Art feed

Curated by Exhibitionary

Mark Handforth
Mark Handforth
London - 50-58 Vyner Street
until 14-09-2019

Mark Handforth - Trash Can Candles Mark Handforth’s sculptures imbue the almost-invisible features of our lives – street lamps, road signs, fluorescent lights and fire hydrants – with formal properties that make them strange, larger than life and enigmatically off-kilter. They are meticulously crafted, but deliberately imperfect, often containing a wry humour and poetry in their references and arrangement in space.  Handforth’s objects collage elements together in alluring compositions; an early sculpture of a Vespa is covered in burning candles and becomes an altar; a street lamp is twisted into the shape of a five-pointed star, and a piece of drift wood is cast in concrete and juxtaposed with fluorescent lights. His works have both a sense of distortion and of the manipulation of the urban landscape — literally tied in knots — but also, often an archaicand poetic sensibility.  For his exhibition at Modern Art’s Vyner Street gallery Handforth has produced seven new sculptures. Dominating the space on the ground floor, a large, fourteen-foot, freestanding sculpture of folded aluminum beams delineates, in muscular calligraphy, an ad-hoc number four. Its harlequin colours and staggered light fixtures tensed, as if holding a breath- both monumental and momentary. Adjacent, a battered beach trashcan barely contains a mass of colourful, burning candles whose wax flows through its metal grid and hardens across the floor, transforming an everyday object into a shrine set for vigil— a slow, endless performance. Elsewhere in the space a large, glazed, stainless-steel arc, a rainbow, leans casually against the wall. This painterly gesture draws the architecture of a landscape, yet its materiality is unmistakably industrial. In the first-floor gallery,FOG/SMOKE,an immense undulating, disjointed diamond hangs from the ceiling. Coated with intensely reflective highway signage foil, it is like some quotidian heavenly body, emitting light and floating, refracting from the curving prismatic surfaces.  Handforth’s work is concerned with the ways in which culture shows itself through signs and symbols in the urban landscape, especially through the poetry and possibility of an entropic renewal as seen through the mangled, broken elements of the built environment that reflect the social sentiments and failing dreams of contemporary Western society.

Mark Handforth - Trash Can Candles Mark Handforth’s sculptures imbue the almost-invisible features of our lives – street lamps, road signs, fluorescent lights and fire hydrants – with formal properties that make them strange, larger than life and enigmatically off-kilter. They are meticulously crafted, but deliberately imperfect, often containing a wry humour and poetry in their references and arrangement in space.  Handforth’s objects collage elements together in alluring compositions; an early sculpture of a Vespa is covered in burning candles and becomes an altar; a street lamp is twisted into the shape of a five-pointed star, and a piece of drift wood is cast in concrete and juxtaposed with fluorescent lights. His works have both a sense of distortion and of the manipulation of the urban landscape — literally tied in knots — but also, often an archaicand poetic sensibility.  For his exhibition at Modern Art’s Vyner Street gallery Handforth has produced seven new sculptures. Dominating the space on the ground floor, a large, fourteen-foot, freestanding sculpture of folded aluminum beams delineates, in muscular calligraphy, an ad-hoc number four. Its harlequin colours and staggered light fixtures tensed, as if holding a breath- both monumental and momentary. Adjacent, a battered beach trashcan barely contains a mass of colourful, burning candles whose wax flows through its metal grid and hardens across the floor, transforming an everyday object into a shrine set for vigil— a slow, endless performance. Elsewhere in the space a large, glazed, stainless-steel arc, a rainbow, leans casually against the wall. This painterly gesture draws the architecture of a landscape, yet its materiality is unmistakably industrial. In the first-floor gallery,FOG/SMOKE,an immense undulating, disjointed diamond hangs from the ceiling. Coated with intensely reflective highway signage foil, it is like some quotidian heavenly body, emitting light and floating, refracting from the curving prismatic surfaces.  Handforth’s work is concerned with the ways in which culture shows itself through signs and symbols in the urban landscape, especially through the poetry and possibility of an entropic renewal as seen through the mangled, broken elements of the built environment that reflect the social sentiments and failing dreams of contemporary Western society.
Michael Craig-Martin
Michael Craig-Martin
London - 6-24 Britannia Street
until 03-08-2019

Michael Craig-Martin – Sculpture Among the leading generation of British Conceptual artists, Craig-Martin probes the relationship between objects and images, perception and reality, harnessing the unique human capacity to conjure ideas through symbols and signs. Since his time at Yale University in the 1960s—where he studied alongside artists such as Chuck Close, Brice Marden, and Richard Serra—Craig-Martin has been building on a specific vocabulary of imagery based on common, everyday items. His early work used real objects to explore the nature of art and representation, illusion and belief. In the late 1970s he turned to making images of objects, beginning with simple and precise line drawings that have remained the foundation of his work. In the ’90s, he began a series of large, site-specific painted installations that explored the physical and imaginary relationships between viewer, object, and space. Subsequently, he turned to painting, developing his hallmark style of bold black outlines surrounded by flat planes of bright, vivid colors. This exhibition includes six new monumental sculptures in a medium that Craig-Martin has been exploring since 2011: powder-coated steel forms that describe everyday objects and appear like line drawings in the air. The first series was shown in the gardens of Chatsworth House in Derbyshire, England, in 2014, where the sculptures were sunk into the soil of the grounds. The new works in this exhibition depict various items both timeless—as in Fork and Knife (green and purple) (2019)—and distinctly contemporary, as in Headphones (magenta) (2019). These elegant, large sculptures leave it up to viewers to attach their own personal narrative histories to the objects portrayed. Standing between three and four meters high, the installation allows visitors to walk under and around the structures, which are discreetly sunk into the concrete floor of the gallery. The sculptures’ lines are suspended in the air at a grand scale that is both implausible with respect to the objects they signify and unexpected within the serene context of the gallery. The forms have an instant sensory, intellectual, and emotional impact; produced with exacting draftsmanship, they are placed so as to explore spatial relationships through the juxtaposition of color. Their colors—vibrant shades denoted in the works’ titles—have a synthetic, man-made quality like that of Pop art and of the objects themselves. Slyly evocative in their simplicity, Craig-Martin’s sculptures evoke the tangible experiences of everyday life while speaking to the symbolic potency and conceptual power that the represented objects hold.  

Michael Craig-Martin – Sculpture Among the leading generation of British Conceptual artists, Craig-Martin probes the relationship between objects and images, perception and reality, harnessing the unique human capacity to conjure ideas through symbols and signs. Since his time at Yale University in the 1960s—where he studied alongside artists such as Chuck Close, Brice Marden, and Richard Serra—Craig-Martin has been building on a specific vocabulary of imagery based on common, everyday items. His early work used real objects to explore the nature of art and representation, illusion and belief. In the late 1970s he turned to making images of objects, beginning with simple and precise line drawings that have remained the foundation of his work. In the ’90s, he began a series of large, site-specific painted installations that explored the physical and imaginary relationships between viewer, object, and space. Subsequently, he turned to painting, developing his hallmark style of bold black outlines surrounded by flat planes of bright, vivid colors. This exhibition includes six new monumental sculptures in a medium that Craig-Martin has been exploring since 2011: powder-coated steel forms that describe everyday objects and appear like line drawings in the air. The first series was shown in the gardens of Chatsworth House in Derbyshire, England, in 2014, where the sculptures were sunk into the soil of the grounds. The new works in this exhibition depict various items both timeless—as in Fork and Knife (green and purple) (2019)—and distinctly contemporary, as in Headphones (magenta) (2019). These elegant, large sculptures leave it up to viewers to attach their own personal narrative histories to the objects portrayed. Standing between three and four meters high, the installation allows visitors to walk under and around the structures, which are discreetly sunk into the concrete floor of the gallery. The sculptures’ lines are suspended in the air at a grand scale that is both implausible with respect to the objects they signify and unexpected within the serene context of the gallery. The forms have an instant sensory, intellectual, and emotional impact; produced with exacting draftsmanship, they are placed so as to explore spatial relationships through the juxtaposition of color. Their colors—vibrant shades denoted in the works’ titles—have a synthetic, man-made quality like that of Pop art and of the objects themselves. Slyly evocative in their simplicity, Craig-Martin’s sculptures evoke the tangible experiences of everyday life while speaking to the symbolic potency and conceptual power that the represented objects hold.  
My Head Is a Haunted House
My Head Is a Haunted House
London - 62 Kingly St
until 10-08-2019

My Head Is a Haunted House Ed Atkins, Sue de Beer, Larry Clark, Matt Copson, Alex da Corte, Tom Friedman, Robert Gober, Richard Hawkins, Lonnie Holley, Cameron Jamie, Mike Kelley, Tetsumi Kudo, Daniel Lopatin and Nate Boyce, Mary Ellen Mark, Megan Marrin, Sam McKinniss, Marianna Simnett, Haim Steinbach, Claude Wampler When I was a weird little kid in suburbia obsessed with horror of all kinds, my grandfather (who isn't alive anymore) built me a haunted house. I could pretend I was a ghost or a bat or a werewolf crying blood over a cardboard tombstone. It was a make-believe world where my imagination could get deranged and it was magic. My Head is a Haunted House grew out of that hallucinogenic memory and its psychic hold on me. Natürlich, a ton of other spooky stuff now surrounds it in the graveyard of my brain, which fed into the show, too. Some major, uh, 'presences' as an exorcist might call them: the psychopath Buffalo Bill's lair from The Silence of the Lambs, Tim Burton's Beetlejuice (remember how Winona finds the door to the Land of the Dead in the attic?), watching VHS rips of MTV Cribs on YouTube, the Red Room from Twin Peaks. The ectoplasm holding all this stuff together is how it deforms home into… something else: the weird interior. Mental space becomes physical space. Look what happened to those dreamy teens in A Nightmare on Elm Street. The haunted house was the first virtual world I inhabited. I was thinking a lot about how movies like Under the Skin, Beauty & the Beast, or Hereditary mutate conventional storytelling into this creepy video game experience where you wander around in a hi-def space looking for clues. I got obsessed with the thought of an art show that did the same kind of sinister environmental simulation. The whole thing is happening in a freaky zone inside somebody's head, faraway from reality, which often sucks. The contents manifest all kinds of wicked stuff about memory, fear, the strangeness of being inside a body, and what it means to be (or not to be) at home. Meanwhile, My Head is a Haunted House's dark counterpart, Dracula's Wedding at RODEO, is a different night of the living dead. The two shows are twins: they relate in kind of a trippy and secretive way. Some artists reappear at each one, like the bogeymen who come back in slasher movie sequels, too monstrous to be killed. But the real, demonic reason for this double act will only be revealed upon my death. If you're lost inside a haunted house, does that make you a ghost? There's no place like home.

My Head Is a Haunted House Ed Atkins, Sue de Beer, Larry Clark, Matt Copson, Alex da Corte, Tom Friedman, Robert Gober, Richard Hawkins, Lonnie Holley, Cameron Jamie, Mike Kelley, Tetsumi Kudo, Daniel Lopatin and Nate Boyce, Mary Ellen Mark, Megan Marrin, Sam McKinniss, Marianna Simnett, Haim Steinbach, Claude Wampler When I was a weird little kid in suburbia obsessed with horror of all kinds, my grandfather (who isn't alive anymore) built me a haunted house. I could pretend I was a ghost or a bat or a werewolf crying blood over a cardboard tombstone. It was a make-believe world where my imagination could get deranged and it was magic. My Head is a Haunted House grew out of that hallucinogenic memory and its psychic hold on me. Natürlich, a ton of other spooky stuff now surrounds it in the graveyard of my brain, which fed into the show, too. Some major, uh, 'presences' as an exorcist might call them: the psychopath Buffalo Bill's lair from The Silence of the Lambs, Tim Burton's Beetlejuice (remember how Winona finds the door to the Land of the Dead in the attic?), watching VHS rips of MTV Cribs on YouTube, the Red Room from Twin Peaks. The ectoplasm holding all this stuff together is how it deforms home into… something else: the weird interior. Mental space becomes physical space. Look what happened to those dreamy teens in A Nightmare on Elm Street. The haunted house was the first virtual world I inhabited. I was thinking a lot about how movies like Under the Skin, Beauty & the Beast, or Hereditary mutate conventional storytelling into this creepy video game experience where you wander around in a hi-def space looking for clues. I got obsessed with the thought of an art show that did the same kind of sinister environmental simulation. The whole thing is happening in a freaky zone inside somebody's head, faraway from reality, which often sucks. The contents manifest all kinds of wicked stuff about memory, fear, the strangeness of being inside a body, and what it means to be (or not to be) at home. Meanwhile, My Head is a Haunted House's dark counterpart, Dracula's Wedding at RODEO, is a different night of the living dead. The two shows are twins: they relate in kind of a trippy and secretive way. Some artists reappear at each one, like the bogeymen who come back in slasher movie sequels, too monstrous to be killed. But the real, demonic reason for this double act will only be revealed upon my death. If you're lost inside a haunted house, does that make you a ghost? There's no place like home.
Cindy Sherman
Cindy Sherman
London - St Martin?s Place
until 15-09-2019

Cindy Sherman This major new retrospective will explore the development of Sherman’s work from the mid-1970s to the present day, and will feature around 150 works from international public and private collections, as well as new work never before displayed in a public gallery. Focusing on the artist’s manipulation of her own appearance and her deployment of material derived from a range of cultural sources, including film, advertising and fashion, the exhibition will explore the tension between façade and identity.

