-hour long concert by the British band, The National. The band performs their song, Sorrow, repeatedly, in an uninterrupted loop. First performed at MoMA PS1 in 2013 as a live concert, the piece is an impressive demonstration of perseverance and strength-both physically and mentally. As a reproduction in the form of a video installation, the visitors are able to experience the struggles and emotions the band members undergo throughout the performance. Depending on what stage of the performance the band is in, the audience will notice different states of energy, emotion, exhaustion, rejuvenation and relief. Each version of the song is, thus, unique; Each time the installation is visited or re-visited, the audience is met with a new experience, depending on their own state of mind, and the time of the performance. It is the first time that a work by Ragnar Kjartansson is exhibited in China, and Faurschou Foundation is honoured to introduce his powerful performance video for the first time in East-Asia. Ragnar Kjartansson has explained that his works are "always about a feeling, but there's no story." He works with repetition to explore the tragicomic in simple situations, through and beyond the boring, combining sorrow and happiness, horror and beauty, drama and levity. His works are often conducted as performances and video installations, but incorporate the entire spectrum of the arts; music, film, classical theatre and literature. Kjartansson was raised in an environment of theatre and music, and combines this world with his observations of people, who — as the artist concludes — ultimately fail to reach perfection, despite endless repetition. Ragnar Kjartansson (b. 1976) lives and works in Reykjavík. The artist has had solo exhibitions at the Reykjavík Art Museum, the Barbican Centre, London, the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Park, Washington D.C., the Musée d'art contemporain de Montréal, the Palais de Tokyo, Paris, the New Museum, New York, the Migros Museum für Gegenwartskunst, Zurich, the Fondazione Sandretto Re Rebaudengo, Turin, the Frankfurter Kunstverein, and the BAWAG Contemporary, Vienna.  Kjartansson participated in The Encyclopedic Palace at the Venice Biennale in 2013, Manifesta 10 in St. Petersburg, Russia in 2014, and he represented Iceland at the 2009 Venice Biennale. The artist is the recipient of the 2015 Artes Mundi's Derek Williams Trust Purchase Award, and Performa's 2011 Malcolm McLaren Award.  

Ragnar Kjartansson – A Lot of Sorrow Faurschou Foundation Beijing has the pleasure of presenting A Lot of Sorrow — a video performance by the Icelandic artist, Ragnar Kjartansson. The work, A Lot of Sorrow, is a single channel video, showing a six-hour long concert by the British band, The National. The band performs their song, Sorrow, repeatedly, in an uninterrupted loop. First performed at MoMA PS1 in 2013 as a live concert, the piece is an impressive demonstration of perseverance and strength-both physically and mentally. As a reproduction in the form of a video installation, the visitors are able to experience the struggles and emotions the band members undergo throughout the performance. Depending on what stage of the performance the band is in, the audience will notice different states of energy, emotion, exhaustion, rejuvenation and relief. Each version of the song is, thus, unique; Each time the installation is visited or re-visited, the audience is met with a new experience, depending on their own state of mind, and the time of the performance. It is the first time that a work by Ragnar Kjartansson is exhibited in China, and Faurschou Foundation is honoured to introduce his powerful performance video for the first time in East-Asia. Ragnar Kjartansson has explained that his works are "always about a feeling, but there's no story." He works with repetition to explore the tragicomic in simple situations, through and beyond the boring, combining sorrow and happiness, horror and beauty, drama and levity. His works are often conducted as performances and video installations, but incorporate the entire spectrum of the arts; music, film, classical theatre and literature. Kjartansson was raised in an environment of theatre and music, and combines this world with his observations of people, who — as the artist concludes — ultimately fail to reach perfection, despite endless repetition. Ragnar Kjartansson (b. 1976) lives and works in Reykjavík. The artist has had solo exhibitions at the Reykjavík Art Museum, the Barbican Centre, London, the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Park, Washington D.C., the Musée d'art contemporain de Montréal, the Palais de Tokyo, Paris, the New Museum, New York, the Migros Museum für Gegenwartskunst, Zurich, the Fondazione Sandretto Re Rebaudengo, Turin, the Frankfurter Kunstverein, and the BAWAG Contemporary, Vienna.  Kjartansson participated in The Encyclopedic Palace at the Venice Biennale in 2013, Manifesta 10 in St. Petersburg, Russia in 2014, and he represented Iceland at the 2009 Venice Biennale. The artist is the recipient of the 2015 Artes Mundi's Derek Williams Trust Purchase Award, and Performa's 2011 Malcolm McLaren Award.  
Carsten Nicolai
Carsten Nicolai
Berlin - Alte Jakobstrasse 124?128
until 03-09-2018

Carsten Nicolai – tele Works by Carsten Nicolai (*1965) oscillate around the interfaces between visual art and electronic sound. He has created the light installation tele to fill the first exhibition space in the Berlinische Galerie. It alludes to a peculiar property of quantum entanglement. The phenomenon whereby two quantum systems that are widely separate in space share the same condition was described by Albert Einstein as “spooky action at a distance”: the two particles are so interconnected that any change in one has a direct, instantaneous effect on the state of the other, as if there were some telepathic link between them. The installation consists of two mirror sculptures almost three metres high resembling a split Archimedean solid. These too seem to communicate in eerie ways – by means of laser beams.  

Carsten Nicolai – tele Works by Carsten Nicolai (*1965) oscillate around the interfaces between visual art and electronic sound. He has created the light installation tele to fill the first exhibition space in the Berlinische Galerie. It alludes to a peculiar property of quantum entanglement. The phenomenon whereby two quantum systems that are widely separate in space share the same condition was described by Albert Einstein as “spooky action at a distance”: the two particles are so interconnected that any change in one has a direct, instantaneous effect on the state of the other, as if there were some telepathic link between them. The installation consists of two mirror sculptures almost three metres high resembling a split Archimedean solid. These too seem to communicate in eerie ways – by means of laser beams.  
Christian Jankowski
Christian Jankowski
Berlin - Fasanenstrasse 25
until 12-05-2018

Christian Jankowski – Neue Malerei  

Christian Jankowski – Neue Malerei  
Trix & Robert Haussmann
Trix & Robert Haussmann
Berlin - Auguststrasse 69
until 29-04-2018

Trix & Robert Haussmann – The Log-O-Rithmic Slide Rule: A Retrospective The architect and designer duo Trix (born 1933 in Chur, CH) & Robert Haussmann (born 1931 in Zurich, CH) may be counted among the most important Swiss architects of the twentieth century. They have realized about 650 projects in their lifetime including the legendary Da Capo Bar, Shopville in Zurich’s main railway station, the boutique Weinberg, the famous bar Kronenhallen and numerous successful experiments in artistic and handcrafted furniture. Since founding their ‚Allgemeine Entwurfsanstalt’ (General Design Institute) in 1967, Trix & Robert Haussmann have been pioneers in breaking with the premises of modern, canonical orders and concepts, reinterpreting playfully the linguistic dogmas of architecture theories. Evading the dictum ‚form follows function’, their designs pursue a ‘manierismo critico’ (a ‘critical Mannerism’), permitting them to merge the old and the new, to generate dissent and work with ambiguity, contradiction, and chance. The dedicated and thoughtful challenging of aesthetic conventions of Trix & Robert Haussmann was ahead of its time and is providing a very important contribution to the contemporary discourses on art and architecture. Trix & Robert Haussmann will occupy the first and second floor of KW. This show will be the first significant survey of their work in Europe and showcases highlights of their personal archive, the main works of the collection at the Museum für Gestaltung in Zurich, works of the estate by Peter Röthlisberger and actual compartments of interior design. The exhibition is curated by Fredi Fischli and Niels Olsen and is accompanied by interventions by Inside Outside / Petra Blaisse, Liam Gillick, and Karl Holmqvist. The exhibition will travel to Nottingham Contemporary later this year.

Trix & Robert Haussmann – The Log-O-Rithmic Slide Rule: A Retrospective The architect and designer duo Trix (born 1933 in Chur, CH) & Robert Haussmann (born 1931 in Zurich, CH) may be counted among the most important Swiss architects of the twentieth century. They have realized about 650 projects in their lifetime including the legendary Da Capo Bar, Shopville in Zurich’s main railway station, the boutique Weinberg, the famous bar Kronenhallen and numerous successful experiments in artistic and handcrafted furniture. Since founding their ‚Allgemeine Entwurfsanstalt’ (General Design Institute) in 1967, Trix & Robert Haussmann have been pioneers in breaking with the premises of modern, canonical orders and concepts, reinterpreting playfully the linguistic dogmas of architecture theories. Evading the dictum ‚form follows function’, their designs pursue a ‘manierismo critico’ (a ‘critical Mannerism’), permitting them to merge the old and the new, to generate dissent and work with ambiguity, contradiction, and chance. The dedicated and thoughtful challenging of aesthetic conventions of Trix & Robert Haussmann was ahead of its time and is providing a very important contribution to the contemporary discourses on art and architecture. Trix & Robert Haussmann will occupy the first and second floor of KW. This show will be the first significant survey of their work in Europe and showcases highlights of their personal archive, the main works of the collection at the Museum für Gestaltung in Zurich, works of the estate by Peter Röthlisberger and actual compartments of interior design. The exhibition is curated by Fredi Fischli and Niels Olsen and is accompanied by interventions by Inside Outside / Petra Blaisse, Liam Gillick, and Karl Holmqvist. The exhibition will travel to Nottingham Contemporary later this year.
Wu Tsang
Wu Tsang
Berlin - Niederkirchnerstrasse 7
until 28-02-2019

Wu Tsang Wu Tsang (b. 1982) is invited for a year-long residency at Martin-Gropius-Bau. Her artistic practice explores various states of connectedness and 'in-between'ness. Often this fluidity manifests itself as collaboration, or in the merging of disciplines, such as performance, moving image, sculpture, and installation. Wu Tsang’s work collapses the boundaries between documentary and fiction, as a way to reflect on the meanings associated with traditional forms of image creation. During the residency, rooms on the upper floors of MGB will function as a studio and workshop, and will be open to the public on a regular basis. Freed from confining temporal and spatial limitations, Wu Tsang will re-envision the concept of “exhibition” and present this to the public in 2019.  

Wu Tsang Wu Tsang (b. 1982) is invited for a year-long residency at Martin-Gropius-Bau. Her artistic practice explores various states of connectedness and 'in-between'ness. Often this fluidity manifests itself as collaboration, or in the merging of disciplines, such as performance, moving image, sculpture, and installation. Wu Tsang’s work collapses the boundaries between documentary and fiction, as a way to reflect on the meanings associated with traditional forms of image creation. During the residency, rooms on the upper floors of MGB will function as a studio and workshop, and will be open to the public on a regular basis. Freed from confining temporal and spatial limitations, Wu Tsang will re-envision the concept of “exhibition” and present this to the public in 2019.  
KölnSkulptur #9
KlnSkulptur #9
Cologne - Riehler Strasse 168
until 22-06-2019

KölnSkulptur #9 Tom Burr, James Lee Byars, Andrea Büttner, Nina Canell, Claudia Comte, Edith Dekyndt, Jimmie Durham, Bogomir Ecker, Peter Fischli / David Weiss, Barry Flanagan, Sou Fujimoto, Dan Graham, Lena Henke, Jenny Holzer, Bethan Huws, Leiko Ikemura, Anish Kapoor, Stefan Kern, Hubert Kiecol, Jan Kiefer, Per Kirkeby, Klara Lidén, Lin May Saeed, Eduardo Navarro, Jorge Pardo, Manfred Pernice, Solange Pessoa, Mandla Reuter, Ulrich Rückriem, Michael Sailstorfer, Karin Sander, Thomas Schütte, Joel Shapiro, Andreas Slominski, Teresa Solar, Mauro Staccioli, Mark di Suvero, Rosemarie Trockel, Amalia Ulman, Simon Ungers, Bernar Venet, Bernard Voïta, Paul Wallach, Lois Weinberger, Martin Willing, Pedro Wirz, Heimo Zobernig La Fin de Babylone.  Mich wundert, dass ich so fröhlich bin!  This 9th edition of KölnSkulptur is a special one since the park commemorates its 20th birthday. All the works presented by the eight artists invited for the 9th edition are newly commissioned. Following the opening, a catalogue will be published. Do you remember the “Tales of A Thousand and One Nights”? When Antoine Galland translated them into French from Arabic at the beginning of the eighteenth century, they transformed the imagination of the time. The night of the May 8, 1709, Antoine Galland made a note in his diary about an extraordinary tale the Syrian merchant Hanna Diyab had just told him: “Aladdin and the Wonderful lamp.” That night in Paris was a dramatic one, marked by riots over food shortages. Diyab arrived in the French capital during this period and turned some of the dark nights into true storytelling sessions that changed the course of a “A Thousand and One Nights”; the tales he told were added to the translation and became world heritage through literature. It would not be accurate to say that the commissioned works for the 9th edition of the exhibition series KölnSkulptur are like those tales, but the park is the perfect grounds to be inhabited by the forces of fiction. Like the character Scheherazade, the wise young woman who tells a story every night to the Sultan in order to survive, Skulpturenpark Köln is a continuous voice that recalls the possibilities we still have to survive, and it does so with art. The Skulpturenpark Köln is not monumental in scale, and yet it is of enormous importance. Over the last two decades, the park has been the place, the site, and the home of sculptures created for it, for you. The title of this year’s edition of KölnSkulptur—La Fin de Babylone—relates to the dream of a new beginning for culture, and therefore for society. There is no such a thing, and yet there is. On the one hand, we have the life we have, our circumstances are hard to change, our possibilities hard to manifest. And there are times when we believe the past was a better place, and others when we see the time we live in as full of possibility, openness. What determines the difference between these two perceptions is the way we feel our relative importance. Oh! you may say it is economy, but even if the economy thrives, there is no guarantee that it provides a social environment in which we feel relevant to others, influential to our community, able to celebrate and partake in the current course of events... Here, I propose a total exaggeration: to imagine that the production of these eight, new site-specific works joining the already existing ones in the parcours is key to the beginning of a new world. What I ask of you is not only to walk through the park and discover the different works but to also see their existence as the wonder that may affect the world order. This is out of proportion, because so is art. And thus the second part of the title: Mich wundert, dass ich so fröhlich bin! This sentence, full of healthy humor, relates not to us but to the effort art makes to be great every time it happens. It is art and artists that produce under the assumption that it is really worth it to intervene, and add to the park not as if it is a piece of land but the whole world. This needed “exaggeration” is what motivates a thinking about the possibility of influence, which is both simple and complex. This may be the reason why the different pieces that comprise this edition are rather unmonumental. They already embody an enormous ambition to affect the real, to touch us in such a way that every bit of skepticism of and cynicism towards the importance of art might be erased. And once liberated from the burden of doubt, we will all experience a new joy. – Chus Martínez