Cindy Sherman This major new retrospective will explore the development of Sherman’s work from the mid-1970s to the present day, and will feature around 150 works from international public and private collections, as well as new work never before displayed in a public gallery. Focusing on the artist’s manipulation of her own appearance and her deployment of material derived from a range of cultural sources, including film, advertising and fashion, the exhibition will explore the tension between façade and identity.
Rirkrit Tiravanija
Rirkrit Tiravanija
London - The Mall
until 06-06-2020

Rirkrit Tiravanija – untitled 2019 (the form of the flower is unknown to the seed)   The Institute of Contemporary Arts is proud to present a newly commissioned permanently sited work by Rirkrit Tiravanija.  Tiravanija is known for a practice that overturns traditional exhibition formats in favour of social interactions through the sharing of everyday activities such as cooking, eating and reading. Creating environments that reject the primacy of the art object, and instead focus on use value and the bringing of people together through simple acts and environments of communal care, Tiravanija’s work challenges expectations around labour and virtuosity.  Open to the public and situated within the ICA’s lower bar, untitled 2019 (the form of the flower is unknown to the seed) comprises a sake bar with communal seating and tables set within a painted sunrise and sunset. Purpose-built for the ICA, the work includes crockery hand-crafted in Tiravanija’s Chiang Mai studio and lighting created in collaboration with artist Rafael Domenech. untitled 2019 (the form of the flower is unknown to the seed) marks Tiravanija’s return to the ICA, following his participation in the landmark exhibition Real Time in 1993.   untitled 2019 (the form of the flower is unknown to the seed) can be visited during regular ICA opening hours.    The sake bar will be open for evenings run by Rochelle Canteen on 7–9, 14, 21, and 28 June 2019 from 6 pm to midnight.

Rirkrit Tiravanija – untitled 2019 (the form of the flower is unknown to the seed)   The Institute of Contemporary Arts is proud to present a newly commissioned permanently sited work by Rirkrit Tiravanija.  Tiravanija is known for a practice that overturns traditional exhibition formats in favour of social interactions through the sharing of everyday activities such as cooking, eating and reading. Creating environments that reject the primacy of the art object, and instead focus on use value and the bringing of people together through simple acts and environments of communal care, Tiravanija’s work challenges expectations around labour and virtuosity.  Open to the public and situated within the ICA’s lower bar, untitled 2019 (the form of the flower is unknown to the seed) comprises a sake bar with communal seating and tables set within a painted sunrise and sunset. Purpose-built for the ICA, the work includes crockery hand-crafted in Tiravanija’s Chiang Mai studio and lighting created in collaboration with artist Rafael Domenech. untitled 2019 (the form of the flower is unknown to the seed) marks Tiravanija’s return to the ICA, following his participation in the landmark exhibition Real Time in 1993.   untitled 2019 (the form of the flower is unknown to the seed) can be visited during regular ICA opening hours.    The sake bar will be open for evenings run by Rochelle Canteen on 7–9, 14, 21, and 28 June 2019 from 6 pm to midnight.
Raymond Hains
Raymond Hains
London - 41 Dover Street, 1st floor
until 25-07-2019

Raymond Hains – Infinite Conversations Galerie Max Hetzler is pleased to announce Raymond Hains: Infnite Conversations, the frst solo exhibition in the UK of Hains’ iconic torn posters, palissades and macintoshages. Widely regarded as one of the most important and challenging post-war French artists, Raymond Hains (1926 - 2005) is often associated with Nouveau Re?alisme, as well as Lettrisme and Situationnisme. He is principally known for his avant-garde torn poster works, begun in 1949 with Jacques Villegle?. Art historian Benjamin Buchloh has pointed out that competition with painting was somewhat inevitable in the mid twentieth-century, at the time Hains started his artistic career. Indeed notions recently developed by the New York School, such as ‘all-over’, gesture and abstract expressionism can arguably also be seen in the torn poster works, parodied by Hains’ deferral to the city’s ‘collective consciousness’, the destructive tearing actions of passers-by. Collected from the street, these ‘de?collages’ of found advertisements, event signs and political messages, were chosen for their bold colours and fragments of images or phrases. Infnite Conversations shows examples of both ‘afches lace?re?es’ where the poster fragments were carefully extracted and relaid onto canvas or paper, and the later ‘to?les’ in which Hains extracted all or part of the original galvanised steel backing. Included in the exhibition is a large-scale torn poster work from the Dauphin series on its original metal placard. Realised in 1990, the title is derived from the French company that manufactured the billboards. Measuring 300 x 400 cm, the standard dimensions for advertising boards of the time and also the size of ffties abstract expressionist paintings. During the late 1950s Hains became interested in the symbolic function of construction-site barriers: objects which concealed and detracted from the environment beyond them, whilst simultaneously pointing out where one’s attention should lie. As with the torn posters, the objects were pre-existing, altered and authored by the destruction and grafti of anonymous passers-by. Two distinct examples of palissades are included in the exhibition. Hanging on the wall like a painting, the smaller Palissade de Beaubourg, 1976, is a portion of fencing selected from the slats surrounding the Centre Pompidou’s building site, its prominence of pattern an ironic nod to the bold striped abstraction of painters working at the time. In contrast, the wooden Untitled (Palissade), 1974, stands on the foor, recalling its original use, blurring the boundaries between sculpture, object and painting. Drawn once more to linguistic play and coincidence, the artist made a wry connection between ‘la palissade’ [the barrier, fence] and the phrase ‘lapalissade’, meaning a comical obvious truth or tautology. Begun in 1998, the macintoshages are collages of digital images arranged using playful associations on a Mackintosh computer screen. Combining references drawn from the artist’s meticulously collected personal archive, a screenshot was made of the results and printed onto aluminium. Language clues appear in the form of fle names, encouraging the viewer to map connections between the juxtaposed elements. The fatness of these printed works contrasts with the dimensional quality of the images within them, from textured tapestries and paintings, to graftied street surfaces. In their exploration of how we interact with visual resources in a digitised society, the macintoshages demonstrate Hains’ prescience and his ongoing relevance to a subsequent generation of artists. Throughout Raymond Hains: Infnite Conversations, the artist’s fascination with the density of the visual world is highlighted through the various layers embedded in the works, from the continually overlaid poster fragments, to the overlapping and infnitely connected images in the macintoshages. In 2017, a large room in the Central Pavilion of the 57th Venice Biennale Vive Arte Viva was devoted to Hains’ work and was listed as a leading highlight of the biennale. Torn poster works by Hains were exhibited alongside works by Gerhard Richer and Joseph Beuys, among others, in an exhibition curated by British artist Tacita Dean in 2005. An Aside: Selected by Tacita Dean was organised by the Hayward Gallery in collaboration with Camden Arts Centre, and subsequently toured to the Fruitmarket Gallery (Edinburgh), and Swansea Festival of Music and the Arts. A large-scale torn poster work from the ‘Dauphin’ series is currently on view at the Fondation Louis Vuitton (Paris), in the exhibitionThe Collection of the Fondation. A Vision for Painting, until 26 August 2019. Raymond Hains (b. 1926, Saint-Brieuc; d. 2005, Paris) participated in major international exhibitions such as Documenta X, Kassel (1997), Paris-Paris, Centre Pompidou, Paris, (1982), Documenta IV, Kassel, (1968) and The Art of Assemblage MoMA, New York, (1961). His frst survey exhibition in a public institution took place in 1976 in Paris. 

Raymond Hains – Infinite Conversations Galerie Max Hetzler is pleased to announce Raymond Hains: Infnite Conversations, the frst solo exhibition in the UK of Hains’ iconic torn posters, palissades and macintoshages. Widely regarded as one of the most important and challenging post-war French artists, Raymond Hains (1926 - 2005) is often associated with Nouveau Re?alisme, as well as Lettrisme and Situationnisme. He is principally known for his avant-garde torn poster works, begun in 1949 with Jacques Villegle?. Art historian Benjamin Buchloh has pointed out that competition with painting was somewhat inevitable in the mid twentieth-century, at the time Hains started his artistic career. Indeed notions recently developed by the New York School, such as ‘all-over’, gesture and abstract expressionism can arguably also be seen in the torn poster works, parodied by Hains’ deferral to the city’s ‘collective consciousness’, the destructive tearing actions of passers-by. Collected from the street, these ‘de?collages’ of found advertisements, event signs and political messages, were chosen for their bold colours and fragments of images or phrases. Infnite Conversations shows examples of both ‘afches lace?re?es’ where the poster fragments were carefully extracted and relaid onto canvas or paper, and the later ‘to?les’ in which Hains extracted all or part of the original galvanised steel backing. Included in the exhibition is a large-scale torn poster work from the Dauphin series on its original metal placard. Realised in 1990, the title is derived from the French company that manufactured the billboards. Measuring 300 x 400 cm, the standard dimensions for advertising boards of the time and also the size of ffties abstract expressionist paintings. During the late 1950s Hains became interested in the symbolic function of construction-site barriers: objects which concealed and detracted from the environment beyond them, whilst simultaneously pointing out where one’s attention should lie. As with the torn posters, the objects were pre-existing, altered and authored by the destruction and grafti of anonymous passers-by. Two distinct examples of palissades are included in the exhibition. Hanging on the wall like a painting, the smaller Palissade de Beaubourg, 1976, is a portion of fencing selected from the slats surrounding the Centre Pompidou’s building site, its prominence of pattern an ironic nod to the bold striped abstraction of painters working at the time. In contrast, the wooden Untitled (Palissade), 1974, stands on the foor, recalling its original use, blurring the boundaries between sculpture, object and painting. Drawn once more to linguistic play and coincidence, the artist made a wry connection between ‘la palissade’ [the barrier, fence] and the phrase ‘lapalissade’, meaning a comical obvious truth or tautology. Begun in 1998, the macintoshages are collages of digital images arranged using playful associations on a Mackintosh computer screen. Combining references drawn from the artist’s meticulously collected personal archive, a screenshot was made of the results and printed onto aluminium. Language clues appear in the form of fle names, encouraging the viewer to map connections between the juxtaposed elements. The fatness of these printed works contrasts with the dimensional quality of the images within them, from textured tapestries and paintings, to graftied street surfaces. In their exploration of how we interact with visual resources in a digitised society, the macintoshages demonstrate Hains’ prescience and his ongoing relevance to a subsequent generation of artists. Throughout Raymond Hains: Infnite Conversations, the artist’s fascination with the density of the visual world is highlighted through the various layers embedded in the works, from the continually overlaid poster fragments, to the overlapping and infnitely connected images in the macintoshages. In 2017, a large room in the Central Pavilion of the 57th Venice Biennale Vive Arte Viva was devoted to Hains’ work and was listed as a leading highlight of the biennale. Torn poster works by Hains were exhibited alongside works by Gerhard Richer and Joseph Beuys, among others, in an exhibition curated by British artist Tacita Dean in 2005. An Aside: Selected by Tacita Dean was organised by the Hayward Gallery in collaboration with Camden Arts Centre, and subsequently toured to the Fruitmarket Gallery (Edinburgh), and Swansea Festival of Music and the Arts. A large-scale torn poster work from the ‘Dauphin’ series is currently on view at the Fondation Louis Vuitton (Paris), in the exhibitionThe Collection of the Fondation. A Vision for Painting, until 26 August 2019. Raymond Hains (b. 1926, Saint-Brieuc; d. 2005, Paris) participated in major international exhibitions such as Documenta X, Kassel (1997), Paris-Paris, Centre Pompidou, Paris, (1982), Documenta IV, Kassel, (1968) and The Art of Assemblage MoMA, New York, (1961). His frst survey exhibition in a public institution took place in 1976 in Paris. 
Serpentine Pavilion 2019
Serpentine Pavilion 2019
London - Kensington Gardens
until 06-10-2019