KölnSkulptur #9 Tom Burr, James Lee Byars, Andrea Büttner, Nina Canell, Claudia Comte, Edith Dekyndt, Jimmie Durham, Bogomir Ecker, Peter Fischli / David Weiss, Barry Flanagan, Sou Fujimoto, Dan Graham, Lena Henke, Jenny Holzer, Bethan Huws, Leiko Ikemura, Anish Kapoor, Stefan Kern, Hubert Kiecol, Jan Kiefer, Per Kirkeby, Klara Lidén, Lin May Saeed, Eduardo Navarro, Jorge Pardo, Manfred Pernice, Solange Pessoa, Mandla Reuter, Ulrich Rückriem, Michael Sailstorfer, Karin Sander, Thomas Schütte, Joel Shapiro, Andreas Slominski, Teresa Solar, Mauro Staccioli, Mark di Suvero, Rosemarie Trockel, Amalia Ulman, Simon Ungers, Bernar Venet, Bernard Voïta, Paul Wallach, Lois Weinberger, Martin Willing, Pedro Wirz, Heimo Zobernig La Fin de Babylone.  Mich wundert, dass ich so fröhlich bin!  This 9th edition of KölnSkulptur is a special one since the park commemorates its 20th birthday. All the works presented by the eight artists invited for the 9th edition are newly commissioned. Following the opening, a catalogue will be published. Do you remember the “Tales of A Thousand and One Nights”? When Antoine Galland translated them into French from Arabic at the beginning of the eighteenth century, they transformed the imagination of the time. The night of the May 8, 1709, Antoine Galland made a note in his diary about an extraordinary tale the Syrian merchant Hanna Diyab had just told him: “Aladdin and the Wonderful lamp.” That night in Paris was a dramatic one, marked by riots over food shortages. Diyab arrived in the French capital during this period and turned some of the dark nights into true storytelling sessions that changed the course of a “A Thousand and One Nights”; the tales he told were added to the translation and became world heritage through literature. It would not be accurate to say that the commissioned works for the 9th edition of the exhibition series KölnSkulptur are like those tales, but the park is the perfect grounds to be inhabited by the forces of fiction. Like the character Scheherazade, the wise young woman who tells a story every night to the Sultan in order to survive, Skulpturenpark Köln is a continuous voice that recalls the possibilities we still have to survive, and it does so with art. The Skulpturenpark Köln is not monumental in scale, and yet it is of enormous importance. Over the last two decades, the park has been the place, the site, and the home of sculptures created for it, for you. The title of this year’s edition of KölnSkulptur—La Fin de Babylone—relates to the dream of a new beginning for culture, and therefore for society. There is no such a thing, and yet there is. On the one hand, we have the life we have, our circumstances are hard to change, our possibilities hard to manifest. And there are times when we believe the past was a better place, and others when we see the time we live in as full of possibility, openness. What determines the difference between these two perceptions is the way we feel our relative importance. Oh! you may say it is economy, but even if the economy thrives, there is no guarantee that it provides a social environment in which we feel relevant to others, influential to our community, able to celebrate and partake in the current course of events... Here, I propose a total exaggeration: to imagine that the production of these eight, new site-specific works joining the already existing ones in the parcours is key to the beginning of a new world. What I ask of you is not only to walk through the park and discover the different works but to also see their existence as the wonder that may affect the world order. This is out of proportion, because so is art. And thus the second part of the title: Mich wundert, dass ich so fröhlich bin! This sentence, full of healthy humor, relates not to us but to the effort art makes to be great every time it happens. It is art and artists that produce under the assumption that it is really worth it to intervene, and add to the park not as if it is a piece of land but the whole world. This needed “exaggeration” is what motivates a thinking about the possibility of influence, which is both simple and complex. This may be the reason why the different pieces that comprise this edition are rather unmonumental. They already embody an enormous ambition to affect the real, to touch us in such a way that every bit of skepticism of and cynicism towards the importance of art might be erased. And once liberated from the burden of doubt, we will all experience a new joy. – Chus Martínez
Markus Huemer
Markus Huemer
Cologne - Aachener Strae 65
until 28-04-2018

Markus Huemer – ?I Don't Have a Solution But I Admire the Problem We inaugurate on March 9, 2018 at 7 pm I Don't Have a Solution But I Admire the Problem, our first solo exhibition with Markus Huemer. Huemer (*1968 in Linz, Austria, lives and works in Berlin) first studied in Linz at the University of Art and Design and thereafter in Dus­sel­dorf at the Art Academy; in the following he was a Fel­low at Cologne's Academy of Media Arts and an Ar­tist in Residenz at the ZKM in Karlsruhe. He had numerous solo and group exhibitions in German galleries and institutions. However, his last larger appearance in the Rhineland is quite some time ago. Thus, we are all the happier to be able to show with Could Have Also Been Another Successful Picture and Una certa idea (ma non tanto che basti) two earlier media-art pieces as well as newer paintings that are all more or less dedicated to architectural topics. The relation between the paintings and the media artworks can be described as correlative.

Markus Huemer – ?I Don't Have a Solution But I Admire the Problem We inaugurate on March 9, 2018 at 7 pm I Don't Have a Solution But I Admire the Problem, our first solo exhibition with Markus Huemer. Huemer (*1968 in Linz, Austria, lives and works in Berlin) first studied in Linz at the University of Art and Design and thereafter in Dus­sel­dorf at the Art Academy; in the following he was a Fel­low at Cologne's Academy of Media Arts and an Ar­tist in Residenz at the ZKM in Karlsruhe. He had numerous solo and group exhibitions in German galleries and institutions. However, his last larger appearance in the Rhineland is quite some time ago. Thus, we are all the happier to be able to show with Could Have Also Been Another Successful Picture and Una certa idea (ma non tanto che basti) two earlier media-art pieces as well as newer paintings that are all more or less dedicated to architectural topics. The relation between the paintings and the media artworks can be described as correlative.
Rotar
Rotar
Dsseldorf - Flurstrasse 57
until 27-04-2018

Rotar  

Rotar  
Jim Lambie
Jim Lambie
Dsseldorf - Platanenstrasse 7
until 12-05-2018

Jim Lambie – Both Ends Burning Jim Lambie (b. 1964, Glasgow, Scotland) collects the material for his energetic and colorful artworks from different sources: everyday objects, flea-market findings, bulky waste, Oxfam stores. These leftovers and relics of our modern world are carefully and liberally remodeled into sculptures and installations.  By doing this, Jim Lambie is referencing musical sources and pop icons, using record sleeves, fan items and collectibles, turntables, song lyrics from Punk, Rock and Glam. So, in his most recent artworks he is combining colored sunglasses with lead frames like in a Medieval church window. They are titled after songs by Pink Floyd, Mary J. Blige, Grace Jones or The Velvet Underground. Jim Lambie transfigures simple objects from trash into treasure, from a material multitude into mind-blowing Minimalism, incidentally giving any political or social background or whatever "meaning" the cold shoulder.  "Brilliant colours, mesmeric patterns, glitter, voluptuous texture, sharp edges, ribboned, bejewelled gorgeousness.", may describe the art of Jim Lambie, as Michael Bracewell did. Or, as  Jonathan Jones of The Guardian has it: "Jim Lambie is a demiurge, a magician. A pure artist, a genius."  Jim Lambie studied at the Glasgow School of Art. His works were shown at Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, at Hara Museum of Contemporary Art, Tokyo, at Hirshhorn Museum, Washington, D.C., at Dallas Museum of Art and in the collections of Tate Modern, London, Museum of Modern Art, New York, the National Portrait Gallery and Walker Art Center, among others.  

Jim Lambie – Both Ends Burning Jim Lambie (b. 1964, Glasgow, Scotland) collects the material for his energetic and colorful artworks from different sources: everyday objects, flea-market findings, bulky waste, Oxfam stores. These leftovers and relics of our modern world are carefully and liberally remodeled into sculptures and installations.  By doing this, Jim Lambie is referencing musical sources and pop icons, using record sleeves, fan items and collectibles, turntables, song lyrics from Punk, Rock and Glam. So, in his most recent artworks he is combining colored sunglasses with lead frames like in a Medieval church window. They are titled after songs by Pink Floyd, Mary J. Blige, Grace Jones or The Velvet Underground. Jim Lambie transfigures simple objects from trash into treasure, from a material multitude into mind-blowing Minimalism, incidentally giving any political or social background or whatever "meaning" the cold shoulder.  "Brilliant colours, mesmeric patterns, glitter, voluptuous texture, sharp edges, ribboned, bejewelled gorgeousness.", may describe the art of Jim Lambie, as Michael Bracewell did. Or, as  Jonathan Jones of The Guardian has it: "Jim Lambie is a demiurge, a magician. A pure artist, a genius."  Jim Lambie studied at the Glasgow School of Art. His works were shown at Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, at Hara Museum of Contemporary Art, Tokyo, at Hirshhorn Museum, Washington, D.C., at Dallas Museum of Art and in the collections of Tate Modern, London, Museum of Modern Art, New York, the National Portrait Gallery and Walker Art Center, among others.  
Witness
Witness
London - 54 Eastcastle Street
until 04-05-2018

Witness Chen Wei, Cui Jie, Hao Jingban & Zhang Ruyi Pilar Corrias is pleased to present Witness, a group exhibition featuring four artists currently living and working in China. Born throughout the early-to-mid 1980s, each of these artists has developed a unique take on the effects that modernisation and reform has had on major Chinese cities. Across their upbringings and into their current adult lives, each artist experienced and continues to bare witness to rapid urban development, gentrification and urban sprawl. Their various observations of the spatial changes that have taken place around them has produced an overarching sensibility across their works; a sensibility which originates in a call to reflect on and respond to the radical and continuous rede nition of social spaces that occurs across their surroundings. This accelerated urbanisation, occurring in both China and across the globe, has given rise to new personal and societal conditions. Feelings of alienation and dislocation as a consequence of constant demolition and rebuilding produce newly coded relationships between environments and those who occupy them. Spaces of leisure or places of work are regularly redefined according to new trends, regulations or technological developments and one’s attachment to their surroundings is perpetually in flux. As witnesses of these transformations throughout the spaces they inhabit, Chen, Cui, Hao and Zhang all present their own distinct interpretations of these historical evolutions.

Witness Chen Wei, Cui Jie, Hao Jingban & Zhang Ruyi Pilar Corrias is pleased to present Witness, a group exhibition featuring four artists currently living and working in China. Born throughout the early-to-mid 1980s, each of these artists has developed a unique take on the effects that modernisation and reform has had on major Chinese cities. Across their upbringings and into their current adult lives, each artist experienced and continues to bare witness to rapid urban development, gentrification and urban sprawl. Their various observations of the spatial changes that have taken place around them has produced an overarching sensibility across their works; a sensibility which originates in a call to reflect on and respond to the radical and continuous rede nition of social spaces that occurs across their surroundings. This accelerated urbanisation, occurring in both China and across the globe, has given rise to new personal and societal conditions. Feelings of alienation and dislocation as a consequence of constant demolition and rebuilding produce newly coded relationships between environments and those who occupy them. Spaces of leisure or places of work are regularly redefined according to new trends, regulations or technological developments and one’s attachment to their surroundings is perpetually in flux. As witnesses of these transformations throughout the spaces they inhabit, Chen, Cui, Hao and Zhang all present their own distinct interpretations of these historical evolutions.
Matthew Day Jackson
Matthew Day Jackson
London - 23 Savile Row
until 28-04-2018

Matthew Day Jackson – Still Life and the Reclining Nude Hauser & Wirth London is delighted to present Matthew Day Jackson’s upcoming exhibition, ‘Still Life and the Reclining Nude’. The artist’s interdisciplinary practice explores a myriad of aspects of human experience and draws from sources that reveal both our intrinsic inventiveness and its counter-point, our ongoing capacity for destruction. The exhibition will feature an entirely new series of still life paintings and bronze sculpture. As Jackson explains, ‘I am interested in exploring how certain ideas, forms, images, narrative structures and traditions are manifest in the present. The process by which they are severed and dismembered from the past is how they are enlivened.’ Utilising the conventions of still life and the reclining nude figure in combination with a precise use of material and form, Jackson critiques these traditions, their cultural placement and his own authorship in relationship to these ways of working. The series of still life ‘paintings’ are direct representations of Jan Brueghel the Elder’s and Younger’s genre defining series of flower paintings from the 16th and 17th centuries, made during a time of Dutch colonial expansion and exploitation. The significance of these works for the artist is their simultaneously beguiling and prosaic qualities; they are both an exuberant expression of nature’s bounty and a visual manifestation of power and wealth. While the era was one of burgeoning scientific knowledge, Jackson signals the pitfalls of the ceaseless misuse and abuse of the natural world. This concern ties into the American environmental movement and issues of sustainability that have been explored in Jackson’s previous works. If Brueghel’s paintings are a celebration of nature as a divine gift to humanity, Jackson presents an alternative to this view since for the artist, ‘each work is a meditation on exploration, the past found in the present, and is a critical discourse of technology and our persistent tendencies to open Pandora’s Box.’ Throughout Jackson’s oeuvre, process and materiality as a conduit for meaning has been a recurrent theme. The flower ‘paintings’ are entirely composed of artificial and manufactured materials such as Formica, plywood and epoxy. These materials have a personal resonance for Jackson and are imbued with memories from his past and his own ‘American experience’. The use of these substances is a meditation on the domestic environment, aspiration, class and impermanence. In ‘Bouquet of Flowers in a Vase’ (2017), Jackson encloses the delicate form of the screen-printed and in-laid flora within a poured lead surround. This metal has associations of poison or death and, in this manner, the artist signals a memento mori ingrained in the fabric of the work itself. The sculptures that feature in the exhibition have arisen from Jackson’s interest in, ‘how we assemble and constantly reformulate our identity through our own form’. Works such as ‘Untitled’ (2017) are both a contemplation and critique of the tradition of the reclining figure – frequently nude and female – which came to define notions of beauty in the western canon. For Jackson, appropriation is a means of investigation and mining the past is a way of understanding how collective knowledge and received ideas come into being. In this exhibition, the works draw on his consideration of the odalisque as the ultimate eroticised representation of the body on display for a spectator. The interest in delving into the relationship between race and past preconceptions of beauty was inspired by his reading of ‘The History of White People’ by the acclaimed historian Nell Irving Penn. The human relationship with nature and our inclination to see human form in inanimate objects – a form of ‘pareidolia’ – has inflected Jackson’s versions of the reclining figure which are composed of found forms. The artist sourced broken and rotting branches, detritus from unseen corners, during walks in Wyoming and New York, casting these components in bronze to create the parts for his human representations. In this way, he encourages us to examine our own tendency to see and project ourselves onto nature, equating the human body with a landscape, a profile of mountains or a vista. The Scottish thistles that are depicted in the reclining figure sculptures are representative of how we define what is beautiful, or desirable in nature. These weeds are considered invasive in much of North America and, for Jackson, these plants relate to larger contemporary conversations regarding insurgents, refugees and immigrants. As he explains, ‘with their inclusion in the sculpture, I wish to turn a critical eye on how we define and classify that which we see as ‘other’ or undesirable.’ For Jackson this examination of human nature has repercussions because, ‘the more we look to the past and our interaction with tradition, history, images, forms and mythology, the more we can address the current situation.’

Matthew Day Jackson – Still Life and the Reclining Nude Hauser & Wirth London is delighted to present Matthew Day Jackson’s upcoming exhibition, ‘Still Life and the Reclining Nude’. The artist’s interdisciplinary practice explores a myriad of aspects of human experience and draws from sources that reveal both our intrinsic inventiveness and its counter-point, our ongoing capacity for destruction. The exhibition will feature an entirely new series of still life paintings and bronze sculpture. As Jackson explains, ‘I am interested in exploring how certain ideas, forms, images, narrative structures and traditions are manifest in the present. The process by which they are severed and dismembered from the past is how they are enlivened.’ Utilising the conventions of still life and the reclining nude figure in combination with a precise use of material and form, Jackson critiques these traditions, their cultural placement and his own authorship in relationship to these ways of working. The series of still life ‘paintings’ are direct representations of Jan Brueghel the Elder’s and Younger’s genre defining series of flower paintings from the 16th and 17th centuries, made during a time of Dutch colonial expansion and exploitation. The significance of these works for the artist is their simultaneously beguiling and prosaic qualities; they are both an exuberant expression of nature’s bounty and a visual manifestation of power and wealth. While the era was one of burgeoning scientific knowledge, Jackson signals the pitfalls of the ceaseless misuse and abuse of the natural world. This concern ties into the American environmental movement and issues of sustainability that have been explored in Jackson’s previous works. If Brueghel’s paintings are a celebration of nature as a divine gift to humanity, Jackson presents an alternative to this view since for the artist, ‘each work is a meditation on exploration, the past found in the present, and is a critical discourse of technology and our persistent tendencies to open Pandora’s Box.’ Throughout Jackson’s oeuvre, process and materiality as a conduit for meaning has been a recurrent theme. The flower ‘paintings’ are entirely composed of artificial and manufactured materials such as Formica, plywood and epoxy. These materials have a personal resonance for Jackson and are imbued with memories from his past and his own ‘American experience’. The use of these substances is a meditation on the domestic environment, aspiration, class and impermanence. In ‘Bouquet of Flowers in a Vase’ (2017), Jackson encloses the delicate form of the screen-printed and in-laid flora within a poured lead surround. This metal has associations of poison or death and, in this manner, the artist signals a memento mori ingrained in the fabric of the work itself. The sculptures that feature in the exhibition have arisen from Jackson’s interest in, ‘how we assemble and constantly reformulate our identity through our own form’. Works such as ‘Untitled’ (2017) are both a contemplation and critique of the tradition of the reclining figure – frequently nude and female – which came to define notions of beauty in the western canon. For Jackson, appropriation is a means of investigation and mining the past is a way of understanding how collective knowledge and received ideas come into being. In this exhibition, the works draw on his consideration of the odalisque as the ultimate eroticised representation of the body on display for a spectator. The interest in delving into the relationship between race and past preconceptions of beauty was inspired by his reading of ‘The History of White People’ by the acclaimed historian Nell Irving Penn. The human relationship with nature and our inclination to see human form in inanimate objects – a form of ‘pareidolia’ – has inflected Jackson’s versions of the reclining figure which are composed of found forms. The artist sourced broken and rotting branches, detritus from unseen corners, during walks in Wyoming and New York, casting these components in bronze to create the parts for his human representations. In this way, he encourages us to examine our own tendency to see and project ourselves onto nature, equating the human body with a landscape, a profile of mountains or a vista. The Scottish thistles that are depicted in the reclining figure sculptures are representative of how we define what is beautiful, or desirable in nature. These weeds are considered invasive in much of North America and, for Jackson, these plants relate to larger contemporary conversations regarding insurgents, refugees and immigrants. As he explains, ‘with their inclusion in the sculpture, I wish to turn a critical eye on how we define and classify that which we see as ‘other’ or undesirable.’ For Jackson this examination of human nature has repercussions because, ‘the more we look to the past and our interaction with tradition, history, images, forms and mythology, the more we can address the current situation.’
Pablo Bronstein
Pablo Bronstein
London - 2 Herald Street
until 19-05-2018

Pablo Bronstein  

Pablo Bronstein  
Counter Investigations. Forensic Architecture
Counter Investigations. Forensic Architecture
London - The Mall
until 06-05-2018

Counter Investigations. Forensic Architecture Counter Investigations is a survey exhibition of the work of Forensic Architecture, an independent research agency based at Goldsmiths, University of London. ‘Forensic Architecture’ is not only the name of the agency but a form of investigative practice that traverses architectural, journalistic, legal and political fields, and moves from theoretical examination to practical application.   In recent years Forensic Architecture has undertaken a series of investigations internationally into state crimes and human rights violations, spanning events within war zones, and instances of politically and racially motivated violence and killing outside of military conflict. These investigations have led to the contestation of accounts of events given by state authorities, affecting legal and human rights processes, giving rise to citizen tribunals and truth commissions, military, parliamentary and UN inquiries.   The work of the agency has responded to the widespread increase in availability of digital recording equipment, satellite imaging, and remote sensing technology, alongside platforms for data sharing. While such developments have contributed to the complexity of forms of conflict and control, they have also enabled new means of monitoring. Grounded in the use of architecture as an ‘analytic device’, Forensic Architecture’s investigations employ spatial and material analysis, mapping and reconstruction, and extend outwards to overlay elements of witness testimony, and the aggregative forms of visual documentation enabled by contemporary media. Counter Investigations presents a selection of recent and new investigations by Forensic Architecture. These address cases including the racist murder of a man in Kassel, Germany by a member of a far-right group, and instances of deferred responsibility by state agencies that have contributed to the deaths of migrants at sea in the Mediterranean. As historically contextualised interrogations of contemporary social and political processes, these investigations put forward a form of ‘counter-forensics’. They serve as sites for the pursuit of public accountability through scientific and aesthetic means, in opposition to the monopolisation of narratives around events by state agencies. The individual investigations presented will function as anchors for public events, workshops and discussions, with the exhibition becoming the physical infrastructure for the curriculum of a short course in forensic architecture.  

Counter Investigations. Forensic Architecture Counter Investigations is a survey exhibition of the work of Forensic Architecture, an independent research agency based at Goldsmiths, University of London. ‘Forensic Architecture’ is not only the name of the agency but a form of investigative practice that traverses architectural, journalistic, legal and political fields, and moves from theoretical examination to practical application.   In recent years Forensic Architecture has undertaken a series of investigations internationally into state crimes and human rights violations, spanning events within war zones, and instances of politically and racially motivated violence and killing outside of military conflict. These investigations have led to the contestation of accounts of events given by state authorities, affecting legal and human rights processes, giving rise to citizen tribunals and truth commissions, military, parliamentary and UN inquiries.   The work of the agency has responded to the widespread increase in availability of digital recording equipment, satellite imaging, and remote sensing technology, alongside platforms for data sharing. While such developments have contributed to the complexity of forms of conflict and control, they have also enabled new means of monitoring. Grounded in the use of architecture as an ‘analytic device’, Forensic Architecture’s investigations employ spatial and material analysis, mapping and reconstruction, and extend outwards to overlay elements of witness testimony, and the aggregative forms of visual documentation enabled by contemporary media. Counter Investigations presents a selection of recent and new investigations by Forensic Architecture. These address cases including the racist murder of a man in Kassel, Germany by a member of a far-right group, and instances of deferred responsibility by state agencies that have contributed to the deaths of migrants at sea in the Mediterranean. As historically contextualised interrogations of contemporary social and political processes, these investigations put forward a form of ‘counter-forensics’. They serve as sites for the pursuit of public accountability through scientific and aesthetic means, in opposition to the monopolisation of narratives around events by state agencies. The individual investigations presented will function as anchors for public events, workshops and discussions, with the exhibition becoming the physical infrastructure for the curriculum of a short course in forensic architecture.  
Louise Bonnet
Louise Bonnet
Los Angeles - 7313 Santa Monica Boulevard
until 05-05-2018

Louise Bonnet – New Works Nino Mier Gallery is pleased to announce a solo exhibition of Los Angeles-based artist Louise Bonnet. This will be Bonnet’s second exhibition with the gallery.    Exquisite Agonies: The Art of Louise Bonnet   The ever-expanding legions that inhabit the world of Louise Bonnet's paintings embody an intriguing and bizarre duality; they tell us very little while manifesting a whole shit ton. Noses swell up like Zeppelins and boomerang in the wind, toes and fingers writhe and twist around one another like baby rattlers in a nest, faces fold behind a slap, knees bend well beyond their breaking points. A face is comprised of a bulbous nose and a helmet-head of hair, wears a blouse, buttons ready to explode at any moment. One character wades in thigh-high water, bent at the waist, fastening a bikini-top secured by thick strands of rope, while another uses the very same gauge rope to batten down a wildly flailing nose. A giant head, rests like a tripod, the pillars made of nose and two sides of hair. Nipples strain against a sweater in what, one can only imagine must be near arctic temperatures. Bonnet's is a world of pulsing, sometimes even grotesque exaggerations, where beings inhabit traits that fluctuate in a kind of gender-blended state. Often alone, sometimes with a counterpoint, usually occupying the lion's share of the composition, almost jammed within the framework of the canvas, with appendages acting more like geysers of feeling, manifesting from deep within. Think more beings functioning as psycho-emotional allegories wherein the inner agonies of plight emerge, baring themselves shamelessly for all the world to ponder.                 Already favoring a life-size scaled canvas though as the work continues to evolve, Bonnet seems heading for even bigger. Notable with many of the artist's figures is the absence of eyes. Bonnet's reasoning is simple. The eyes, traditionally considered the windows into the soul, demand too much of the viewer's attention. By taking that easy get off the table, Bonnet liberates us of the onus, encouraging, in the critical patois of Ab-Ex Champ Clement Greenberg, a more all-over assessment of the composition. I would say comparisons to that style of painting might not end there, either. Though Bonnet's paintings, pragmatically-speaking, are rooted in the figurative, and are very much precisely and specifically rendered, the figures themselves read much more like Rorschach's of inner states of being. Often an action, or a repeated gesture serves as inspiration for work ("I like a very controlled rage."). Every canvas shows evidence of bending and pulling, pushing away, always evoking an air of tension and tautness. At the same time, the compositions are, also, very much rife with comedy, while never losing their exquisite agony. One early motif, tennis players, has been met by a frenzied reception and requests for more. But the artist assures me the country club cads are gone for good, "I have no connection to tennis players beyond the fact that I love uniforms." Even more, Bonnet has zero desire to make her mark as the cute-tennis-player-painter.  As is often the case with a painter possessing of Bonnet's talents and trafficking in vividly-rendered cartoonish scenes with sly nods to pop culture, there is the danger of almost too easily pleasing the crowd (Hearing this, the artist recalls hearing a recent quote to the effect of, "I'm not interested in art that's trying to be friends with me."). But even more so, taking a longer look at the work, it's clear that merely scanning the sexy surfaces one misses the real stuff, much deeper down and a function of the artist's hard-earned apprenticeship.     Growing up in Geneva, Switzerland, Bonnet's tastes always leaned toward the vivid and graphic work of masters such as R. Crumb, Popeye, and Basil Wolverton. Embarking to art school in her hometown, she found herself equally drawn more toward the students of said aesthetic, at the same time, relishing the opportunity to engage in no-holds-barred critical dialogues, a ritual she continues to this day ("I always wanted to be part of a group like the Futurists or something."). Upon completion of her studies, Bonnet headed out into the world, ending up in Los Angeles where she began working as a graphic designer, the whole time continuing to make drawings she mostly tagged as illustrations until, in 2008, when she was offered a show at LA’s Subliminal Projects. With a deadline hanging over her head, Bonnet found herself for the first time having to, "make paintings." The works, all done on paper using acrylic paint, were portraits, poppy and flat and already very much showing the telltale signs of the artist's askew sense of proportion. For Bonnet, the task of putting together an exhibit of paintings was a revelation, prompting an immediate end to her days as a graphic designer, so she could jump with both feet onto her newly limned path. Over the next five years, Bonnet painted and began having studio visits. One visit, with the Australian artist Ricky Swallow, proved particular prescient when Swallow suggested Bonnet try using oil paint. Despite the tiniest hint of reticence -- after all, only artists with a capital "A" dared use oil paint -- Bonnet was ready. More and more she was finding that acrylic paint was falling shy of where she wanted to go and what she wanted to convey. Moving away from the flat quality of acrylic paint enabled Bonnet to lean deeper into her compositions -- both from an aesthetic perspective as well as an emotional -- plumbing lurid depths that gave the new canvases a vibrant chiaroscuro. At the same, the introduction of oil paint into her repertoire seemed to trigger yet another resolution within Bonnet. Raised by laid-back hippies, the artist found herself often at loggerheads with the notion that her work somehow always had to exude a kind of loosey goosey quality. That, that was how mellow-minded people created. But it wasn't working anymore. When it came to her art, Bonnet was much happier when she was making very exacting paintings. And, although she still likes to leave evidence of the hand in the work, Bonner does not want the brushstrokes themselves to mean too much. Or stand alone. As mentioned earlier, Bonnet's figures often take up almost the entire canvas. After that, there might be a few small but significant touches. Maybe a vest made of rope (rope shows up in many of Bonnet's pieces, perhaps as a result of having a mountain climbing father), a shower nozzle, or, maybe a tree stump with a single branch containing barely two leaves. The earlier works played more nicely, contained stronger hints of illustrative qualities with nods to the likes of Guston or Saul. More recently, the paintings have begun to take on a much more muscular, minimal quality. The figures look more strained and uncomfortable, the limbs more contorted, the settings sparser and more starkly lit like post-punk odes to Goya's "Saturn Devouring His Son." Or maybe some creature that Odysseus had to wage war with on that long and perilous road back to Ithaca. With her work evolving in both scope and scale, Bonnet remains steadfast in her desire to not over-think, at the same time, still allowing herself room for discovery and the possibility of the unknown. Educated artists have a tendency to get in their own way. Even more so, contends Bonnet, is her desire to keep on mining a favorite dilemma. "I mean… Boobs are weird. Testicles are weird. And yet they define us. What I really like is when our bodies betray us."   – Arty Nelson Louise Bonnet (b. 1970, Geneva, Switzerland) has had solo exhibitions “New Works” at NINO MIER GALLERY, Los Angeles in 2018, “Wakefield Work” at Half Gallery, New York in 2017 and “Paintings” at NINO MIER GALLERY, Los Angeles in 2016. She has had work included in group exhibitions “10” at Anton Kern Gallery, New York (2018),  “Summerfest” curated by Lauren Taschen at Max Hetzler Gallery, Berlin (2017),  “Global Times Painting Painting To” curated by Alex Becerra at Half Gallery, New York (2016); “Giles” at Gagosian Gallery, Athens (2016); “Please Have Enough Acid in the Dish” organized by Vinny Dotolo at M+B, Los Angeles (2016); “Surrreal” at König Galerie, Berlin (2016). Bonnet has an upcoming solo at Max Hetzler Gallery, Berlin (2018). Bonnet lives and works in Los Angeles.  