Serpentine Pavilion 2019 Designed by Junya Ishigami The Japanese architect Junya Ishigami, celebrated for his experimental structures that interpret traditional architectural conventions and reflect natural phenomena, has been selected to design the Serpentine Pavilion 2019. Ishigami’s design takes inspiration from roofs, the most common architectural feature used around the world. The design of the 2019 Serpentine Pavilion is made by arranging slates to create a single canopy roof that appears to emerge from the ground of the surrounding park. Within, the interior of the Pavilion is an enclosed cave-like space, a refuge for contemplation. For Ishigami, the Pavilion articulates his ‘free space’ philosophy in which he seeks harmony between man-made structures and those that already exist in nature. Describing his design, Ishigami said: ‘My design for the Pavilion plays with our perspectives of the built environment against the backdrop of a natural landscape, emphasising a natural and organic feel as though it had grown out of the lawn, resembling a hill made out of rocks. This is an attempt to supplement traditional architecture with modern methodologies and concepts, to create in this place an expanse of scenery like never seen before. Possessing the weighty presence of slate roofs seen around the world, and simultaneously appearing so light it could blow away in the breeze, the cluster of scattered rock levitates, like a billowing piece of fabric.’   Junya Ishigami (b. 1974) worked as an architect at SANAA before founding the prize-winning Junya Ishigami + Associates in 2004. Winner of the Golden Lion award at the Venice Biennale of Architecture in 2010, he was the subject of a major and critically acclaimed solo exhibition at the Fondation Cartier pour l’art contemporain in 2018 that is traveling to the Power Station of art in Shanghai later this year. He is known for designs with dream-like qualities that incorporate the natural world, such as landscapes, forests and clouds, in an architectural practice that places humankind as part of nature. He is the nineteenth architect to accept the invitation to design a temporary Pavilion on the Serpentine Gallery’s lawn in Kensington Gardens. This pioneering commission, which began in 2000 with Zaha Hadid, has presented the first UK structures by some of the biggest names in international architecture. In recent years it has grown into a highly-anticipated showcase for emerging talent, from Frida Escobedo of Mexico to Francis Kéré of Burkina Faso and Bjarke Ingels of Denmark, whose 2016 Pavilion was the most visited architectural and design exhibition in the world.

Serpentine Pavilion 2019 Designed by Junya Ishigami The Japanese architect Junya Ishigami, celebrated for his experimental structures that interpret traditional architectural conventions and reflect natural phenomena, has been selected to design the Serpentine Pavilion 2019. Ishigami’s design takes inspiration from roofs, the most common architectural feature used around the world. The design of the 2019 Serpentine Pavilion is made by arranging slates to create a single canopy roof that appears to emerge from the ground of the surrounding park. Within, the interior of the Pavilion is an enclosed cave-like space, a refuge for contemplation. For Ishigami, the Pavilion articulates his ‘free space’ philosophy in which he seeks harmony between man-made structures and those that already exist in nature. Describing his design, Ishigami said: ‘My design for the Pavilion plays with our perspectives of the built environment against the backdrop of a natural landscape, emphasising a natural and organic feel as though it had grown out of the lawn, resembling a hill made out of rocks. This is an attempt to supplement traditional architecture with modern methodologies and concepts, to create in this place an expanse of scenery like never seen before. Possessing the weighty presence of slate roofs seen around the world, and simultaneously appearing so light it could blow away in the breeze, the cluster of scattered rock levitates, like a billowing piece of fabric.’   Junya Ishigami (b. 1974) worked as an architect at SANAA before founding the prize-winning Junya Ishigami + Associates in 2004. Winner of the Golden Lion award at the Venice Biennale of Architecture in 2010, he was the subject of a major and critically acclaimed solo exhibition at the Fondation Cartier pour l’art contemporain in 2018 that is traveling to the Power Station of art in Shanghai later this year. He is known for designs with dream-like qualities that incorporate the natural world, such as landscapes, forests and clouds, in an architectural practice that places humankind as part of nature. He is the nineteenth architect to accept the invitation to design a temporary Pavilion on the Serpentine Gallery’s lawn in Kensington Gardens. This pioneering commission, which began in 2000 with Zaha Hadid, has presented the first UK structures by some of the biggest names in international architecture. In recent years it has grown into a highly-anticipated showcase for emerging talent, from Frida Escobedo of Mexico to Francis Kéré of Burkina Faso and Bjarke Ingels of Denmark, whose 2016 Pavilion was the most visited architectural and design exhibition in the world.
DIS
DIS
London - Dressage Court | 58 - 64 Three Colts Lane
until 21-09-2019

DIS – A Good Crisis  

DIS – A Good Crisis  
Amalia Pica
Amalia Pica
London - 43 Museum Street
until 28-07-2019

Amalia Pica – While inside For While inside, Amalia Pica turns her attention to the exchange with other species. As part of her long-standing interest in processes of communication, Pica chooses to focus on the material culture that is created in labs and zoos to aid the process of observation, be it scientific or recreational. The exhibition takes place across the gallery ?s two venues Herald St and Museum St. Herald St is occupied by Yerkish, 2018, a work originally commissioned as part of the artist ?s solo show at Institute of Modern Art, Brisbane; Perth Institute of Contemporary Art; and shown at the latest edition of the Shanghai Biennial. The installation is based on a graphic keyboard lexicon invented by scientists to investigate the communication skills of great apes. Consisting of over 200 paper collages on wooden panels that hang from a structure that resembles an enlarged version of the books that primatologists bring to the field when taking the primates outdoors.  

Amalia Pica – While inside For While inside, Amalia Pica turns her attention to the exchange with other species. As part of her long-standing interest in processes of communication, Pica chooses to focus on the material culture that is created in labs and zoos to aid the process of observation, be it scientific or recreational. The exhibition takes place across the gallery ?s two venues Herald St and Museum St. Herald St is occupied by Yerkish, 2018, a work originally commissioned as part of the artist ?s solo show at Institute of Modern Art, Brisbane; Perth Institute of Contemporary Art; and shown at the latest edition of the Shanghai Biennial. The installation is based on a graphic keyboard lexicon invented by scientists to investigate the communication skills of great apes. Consisting of over 200 paper collages on wooden panels that hang from a structure that resembles an enlarged version of the books that primatologists bring to the field when taking the primates outdoors.  
Subversive Suburbia
Subversive Suburbia
Miami - 8397 NE 2nd Avenue
until 27-07-2019

Subversive Suburbia Jeremy Chandler, Generic Art Solutions (GAS), Kate MacDowell, Scot Sothern Lush plants, manicured lawns, and perfect families. The American dream. Except when it’s not. Dysfunctional families, crazy house pets, and lurking beings- animal, vegetable, and mineral. All of the unseen and unknown. This is the story of Subversive Suburbia. Told through the creative lens of 4 artists and artists’ collaboratives, each artist has a unique and topical story to tell.

Subversive Suburbia Jeremy Chandler, Generic Art Solutions (GAS), Kate MacDowell, Scot Sothern Lush plants, manicured lawns, and perfect families. The American dream. Except when it’s not. Dysfunctional families, crazy house pets, and lurking beings- animal, vegetable, and mineral. All of the unseen and unknown. This is the story of Subversive Suburbia. Told through the creative lens of 4 artists and artists’ collaboratives, each artist has a unique and topical story to tell.
Ettore Sottsass
Ettore Sottsass
Miami - 61 NE 41st Street
until 06-10-2019

Ettore Sottsass and the Social Factory Ettore Sottsass and the Social Factory surveys the work of Italian architect and designer Ettore Sottsass (b. 1917, Innsbruck, Austria; d. 2007, Milan), focusing on four decades of his monumental furniture and ceramics, conceptual photography, and speculative drawings. A seminal figure of the postwar period, Sottsass reimagined modern life through design, profoundly influencing his peers and generations of cultural producers. While Sottsass has been frequently touted for his contributions to design and architecture, Ettore Sottsass and the Social Factory investigates his polymathic work through its social and economic contexts, from Italy’s postwar prosperity to the utopianism and social upheaval of the 1960s and ’70s to the conservative turn of the 1980s and the renewed progressive currents of the turn of the millennium. Encompassing more than 50 works organized in four chronological sections, the exhibition presents significant objects that convey the designer’s evolving visions of society. Included in the exhibition are Sottsass’s “Superboxes,” functional cabinets that challenge the traditional scale and role of furniture in order to defy consumerist trends. Ceramic totems of the late 1960s combine sacred architectural forms and pop culture artifacts, while utopian drawings and photographs imagine a world free from tedious work. The exhibition also highlights outstanding examples of Sottsass’s objects for the famed Memphis group he founded in the 1980s, and the baroque and monumental furniture he produced until his passing.  

Ettore Sottsass and the Social Factory Ettore Sottsass and the Social Factory surveys the work of Italian architect and designer Ettore Sottsass (b. 1917, Innsbruck, Austria; d. 2007, Milan), focusing on four decades of his monumental furniture and ceramics, conceptual photography, and speculative drawings. A seminal figure of the postwar period, Sottsass reimagined modern life through design, profoundly influencing his peers and generations of cultural producers. While Sottsass has been frequently touted for his contributions to design and architecture, Ettore Sottsass and the Social Factory investigates his polymathic work through its social and economic contexts, from Italy’s postwar prosperity to the utopianism and social upheaval of the 1960s and ’70s to the conservative turn of the 1980s and the renewed progressive currents of the turn of the millennium. Encompassing more than 50 works organized in four chronological sections, the exhibition presents significant objects that convey the designer’s evolving visions of society. Included in the exhibition are Sottsass’s “Superboxes,” functional cabinets that challenge the traditional scale and role of furniture in order to defy consumerist trends. Ceramic totems of the late 1960s combine sacred architectural forms and pop culture artifacts, while utopian drawings and photographs imagine a world free from tedious work. The exhibition also highlights outstanding examples of Sottsass’s objects for the famed Memphis group he founded in the 1980s, and the baroque and monumental furniture he produced until his passing.  
Call-and-response
Call-and-response
Miami - 2100 Collins Avenue
until 27-07-2019

Call-and-response. Recent Acquisitions from the Collection Jennifer Allora & Guillermo Calzadilla, Sandford Biggers, Jeppe Hein, Mika Rottenberg, Lawrence Weiner Call–and-response exemplifies a vocal, often lyrical framework in which an initial statement is made, then responded to by another person or group. The format can be found across contexts, from athletic team chants and public demonstrations, to religious rituals and musical compositions. At its core, the term indicates a form of communication, an exchange of ideas between individuals, systems and institutions. This selection of newly acquired works interprets call–and-response visually to describe the creative process, in which artists produce work that creates dialogue with formal, social, political and environmental stimuli. The Bass, Miami Beach’s contemporary art museum, is committed to exhibiting and collecting work by international contemporary artists that define, explore and question our place and time. These artists’ projects take many forms, from major installations to public sculpture, that span generations and media. The following works on view reflect the artists’ diverse approaches to creative discourse, from manipulating language, appropriating pop culture and current events, to negotiating with form and public space.  