Louise Bonnet – New Works Nino Mier Gallery is pleased to announce a solo exhibition of Los Angeles-based artist Louise Bonnet. This will be Bonnet’s second exhibition with the gallery.    Exquisite Agonies: The Art of Louise Bonnet   The ever-expanding legions that inhabit the world of Louise Bonnet's paintings embody an intriguing and bizarre duality; they tell us very little while manifesting a whole shit ton. Noses swell up like Zeppelins and boomerang in the wind, toes and fingers writhe and twist around one another like baby rattlers in a nest, faces fold behind a slap, knees bend well beyond their breaking points. A face is comprised of a bulbous nose and a helmet-head of hair, wears a blouse, buttons ready to explode at any moment. One character wades in thigh-high water, bent at the waist, fastening a bikini-top secured by thick strands of rope, while another uses the very same gauge rope to batten down a wildly flailing nose. A giant head, rests like a tripod, the pillars made of nose and two sides of hair. Nipples strain against a sweater in what, one can only imagine must be near arctic temperatures. Bonnet's is a world of pulsing, sometimes even grotesque exaggerations, where beings inhabit traits that fluctuate in a kind of gender-blended state. Often alone, sometimes with a counterpoint, usually occupying the lion's share of the composition, almost jammed within the framework of the canvas, with appendages acting more like geysers of feeling, manifesting from deep within. Think more beings functioning as psycho-emotional allegories wherein the inner agonies of plight emerge, baring themselves shamelessly for all the world to ponder.                 Already favoring a life-size scaled canvas though as the work continues to evolve, Bonnet seems heading for even bigger. Notable with many of the artist's figures is the absence of eyes. Bonnet's reasoning is simple. The eyes, traditionally considered the windows into the soul, demand too much of the viewer's attention. By taking that easy get off the table, Bonnet liberates us of the onus, encouraging, in the critical patois of Ab-Ex Champ Clement Greenberg, a more all-over assessment of the composition. I would say comparisons to that style of painting might not end there, either. Though Bonnet's paintings, pragmatically-speaking, are rooted in the figurative, and are very much precisely and specifically rendered, the figures themselves read much more like Rorschach's of inner states of being. Often an action, or a repeated gesture serves as inspiration for work ("I like a very controlled rage."). Every canvas shows evidence of bending and pulling, pushing away, always evoking an air of tension and tautness. At the same time, the compositions are, also, very much rife with comedy, while never losing their exquisite agony. One early motif, tennis players, has been met by a frenzied reception and requests for more. But the artist assures me the country club cads are gone for good, "I have no connection to tennis players beyond the fact that I love uniforms." Even more, Bonnet has zero desire to make her mark as the cute-tennis-player-painter.  As is often the case with a painter possessing of Bonnet's talents and trafficking in vividly-rendered cartoonish scenes with sly nods to pop culture, there is the danger of almost too easily pleasing the crowd (Hearing this, the artist recalls hearing a recent quote to the effect of, "I'm not interested in art that's trying to be friends with me."). But even more so, taking a longer look at the work, it's clear that merely scanning the sexy surfaces one misses the real stuff, much deeper down and a function of the artist's hard-earned apprenticeship.     Growing up in Geneva, Switzerland, Bonnet's tastes always leaned toward the vivid and graphic work of masters such as R. Crumb, Popeye, and Basil Wolverton. Embarking to art school in her hometown, she found herself equally drawn more toward the students of said aesthetic, at the same time, relishing the opportunity to engage in no-holds-barred critical dialogues, a ritual she continues to this day ("I always wanted to be part of a group like the Futurists or something."). Upon completion of her studies, Bonnet headed out into the world, ending up in Los Angeles where she began working as a graphic designer, the whole time continuing to make drawings she mostly tagged as illustrations until, in 2008, when she was offered a show at LA’s Subliminal Projects. With a deadline hanging over her head, Bonnet found herself for the first time having to, "make paintings." The works, all done on paper using acrylic paint, were portraits, poppy and flat and already very much showing the telltale signs of the artist's askew sense of proportion. For Bonnet, the task of putting together an exhibit of paintings was a revelation, prompting an immediate end to her days as a graphic designer, so she could jump with both feet onto her newly limned path. Over the next five years, Bonnet painted and began having studio visits. One visit, with the Australian artist Ricky Swallow, proved particular prescient when Swallow suggested Bonnet try using oil paint. Despite the tiniest hint of reticence -- after all, only artists with a capital "A" dared use oil paint -- Bonnet was ready. More and more she was finding that acrylic paint was falling shy of where she wanted to go and what she wanted to convey. Moving away from the flat quality of acrylic paint enabled Bonnet to lean deeper into her compositions -- both from an aesthetic perspective as well as an emotional -- plumbing lurid depths that gave the new canvases a vibrant chiaroscuro. At the same, the introduction of oil paint into her repertoire seemed to trigger yet another resolution within Bonnet. Raised by laid-back hippies, the artist found herself often at loggerheads with the notion that her work somehow always had to exude a kind of loosey goosey quality. That, that was how mellow-minded people created. But it wasn't working anymore. When it came to her art, Bonnet was much happier when she was making very exacting paintings. And, although she still likes to leave evidence of the hand in the work, Bonner does not want the brushstrokes themselves to mean too much. Or stand alone. As mentioned earlier, Bonnet's figures often take up almost the entire canvas. After that, there might be a few small but significant touches. Maybe a vest made of rope (rope shows up in many of Bonnet's pieces, perhaps as a result of having a mountain climbing father), a shower nozzle, or, maybe a tree stump with a single branch containing barely two leaves. The earlier works played more nicely, contained stronger hints of illustrative qualities with nods to the likes of Guston or Saul. More recently, the paintings have begun to take on a much more muscular, minimal quality. The figures look more strained and uncomfortable, the limbs more contorted, the settings sparser and more starkly lit like post-punk odes to Goya's "Saturn Devouring His Son." Or maybe some creature that Odysseus had to wage war with on that long and perilous road back to Ithaca. With her work evolving in both scope and scale, Bonnet remains steadfast in her desire to not over-think, at the same time, still allowing herself room for discovery and the possibility of the unknown. Educated artists have a tendency to get in their own way. Even more so, contends Bonnet, is her desire to keep on mining a favorite dilemma. "I mean… Boobs are weird. Testicles are weird. And yet they define us. What I really like is when our bodies betray us."   – Arty Nelson Louise Bonnet (b. 1970, Geneva, Switzerland) has had solo exhibitions “New Works” at NINO MIER GALLERY, Los Angeles in 2018, “Wakefield Work” at Half Gallery, New York in 2017 and “Paintings” at NINO MIER GALLERY, Los Angeles in 2016. She has had work included in group exhibitions “10” at Anton Kern Gallery, New York (2018),  “Summerfest” curated by Lauren Taschen at Max Hetzler Gallery, Berlin (2017),  “Global Times Painting Painting To” curated by Alex Becerra at Half Gallery, New York (2016); “Giles” at Gagosian Gallery, Athens (2016); “Please Have Enough Acid in the Dish” organized by Vinny Dotolo at M+B, Los Angeles (2016); “Surrreal” at König Galerie, Berlin (2016). Bonnet has an upcoming solo at Max Hetzler Gallery, Berlin (2018). Bonnet lives and works in Los Angeles.  
Chris Kraus
Chris Kraus
Los Angeles - 1206 Maple Avenue, Suite 1030
until 19-05-2018

Chris Kraus – In Order to Pass: Films from 1982-1995 Chris Kraus made nine films between 1982 and 1995, the entirety of her output in this medium. These works range widely in form, feeling and length. Each materializes from the meeting of desire and contingency, where the personal, political and practical contend with one another. In the title of one of Kraus’ films, In Order to Pass, there is an instruction for how to understand her filmmaking drive. These works are characterized by a passing through, with Kraus’ subjectivity the conductor for all that runs through it, that eventually tips out into the work. They capture moments of charged transition. As Kraus reflects on the films years later: I had not yet started writing, and the desire behind them – to escape from unhappiness (i.e., a surfeit of emotion and content) into happiness (i.e., a clarity or form in which all these fragments of feeling and thought could be magically held) was still fresh. 1 What courses through each of these distinct films is a current of visions, refrains, genre, nostalgia, libido, sound, image and impulse. These films convey their maker’s process of sublimation and also an undoing of that same process. Kraus’ productions are necessarily experimental. Recurrently, she considers existing formats – the novel, the biography, the manifesto, the documentary, the trailer, the short and feature-length film – and retools them. The process of finding a process often becomes subject matter rendered visible in the work. Scripted dialogue and improvised exchanges share equal status. Footage might be captured on an involuntary whim, or be the consequence of assiduous planning. In her own words, Kraus ascribes her urge to make films as: ‘A terrible megalomania, an insistence on being present - even when one has no personal presence – through one’s double, the film… Much as I loathe the idea of a feminine ecriture, I have to admit that the impulse to do this seems very female. Barbara Rubin is a patron saint of this kind of film … 15-year-old girl given a Bolex transforms her isolate misery into Christmas on Earth.’ 2 Simone Weil, Antonin Artaud, Henry James and Chuck Berry are adapted for the screen through various methods; and a flurry of characters visit these works as subjects, actors, cameos and apparitions. Kraus also maps a community of contemporary writers, artists and performers by including them as collaborators, cast, and crew; on-screen appearances made by Sylvère Lotringer, Terence Sellers, Lee Madigan, Penny Arcade, Jim Fletcher, John Kelsey, David Rattray, Bill Raymond, Will Patton and Judy Nylon toy with boundaries between personality and character, between fiction and journalism. It is her final film and only feature, Gravity and Grace, that offers the most congealed plot and patent characters, and can now be viewed as the jump-off for Kraus’ literary ambitions. In 2018, it’s almost implausible to consider Chris Kraus’ films without the heft of her subsequent writing bearing down on their reading. Kraus, who Holland Cotter describes as ‘one of our smartest and most original writers on contemporary art and culture,’ 3  develops a method in her novels that invites the intellectual and critical mind of a writer to be built upon her emotional chassis. The cohabitation of what is deemed high and cognitive, with what is deemed base and sentimental, takes full effect in her four novels and extends to the manner with which she considers artists and confronts their work in her critical writing. Yet this influential space that Kraus established – where the private and public modes of experience meddle with one another – is initiated in these nine films, each intoxicated and equipped with heady thinking and thick atmosphere. Kraus’ work is now decisively inscribed in the DNA of contemporary cultural thought and In Order to Pass (1982), Terrorists in Love (1983), Foolproof Illusion (1986), Voyage to Rodez (1986), How to Shoot a Crime (1987), The Golden Bowl or Repression (1984-88), Traveling at Night (1990), Sadness at Leaving (1992), and Gravity and Grace (1995) form the foundation of this impactful contribution.  Chris Kraus (b. 1955) is a Los Angeles–based filmmaker, writer, art critic, and editor whose novels include I Love Dick (1997), Aliens & Anorexia (2000), Torpor (2006), and Summer of Hate (2012). Kraus’ latest book is a literary biography of writer Kathy Acker: After Kathy Acker (2017). Kraus’ collections of essays on art include Video Green: Los Angeles Art and the Triumph of Nothingness (2004), Where Art Belongs (2011), and a forthcoming book of essays and story collections called Social Practices (2018). She has written countless reviews, essays, and stories for publications such as Artforum, Art in America, Modern Painters, Afterall, The New Yorker, The New York Times Literary Supplement, The Paris Review, The Los Angeles Review of Books, Bookforum, and Texte zur Kunste. Kraus taught creative writing and art writing at The European Graduate School/EGS for ten years and has been a visiting professor at the Art Center College of Design, the University of California at San Diego, New York University, the San Francisco Art Institute. Along with Sylvère Lotringer and Hedi El Kholti, Kraus is co-editor of the publishing house Semiotext(e). Kraus is the recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship for General Non-Fiction (2016), a Warhol Foundation Arts Writing Grant (2011), and Frank Jewett Mather Award for Art Criticism from the College Art Association (2008). Her first novel, I Love Dick, was recently adapted for television and released on Amazon Video.

Chris Kraus – In Order to Pass: Films from 1982-1995 Chris Kraus made nine films between 1982 and 1995, the entirety of her output in this medium. These works range widely in form, feeling and length. Each materializes from the meeting of desire and contingency, where the personal, political and practical contend with one another. In the title of one of Kraus’ films, In Order to Pass, there is an instruction for how to understand her filmmaking drive. These works are characterized by a passing through, with Kraus’ subjectivity the conductor for all that runs through it, that eventually tips out into the work. They capture moments of charged transition. As Kraus reflects on the films years later: I had not yet started writing, and the desire behind them – to escape from unhappiness (i.e., a surfeit of emotion and content) into happiness (i.e., a clarity or form in which all these fragments of feeling and thought could be magically held) was still fresh. 1 What courses through each of these distinct films is a current of visions, refrains, genre, nostalgia, libido, sound, image and impulse. These films convey their maker’s process of sublimation and also an undoing of that same process. Kraus’ productions are necessarily experimental. Recurrently, she considers existing formats – the novel, the biography, the manifesto, the documentary, the trailer, the short and feature-length film – and retools them. The process of finding a process often becomes subject matter rendered visible in the work. Scripted dialogue and improvised exchanges share equal status. Footage might be captured on an involuntary whim, or be the consequence of assiduous planning. In her own words, Kraus ascribes her urge to make films as: ‘A terrible megalomania, an insistence on being present - even when one has no personal presence – through one’s double, the film… Much as I loathe the idea of a feminine ecriture, I have to admit that the impulse to do this seems very female. Barbara Rubin is a patron saint of this kind of film … 15-year-old girl given a Bolex transforms her isolate misery into Christmas on Earth.’ 2 Simone Weil, Antonin Artaud, Henry James and Chuck Berry are adapted for the screen through various methods; and a flurry of characters visit these works as subjects, actors, cameos and apparitions. Kraus also maps a community of contemporary writers, artists and performers by including them as collaborators, cast, and crew; on-screen appearances made by Sylvère Lotringer, Terence Sellers, Lee Madigan, Penny Arcade, Jim Fletcher, John Kelsey, David Rattray, Bill Raymond, Will Patton and Judy Nylon toy with boundaries between personality and character, between fiction and journalism. It is her final film and only feature, Gravity and Grace, that offers the most congealed plot and patent characters, and can now be viewed as the jump-off for Kraus’ literary ambitions. In 2018, it’s almost implausible to consider Chris Kraus’ films without the heft of her subsequent writing bearing down on their reading. Kraus, who Holland Cotter describes as ‘one of our smartest and most original writers on contemporary art and culture,’ 3  develops a method in her novels that invites the intellectual and critical mind of a writer to be built upon her emotional chassis. The cohabitation of what is deemed high and cognitive, with what is deemed base and sentimental, takes full effect in her four novels and extends to the manner with which she considers artists and confronts their work in her critical writing. Yet this influential space that Kraus established – where the private and public modes of experience meddle with one another – is initiated in these nine films, each intoxicated and equipped with heady thinking and thick atmosphere. Kraus’ work is now decisively inscribed in the DNA of contemporary cultural thought and In Order to Pass (1982), Terrorists in Love (1983), Foolproof Illusion (1986), Voyage to Rodez (1986), How to Shoot a Crime (1987), The Golden Bowl or Repression (1984-88), Traveling at Night (1990), Sadness at Leaving (1992), and Gravity and Grace (1995) form the foundation of this impactful contribution.  Chris Kraus (b. 1955) is a Los Angeles–based filmmaker, writer, art critic, and editor whose novels include I Love Dick (1997), Aliens & Anorexia (2000), Torpor (2006), and Summer of Hate (2012). Kraus’ latest book is a literary biography of writer Kathy Acker: After Kathy Acker (2017). Kraus’ collections of essays on art include Video Green: Los Angeles Art and the Triumph of Nothingness (2004), Where Art Belongs (2011), and a forthcoming book of essays and story collections called Social Practices (2018). She has written countless reviews, essays, and stories for publications such as Artforum, Art in America, Modern Painters, Afterall, The New Yorker, The New York Times Literary Supplement, The Paris Review, The Los Angeles Review of Books, Bookforum, and Texte zur Kunste. Kraus taught creative writing and art writing at The European Graduate School/EGS for ten years and has been a visiting professor at the Art Center College of Design, the University of California at San Diego, New York University, the San Francisco Art Institute. Along with Sylvère Lotringer and Hedi El Kholti, Kraus is co-editor of the publishing house Semiotext(e). Kraus is the recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship for General Non-Fiction (2016), a Warhol Foundation Arts Writing Grant (2011), and Frank Jewett Mather Award for Art Criticism from the College Art Association (2008). Her first novel, I Love Dick, was recently adapted for television and released on Amazon Video.
Chris Ofili
Chris Ofili
Miami - 61 NE 41st Street
until 05-05-2018

Chris Ofili A new installation of paintings by internationally renowned artist Chris Ofili will reflect the artist's practice of employing historical and cultural references to comment on contemporary society.

Chris Ofili A new installation of paintings by internationally renowned artist Chris Ofili will reflect the artist's practice of employing historical and cultural references to comment on contemporary society.
Jacolby Satterwhite
Jacolby Satterwhite
New York - 291 Grand Street, 3rd floor
until 06-05-2018

Jacolby Satterwhite – Blessed Avenue  

Jacolby Satterwhite – Blessed Avenue  
Joel Shapiro
Joel Shapiro
New York - 521 West 21st Street
until 28-04-2018

Joel Shapiro Paula Cooper Gallery is pleased to announce an exhibition of recent work by Joel Shapiro. On view will be new sculptures demonstrating a breadth of material, scale and form, as well as a selection of ink drawings on paper.  Since his earliest one-person shows, presented at Paula Cooper Gallery in 1970 and 1972, Joel Shapiro has created work that activates and reconfigures space using his iconic vocabulary of geometric forms, shifting figural and nonreferential implications, and subtle manipulations of scale. Constructed from wood and painted a lustrous blue, his new monumental sculpture surges upward from the ground, bearing traces of gestural improvisation. Composed of four irregularly stacked polyhedral shapes, the work invites the viewer to engage with the gallery space, as its multifaceted planes advance and recede out of view. Similarly, Shapiro’s wall relief and suspended sculptures are assembled from geometric wood elements joined to form multiaxial projections. Unfolding in time and space, the works externalize thought in material, form, and color. Leaving the striated texture of the underlying wood structures partially visible, Shapiro covers the works with supersaturated casein paint. In the catalogue to his 1982 exhibition at the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, Shapiro stated: “The idea of thinking in color always interested me. If you are a sculptor and you use color, the color has to mean something, do something to change your perception of the piece. Cobalt violet obfuscates form and blue withdraws. Cadmium red and black both add density.” In another room of the gallery, small cast bronze works—evoking a charred table and created from a dismembered draftsmen’s mannequin—are presented on an intimate scale, recalling early works of Shapiro’s from the 1970s. Their scarred surfaces and mutated forms invoke melancholic psychological narratives. And yet, the works maintain an obdurate sense of object-ness, translated to schematic abstract forms: “There’s a spatial or temporal proximity that induces the mind to perceive it in relation to its surroundings, while on the other hand [the work is seen] as a complete volumetric structure on the surface.”[1]   Also on view is a selection of recent ink drawings, for which Shapiro employs loose, expressionistic brushwork to build a shifting, atmospheric dimensionality. Creating some as pairs by overlaying a clean sheet of paper onto a wet drawing, Shapiro transfers its mirror image—which he then develops further through the addition of ink or the reorientation of the paper. Applying a range of tones from buoyant vivid chroma to bereaved grays and blacks, the works explore a multiplicity of affectual and perceptual associations.     Born in New York City in 1941, Joel Shapiro received his Bachelor of Arts (1964) and Master of Arts (1969) from New York University. Since 1970, his work has been the subject of many one-person and retrospective exhibitions, including the current show, Joel Shapiro: Plaster, Paper, Wood, and Wire, on view at Yale University Art Gallery in New Haven, CT, through June 10, 2018. Other important one-person exhibitions include those at the Whitechapel Gallery, London (1980), that traveled to Museum Haus Lange, Krefeld, and Moderna Museet, Stockholm; the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (1982); the Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam (1985); the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis (jointly with the Nelson-Atkins Museum, Kansas City, 1995-6); the Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Roof Garden, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York (2001); the Museum Ludwig, Cologne (2011); the Portland Art Museum, OR (2014); Nasher Sculpture Center, Dallas (2016); and Kunstmuseum Winterthur, Winterthur (2017). Shapiro has executed more than thirty commissions and publicly sited sculptures in major Asian, European and North American cities. His work can be found in numerous public collections in the United States and abroad, including: the Museum of Modern Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art, and the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York; the Tate Gallery, London; and the Musée national d’art moderne, Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris. Shapiro was elected to the Swedish Royal Academy of Art in 1994 and the American Academy of Arts and Letters in 1998.  The French Minister of Culture awarded Shapiro the Chevalier in the Order of Arts and Letters in 2005; and in 2013 he was honored with the National Art Award for Outstanding Achievement by Americans for the Arts. The artist lives and works in New York City.  

Joel Shapiro Paula Cooper Gallery is pleased to announce an exhibition of recent work by Joel Shapiro. On view will be new sculptures demonstrating a breadth of material, scale and form, as well as a selection of ink drawings on paper.  Since his earliest one-person shows, presented at Paula Cooper Gallery in 1970 and 1972, Joel Shapiro has created work that activates and reconfigures space using his iconic vocabulary of geometric forms, shifting figural and nonreferential implications, and subtle manipulations of scale. Constructed from wood and painted a lustrous blue, his new monumental sculpture surges upward from the ground, bearing traces of gestural improvisation. Composed of four irregularly stacked polyhedral shapes, the work invites the viewer to engage with the gallery space, as its multifaceted planes advance and recede out of view. Similarly, Shapiro’s wall relief and suspended sculptures are assembled from geometric wood elements joined to form multiaxial projections. Unfolding in time and space, the works externalize thought in material, form, and color. Leaving the striated texture of the underlying wood structures partially visible, Shapiro covers the works with supersaturated casein paint. In the catalogue to his 1982 exhibition at the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, Shapiro stated: “The idea of thinking in color always interested me. If you are a sculptor and you use color, the color has to mean something, do something to change your perception of the piece. Cobalt violet obfuscates form and blue withdraws. Cadmium red and black both add density.” In another room of the gallery, small cast bronze works—evoking a charred table and created from a dismembered draftsmen’s mannequin—are presented on an intimate scale, recalling early works of Shapiro’s from the 1970s. Their scarred surfaces and mutated forms invoke melancholic psychological narratives. And yet, the works maintain an obdurate sense of object-ness, translated to schematic abstract forms: “There’s a spatial or temporal proximity that induces the mind to perceive it in relation to its surroundings, while on the other hand [the work is seen] as a complete volumetric structure on the surface.”[1]   Also on view is a selection of recent ink drawings, for which Shapiro employs loose, expressionistic brushwork to build a shifting, atmospheric dimensionality. Creating some as pairs by overlaying a clean sheet of paper onto a wet drawing, Shapiro transfers its mirror image—which he then develops further through the addition of ink or the reorientation of the paper. Applying a range of tones from buoyant vivid chroma to bereaved grays and blacks, the works explore a multiplicity of affectual and perceptual associations.     Born in New York City in 1941, Joel Shapiro received his Bachelor of Arts (1964) and Master of Arts (1969) from New York University. Since 1970, his work has been the subject of many one-person and retrospective exhibitions, including the current show, Joel Shapiro: Plaster, Paper, Wood, and Wire, on view at Yale University Art Gallery in New Haven, CT, through June 10, 2018. Other important one-person exhibitions include those at the Whitechapel Gallery, London (1980), that traveled to Museum Haus Lange, Krefeld, and Moderna Museet, Stockholm; the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (1982); the Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam (1985); the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis (jointly with the Nelson-Atkins Museum, Kansas City, 1995-6); the Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Roof Garden, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York (2001); the Museum Ludwig, Cologne (2011); the Portland Art Museum, OR (2014); Nasher Sculpture Center, Dallas (2016); and Kunstmuseum Winterthur, Winterthur (2017). Shapiro has executed more than thirty commissions and publicly sited sculptures in major Asian, European and North American cities. His work can be found in numerous public collections in the United States and abroad, including: the Museum of Modern Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art, and the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York; the Tate Gallery, London; and the Musée national d’art moderne, Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris. Shapiro was elected to the Swedish Royal Academy of Art in 1994 and the American Academy of Arts and Letters in 1998.  The French Minister of Culture awarded Shapiro the Chevalier in the Order of Arts and Letters in 2005; and in 2013 he was honored with the National Art Award for Outstanding Achievement by Americans for the Arts. The artist lives and works in New York City.  
Rita McBride
Rita McBride
New York - 535, 541, and 545 West 22nd Street
until 02-06-2018

Rita McBride – Particulates This new commission by Rita McBride, titled Particulates (2017), is inspired by time travel, the principles of light and space, and quantum physics. The materials of McBride’s Particulates include water molecules, marble dust, surfactant compounds, and the beams of high-intensity lasers. Her use of light as a sculptural medium marks a departure for the artist who has explored the tension between architectural and sculptural form in her extensive oeuvre since the mid-1980s. Particulates exchanges gravity, a core element in sculpture, for the potential of infinitely traversable space. It unfolds a wrinkle in time. Particulates is made possible by major support from Brenda R. Potter. Significant support is provided by the Horace W. Goldsmith Foundation, the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, and Dia’s Director’s Council: Fady Jameel, Leslie and Mac McQuown, Hope Warschaw, and Sara and Ev Williams. Generous support is provided by Frances Bowes, Nathalie and Charles de Gunzburg, and Marissa Sackler. Additional support is provided by Light Art Space.

Rita McBride – Particulates This new commission by Rita McBride, titled Particulates (2017), is inspired by time travel, the principles of light and space, and quantum physics. The materials of McBride’s Particulates include water molecules, marble dust, surfactant compounds, and the beams of high-intensity lasers. Her use of light as a sculptural medium marks a departure for the artist who has explored the tension between architectural and sculptural form in her extensive oeuvre since the mid-1980s. Particulates exchanges gravity, a core element in sculpture, for the potential of infinitely traversable space. It unfolds a wrinkle in time. Particulates is made possible by major support from Brenda R. Potter. Significant support is provided by the Horace W. Goldsmith Foundation, the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, and Dia’s Director’s Council: Fady Jameel, Leslie and Mac McQuown, Hope Warschaw, and Sara and Ev Williams. Generous support is provided by Frances Bowes, Nathalie and Charles de Gunzburg, and Marissa Sackler. Additional support is provided by Light Art Space.
Matthew Kirk
Matthew Kirk
New York - 127 Henry Street
until 29-04-2018

Matthew Kirk – 1978 FIERMAN presents 1978, a new solo exhibition by Arizona-born, Queens based artist Matthew Kirk, comprised of new paintings, works on paper, and sculpture. Kirk is known for his energetic, all-over aesthetic and his use of humble materials, some found, some based in the construction and commercial art handling industries, as well as his investigation into his own Navajo heritage and the political implications of Native American culture.   Matthew Kirk’s paintings exude a rhythmic intensity based in a matrix of mark-making that the artist has developed over the past decade. He  mixes oil pastel, chalk, gouache, spray paint, graphite, acrylic paint, colored tape, and brass BB’s in a compositional strategy that merges representation of the landscape of the Southwest with the freeform abstraction of music. Across Kirk’s oeuvre symbols reappear –a pair of boots, a basketball hoop, a Navajo man with a ponytail— creating a distinct visual world of the artist’s own design.   His use of sheetrock and plywood as painting supports reflects a rubric of working with readily available materials, primarily from the construction industry, as well as found objects. The purple color serving as the ground in Fence Hopper, the largest painting on view, is inherent to the material, a signifier of the commercial grading of the sheetrock, and as such functions as a found object much like the bricks used to compose the boots in Papa Boots. A plywood backboard and hoop-less basketball rim, both found materials, hangs outside the gallery and will be repurposed after the show at a basketball court on a Navajo reservation.   The title of the show, 1978, refers both to the year in which the American Indian Religious Freedom Act (AIRFA) was enacted and to the year of the artist’s birth. AIRFA established federal protection for the religious practices and holy sites of American Indians, Eskimos, Aleuts, and Native Hawaiians. The enshrinement of freedom of worship for fellow people of native descent mirroring Kirk's own lifespan serves as a metaphor for his spiritual approach to painting.    Matthew Kirk (b. 1978, Ganado, AZ) lives and works in Queens, NY.  A self-taught artist, he has recently had exhibitions at Adams and Ollman, Portland; Intuit: The Center for Intuitive and Outsider Art, Chicago; Louis B. James, NY; Exit Art, New York.  His work has been published in The New York Observer, Modern Painters, and The Wall Street Journal, among other publications.   