Call-and-response. Recent Acquisitions from the Collection Jennifer Allora & Guillermo Calzadilla, Sandford Biggers, Jeppe Hein, Mika Rottenberg, Lawrence Weiner Call–and-response exemplifies a vocal, often lyrical framework in which an initial statement is made, then responded to by another person or group. The format can be found across contexts, from athletic team chants and public demonstrations, to religious rituals and musical compositions. At its core, the term indicates a form of communication, an exchange of ideas between individuals, systems and institutions. This selection of newly acquired works interprets call–and-response visually to describe the creative process, in which artists produce work that creates dialogue with formal, social, political and environmental stimuli. The Bass, Miami Beach’s contemporary art museum, is committed to exhibiting and collecting work by international contemporary artists that define, explore and question our place and time. These artists’ projects take many forms, from major installations to public sculpture, that span generations and media. The following works on view reflect the artists’ diverse approaches to creative discourse, from manipulating language, appropriating pop culture and current events, to negotiating with form and public space.  
Beatriz González
Beatriz Gonzlez
Miami - 1103 Biscayne Blvd
until 01-09-2019

Beatriz González – A Retrospective Beatriz González: A Retrospective will be the first large-scale U.S. retrospective of the work of Bogotá-based artist Beatriz González (b. 1938, Bucaramanga, Colombia). At 81, González is not only an internationally celebrated Colombian artist but also one of the few extant representatives of the so-called “radical women” generation from Latin America. Despite the fact that it spans over six decades of intensive research, her groundbreaking production is, for the most part, unfamiliar to audiences in the United States. One of the most comprehensive displays of the artist’s work to date, this retrospective seeks to remedy this lag by presenting approximately 150 works, with examples from the early 1960s through the present, all of which embody the full scope of González’s oeuvre.

Beatriz González – A Retrospective Beatriz González: A Retrospective will be the first large-scale U.S. retrospective of the work of Bogotá-based artist Beatriz González (b. 1938, Bucaramanga, Colombia). At 81, González is not only an internationally celebrated Colombian artist but also one of the few extant representatives of the so-called “radical women” generation from Latin America. Despite the fact that it spans over six decades of intensive research, her groundbreaking production is, for the most part, unfamiliar to audiences in the United States. One of the most comprehensive displays of the artist’s work to date, this retrospective seeks to remedy this lag by presenting approximately 150 works, with examples from the early 1960s through the present, all of which embody the full scope of González’s oeuvre.
Simone Leigh
Simone Leigh
New York - 1071 Fifth Avenue
until 27-10-2019

he Hugo Boss Prize 2018: Simone Leigh – Loophole of Retreat Loophole of Retreat presents a new body of work by Simone Leigh, winner of the Hugo Boss Prize 2018, an award for significant achievement in contemporary art. The exhibition’s title is drawn from the writings of Harriet Jacobs (1813–1897), a formerly enslaved abolitionist who pseudonymously published an account of her life. It refers to the grueling seven years she spent hiding from her master in a tiny crawl space beneath the rafters of her grandmother’s home—an act of astonishing fortitude that carved out a space of sanctuary and autonomy in defiance of an unjust reality. Over the course of a career that spans sculpture, video, and social practice, Leigh has continuously and insistently centered the black female experience. Her forms, rendered in materials such as ceramic, raffia, and bronze, unify a timeless beauty with valences that are both deeply personal and piercingly political. Summoning the ancient archetype of the female nude and inflecting it with vernacular and folk traditions, the artist merges the human body with domestic vessels or architectural elements, evoking the labors of care and protection that have historically fallen to women. Encompassing a suite of sculptures and a sound installation, as well as a text by the renowned historian Saidiya Hartman, Loophole of Retreat explores narratives of communal nurture, resilience, and resistance.

he Hugo Boss Prize 2018: Simone Leigh – Loophole of Retreat Loophole of Retreat presents a new body of work by Simone Leigh, winner of the Hugo Boss Prize 2018, an award for significant achievement in contemporary art. The exhibition’s title is drawn from the writings of Harriet Jacobs (1813–1897), a formerly enslaved abolitionist who pseudonymously published an account of her life. It refers to the grueling seven years she spent hiding from her master in a tiny crawl space beneath the rafters of her grandmother’s home—an act of astonishing fortitude that carved out a space of sanctuary and autonomy in defiance of an unjust reality. Over the course of a career that spans sculpture, video, and social practice, Leigh has continuously and insistently centered the black female experience. Her forms, rendered in materials such as ceramic, raffia, and bronze, unify a timeless beauty with valences that are both deeply personal and piercingly political. Summoning the ancient archetype of the female nude and inflecting it with vernacular and folk traditions, the artist merges the human body with domestic vessels or architectural elements, evoking the labors of care and protection that have historically fallen to women. Encompassing a suite of sculptures and a sound installation, as well as a text by the renowned historian Saidiya Hartman, Loophole of Retreat explores narratives of communal nurture, resilience, and resistance.
Mika Rottenberg
Mika Rottenberg
New York - 235 Bowery
until 15-09-2019

Mika Rottenberg – Easy Pieces Employing absurdist satire to address the critical issues of our time, Rottenberg creates videos and installations that offer subversive allegories for contemporary life. Her works interweave documentary elements and fiction, and often feature protagonists who work in factory-like settings to manufacture goods ranging from cultured pearls (NoNoseKnows, 2015) to the millions of brightly colored plastic wholesale items sold in Chinese superstores (Cosmic Generator, 2017). The exhibition presents several of her recent video installations and kinetic sculptures, and premieres a new video installation, Spaghetti Blockchain (2019), that explores ancient and new ideas about materialism and considers how humans both comprise and manipulate matter. Together, the works in the exhibition trace central themes in Rottenberg’s oeuvre, including labor, technology, distance, energy, and the interconnectedness of the mechanical and the corporeal.

Mika Rottenberg – Easy Pieces Employing absurdist satire to address the critical issues of our time, Rottenberg creates videos and installations that offer subversive allegories for contemporary life. Her works interweave documentary elements and fiction, and often feature protagonists who work in factory-like settings to manufacture goods ranging from cultured pearls (NoNoseKnows, 2015) to the millions of brightly colored plastic wholesale items sold in Chinese superstores (Cosmic Generator, 2017). The exhibition presents several of her recent video installations and kinetic sculptures, and premieres a new video installation, Spaghetti Blockchain (2019), that explores ancient and new ideas about materialism and considers how humans both comprise and manipulate matter. Together, the works in the exhibition trace central themes in Rottenberg’s oeuvre, including labor, technology, distance, energy, and the interconnectedness of the mechanical and the corporeal.
Jonathan Monk
Jonathan Monk
New York - 121 W 27th Street
until 27-07-2019

Jonathan Monk – Restaurant Drawings This show brings together over 120 drawings on restaurant receipts, produced over the last year. Each receipt portrays a hand rendered artwork, and is priced at the cost of the meal. The series began in 2015 when Monk and his family relocated temporarily from Berlin to Rome. Communal meals became habitual as the family sought to familiarize themselves with the new city. Attracted to the elegant, hand-written paper receipts commonly used in restaurants in Italy, Monk began to collect the bills received at the end of his family meals. Once home, he would draw directly onto the receipts, a recurring practice that has continued to this day. Monk's imagery is culled from both a personal and canonicalized engagement with more recent Western art history. Appropriations of seminal artworks, often immediately recognizable, by artists such as Donald Judd, On Kawara, David Hammonds, Sol Lewitt, Christopher Wool, Barbara Kruger and Alighiero Boetti, are rendered in graphite, watercolor and pastel, directly onto the thermal or paper receipts. Once completed, Monk photographs the drawing with his iPhone and posts the image on his Instagram account @monkpictures, where his followers have the opportunity to purchase the artwork for the price of the meal recorded on the receipt (typically ranging between €2 - €250). From Instagram, the works sell rapidly, with Monk’s most attentive followers staking claim on their desired drawing within seconds. The artworks are generally allocated on a first-come-first-serve basis; a gesture of inclusivity in an otherwise exclusionary art market. The drawings offer a diaristic glimpse inside the daily life of the artist through the logging of his meals. While the meals themselves are a public and often communal act, their visibility and distribution has remained mostly digital. Rather than a critique of social media, Monk manipulates Instagram as a platform through which he can engage directly with his patrons, reminiscent of the democratic utopia once promised by the internet as a potential space for unregulated exchange. The speed and accessibility of the interaction are fundamental to the conceptual underpinnings of the work. Radically affordable in comparison to Monk’s primary market value, the pricing structure of the drawings parodies the frivolity of the art market at large, where secondary prices for artworks can soar to the precipice of absurdity.  This exhibition will provide most viewers their first opportunity to see the restaurant drawings in person, rather than mediated through the screen of a phone; a chance for the pace of viewing to more closely mirror the leisure of dining out. Seen up-close, the drawings reveal the gestural intimacy of the artist’s hand. Many contain slight creases, torn corners, or curling edges that expose their vulnerability and the ephemeral nature of receipt paper. The framed works line the gallery walls at a shared horizontal axis, in an installation reminiscent of a minimalist template; a uniform repetition which calls to mind the formal strategies of artists such as Walter de Maria, Bernd and Hilla Becher, or Ellsworth Kelly. The reiterations of particular artworks - Boetti grids, Judd stacks and Lewitt cubes - suggests the pervasiveness of certain art historical influences, many of whom Monk grew up absorbing through reproductions in books. This contrast between the digital and manually-reproduced image is fundamental to the artist’s oeuvre, in which multiple references from art history are continually consumed, manipulated, and re-contextualized. The series marks a significant continuation of Monk’s reverent provocation of authorship, ownership and originality.

Jonathan Monk – Restaurant Drawings This show brings together over 120 drawings on restaurant receipts, produced over the last year. Each receipt portrays a hand rendered artwork, and is priced at the cost of the meal. The series began in 2015 when Monk and his family relocated temporarily from Berlin to Rome. Communal meals became habitual as the family sought to familiarize themselves with the new city. Attracted to the elegant, hand-written paper receipts commonly used in restaurants in Italy, Monk began to collect the bills received at the end of his family meals. Once home, he would draw directly onto the receipts, a recurring practice that has continued to this day. Monk's imagery is culled from both a personal and canonicalized engagement with more recent Western art history. Appropriations of seminal artworks, often immediately recognizable, by artists such as Donald Judd, On Kawara, David Hammonds, Sol Lewitt, Christopher Wool, Barbara Kruger and Alighiero Boetti, are rendered in graphite, watercolor and pastel, directly onto the thermal or paper receipts. Once completed, Monk photographs the drawing with his iPhone and posts the image on his Instagram account @monkpictures, where his followers have the opportunity to purchase the artwork for the price of the meal recorded on the receipt (typically ranging between €2 - €250). From Instagram, the works sell rapidly, with Monk’s most attentive followers staking claim on their desired drawing within seconds. The artworks are generally allocated on a first-come-first-serve basis; a gesture of inclusivity in an otherwise exclusionary art market. The drawings offer a diaristic glimpse inside the daily life of the artist through the logging of his meals. While the meals themselves are a public and often communal act, their visibility and distribution has remained mostly digital. Rather than a critique of social media, Monk manipulates Instagram as a platform through which he can engage directly with his patrons, reminiscent of the democratic utopia once promised by the internet as a potential space for unregulated exchange. The speed and accessibility of the interaction are fundamental to the conceptual underpinnings of the work. Radically affordable in comparison to Monk’s primary market value, the pricing structure of the drawings parodies the frivolity of the art market at large, where secondary prices for artworks can soar to the precipice of absurdity.  This exhibition will provide most viewers their first opportunity to see the restaurant drawings in person, rather than mediated through the screen of a phone; a chance for the pace of viewing to more closely mirror the leisure of dining out. Seen up-close, the drawings reveal the gestural intimacy of the artist’s hand. Many contain slight creases, torn corners, or curling edges that expose their vulnerability and the ephemeral nature of receipt paper. The framed works line the gallery walls at a shared horizontal axis, in an installation reminiscent of a minimalist template; a uniform repetition which calls to mind the formal strategies of artists such as Walter de Maria, Bernd and Hilla Becher, or Ellsworth Kelly. The reiterations of particular artworks - Boetti grids, Judd stacks and Lewitt cubes - suggests the pervasiveness of certain art historical influences, many of whom Monk grew up absorbing through reproductions in books. This contrast between the digital and manually-reproduced image is fundamental to the artist’s oeuvre, in which multiple references from art history are continually consumed, manipulated, and re-contextualized. The series marks a significant continuation of Monk’s reverent provocation of authorship, ownership and originality.
Whitney Biennial 2019
Whitney Biennial 2019
New York - 99 Gansevoort Street
until 22-09-2019

Whitney Biennial 2019 Eddie Arroyo, Korakrit Arunanondchai, Olga Balema, Morgan Bassichis, Blitz Bazawule, Alexandra Bell, Brian Belott, Meriem Bennani, Robert Bittenbender, Lucas Blalock, Garrett Bradley, Milano Chow, Colectivo Los Ingrávidos, Thirza Cuthand, John Edmonds, Nicole Eisenman, Janiva Ellis, Kota Ezawa, Brendan Fernandes, FIERCE and Paper Tiger Television, Marcus Fischer, Forensic Architecture, Ellie Ga, Nicholas Galanin, Sofía Gallisá Muriente, Jeffrey Gibson, Todd Gray, Sam Green, Barbara Hammer, Ilana Harris-Babou, Matthew Angelo Harrison, Curran Hatleberg, Madeline Hollander, Iman Issa, Tomashi Jackson, Steffani Jemison, Adam Khalil, Zack Khalil, and Jackson Polys, Christine Sun Kim, Josh Kline, Autumn Knight, Carolyn Lazard, Maia Ruth Lee, Simone Leigh, Daniel Lind-Ramos, James Luna, Eric N. Mack, Calvin Marcus, Tiona Nekkia McClodden, Troy Michie, Joe Minter, Keegan Monaghan, Caroline Monnet, Darius Clark Monroe, Ragen Moss, Sahra Motalebi, Marlon Mullen, Jeanette Mundt, Wangechi Mutu, Las Nietas de Nonó (Lydela Nonó and Michel Nonó), Jenn Nkiru, Laura Ortman, Jennifer Packer, nibia pastrana santiago, Elle Pérez, Pat Phillips, Gala Porras-Kim, Walter Price, Carissa Rodriguez, Paul Mpagi Sepuya, Heji Shin, Diane Simpson, Martine Syms, Kyle Thurman, Mariana Valencia, Agustina Woodgate Often described as a snapshot of art in the United States, the Biennial brings together work by individuals and collectives in a broad array of mediums. Over the past year and a half—an undeniably intense and polarized time in this country—we made hundreds of studio visits. While we often encountered heightened emotions, they were directed toward thoughtful and productive experimentation, the re-envisioning of self and society, and political and aesthetic strategies for survival. Although much of the work presented here is steeped in sociopolitical concerns, the cumulative effect is open-ended and hopeful. Key issues and approaches emerge across the exhibition: the mining of history as a means to reimagine the present or future; a profound consideration of race, gender, and equity; and explorations of the vulnerability of the body. Concerns for community appear in the content and social engagement of the work and also in the ways that the artists navigate the world. Many of the artists included emphasize the physicality of their materials, whether in sculptures assembled out of found objects, heavily worked paintings, or painstakingly detailed drawings. An emphasis on the artist’s hand suggests a rejection of the digital and the related slick, packaged presentation of the self in favor of more individualized and idiosyncratic work. While we were organizing this exhibition, broader debates in the public sphere surfaced at the Museum, which itself became the site and subject of protest, as it has been throughout its history. Fundamental to the Whitney’s identity is its openness to dialogue, and the conversations that have occurred here and across the country became a productive lens through which to synthesize our own looking, thinking, and self-questioning.  The 2019 Whitney Biennial is organized by Jane Panetta, associate curator, and Rujeko Hockley, assistant curator, with Ramsay Kolber, curatorial project assistant.

Whitney Biennial 2019 Eddie Arroyo, Korakrit Arunanondchai, Olga Balema, Morgan Bassichis, Blitz Bazawule, Alexandra Bell, Brian Belott, Meriem Bennani, Robert Bittenbender, Lucas Blalock, Garrett Bradley, Milano Chow, Colectivo Los Ingrávidos, Thirza Cuthand, John Edmonds, Nicole Eisenman, Janiva Ellis, Kota Ezawa, Brendan Fernandes, FIERCE and Paper Tiger Television, Marcus Fischer, Forensic Architecture, Ellie Ga, Nicholas Galanin, Sofía Gallisá Muriente, Jeffrey Gibson, Todd Gray, Sam Green, Barbara Hammer, Ilana Harris-Babou, Matthew Angelo Harrison, Curran Hatleberg, Madeline Hollander, Iman Issa, Tomashi Jackson, Steffani Jemison, Adam Khalil, Zack Khalil, and Jackson Polys, Christine Sun Kim, Josh Kline, Autumn Knight, Carolyn Lazard, Maia Ruth Lee, Simone Leigh, Daniel Lind-Ramos, James Luna, Eric N. Mack, Calvin Marcus, Tiona Nekkia McClodden, Troy Michie, Joe Minter, Keegan Monaghan, Caroline Monnet, Darius Clark Monroe, Ragen Moss, Sahra Motalebi, Marlon Mullen, Jeanette Mundt, Wangechi Mutu, Las Nietas de Nonó (Lydela Nonó and Michel Nonó), Jenn Nkiru, Laura Ortman, Jennifer Packer, nibia pastrana santiago, Elle Pérez, Pat Phillips, Gala Porras-Kim, Walter Price, Carissa Rodriguez, Paul Mpagi Sepuya, Heji Shin, Diane Simpson, Martine Syms, Kyle Thurman, Mariana Valencia, Agustina Woodgate Often described as a snapshot of art in the United States, the Biennial brings together work by individuals and collectives in a broad array of mediums. Over the past year and a half—an undeniably intense and polarized time in this country—we made hundreds of studio visits. While we often encountered heightened emotions, they were directed toward thoughtful and productive experimentation, the re-envisioning of self and society, and political and aesthetic strategies for survival. Although much of the work presented here is steeped in sociopolitical concerns, the cumulative effect is open-ended and hopeful. Key issues and approaches emerge across the exhibition: the mining of history as a means to reimagine the present or future; a profound consideration of race, gender, and equity; and explorations of the vulnerability of the body. Concerns for community appear in the content and social engagement of the work and also in the ways that the artists navigate the world. Many of the artists included emphasize the physicality of their materials, whether in sculptures assembled out of found objects, heavily worked paintings, or painstakingly detailed drawings. An emphasis on the artist’s hand suggests a rejection of the digital and the related slick, packaged presentation of the self in favor of more individualized and idiosyncratic work. While we were organizing this exhibition, broader debates in the public sphere surfaced at the Museum, which itself became the site and subject of protest, as it has been throughout its history. Fundamental to the Whitney’s identity is its openness to dialogue, and the conversations that have occurred here and across the country became a productive lens through which to synthesize our own looking, thinking, and self-questioning.  The 2019 Whitney Biennial is organized by Jane Panetta, associate curator, and Rujeko Hockley, assistant curator, with Ramsay Kolber, curatorial project assistant.
André Butzer
Andr Butzer
New York - 519 West 24th Street
until 09-08-2019

André Butzer  Metro Pictures presents an exhibition of nine large, vibrant new paintings by artist André Butzer. In a striking reversal from his last exhibition at the gallery, which featured mostly black, largely monochromatic works titled the N-Bilder [pictures], Butzer’s latest paintings employ vivid color and his signature figures. The new works bring to mind motifs and approaches that predate the stark abstraction and distinctive brushwork of his N-Bilder, begun in 2010, though Butzer asserts that everything he does is unified by an exploration of color and that this is a natural continuation of his work. He says, “Nothing was ever not about color. Color is a potency, a fusion. The blacks and light were color, too. I only left things behind in order to reach a limit to return from. I consider myself a colorist.”

André Butzer  Metro Pictures presents an exhibition of nine large, vibrant new paintings by artist André Butzer. In a striking reversal from his last exhibition at the gallery, which featured mostly black, largely monochromatic works titled the N-Bilder [pictures], Butzer’s latest paintings employ vivid color and his signature figures. The new works bring to mind motifs and approaches that predate the stark abstraction and distinctive brushwork of his N-Bilder, begun in 2010, though Butzer asserts that everything he does is unified by an exploration of color and that this is a natural continuation of his work. He says, “Nothing was ever not about color. Color is a potency, a fusion. The blacks and light were color, too. I only left things behind in order to reach a limit to return from. I consider myself a colorist.”
John Edmonds
John Edmonds
New York - 88 Eldridge Street, 5th floor
until 27-07-2019

John Edmonds – Between Pathos & Seduction  

John Edmonds – Between Pathos & Seduction  
En Plein Air
En Plein Air
New York - Tenth Avenue Square
until 31-03-2020

En Plein Air? Ei Arakawa, Firelei Báez, Daniel Buren, Sam Falls, Lubaina Himid, Lara Schnitger, Ryan Sullivan, Vivian Suter En Plein Air is a group exhibition that broadens and challenges historical ideas of outdoor painting. Along the length of the park, the exhibition features newly commissioned artworks . En Plein Air, inspired by the unique site of the High Line, examines and expands the tradition of outdoor painting. The title refers to the mid-19th-century practice of en plein air painting (French for “in the open air”). When pre-mixed paints became readily available in tubes, and thus could be easily transported along with canvases and easels, artists brought their studios outside. The act of painting outdoors became associated with the Impressionist movement, which emphasized capturing nature and the fleeting qualities of light while depicting new perceptual and social experiences accelerated by the Industrial Revolution. The inclination to paint outside was one reaction to the overwhelming transformations of life in urban centers, as nature and cities redefined each other under the pressure of modernization—a history that connects to that of the High Line, a remnant of the industrial era of the neighborhood. The artists in the exhibition expand well beyond the historical plein air lineage. They not only bring painting outside but imagine nature as context, subject, and collaborator. The eight featured artists approach the history, methodologies, and content of outdoor painting from a variety of perspectives. Some of the artists make work exclusively to be shown outside, while others turn nature into both the subject and the medium used to create their paintings. Still others challenge elementary distinctions between nature and the artificial. The High Line is an apt site for the consideration of the importance of landscape painting in our time, as the natural features of the park juxtapose with the artificial scenery of the surrounding billboards, building facades and walls, and variety of advertisements. Through the participation of an international group of artists, En Plein Air challenges the kinds of work traditionally associated with public art—sculptures and murals—by presenting freestanding, outdoor paintings that can be viewed in the round and in dialogue with the surrounding landscapes.  

En Plein Air? Ei Arakawa, Firelei Báez, Daniel Buren, Sam Falls, Lubaina Himid, Lara Schnitger, Ryan Sullivan, Vivian Suter En Plein Air is a group exhibition that broadens and challenges historical ideas of outdoor painting. Along the length of the park, the exhibition features newly commissioned artworks . En Plein Air, inspired by the unique site of the High Line, examines and expands the tradition of outdoor painting. The title refers to the mid-19th-century practice of en plein air painting (French for “in the open air”). When pre-mixed paints became readily available in tubes, and thus could be easily transported along with canvases and easels, artists brought their studios outside. The act of painting outdoors became associated with the Impressionist movement, which emphasized capturing nature and the fleeting qualities of light while depicting new perceptual and social experiences accelerated by the Industrial Revolution. The inclination to paint outside was one reaction to the overwhelming transformations of life in urban centers, as nature and cities redefined each other under the pressure of modernization—a history that connects to that of the High Line, a remnant of the industrial era of the neighborhood. The artists in the exhibition expand well beyond the historical plein air lineage. They not only bring painting outside but imagine nature as context, subject, and collaborator. The eight featured artists approach the history, methodologies, and content of outdoor painting from a variety of perspectives. Some of the artists make work exclusively to be shown outside, while others turn nature into both the subject and the medium used to create their paintings. Still others challenge elementary distinctions between nature and the artificial. The High Line is an apt site for the consideration of the importance of landscape painting in our time, as the natural features of the park juxtapose with the artificial scenery of the surrounding billboards, building facades and walls, and variety of advertisements. Through the participation of an international group of artists, En Plein Air challenges the kinds of work traditionally associated with public art—sculptures and murals—by presenting freestanding, outdoor paintings that can be viewed in the round and in dialogue with the surrounding landscapes.  
Alicja Kwade
Alicja Kwade
New York - 1000 Fifth Avenue
until 27-10-2019

The Roof Garden Commission?: Alicja Kwade – ParaPivot Berlin-based artist Alicja Kwade's (born 1979, Poland) work is elegant, rigorous, and highly experiential. Using a wide range of media, Kwade creates sculptures and installations that reflect on time, perception, and scientific inquiry. With equal parts poetry and critical acumen, she calls into question the systems designed to banish doubt from the world and make sense of an otherwise unfathomable universe. Ultimately, Kwade seeks to heighten both the mystery and the absurdity of the human condition in order to enhance our powers of self-reflection. For The Met, Kwade has created two sculptures using steel and stone to evoke a miniature solar system, a piece of space that will settle temporarily on the Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Roof Garden. This will be Kwade's first solo exhibition at a museum in the United States.