Matthew Kirk – 1978 FIERMAN presents 1978, a new solo exhibition by Arizona-born, Queens based artist Matthew Kirk, comprised of new paintings, works on paper, and sculpture. Kirk is known for his energetic, all-over aesthetic and his use of humble materials, some found, some based in the construction and commercial art handling industries, as well as his investigation into his own Navajo heritage and the political implications of Native American culture.   Matthew Kirk’s paintings exude a rhythmic intensity based in a matrix of mark-making that the artist has developed over the past decade. He  mixes oil pastel, chalk, gouache, spray paint, graphite, acrylic paint, colored tape, and brass BB’s in a compositional strategy that merges representation of the landscape of the Southwest with the freeform abstraction of music. Across Kirk’s oeuvre symbols reappear –a pair of boots, a basketball hoop, a Navajo man with a ponytail— creating a distinct visual world of the artist’s own design.   His use of sheetrock and plywood as painting supports reflects a rubric of working with readily available materials, primarily from the construction industry, as well as found objects. The purple color serving as the ground in Fence Hopper, the largest painting on view, is inherent to the material, a signifier of the commercial grading of the sheetrock, and as such functions as a found object much like the bricks used to compose the boots in Papa Boots. A plywood backboard and hoop-less basketball rim, both found materials, hangs outside the gallery and will be repurposed after the show at a basketball court on a Navajo reservation.   The title of the show, 1978, refers both to the year in which the American Indian Religious Freedom Act (AIRFA) was enacted and to the year of the artist’s birth. AIRFA established federal protection for the religious practices and holy sites of American Indians, Eskimos, Aleuts, and Native Hawaiians. The enshrinement of freedom of worship for fellow people of native descent mirroring Kirk's own lifespan serves as a metaphor for his spiritual approach to painting.    Matthew Kirk (b. 1978, Ganado, AZ) lives and works in Queens, NY.  A self-taught artist, he has recently had exhibitions at Adams and Ollman, Portland; Intuit: The Center for Intuitive and Outsider Art, Chicago; Louis B. James, NY; Exit Art, New York.  His work has been published in The New York Observer, Modern Painters, and The Wall Street Journal, among other publications.   
Painting/Object
Painting/Object
New York - 545 West 25th Street, 9th Floor
until 19-05-2018

Painting/Object Sarah Crowner, N. Dash, Sam Moyer, Julia Rommel, Erin Shirreff On the occasion of its 10th anniversary, The FLAG Art Foundation is pleased to present Painting/Object: Sarah Crowner, N. Dash, Sam Moyer, Julia Rommel, Erin Shirreff, on view February 23—May 19, 2018, on its 10th floor. The exhibition features new and recent works by five New York-based contemporary artists who draw upon Ellsworth Kelly’s legacy in their varied practices. Painting/Object coincides with FLAG’s exhibition Ellsworth Kelly, curated by Jack Shear, on its 9th Floor. The title of the exhibition refers to a phrase used by Ellsworth Kelly (1923-2015) to describe Window, Museum of Modern Art, 1949, the first work in which he combined multiple relief panels to create one image: “It is the replica of a window that does not exist as either window or painting but as painting/object…the flattening of the forms in paintings condenses vision and presents a three-dimensional world reduced to two dimensions.”[1] Kelly’s newfound direction, which would ultimately become the cornerstone of his oeuvre, disrupted painting’s traditional figure-ground relationship and resulted in an increasingly simplified visual language. Crowner, Dash, Moyer, Rommel, and Shirreff employ similar formal tactics as Kelly, yet each embraces the mark of the artist’s hand to highlight distinctive approaches to construction, materiality, and process. Sarah Crowner integrates repeated shapes and patterns—often in saturated, primary colors— into graphic compositions that evoke hard-edge painting, modernist design, and textile production. Crowner’s patchwork construction of panels of raw and painted canvas references craft traditions, such as quilting, sewing, and collage. “It’s a way of creating form by joining material,” Crowner says of her process, which she uses to bring more tactility to the medium. “They are really objects more than paintings.”[2] N. Dash’s monochromatic, stacked canvases encapsulate the artist’s tactile engagement with the world. Dash layers gesso, paint, and graphite over adobe—hand-collected in New Mexico—to create textural surfaces that accentuate the natural cracks, ripples, and imperfections of the material underneath. Beveled at the edges, these paintings pivot between two and three dimensions, and acknowledge their material’s historical significance in creating structure. Sam Moyer’s newly created Coenties Slip, Spencertown, and Rye, all 2018, reference three New York locations where Kelly lived and worked throughout his career. Moyer fuses painted canvas and reclaimed fragments of granite, marble, and limestone—stones used in capacities ranging from classical sculpture to kitchen design—into color field abstractions that address ideas of labor, luxury, and beauty. Julia Rommel incorporates physical traces of construction into paintings that layer process, color, and elements of chance. Geometry, ridges, and breaks in monochromatic planes are the result of the artist repeatedly stretching, painting, un-stretching, and re-stretching linen canvas on differently-scaled bars. Rommel’s The Unbelievers, 2016, is directly inspired by Kelly’s black and white photography, and employs a similar strategy of high-contrast, angular shapes that accentuate architectural forms. Erin Shirreff explores the possibilities of representing three-dimensional objects through photography, painting, sculpture, and video. Shirreff’s sculpture Catalogue, 21 parts, 2016, is comprised of handmade cylinders, arches, irregular blocks, and a variety of other shapes, assembled en masse to create a compact still-life. The artist photographs the sculpture’s individual components and prints them in large-scale format; this shift in scale and medium recasts intimate objects as monumental, architectural portraits. Sarah Crowner (b. 1974) is an artist living and working in Brooklyn, NY. Crowner received a BA from the University of California, Santa Cruz, CA, in 1999, studied at the Ecole Nationale Superieure des Beaux Arts, Paris, France, in 2002, and earned a MFA from Hunter College City University of New York, New York, NY, in 2002. She has been the subject of solo exhibitions, including at Casey Kaplan, New York, NY (2018) (forthcoming); Sarah Crowner/Tutsi Baskets, Galerie Nordenhake, Stockholm, Sweden (2016); Plastic Memory, Simon Lee Gallery, London, United Kingdom (2016); Beetle in the Leaves, MASS MoCA, North Adams, MA (2016); among others. Her works have been included in major group exhibitions, including Invitation Exhibition, American Academy of Arts and Letters, New York, NY (2018) (forthcoming); Hog’s Curve, Halsey McKay, New York, NY (2018) (forthcoming); 5KV / 5 Years of Art and Design in Kvalitá? Gallery, Kvalitá? Gallery, Prague, Czech Republic (2017); Für Barbara, Hall Art Foundation, Derneburg, Germany (2017); among others. Crowner has been the subject of articles and reviews in Art in America, Artforum, Frieze, Modern Painters, The New York Times, Vogue, among others. N. Dash (b. 1980) is an artist living and working in Brooklyn, NY, and New Mexico. Dash received a BA from New York University, New York, NY, in 2003, and a MFA from Columbia University, New York, NY, in 2010. She has been the subject of solo exhibitions, including at Zeno X Gallery, Antwerp, Belgium (2018) (forthcoming); Fondazione Giuliani, Rome, Italy (2017); Casey Kaplan, New York, NY (2016); Mehdi Chouakri, Berlin, Germany (2015); among others. Her works have been included in numerous group exhibitions, including Generations Female Artist in Dialogue, Sammlung Goetz, Berlin, Germany (2018); The Margulies Collection at the Warehouse, Miami, FL (2018); N. Dash | Virginia Overton | B. Wurtz (Form, Content, Place), Maisterravalbuena, Lisbon, Portugal (2017); Heartbreak Hotel, Invisible Exports, New York, NY (2017); among others. Dash has been the subject of articles and reviews in Art in America, Artforum, Artsy, Frieze, The New York Times, among others. Sam Moyer (b. 1983) is an artist living and working in Brooklyn, NY. Moyer received a BFA from the Corcoran College of Art and Design, Washington, D.C., in 2005, and a MFA from the Yale School of Art, New Haven, CT, in 2007. She has been the subject of solo exhibitions, including WIDE WAKE, Sean Kelly Gallery, New York, NY (2017); Brick Window, 56 Henry, New York, NY (2017); MGM, JOAN Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (2017); among others. Her works have been included in numerous solo exhibitions, including EDIFICE, COMPLEX, VISIONARRY, STRUCTURE, Sean Kelly, New York, NY (2018); Crooked Bazaar, Proyectos Monclova, Mexico City, Mexico (2017); Drawing Island, The Journal Gallery, Brooklyn, NY (2017); New Ruins, American University, Washington, D.C. (2017): among others. Moyer has been the subject of articles and reviews in Architectural Digest, Art in America, Artsy, Cultured, T Magazine, The New York Times, Vulture, The Wall Street Journal, among others. Julia Rommel (b. 1980) is an artist living and working in Brooklyn, NY. Rommel received a BS from the University of Richmond, Richmond, VA, in 2002, and a MFA from The American University, Washington, D.C., in 2005. She has been the subject of solo & two-person exhibitions, including Stay-at-Home, Matthew Cerletty & Julia Rommel, Standard, Oslo, Norway (2017); Man Alive, Bureau, New York, NY (2016); A Cheesecake With Your Name On It, Overduin & Co., Los Angeles, CA (2016); Two Italians, Six Lifeguards, The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum, Ridgefield, CT (2015); among others. Her works have been included in numerous group exhibitions, including Milwaukee Collects, Milwaukee Art Museum, Milwaukee, WI (2017); Zombie Formalism, ca. 1970/2016, Mitchell Algus Gallery, New York, NY (2016); The Congregation, Jack Hanley Gallery, New York, NY (2016); among others. Rommel has been the subject of articles and reviews in Art in America, Artforum, The Brooklyn Rail, New York Magazine, Mousse Magazine, among others. Erin Shirreff (b. 1975) is an artist living in New York, NY. Shirreff received a BFA in Visual Arts from the University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia, in 1998, and a MFA in Sculpture from the Yale University School of Art, New Haven, CT, in 2005. She has been the subject of solo exhibitions, including Halves and Wholes, Kunsthalle Basel, Basel, Switzerland (2016); Institute of Contemporary Art/Boston, Boston, MA (2015); Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, NY (2015); Arm’s Length, Sikkema Jenkins & Co., New York, NY (2015); among others. Her works have been included in numerous group exhibitions, including You Are Looking at Something That Never Occurred, Zubludowicz Collection, United Kingdom (2017); Gray Matters, Wexner Art Center, Columbus, OH (2017); MOMENTA/Biennale de L’image: Erin Shirreff—Concrete Buildings, Darling Foundry, Montreal, Canada (2017); L’image voiée, Fondazione Prada, Milan, Italy (2016); among others. Shirreff has been the subject of articles and reviews in Architectural Digest, Art in America, Artforum, ArtReview, Frieze, The New Yorker, The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, among others. [1] Wilmes, Ulrich. “Black and White.” Ellsworth Kelly: Black & White, Berlin: Hatje Cantz, 2012. [2] Mendelsohn, Meredith. “Artist Crowner finds beauty in both shapes and the spaces in between.” Architectural Digest, April 11, 2016.

Painting/Object Sarah Crowner, N. Dash, Sam Moyer, Julia Rommel, Erin Shirreff On the occasion of its 10th anniversary, The FLAG Art Foundation is pleased to present Painting/Object: Sarah Crowner, N. Dash, Sam Moyer, Julia Rommel, Erin Shirreff, on view February 23—May 19, 2018, on its 10th floor. The exhibition features new and recent works by five New York-based contemporary artists who draw upon Ellsworth Kelly’s legacy in their varied practices. Painting/Object coincides with FLAG’s exhibition Ellsworth Kelly, curated by Jack Shear, on its 9th Floor. The title of the exhibition refers to a phrase used by Ellsworth Kelly (1923-2015) to describe Window, Museum of Modern Art, 1949, the first work in which he combined multiple relief panels to create one image: “It is the replica of a window that does not exist as either window or painting but as painting/object…the flattening of the forms in paintings condenses vision and presents a three-dimensional world reduced to two dimensions.”[1] Kelly’s newfound direction, which would ultimately become the cornerstone of his oeuvre, disrupted painting’s traditional figure-ground relationship and resulted in an increasingly simplified visual language. Crowner, Dash, Moyer, Rommel, and Shirreff employ similar formal tactics as Kelly, yet each embraces the mark of the artist’s hand to highlight distinctive approaches to construction, materiality, and process. Sarah Crowner integrates repeated shapes and patterns—often in saturated, primary colors— into graphic compositions that evoke hard-edge painting, modernist design, and textile production. Crowner’s patchwork construction of panels of raw and painted canvas references craft traditions, such as quilting, sewing, and collage. “It’s a way of creating form by joining material,” Crowner says of her process, which she uses to bring more tactility to the medium. “They are really objects more than paintings.”[2] N. Dash’s monochromatic, stacked canvases encapsulate the artist’s tactile engagement with the world. Dash layers gesso, paint, and graphite over adobe—hand-collected in New Mexico—to create textural surfaces that accentuate the natural cracks, ripples, and imperfections of the material underneath. Beveled at the edges, these paintings pivot between two and three dimensions, and acknowledge their material’s historical significance in creating structure. Sam Moyer’s newly created Coenties Slip, Spencertown, and Rye, all 2018, reference three New York locations where Kelly lived and worked throughout his career. Moyer fuses painted canvas and reclaimed fragments of granite, marble, and limestone—stones used in capacities ranging from classical sculpture to kitchen design—into color field abstractions that address ideas of labor, luxury, and beauty. Julia Rommel incorporates physical traces of construction into paintings that layer process, color, and elements of chance. Geometry, ridges, and breaks in monochromatic planes are the result of the artist repeatedly stretching, painting, un-stretching, and re-stretching linen canvas on differently-scaled bars. Rommel’s The Unbelievers, 2016, is directly inspired by Kelly’s black and white photography, and employs a similar strategy of high-contrast, angular shapes that accentuate architectural forms. Erin Shirreff explores the possibilities of representing three-dimensional objects through photography, painting, sculpture, and video. Shirreff’s sculpture Catalogue, 21 parts, 2016, is comprised of handmade cylinders, arches, irregular blocks, and a variety of other shapes, assembled en masse to create a compact still-life. The artist photographs the sculpture’s individual components and prints them in large-scale format; this shift in scale and medium recasts intimate objects as monumental, architectural portraits. Sarah Crowner (b. 1974) is an artist living and working in Brooklyn, NY. Crowner received a BA from the University of California, Santa Cruz, CA, in 1999, studied at the Ecole Nationale Superieure des Beaux Arts, Paris, France, in 2002, and earned a MFA from Hunter College City University of New York, New York, NY, in 2002. She has been the subject of solo exhibitions, including at Casey Kaplan, New York, NY (2018) (forthcoming); Sarah Crowner/Tutsi Baskets, Galerie Nordenhake, Stockholm, Sweden (2016); Plastic Memory, Simon Lee Gallery, London, United Kingdom (2016); Beetle in the Leaves, MASS MoCA, North Adams, MA (2016); among others. Her works have been included in major group exhibitions, including Invitation Exhibition, American Academy of Arts and Letters, New York, NY (2018) (forthcoming); Hog’s Curve, Halsey McKay, New York, NY (2018) (forthcoming); 5KV / 5 Years of Art and Design in Kvalitá? Gallery, Kvalitá? Gallery, Prague, Czech Republic (2017); Für Barbara, Hall Art Foundation, Derneburg, Germany (2017); among others. Crowner has been the subject of articles and reviews in Art in America, Artforum, Frieze, Modern Painters, The New York Times, Vogue, among others. N. Dash (b. 1980) is an artist living and working in Brooklyn, NY, and New Mexico. Dash received a BA from New York University, New York, NY, in 2003, and a MFA from Columbia University, New York, NY, in 2010. She has been the subject of solo exhibitions, including at Zeno X Gallery, Antwerp, Belgium (2018) (forthcoming); Fondazione Giuliani, Rome, Italy (2017); Casey Kaplan, New York, NY (2016); Mehdi Chouakri, Berlin, Germany (2015); among others. Her works have been included in numerous group exhibitions, including Generations Female Artist in Dialogue, Sammlung Goetz, Berlin, Germany (2018); The Margulies Collection at the Warehouse, Miami, FL (2018); N. Dash | Virginia Overton | B. Wurtz (Form, Content, Place), Maisterravalbuena, Lisbon, Portugal (2017); Heartbreak Hotel, Invisible Exports, New York, NY (2017); among others. Dash has been the subject of articles and reviews in Art in America, Artforum, Artsy, Frieze, The New York Times, among others. Sam Moyer (b. 1983) is an artist living and working in Brooklyn, NY. Moyer received a BFA from the Corcoran College of Art and Design, Washington, D.C., in 2005, and a MFA from the Yale School of Art, New Haven, CT, in 2007. She has been the subject of solo exhibitions, including WIDE WAKE, Sean Kelly Gallery, New York, NY (2017); Brick Window, 56 Henry, New York, NY (2017); MGM, JOAN Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (2017); among others. Her works have been included in numerous solo exhibitions, including EDIFICE, COMPLEX, VISIONARRY, STRUCTURE, Sean Kelly, New York, NY (2018); Crooked Bazaar, Proyectos Monclova, Mexico City, Mexico (2017); Drawing Island, The Journal Gallery, Brooklyn, NY (2017); New Ruins, American University, Washington, D.C. (2017): among others. Moyer has been the subject of articles and reviews in Architectural Digest, Art in America, Artsy, Cultured, T Magazine, The New York Times, Vulture, The Wall Street Journal, among others. Julia Rommel (b. 1980) is an artist living and working in Brooklyn, NY. Rommel received a BS from the University of Richmond, Richmond, VA, in 2002, and a MFA from The American University, Washington, D.C., in 2005. She has been the subject of solo & two-person exhibitions, including Stay-at-Home, Matthew Cerletty & Julia Rommel, Standard, Oslo, Norway (2017); Man Alive, Bureau, New York, NY (2016); A Cheesecake With Your Name On It, Overduin & Co., Los Angeles, CA (2016); Two Italians, Six Lifeguards, The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum, Ridgefield, CT (2015); among others. Her works have been included in numerous group exhibitions, including Milwaukee Collects, Milwaukee Art Museum, Milwaukee, WI (2017); Zombie Formalism, ca. 1970/2016, Mitchell Algus Gallery, New York, NY (2016); The Congregation, Jack Hanley Gallery, New York, NY (2016); among others. Rommel has been the subject of articles and reviews in Art in America, Artforum, The Brooklyn Rail, New York Magazine, Mousse Magazine, among others. Erin Shirreff (b. 1975) is an artist living in New York, NY. Shirreff received a BFA in Visual Arts from the University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia, in 1998, and a MFA in Sculpture from the Yale University School of Art, New Haven, CT, in 2005. She has been the subject of solo exhibitions, including Halves and Wholes, Kunsthalle Basel, Basel, Switzerland (2016); Institute of Contemporary Art/Boston, Boston, MA (2015); Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, NY (2015); Arm’s Length, Sikkema Jenkins & Co., New York, NY (2015); among others. Her works have been included in numerous group exhibitions, including You Are Looking at Something That Never Occurred, Zubludowicz Collection, United Kingdom (2017); Gray Matters, Wexner Art Center, Columbus, OH (2017); MOMENTA/Biennale de L’image: Erin Shirreff—Concrete Buildings, Darling Foundry, Montreal, Canada (2017); L’image voiée, Fondazione Prada, Milan, Italy (2016); among others. Shirreff has been the subject of articles and reviews in Architectural Digest, Art in America, Artforum, ArtReview, Frieze, The New Yorker, The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, among others. [1] Wilmes, Ulrich. “Black and White.” Ellsworth Kelly: Black & White, Berlin: Hatje Cantz, 2012. [2] Mendelsohn, Meredith. “Artist Crowner finds beauty in both shapes and the spaces in between.” Architectural Digest, April 11, 2016.
Martha Jungwirth
Martha Jungwirth
Vienna - Albertinaplatz 1
until 03-06-2018

Martha Jungwirth? The artist Martha Jungwirth is receiving her first solo presentation at the ALBERTINA Museum. Individual key works, as well as groups of works presented as series, afford a fascinating look into the wide-ranging oeuvre of this Viennese painter, who was born in 1940. Jungwirth alternates constantly between abstract and figurative painting from her vantage point at the interface between the two. This exhibition spans a temporal arc from early masterpieces to her most recent output, which is being publicly presented here for the first time. Since her beginnings as an artist, Jungwirth has valued paper as a medium for paintings that include numerous large-format watercolours. Her works also stand out for their unique colour combinations, which serve to convey her highly sensitive perception of reality.  

Martha Jungwirth? The artist Martha Jungwirth is receiving her first solo presentation at the ALBERTINA Museum. Individual key works, as well as groups of works presented as series, afford a fascinating look into the wide-ranging oeuvre of this Viennese painter, who was born in 1940. Jungwirth alternates constantly between abstract and figurative painting from her vantage point at the interface between the two. This exhibition spans a temporal arc from early masterpieces to her most recent output, which is being publicly presented here for the first time. Since her beginnings as an artist, Jungwirth has valued paper as a medium for paintings that include numerous large-format watercolours. Her works also stand out for their unique colour combinations, which serve to convey her highly sensitive perception of reality.  
Vik Muniz
Vik Muniz
Vienna - Prinz Eugen-Strae 27
until 17-06-2018

Vik Muniz – In-sight Telling a story in an intimate, covert, often encrypted way, the back of each painting is distinct: owners add their labels, exhibitions are noted, and customs stamps bear witness to the often long journeys experienced by the works. The question of what is literally behind a painting is closely linked to the question of what art really is. The headlining artist Vik Muniz, who lives in New York and Rio de Janeiro, has dedicated himself to investigating the reverse sides, or the versos, of famous paintings, and produces three-dimensional, faithful reproductions of them. They are replicas of the most important works of art history that leave open the question of original versus copy. This intervention in the Upper Belvedere is the artist’s first major solo exhibition in Vienna. Muniz’s reproductions in his Verso series are presented together with important works from the museum’s collection. Among Muniz’s replicas are the reverse sides of da Vinci's Mona Lisa, van Gogh's Starry Night, Vermeer’s Girl with the Pearl Earring, Fabritius’s The Goldfinch, Rembrandt’s The Anatomy Lesson of Dr Nicolaes Tulp, and Picasso’s Les Demoiselles d'Avignon.   For this project, Gustav Klimt's Kiss and Egon Schiele's The Embrace, two principal works from the Belvedere, have been added to Muniz's series of masterpieces.

Vik Muniz – In-sight Telling a story in an intimate, covert, often encrypted way, the back of each painting is distinct: owners add their labels, exhibitions are noted, and customs stamps bear witness to the often long journeys experienced by the works. The question of what is literally behind a painting is closely linked to the question of what art really is. The headlining artist Vik Muniz, who lives in New York and Rio de Janeiro, has dedicated himself to investigating the reverse sides, or the versos, of famous paintings, and produces three-dimensional, faithful reproductions of them. They are replicas of the most important works of art history that leave open the question of original versus copy. This intervention in the Upper Belvedere is the artist’s first major solo exhibition in Vienna. Muniz’s reproductions in his Verso series are presented together with important works from the museum’s collection. Among Muniz’s replicas are the reverse sides of da Vinci's Mona Lisa, van Gogh's Starry Night, Vermeer’s Girl with the Pearl Earring, Fabritius’s The Goldfinch, Rembrandt’s The Anatomy Lesson of Dr Nicolaes Tulp, and Picasso’s Les Demoiselles d'Avignon.   For this project, Gustav Klimt's Kiss and Egon Schiele's The Embrace, two principal works from the Belvedere, have been added to Muniz's series of masterpieces.
Sebastian Jefford
Sebastian Jefford
Vienna - Wassergasse 14
until 28-04-2018

Sebastian Jefford – Procrustean Flatulence Gianni Manhattan is pleased to present Procrustean Flatulence, Sebastian Jefford's first solo show with the gallery. Accompanying the exhibition is the second publication released by Gianni Manhattan Publishing, Sebastian Jefford's short story - In the City. "In The City, there was a law that dominated its entire existence. If a citizen needed to enter any dwelling or building, whether for work or any other reason, be it personal or private, the citizen was required to witness its entire construction, beginning to end. And if they were born after the construction of said building, or had missed it due to the fact you were witnessing a different (re)construction that day, the citizen would have to make an application to the council to have it demolished, or rather, taken apart. If approved they were then required to witness the entire process of its reconstruction before they could enter that building. Once observed from top to bottom (which was obviously an incredibly time-consuming activity), the citizen could visit that building as many times as they needed to, for the rest of their life." – Excerpt from "In The City" Sebastian Jefford, born 1991 in Swansea, Wales; lives and works in London. Recent and upcoming exhibitions include V22 Young London, London (Spring 2018); The Sleeping Procession, CASS Sculpture Foundation; RA Schools Degree Show, Royal Academy of Arts, London (2017); A Rose Is Without a 'Why'. It Blooms Because It Blooms, curated by Sean Steadman, Carl Freedman, London; Modest Villa Immense Versailles, co-curated with Rebecca Ackroyd, Kinman, London; Bloomberg New Contemporaries, The Bluecoat, Liverpool + ICA (2016), London; Qwaypurlake, Hauser & Wirth Somerset, Bruton (2015)

Sebastian Jefford – Procrustean Flatulence Gianni Manhattan is pleased to present Procrustean Flatulence, Sebastian Jefford's first solo show with the gallery. Accompanying the exhibition is the second publication released by Gianni Manhattan Publishing, Sebastian Jefford's short story - In the City. "In The City, there was a law that dominated its entire existence. If a citizen needed to enter any dwelling or building, whether for work or any other reason, be it personal or private, the citizen was required to witness its entire construction, beginning to end. And if they were born after the construction of said building, or had missed it due to the fact you were witnessing a different (re)construction that day, the citizen would have to make an application to the council to have it demolished, or rather, taken apart. If approved they were then required to witness the entire process of its reconstruction before they could enter that building. Once observed from top to bottom (which was obviously an incredibly time-consuming activity), the citizen could visit that building as many times as they needed to, for the rest of their life." – Excerpt from "In The City" Sebastian Jefford, born 1991 in Swansea, Wales; lives and works in London. Recent and upcoming exhibitions include V22 Young London, London (Spring 2018); The Sleeping Procession, CASS Sculpture Foundation; RA Schools Degree Show, Royal Academy of Arts, London (2017); A Rose Is Without a 'Why'. It Blooms Because It Blooms, curated by Sean Steadman, Carl Freedman, London; Modest Villa Immense Versailles, co-curated with Rebecca Ackroyd, Kinman, London; Bloomberg New Contemporaries, The Bluecoat, Liverpool + ICA (2016), London; Qwaypurlake, Hauser & Wirth Somerset, Bruton (2015)
Lisa Holzer
Lisa Holzer
Vienna - Seilerstdte 2/26
until 05-05-2018

Lisa Holzer – I Come in You  

Lisa Holzer – I Come in You  
Art Into Life!
Art Into Life!
Vienna - Museumsplatz 1
until 24-06-2018

Art Into Life! Collector Wolfgang Hahn and the 60s Anouj, Ar­man, Ay-O, Joseph Beuys, Ge­orge Brecht, Michael Buthe, John Cage, John Cham­ber­lain, Chris­to, Bruce Con­n­er, Philip Corn­er, Merce Cun­n­ing­ham, Gérard De­schamps, Jim Dine, François Dufrêne, Öyvind Fahl­ström, Robert Fil­liou, Sam Gil­li­am, Lud­wig Gose­witz, Nan­cy Graves, Ray­mond Hains, Al Hansen, Dick Hig­gins, Al­lan Kaprow / Ka­sia Fu­dakows­ki, Al­i­son Knowles, Arthur Køpcke, Gary Kuehn, Yay­oi Kusa­ma, Bar­ry Le Va, Boris Lurie, Gor­don Mat­ta-Clark, Claes Ol­d­en­burg, Yoko Ono, Nam June Paik, Lil Pi­card, Klaus Rinke, Mim­mo Rotel­la, Di­eter Roth,  Ni­ki de Saint Phalle, Gün­ter Sa­ree, Ge­orge Se­gal, Daniel Spo­er­ri, Paul Thek, Jean Tingue­ly, Ur­su­la, Franz Er­hard Walther, Robert Watts, Lawrence Wein­er, H.C. West­er­mann, Ste­fan Wew­er­ka, Jac­ques de la Vil­leglé, Wolf Vostell, Gil J. Wol­man In the 1960s, a new avantgarde movement emerged in the Rhineland. It was to break down the parameters of artistic disciplines, with an new internationally networked generation of artists coming from nouveau réalisme, Fluxus, and new music. One of the first collectors of their works was Wolfgang Hahn, chief restorer at the Wallraf Richartz Museum in Cologne. In 1978 his collection of around 400 works came to Vienna, where it is now one of mumok’s key collections. In the exhibition Art into Life! Collector Wolfgang Hahn and the 60s, mumok now presents the major works from the Hahn Collection. The slogan “art into life” was taken literally in the 1960s. The aim was to overcome an obsolete tradition in painting, using everyday objects, texts, and musical scores instead of creating classical painting and sculpture. All the works shown in this exhibition, beginning with Door by Joseph Beuys and ending with Wolf Vostell‘s action objects, are indebted to this expanded concept of art. Happenings, actions, and performances of new music are well represented, with works by Allan Kaprow, Nam June Paik, and John Cage. Prominent works of Pop art by George Segal, Claes Oldenburg, and Tom Wesselman enter into dialogue with material images from nouveau réalisme, which is a focus of the Hahn Collection, including works by Daniel Spoerri, Jean Tinguely, and Niki de Saint Phalle.