The Roof Garden Commission?: Alicja Kwade – ParaPivot Berlin-based artist Alicja Kwade's (born 1979, Poland) work is elegant, rigorous, and highly experiential. Using a wide range of media, Kwade creates sculptures and installations that reflect on time, perception, and scientific inquiry. With equal parts poetry and critical acumen, she calls into question the systems designed to banish doubt from the world and make sense of an otherwise unfathomable universe. Ultimately, Kwade seeks to heighten both the mystery and the absurdity of the human condition in order to enhance our powers of self-reflection. For The Met, Kwade has created two sculptures using steel and stone to evoke a miniature solar system, a piece of space that will settle temporarily on the Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Roof Garden. This will be Kwade's first solo exhibition at a museum in the United States.
Monica Bonvicini
Monica Bonvicini
Vienna - Arsenalstrasse 1
until 27-10-2019

Monica Bonvicini – I Cannot Hide My Anger Since the mid-1990s Monica Bonvicini has been exploring political, social, and institutional situations and their impact on society, as well as on the conditions of artistic production. Her work is direct, merciless, political, and not without a dry sense of humor. In the process, she focuses on the relationship between architecture, gender roles, control mechanisms, and devices of power. Bonvicini has a multimedia approach, using drawing, sculpture, installation, video, and photography. For the Belvedere 21—originally the Austrian pavilion at the World’s Fair in Brussels in 1958—she has developed a site-specific and space-consuming installation that reacts radically to Karl Schwanzer’s architecture. As such, it reflects male-dominated power structures, which are expressed just as much in the constructed space as in art history, politics and language.  

Monica Bonvicini – I Cannot Hide My Anger Since the mid-1990s Monica Bonvicini has been exploring political, social, and institutional situations and their impact on society, as well as on the conditions of artistic production. Her work is direct, merciless, political, and not without a dry sense of humor. In the process, she focuses on the relationship between architecture, gender roles, control mechanisms, and devices of power. Bonvicini has a multimedia approach, using drawing, sculpture, installation, video, and photography. For the Belvedere 21—originally the Austrian pavilion at the World’s Fair in Brussels in 1958—she has developed a site-specific and space-consuming installation that reacts radically to Karl Schwanzer’s architecture. As such, it reflects male-dominated power structures, which are expressed just as much in the constructed space as in art history, politics and language.  
Min Yoon
Min Yoon
Vienna - Eschenbachgasse 9
until 27-07-2019

Boltensternraum: Min Yoon The cognitive utopia would be to use concepts to unseal the non-conceptual, without making it their equal.”1 In his first solo presentation at the gallery Meyer Kainer, the South Korean artist Min Yoon uses and subverts the spatial structures of the room, which has been named after the Austrian architect Boltenstern and designated for exhibitions since 2007. Ironically, Yoon installs four images in the size from 72 x 84 to 72 x 86 cm, on the wall containing window niches, which in turn depict rooms in hatching style. The frames are covered with crocheted woolen textures, a delicate anthropomorphic gesture with lasting surreal potential. One picture also contains a portrait study of a tool that already has been used by the artist several times and in different contexts – a pencil – and which also provides the motive for the invitation card of this exhibition. A wall in another picture indicates cracks and refers to damages to the fictitious building left in disrepair and the vulnerability of its architectural structure. Perched on not entirely unrolled leather straps on the floor are two sewn leather turtle sculptures, conjoined by a common load and facing in different directions. They also serve as metaphorical triggers in the calculated play of the imagination, which allow for several possible narratives and references of varying complexity. Concrete references to a main narrative are not pursued as Yoon evades distinctly assignable forms of address and, with regard to the structure of the exhibition, strives for finely tared and simultaneous movements of concealment and visualization. Connotations of transparency are replaced by those of skepticism. There is something that is shown, but there is equally something being concealed that is not visible. Sculptural statements are made, painterly explanations suggested, unambiguously verifiable author proofs; yet perhaps withdrawn only during the mounting of the exhibition and left wanting. This exhibition is thus pervaded by a sense of ‘looks-and-feels-like’, presenting itself as its own mimicry. But in this process it also permanently feeds the doubt, comparable to the historical form of the trick routine cups and balls, in which a performer moves three cups in such speed that only seemingly allows the observing teammates to memorise the procedure and the ball below to identify the correct cup. By presenting different media levels of exhibiting in relation, they are relativized. The observers see the conditions that the exhibition evokes in mystifying echoes, yet without logical or rational references. This exhibition could for instance also be a dream, a literary adaptation or even a contextual analysis of melodramatically cliche?d creative crises. It is none of those, yet it could be any one of them. Min Yoon presents the conditions of exhibiting along with the exhibition, proving that today they are too far-reaching and total in order to identify the culpable or innocent. There is only desire and supply, with the one being inseparably entangled in the other. What does not imply that, which desires is innocent and that, which offers to supply, is culpable, or vice versa. The separation between subject and object, between observer and work is outmanoeuvred on multiple levels; the artist himself eschews attributes and role ascriptions, deliberately constricting the format of the exhibition so that it is able not only to unfold its own performative potential, but ultimately also to release the adroitly concealed abundance of detail with regard to subject matter and craft. — Christian Egger   1 T.W. Adorno, Negative Dialectics, p. 10.

Boltensternraum: Min Yoon The cognitive utopia would be to use concepts to unseal the non-conceptual, without making it their equal.”1 In his first solo presentation at the gallery Meyer Kainer, the South Korean artist Min Yoon uses and subverts the spatial structures of the room, which has been named after the Austrian architect Boltenstern and designated for exhibitions since 2007. Ironically, Yoon installs four images in the size from 72 x 84 to 72 x 86 cm, on the wall containing window niches, which in turn depict rooms in hatching style. The frames are covered with crocheted woolen textures, a delicate anthropomorphic gesture with lasting surreal potential. One picture also contains a portrait study of a tool that already has been used by the artist several times and in different contexts – a pencil – and which also provides the motive for the invitation card of this exhibition. A wall in another picture indicates cracks and refers to damages to the fictitious building left in disrepair and the vulnerability of its architectural structure. Perched on not entirely unrolled leather straps on the floor are two sewn leather turtle sculptures, conjoined by a common load and facing in different directions. They also serve as metaphorical triggers in the calculated play of the imagination, which allow for several possible narratives and references of varying complexity. Concrete references to a main narrative are not pursued as Yoon evades distinctly assignable forms of address and, with regard to the structure of the exhibition, strives for finely tared and simultaneous movements of concealment and visualization. Connotations of transparency are replaced by those of skepticism. There is something that is shown, but there is equally something being concealed that is not visible. Sculptural statements are made, painterly explanations suggested, unambiguously verifiable author proofs; yet perhaps withdrawn only during the mounting of the exhibition and left wanting. This exhibition is thus pervaded by a sense of ‘looks-and-feels-like’, presenting itself as its own mimicry. But in this process it also permanently feeds the doubt, comparable to the historical form of the trick routine cups and balls, in which a performer moves three cups in such speed that only seemingly allows the observing teammates to memorise the procedure and the ball below to identify the correct cup. By presenting different media levels of exhibiting in relation, they are relativized. The observers see the conditions that the exhibition evokes in mystifying echoes, yet without logical or rational references. This exhibition could for instance also be a dream, a literary adaptation or even a contextual analysis of melodramatically cliche?d creative crises. It is none of those, yet it could be any one of them. Min Yoon presents the conditions of exhibiting along with the exhibition, proving that today they are too far-reaching and total in order to identify the culpable or innocent. There is only desire and supply, with the one being inseparably entangled in the other. What does not imply that, which desires is innocent and that, which offers to supply, is culpable, or vice versa. The separation between subject and object, between observer and work is outmanoeuvred on multiple levels; the artist himself eschews attributes and role ascriptions, deliberately constricting the format of the exhibition so that it is able not only to unfold its own performative potential, but ultimately also to release the adroitly concealed abundance of detail with regard to subject matter and craft. — Christian Egger   1 T.W. Adorno, Negative Dialectics, p. 10.
Nora Schultz
Nora Schultz
Vienna - Friedrichstrasse 12
until 01-09-2019

Nora Schultz – Would you say this is the day?  

Nora Schultz – Would you say this is the day?  
Hysterical Mining
Hysterical Mining
Vienna - Museumsplatz 1
until 06-10-2019

Hysterical Mining Trisha Baga, Louise Drulhe, Veronika Eberhart, Sylvia Eckermann & Gerald Nestler, Judith Fegerl, Fabien Giraud & Raphaël Siboni, Katrin Hornek, Barbara Kapusta, Marlene Maier, Pratchaya Phinthong, Marlies Pöschl, Delphine Reist, Tabita Rezaire, Miao Ying Curated by Anne Faucheret and Vanessa Joan Müller Hysterical Mining analyses the material worlds we are creating through technology and technology’s role in shaping local and global configurations of power, forms of identity, and ways of living. It draws on radical feminist and ecofeminist theories from the 1970s until now that criticised and revised the nexus tying new technologies and techno-sciences to patriarchal ideas. Its agenda is both intellectual and political. The works of the participating artists go beyond critique to invent and enact other kinds of knowledge, skills, and bodily practices regarding the use as well as production of (new) technologies.

Hysterical Mining Trisha Baga, Louise Drulhe, Veronika Eberhart, Sylvia Eckermann & Gerald Nestler, Judith Fegerl, Fabien Giraud & Raphaël Siboni, Katrin Hornek, Barbara Kapusta, Marlene Maier, Pratchaya Phinthong, Marlies Pöschl, Delphine Reist, Tabita Rezaire, Miao Ying Curated by Anne Faucheret and Vanessa Joan Müller Hysterical Mining analyses the material worlds we are creating through technology and technology’s role in shaping local and global configurations of power, forms of identity, and ways of living. It draws on radical feminist and ecofeminist theories from the 1970s until now that criticised and revised the nexus tying new technologies and techno-sciences to patriarchal ideas. Its agenda is both intellectual and political. The works of the participating artists go beyond critique to invent and enact other kinds of knowledge, skills, and bodily practices regarding the use as well as production of (new) technologies.
Pattern and Decoration
Pattern and Decoration
Vienna - Museumsplatz 1
until 08-09-2019

Pattern and Decoration Brad Davis, Frank Faulkner, Tina Girouard, Valerie Jaudon, Joyce Kozloff, Robert Kushner, Thomas Lanigan-Schmidt, Kim MacConnel, Miriam Schapiro, Kendall Shaw, Ned Smyth, Robert Zakanitch, Joe Zucker Ornament as Promise was the premise of the Pattern and Decoration movement in the United States (1975–1985). In this exhibition, mumok presents the rich collection of works from this movement of Peter and Irene Ludwig, in the largest presentation of Pattern and Decoration in German-speaking Europe since the 1980s. With oriental-style mosaics, monumental textile collages, paintings, installations, and performances, in the 1970s committed feminist artists like Miriam Schapiro, Joyce Kozloff, Valerie Jaudon, and Robert Kushner aimed to bring color, formal diversity, and emotion back into art. Decoration played a key role, with its connotations of the techniques of artisanship. Various ornamental traditions, from the Islamic world to North American Indians to Art Deco, were incorporated in their works, opening up a view beyond geographical and historical boundaries. A proximity to folk art was sought as a deliberate counter to the “purism” of the art of the 1960s.