Art Into Life! Collector Wolfgang Hahn and the 60s Anouj, Ar­man, Ay-O, Joseph Beuys, Ge­orge Brecht, Michael Buthe, John Cage, John Cham­ber­lain, Chris­to, Bruce Con­n­er, Philip Corn­er, Merce Cun­n­ing­ham, Gérard De­schamps, Jim Dine, François Dufrêne, Öyvind Fahl­ström, Robert Fil­liou, Sam Gil­li­am, Lud­wig Gose­witz, Nan­cy Graves, Ray­mond Hains, Al Hansen, Dick Hig­gins, Al­lan Kaprow / Ka­sia Fu­dakows­ki, Al­i­son Knowles, Arthur Køpcke, Gary Kuehn, Yay­oi Kusa­ma, Bar­ry Le Va, Boris Lurie, Gor­don Mat­ta-Clark, Claes Ol­d­en­burg, Yoko Ono, Nam June Paik, Lil Pi­card, Klaus Rinke, Mim­mo Rotel­la, Di­eter Roth,  Ni­ki de Saint Phalle, Gün­ter Sa­ree, Ge­orge Se­gal, Daniel Spo­er­ri, Paul Thek, Jean Tingue­ly, Ur­su­la, Franz Er­hard Walther, Robert Watts, Lawrence Wein­er, H.C. West­er­mann, Ste­fan Wew­er­ka, Jac­ques de la Vil­leglé, Wolf Vostell, Gil J. Wol­man In the 1960s, a new avantgarde movement emerged in the Rhineland. It was to break down the parameters of artistic disciplines, with an new internationally networked generation of artists coming from nouveau réalisme, Fluxus, and new music. One of the first collectors of their works was Wolfgang Hahn, chief restorer at the Wallraf Richartz Museum in Cologne. In 1978 his collection of around 400 works came to Vienna, where it is now one of mumok’s key collections. In the exhibition Art into Life! Collector Wolfgang Hahn and the 60s, mumok now presents the major works from the Hahn Collection. The slogan “art into life” was taken literally in the 1960s. The aim was to overcome an obsolete tradition in painting, using everyday objects, texts, and musical scores instead of creating classical painting and sculpture. All the works shown in this exhibition, beginning with Door by Joseph Beuys and ending with Wolf Vostell‘s action objects, are indebted to this expanded concept of art. Happenings, actions, and performances of new music are well represented, with works by Allan Kaprow, Nam June Paik, and John Cage. Prominent works of Pop art by George Segal, Claes Oldenburg, and Tom Wesselman enter into dialogue with material images from nouveau réalisme, which is a focus of the Hahn Collection, including works by Daniel Spoerri, Jean Tinguely, and Niki de Saint Phalle.
Armin Boehm
Armin Boehm
Zrich - Zahnradstrasse 21
until 19-05-2018

Armin Boehm – Involution  

Armin Boehm – Involution  
Collection on Display – Oscar Tuazon, Banks Violette
Collection on Display ? Oscar Tuazon, Banks Violette
Zrich - Lwenbru Areal, Limmatstrasse 270
until 13-05-2018

Collection on Display – Oscar Tuazon, Banks Violette The exhibition format Collection on Display showcases selected works from the collection of the Migros Museum für Gegenwartskunst. This year’s focus is on expansive sculptures and installations, a genre that figures prominently in the collection. In part produced specifically for temporary ex- hibitions in the museum’s galleries, a large number of these generously dimensioned works were acquired for the collection. They exemplify the close conjunction between exhibition programming and collection building that has been characteristic of the museum’s activities since its founding in 1996. This year’s Collection on Display presentations will be devoted to a small number of selected artists, affording their sprawling works ample space. Starting in February, two sculptural installations by Banks Violette (b. 1973, USA) and two works of sculpture by Oscar Tuazon (b. 1975, USA) will be on view on the museum’s ground floor, complemented by an audio installation for which Tuazon collaborated with Vito Acconci (1940–2017, USA). The second presentation, scheduled to open in late August, will bring a premiere: the entire upstairs gallery will be reserved for Pipilotti Rist (b. 1962, Switzerland) and her complex video installation Show a Leg (2001). Collection on Display is curated by Nadia Schneider Willen (Collection Curator, Migros Museum für Gegenwartskunst).  

Collection on Display – Oscar Tuazon, Banks Violette The exhibition format Collection on Display showcases selected works from the collection of the Migros Museum für Gegenwartskunst. This year’s focus is on expansive sculptures and installations, a genre that figures prominently in the collection. In part produced specifically for temporary ex- hibitions in the museum’s galleries, a large number of these generously dimensioned works were acquired for the collection. They exemplify the close conjunction between exhibition programming and collection building that has been characteristic of the museum’s activities since its founding in 1996. This year’s Collection on Display presentations will be devoted to a small number of selected artists, affording their sprawling works ample space. Starting in February, two sculptural installations by Banks Violette (b. 1973, USA) and two works of sculpture by Oscar Tuazon (b. 1975, USA) will be on view on the museum’s ground floor, complemented by an audio installation for which Tuazon collaborated with Vito Acconci (1940–2017, USA). The second presentation, scheduled to open in late August, will bring a premiere: the entire upstairs gallery will be reserved for Pipilotti Rist (b. 1962, Switzerland) and her complex video installation Show a Leg (2001). Collection on Display is curated by Nadia Schneider Willen (Collection Curator, Migros Museum für Gegenwartskunst).  
Lena Henke
Lena Henke
Zrich - Lwenbru Areal, Limmatstrasse 270
until 13-05-2018

Lena Henke – An Idea of Late German Sculpture To the People of New York, 2018 The heart of Lena Henke’s exhibition at the Kunsthalle Zu?rich is a machine. With a winch set into the walls of the exhibition space, large pieces of chain mail are pulled through the room. However, this material made of aluminum rings does not protect virile bodies in close combat. Instead, it glides across the surfaces of sculptures, sometimes setting them in motion. The armor does not protect the surfaces from the outside, and instead opens up the possibility of a cool touch, which it itself paradoxically performs. With one exception, all these works, like objects in a scientific experiment, are doubled in the exhibition, and the exhibition itself is divided into two halves by a wall. In one part, the artworks are points in a constantly changing relation that becomes part of the machine-made relationships between the objects. The visitor is forced into this relationship as he moves through it. On the other side of the wall, in the second part, the same pieces are brought into an opposite state: rather than designing a possible environment with objects in motion, here they stand motionless, as images, on a shelf. They are in a situation of waiting: the past of the storage room. Thus, the exhibition is divided into two extremes: the archive and a topological machine that activates the space. Both poles are contrary to the normal function of the institution, which otherwise shows objects but neither makes it possible to use them nor to see their archiving. The sculptures shown twice in the exhibition attest to precisely this contrast. On one side, they seem abstract: peculiar postmodern mishaps between Surrealism and Minimal Art. This also indicates the historical period that these pieces refer to: twentieth- century art, articulated as a complex exchange between Europe and the United States. On the other side, the sheer size of the sculptures—which, based on Lena Henke’s height, was determined with the help of Le Corbusier’s Modulor—presents them to the visitors as a human counterpart. The hollow core of these figures is sprayed with a soft rubber granulate normally used for flooring on athletic fields or playgrounds. With their bare materiality, Henke’s objects surely travesty the verticality and solidity of The series Geburt und Familie shown on the partition between the two exhibition spaces continues this complex reference to the history of sculpture. Eight modernist works from the collection of the Skulpturenmuseum Glaskasten Marl were used by Henke in 2014 as protagonists in a comic book. It tells of the unplanned pregnancy of a teenager who herself is an object made of bronze. Instead of ending the history of modern sculpture with patricide, the story involves these objects in a cycle of organic and ultimately feminine reproduction. The comic book mixes modernism with structures that it itself vehemently opposed: narrative, memory, psychological depth, and humor. In 2016, Henke translated the two-dimensional figures from the photomontage back into three-dimensional silicone versions. At the same time, the facial features of the sculptures were superimposed with those of her own family members. The narrative was thus fictionally interwoven with Henke’s own biography. Henke has now integrated these pieces into a new family for the exhibition at the Kunsthalle Zu?rich: a prosthesis body from a painting by Giorgio de Chirico formed out of architectural elements that now serve as shelves on which the sculptures—which, like parasites, continually find new hosts—can show themselves again. Thus, the poison administered by Henke does not simply destroy the ideologies of modernism: it induces a new, polymorphically perverse afterlife for sculpture. Simon Baier sculpture. Like Lynda Benglis’s latex works from the 1970s, which were poured on the floor, Henke’s artworks thus absorb horizontality as a negation of sculpture. Unlike such historical examples, however, they do not seem to want to transcend or destroy its identity. They do not take part in any illusions of progress. The figure of Aldo Rossi’s Sleeping Elephant emblematically takes this tension to the extreme: its form can be read both as an animal lying on the ground and as an overturned sequence of architectural arches. The elephant’s sleep is simultaneously the allegorical sleep of modern sculpture itself and the dream of its utopian realization as architecture. Another form rolls through the room as Ays?e Erkmen’s Endless Knee. As two entangled legs concealing the crotch, it turns to stand up to the masculine dream and suspends it for a time.

Lena Henke – An Idea of Late German Sculpture To the People of New York, 2018 The heart of Lena Henke’s exhibition at the Kunsthalle Zu?rich is a machine. With a winch set into the walls of the exhibition space, large pieces of chain mail are pulled through the room. However, this material made of aluminum rings does not protect virile bodies in close combat. Instead, it glides across the surfaces of sculptures, sometimes setting them in motion. The armor does not protect the surfaces from the outside, and instead opens up the possibility of a cool touch, which it itself paradoxically performs. With one exception, all these works, like objects in a scientific experiment, are doubled in the exhibition, and the exhibition itself is divided into two halves by a wall. In one part, the artworks are points in a constantly changing relation that becomes part of the machine-made relationships between the objects. The visitor is forced into this relationship as he moves through it. On the other side of the wall, in the second part, the same pieces are brought into an opposite state: rather than designing a possible environment with objects in motion, here they stand motionless, as images, on a shelf. They are in a situation of waiting: the past of the storage room. Thus, the exhibition is divided into two extremes: the archive and a topological machine that activates the space. Both poles are contrary to the normal function of the institution, which otherwise shows objects but neither makes it possible to use them nor to see their archiving. The sculptures shown twice in the exhibition attest to precisely this contrast. On one side, they seem abstract: peculiar postmodern mishaps between Surrealism and Minimal Art. This also indicates the historical period that these pieces refer to: twentieth- century art, articulated as a complex exchange between Europe and the United States. On the other side, the sheer size of the sculptures—which, based on Lena Henke’s height, was determined with the help of Le Corbusier’s Modulor—presents them to the visitors as a human counterpart. The hollow core of these figures is sprayed with a soft rubber granulate normally used for flooring on athletic fields or playgrounds. With their bare materiality, Henke’s objects surely travesty the verticality and solidity of The series Geburt und Familie shown on the partition between the two exhibition spaces continues this complex reference to the history of sculpture. Eight modernist works from the collection of the Skulpturenmuseum Glaskasten Marl were used by Henke in 2014 as protagonists in a comic book. It tells of the unplanned pregnancy of a teenager who herself is an object made of bronze. Instead of ending the history of modern sculpture with patricide, the story involves these objects in a cycle of organic and ultimately feminine reproduction. The comic book mixes modernism with structures that it itself vehemently opposed: narrative, memory, psychological depth, and humor. In 2016, Henke translated the two-dimensional figures from the photomontage back into three-dimensional silicone versions. At the same time, the facial features of the sculptures were superimposed with those of her own family members. The narrative was thus fictionally interwoven with Henke’s own biography. Henke has now integrated these pieces into a new family for the exhibition at the Kunsthalle Zu?rich: a prosthesis body from a painting by Giorgio de Chirico formed out of architectural elements that now serve as shelves on which the sculptures—which, like parasites, continually find new hosts—can show themselves again. Thus, the poison administered by Henke does not simply destroy the ideologies of modernism: it induces a new, polymorphically perverse afterlife for sculpture. Simon Baier sculpture. Like Lynda Benglis’s latex works from the 1970s, which were poured on the floor, Henke’s artworks thus absorb horizontality as a negation of sculpture. Unlike such historical examples, however, they do not seem to want to transcend or destroy its identity. They do not take part in any illusions of progress. The figure of Aldo Rossi’s Sleeping Elephant emblematically takes this tension to the extreme: its form can be read both as an animal lying on the ground and as an overturned sequence of architectural arches. The elephant’s sleep is simultaneously the allegorical sleep of modern sculpture itself and the dream of its utopian realization as architecture. Another form rolls through the room as Ays?e Erkmen’s Endless Knee. As two entangled legs concealing the crotch, it turns to stand up to the masculine dream and suspends it for a time.