Pattern and Decoration Brad Davis, Frank Faulkner, Tina Girouard, Valerie Jaudon, Joyce Kozloff, Robert Kushner, Thomas Lanigan-Schmidt, Kim MacConnel, Miriam Schapiro, Kendall Shaw, Ned Smyth, Robert Zakanitch, Joe Zucker Ornament as Promise was the premise of the Pattern and Decoration movement in the United States (1975–1985). In this exhibition, mumok presents the rich collection of works from this movement of Peter and Irene Ludwig, in the largest presentation of Pattern and Decoration in German-speaking Europe since the 1980s. With oriental-style mosaics, monumental textile collages, paintings, installations, and performances, in the 1970s committed feminist artists like Miriam Schapiro, Joyce Kozloff, Valerie Jaudon, and Robert Kushner aimed to bring color, formal diversity, and emotion back into art. Decoration played a key role, with its connotations of the techniques of artisanship. Various ornamental traditions, from the Islamic world to North American Indians to Art Deco, were incorporated in their works, opening up a view beyond geographical and historical boundaries. A proximity to folk art was sought as a deliberate counter to the “purism” of the art of the 1960s.
Michail Pirgelis & Ruth Wolf-Rehfeldt
Michail Pirgelis & Ruth Wolf-Rehfeldt
Cologne - Geisselstrasse 84-86
until 03-08-2019

Michail Pirgelis & Ruth Wolf-Rehfeldt – Introverse Arrangements

Michail Pirgelis & Ruth Wolf-Rehfeldt – Introverse Arrangements
Fiona Tan
Fiona Tan
Cologne - Heinrich-Bll-Platz
until 11-08-2019

Fiona Tan – GAAF The Museum Ludwig invited the artist and filmmaker Fiona Tan (b. 1966 in Pekanbaru, Indonesia; lives in Amsterdam) to realize an exhibition project with the museum’s photography collection as the starting point. Fiona Tan’s work revolves around questions of time, identity, and memory. The archive as a time capsule has played a role in her artistic strategies of research and classification in previous projects. Fiona Tan: GAAF takes as its starting point the Agfacolor advertisement archive—several thousand 6 x 6 color negatives and photographs which were taken between 1952 and 1968. This archive provided Agfa with material for advertisements, brochures, exhibitions, and the magazine Agfa Photoblätter. After discovering this almost forgotten and uncatalogued archive at the Museum Ludwig, Tan became interested in the inherent paradox of its images: staged and idealized scenes of models posing for professional photographers, nonetheless intended to appear spontaneous and authentic, as if taken by amateurs. “These images cause me to reflect upon the pose, upon artificiality versus spontaneity and authenticity,” says Tan who is making these images visible to the public for the first time. The Dutch word gaaf—an anagram, or reordering, of the letters in Agfa—means “neat” or “perfect.” In this exhibition Fiona Tan focuses on the image and the role of women as portrayed in these photographs, drawing attention to the ideal as opposed to the reality of these formative decades in postwar Germany. Juxtaposing fantasy with reality, professional with vernacular, color with black and white, Tan confronts this advertising archive with documentary photographs from the same era from the Museum Ludwig collection and with a selection of her own works dealing with portraiture. Vox Populi London (2012) embodies an informal snapshot, a playful group portrait of a city. In Linnaeus’ Flower Clock (1998), Tan reflects on the nature of time itself. Intentionally blurring the divisions between film and photography, the six-part installation Provenance (2008) questions if it is possible to look at a film in the same way as a painted portrait.

Fiona Tan – GAAF The Museum Ludwig invited the artist and filmmaker Fiona Tan (b. 1966 in Pekanbaru, Indonesia; lives in Amsterdam) to realize an exhibition project with the museum’s photography collection as the starting point. Fiona Tan’s work revolves around questions of time, identity, and memory. The archive as a time capsule has played a role in her artistic strategies of research and classification in previous projects. Fiona Tan: GAAF takes as its starting point the Agfacolor advertisement archive—several thousand 6 x 6 color negatives and photographs which were taken between 1952 and 1968. This archive provided Agfa with material for advertisements, brochures, exhibitions, and the magazine Agfa Photoblätter. After discovering this almost forgotten and uncatalogued archive at the Museum Ludwig, Tan became interested in the inherent paradox of its images: staged and idealized scenes of models posing for professional photographers, nonetheless intended to appear spontaneous and authentic, as if taken by amateurs. “These images cause me to reflect upon the pose, upon artificiality versus spontaneity and authenticity,” says Tan who is making these images visible to the public for the first time. The Dutch word gaaf—an anagram, or reordering, of the letters in Agfa—means “neat” or “perfect.” In this exhibition Fiona Tan focuses on the image and the role of women as portrayed in these photographs, drawing attention to the ideal as opposed to the reality of these formative decades in postwar Germany. Juxtaposing fantasy with reality, professional with vernacular, color with black and white, Tan confronts this advertising archive with documentary photographs from the same era from the Museum Ludwig collection and with a selection of her own works dealing with portraiture. Vox Populi London (2012) embodies an informal snapshot, a playful group portrait of a city. In Linnaeus’ Flower Clock (1998), Tan reflects on the nature of time itself. Intentionally blurring the divisions between film and photography, the six-part installation Provenance (2008) questions if it is possible to look at a film in the same way as a painted portrait.
John Bock
John Bock
Berlin - Chausseestrasse 128/129
until 28-07-2019

John Bock – Im AntliTZ des SchädelapparaTZ Curated by Kathrin Becker John Bock has developed a new project for Neuer Berliner Kunstverein that intermeshes elements of instal- lation, film, and performance in four different spaces. The pivotal work of the exhibition Im AntliTZ des Scha?delapparaTZ is a 4.2-meter-high metal wedge hanging from the ceiling of the exhibition space. It serves both as an action space for four dancers and one actor, and as a set for a film that will be shown at n.b.k. from June 25, 2019, onwards. The transient element of the performative and the time-based nature of the medium video permeate each other. Being an integral part of the exhibition, performative “lectures” involving the five live actors will take place on June 17, June 25, and Friday, June 28, 2019, at 7 pm respectively. In two adjoining rooms, Bock has created another independent, extensive installation. In the “Leibraum” (body room), a second room level was installed using a grating floor, thus creating a gloomy- looking space which can only be looked at by the visitors from below. A slit silicone body is at the center, liquid dripping from its hair. The walls of the lower level are lined with metal plates. Through another opening one enters the “Stube” (parlor), where a claustrophobic scenario unfolds. The rooms and performances refer to the lifestyle of the US terrorist and former professor of mathematics Theodore Kaczynski (* 1942, called „Unabomber“) and the Hanoverian serial killer Fritz Haarmann (* 1879 † 1925). In his works, John Bock brings together live actions, drawings, sculptures, installations, film sets, and film projections to create a Gesamtkunstwerk. His spatial arrangements, which are characterized by material combinations, can become a place for live actions, which the artist calls “lectures”. His work is built on a darkly tinted humor, which expresses itself not least on a linguistic level by means of neologisms, repetitions, onomatopoeia, and surprising language combinations. Informed by his biography, Bock shows an affinity to agricultural and economic terms and objects, which is also reflected in the artist’s environments. Organic material, earthy consistencies, fermentation processes, and living animals occur alongside of architectural spaces, self-built kinetic sculptures, modeled language plots, and psychedelic elements. Objects can become decisive elements in the films and live actions. Repeatedly, Bock himself appears as a protagonist in his extensive installations. His movies and environments draw on expressionist film as well as western, horror or thriller movies. Even though his films and live actions elude clear interpretations, there is an obvious desire behind Bock’s oeuvre to constantly expand the concept of art. His main concern is the dissolution of boundaries in art, whether as to the abolition of genre boundaries and of static work concepts or as to the relationship between recipient and artist.

John Bock – Im AntliTZ des SchädelapparaTZ Curated by Kathrin Becker John Bock has developed a new project for Neuer Berliner Kunstverein that intermeshes elements of instal- lation, film, and performance in four different spaces. The pivotal work of the exhibition Im AntliTZ des Scha?delapparaTZ is a 4.2-meter-high metal wedge hanging from the ceiling of the exhibition space. It serves both as an action space for four dancers and one actor, and as a set for a film that will be shown at n.b.k. from June 25, 2019, onwards. The transient element of the performative and the time-based nature of the medium video permeate each other. Being an integral part of the exhibition, performative “lectures” involving the five live actors will take place on June 17, June 25, and Friday, June 28, 2019, at 7 pm respectively. In two adjoining rooms, Bock has created another independent, extensive installation. In the “Leibraum” (body room), a second room level was installed using a grating floor, thus creating a gloomy- looking space which can only be looked at by the visitors from below. A slit silicone body is at the center, liquid dripping from its hair. The walls of the lower level are lined with metal plates. Through another opening one enters the “Stube” (parlor), where a claustrophobic scenario unfolds. The rooms and performances refer to the lifestyle of the US terrorist and former professor of mathematics Theodore Kaczynski (* 1942, called „Unabomber“) and the Hanoverian serial killer Fritz Haarmann (* 1879 † 1925). In his works, John Bock brings together live actions, drawings, sculptures, installations, film sets, and film projections to create a Gesamtkunstwerk. His spatial arrangements, which are characterized by material combinations, can become a place for live actions, which the artist calls “lectures”. His work is built on a darkly tinted humor, which expresses itself not least on a linguistic level by means of neologisms, repetitions, onomatopoeia, and surprising language combinations. Informed by his biography, Bock shows an affinity to agricultural and economic terms and objects, which is also reflected in the artist’s environments. Organic material, earthy consistencies, fermentation processes, and living animals occur alongside of architectural spaces, self-built kinetic sculptures, modeled language plots, and psychedelic elements. Objects can become decisive elements in the films and live actions. Repeatedly, Bock himself appears as a protagonist in his extensive installations. His movies and environments draw on expressionist film as well as western, horror or thriller movies. Even though his films and live actions elude clear interpretations, there is an obvious desire behind Bock’s oeuvre to constantly expand the concept of art. His main concern is the dissolution of boundaries in art, whether as to the abolition of genre boundaries and of static work concepts or as to the relationship between recipient and artist.
Christoph Keller, Hito Steyerl, Tao Hui
Christoph Keller, Hito Steyerl, Tao Hui
Berlin - Potsdamer Strasse 81E
until 17-08-2019

Christoph Keller, Hito Steyerl, Tao Hui If the works presented here are characterized by a variety of forms, they all address issues of identity, belongings and migration. While Christoph Keller’s body of work reflects upon the traces left by history and politics on our urban landscape, Hito Steyerl makes visible our society’s political contradictions and hypocrisies through a system of cultural references. Tao Hui’s immersive multimedia installations bend the boundaries of fiction and reality to address cultural and identity related issues.

Christoph Keller, Hito Steyerl, Tao Hui If the works presented here are characterized by a variety of forms, they all address issues of identity, belongings and migration. While Christoph Keller’s body of work reflects upon the traces left by history and politics on our urban landscape, Hito Steyerl makes visible our society’s political contradictions and hypocrisies through a system of cultural references. Tao Hui’s immersive multimedia installations bend the boundaries of fiction and reality to address cultural and identity related issues.
Ricarda Roggan
Ricarda Roggan
Berlin - Auguststrasse 26
until 27-07-2019

Ricarda Roggan – WEIMAR, NORIS, ERNEMANN Heavy machines through whose gaps light penetrates into the darkness of the screening room: the special aura of the projectors has enthused Ricarda Roggan since she spent long, tranquil cinema evenings with them on a student job. The weight of the heavy apparatus, the subdued clattering of the motors, the airy flickering of the images in the movie theater. All these impressions waited a long time and tenaciously exerted their effect, to be condensed now in a new photo series that is more closely tied than usual to the biography of the pictorial artist. Like everything that Ricarda Roggan arranges in front of the lens of her large-format analog camera, the projectors now persist in a kind of time capsule. They don't shout, "Look at me!" or "Get me out of here!" They are self-sufficient, modestly pleased that a stage is prepared for them once again. They persist, resting in themselves, and precisely because of that develop their own sober, completely unsentimental magic. They express a mute invitation to view them concentratedly and without disturbance. In search of projectors successively taken out of service in the digital age of movie projection, Ricarda Roggan encountered a passionate collector who had preserved an almost complete collection of 35mm, 16mm, and 8mm projectors in several sheds in the garden of his house in Leipzig. All of them are machines that were taken long ago out of the circulation of commodities and function: a treasure just waiting to be retrieved some day by a museum, and now she has already done it photographic honor. From the chaos of the collection, the photographer separated out individual apparatus, chosen for the special sound of their names: Weimar, Noris, Ernemann. Ricarda Roggan avoids dramatic effects, distilling with constant condensation and concentration the purism of a concentrated moment from restless, disordered reality. These clarified sceneries are illuminated only by their own light and the radiance of the projectors, which an ingenious system of reflections on glass panes and mirror surfaces guides across walls and through the room back upon themselves, where they are collected until the bodies, contours, and textures emerge from the darkness. Ricarda Roggan paints with light and time. In their sober objectivity, the resulting distillations are reminiscent of industrial and advertising photographs from the 1960s and '70s, the era from which the apparatus come. And yet, the pictures go far beyond mere product stagings. In the series Apparate, two previously separate working paths come together: the clarifying staging of a place, and stage set construction for small and large objects. Depending on the intended effect, Ricarda Roggan photographed the machines in black-and-white or in subdued colors, or else presented them as a slide in a light box, whereby they leave new traces in the exhibition room, delicate shimmerings of light on the floor of museums and galleries. Sometimes the way the pictures are hung makes them reflect each other and enter into a mute dialog, a filigree field of tension. The apparatus seem like beings from a past age lost in reverie, ambassadors of a tranquility wrung from the raging of modern times. This field of tension is extended with a phonograph record with 12 tracks reproducing the wide range of the noises the projectors make in operation and with a book in which some of the pictures torn from them in the sober staging are collected as film still shots, archetypal scenes from American action films, naturally empty of human figures. — Anke Sterneborg (Translation Mitch Cohen)  

Ricarda Roggan – WEIMAR, NORIS, ERNEMANN Heavy machines through whose gaps light penetrates into the darkness of the screening room: the special aura of the projectors has enthused Ricarda Roggan since she spent long, tranquil cinema evenings with them on a student job. The weight of the heavy apparatus, the subdued clattering of the motors, the airy flickering of the images in the movie theater. All these impressions waited a long time and tenaciously exerted their effect, to be condensed now in a new photo series that is more closely tied than usual to the biography of the pictorial artist. Like everything that Ricarda Roggan arranges in front of the lens of her large-format analog camera, the projectors now persist in a kind of time capsule. They don't shout, "Look at me!" or "Get me out of here!" They are self-sufficient, modestly pleased that a stage is prepared for them once again. They persist, resting in themselves, and precisely because of that develop their own sober, completely unsentimental magic. They express a mute invitation to view them concentratedly and without disturbance. In search of projectors successively taken out of service in the digital age of movie projection, Ricarda Roggan encountered a passionate collector who had preserved an almost complete collection of 35mm, 16mm, and 8mm projectors in several sheds in the garden of his house in Leipzig. All of them are machines that were taken long ago out of the circulation of commodities and function: a treasure just waiting to be retrieved some day by a museum, and now she has already done it photographic honor. From the chaos of the collection, the photographer separated out individual apparatus, chosen for the special sound of their names: Weimar, Noris, Ernemann. Ricarda Roggan avoids dramatic effects, distilling with constant condensation and concentration the purism of a concentrated moment from restless, disordered reality. These clarified sceneries are illuminated only by their own light and the radiance of the projectors, which an ingenious system of reflections on glass panes and mirror surfaces guides across walls and through the room back upon themselves, where they are collected until the bodies, contours, and textures emerge from the darkness. Ricarda Roggan paints with light and time. In their sober objectivity, the resulting distillations are reminiscent of industrial and advertising photographs from the 1960s and '70s, the era from which the apparatus come. And yet, the pictures go far beyond mere product stagings. In the series Apparate, two previously separate working paths come together: the clarifying staging of a place, and stage set construction for small and large objects. Depending on the intended effect, Ricarda Roggan photographed the machines in black-and-white or in subdued colors, or else presented them as a slide in a light box, whereby they leave new traces in the exhibition room, delicate shimmerings of light on the floor of museums and galleries. Sometimes the way the pictures are hung makes them reflect each other and enter into a mute dialog, a filigree field of tension. The apparatus seem like beings from a past age lost in reverie, ambassadors of a tranquility wrung from the raging of modern times. This field of tension is extended with a phonograph record with 12 tracks reproducing the wide range of the noises the projectors make in operation and with a book in which some of the pictures torn from them in the sober staging are collected as film still shots, archetypal scenes from American action films, naturally empty of human figures. — Anke Sterneborg (Translation Mitch Cohen)  
Theaster Gates
Theaster Gates
Berlin - Niederkirchnerstrasse 7
until 28-07-2019

Theaster Gates – The Black Image Corporation With The Black Image Corporation, Theaster Gates has conceived a participatory exhibition which explores the fundamental legacy of Johnson Publishing Company archives. Featuring more than four million images, they have contributed to shape the aesthetic and cultural languages of African American identity. Central to the exhibition are the works of two photographers, Moneta Sleet Jr. and Isaac Sutton, who both worked for Johnson Publishing. The publishing company created two landmark publications for black American audiences in the 1940s and ‘50s: the monthly magazine Ebony and its weekly sister outlet Jet, which quickly became two of the major platforms for the representation and discussion of black culture. The magazines covered historic milestones such as the March on Washington in 1963 and the first African-American astronaut, politics, sports and celebrities, as well as the complex realities black Americans faced in the US post-war era. On the first floor of the Gropius Bau, The Black Image Corporation displays ten large format prints and more than hundred photographs in four specially designed cabinets. Many frames display images of Black women, actresses and models, while others show the reverse of photographs, revealing information on their location, date and photographer. Within this set-up, visitors will be able to browse and read original copies of Ebony and Jet magazines. Michigan Avenue In Full Bloom (2018), a video shot by Gates and documenting the real architectural spaces where the offices were located, will be displayed in the show. The audience is invited to freely explore this visual archive and leave their own selection and compilation of photographs on the cabinets for other visitors to encounter. At the Gropius Bau, Vaginal Davis, Mac Folkes and Wu Tsang will each choose their own way of engaging with the presented works.  

Theaster Gates – The Black Image Corporation With The Black Image Corporation, Theaster Gates has conceived a participatory exhibition which explores the fundamental legacy of Johnson Publishing Company archives. Featuring more than four million images, they have contributed to shape the aesthetic and cultural languages of African American identity. Central to the exhibition are the works of two photographers, Moneta Sleet Jr. and Isaac Sutton, who both worked for Johnson Publishing. The publishing company created two landmark publications for black American audiences in the 1940s and ‘50s: the monthly magazine Ebony and its weekly sister outlet Jet, which quickly became two of the major platforms for the representation and discussion of black culture. The magazines covered historic milestones such as the March on Washington in 1963 and the first African-American astronaut, politics, sports and celebrities, as well as the complex realities black Americans faced in the US post-war era. On the first floor of the Gropius Bau, The Black Image Corporation displays ten large format prints and more than hundred photographs in four specially designed cabinets. Many frames display images of Black women, actresses and models, while others show the reverse of photographs, revealing information on their location, date and photographer. Within this set-up, visitors will be able to browse and read original copies of Ebony and Jet magazines. Michigan Avenue In Full Bloom (2018), a video shot by Gates and documenting the real architectural spaces where the offices were located, will be displayed in the show. The audience is invited to freely explore this visual archive and leave their own selection and compilation of photographs on the cabinets for other visitors to encounter. At the Gropius Bau, Vaginal Davis, Mac Folkes and Wu Tsang will each choose their own way of engaging with the presented works.  
Thilo Heinzmann
Thilo Heinzmann
Berlin - Linienstrasse 155
until 10-08-2019

Thilo Heinzmann – Pantaloni neugerriemschneider is pleased to present its first exhibition with Thilo Heinzmann at the gallery. Over more than two decades, Thilo Heinzmann has developed a refined visual language that explores the aesthetic and synesthetic possibilities of painting. Investigating this art form's various fundamentals – composition, surface, form, color, light, texture, and scale – his work seeks out new sensations and ways of seeing. The exhibition, entitled Pantaloni, comprises a new body of work that draws from an array of physical and conceptual ideas deployed in previous pieces. For the first time, Heinzmann employs irregular, modular picture planes. These shaped compositions are hewn from the warm-hued, humble material of particle board, with rough edges disclosing the hidden disarray of the board’s interior. The works are painted with epoxy resin that flows, drips, dashes and melts onto the matte surface of the board. Embedded in this clear resin are fragments of the board’s interior. The limit of the picture plane in terms of depth and boundary is of ongoing interest for Heinzmann. In Pantaloni, he positions compositions away from the wall so they appear to be floating in space. Each of the one, two or three planes of a work is suspended at an angle, and in one instance even interacts with the floor. Particle board was initially used in Heinzmann’s work in the mid-90s, when he first departed from the canvas. Drawn to its industrially smooth surface, yet internally chaotic structure, Heinzmann was then led to materials such as polystyrene, aluminum and unbound pigment that remain at the core of his practice. With each of these elements, Heinzmann reveals their hidden incongruities and caprices, making space for a directness and freedom that he sees as fundamental to the medium of painting. Work by Thilo Heinzmann (b. 1969) has been featured in institutional exhibitions internationally. Thilo Heinzmann is Professor of Painting at Universita?t der Ku?nste, Berlin, Germany, where he also lives and works. For further press information and imagery, please contact Jan Salewski at neugerriemschneider: +49 30 288 77277 or [email protected]

Thilo Heinzmann – Pantaloni neugerriemschneider is pleased to present its first exhibition with Thilo Heinzmann at the gallery. Over more than two decades, Thilo Heinzmann has developed a refined visual language that explores the aesthetic and synesthetic possibilities of painting. Investigating this art form's various fundamentals – composition, surface, form, color, light, texture, and scale – his work seeks out new sensations and ways of seeing. The exhibition, entitled Pantaloni, comprises a new body of work that draws from an array of physical and conceptual ideas deployed in previous pieces. For the first time, Heinzmann employs irregular, modular picture planes. These shaped compositions are hewn from the warm-hued, humble material of particle board, with rough edges disclosing the hidden disarray of the board’s interior. The works are painted with epoxy resin that flows, drips, dashes and melts onto the matte surface of the board. Embedded in this clear resin are fragments of the board’s interior. The limit of the picture plane in terms of depth and boundary is of ongoing interest for Heinzmann. In Pantaloni, he positions compositions away from the wall so they appear to be floating in space. Each of the one, two or three planes of a work is suspended at an angle, and in one instance even interacts with the floor. Particle board was initially used in Heinzmann’s work in the mid-90s, when he first departed from the canvas. Drawn to its industrially smooth surface, yet internally chaotic structure, Heinzmann was then led to materials such as polystyrene, aluminum and unbound pigment that remain at the core of his practice. With each of these elements, Heinzmann reveals their hidden incongruities and caprices, making space for a directness and freedom that he sees as fundamental to the medium of painting. Work by Thilo Heinzmann (b. 1969) has been featured in institutional exhibitions internationally. Thilo Heinzmann is Professor of Painting at Universita?t der Ku?nste, Berlin, Germany, where he also lives and works. For further press information and imagery, please contact Jan Salewski at neugerriemschneider: +49 30 288 77277 or [email protected]
Kathryn Andrews
Kathryn Andrews
Berlin - Alexandrinenstrasse 118-121
until 04-08-2019

Kathryn Andrews – Circus Empire This is the first exhibition of large-scale sculptures and wall objects by Kathryn Andrews. The Los Angeles-based artist transforms the gallery's historic building into a massive circus tent support. Inside, interactive artworks mash up references to empire, past and present, alongside symbols of decline, excess, failure and rot. With biting wit in the form of materially rich, absurd objects, Andrews questions the current state of civilization and its representations, while exposing the failures of its never-ending fascination with dominance.

Kathryn Andrews – Circus Empire This is the first exhibition of large-scale sculptures and wall objects by Kathryn Andrews. The Los Angeles-based artist transforms the gallery's historic building into a massive circus tent support. Inside, interactive artworks mash up references to empire, past and present, alongside symbols of decline, excess, failure and rot. With biting wit in the form of materially rich, absurd objects, Andrews questions the current state of civilization and its representations, while exposing the failures of its never-ending fascination with dominance.
Peter Fischli & David Weiss
Peter Fischli & David Weiss
Berlin - Oranienburger Strasse 18
until 27-07-2019

Peter Fischli & David Weiss – HAUS Sprüth Magers is pleased to present HAUS, a solo exhibition by Fischli Weiss, the Swiss artist duo known since the 1980s for their films including Der geringste Widerstand (The Least Resistance) and ambiguous sculptural everyday objects.  At the core of this new exhibition is Haus (House), a work Peter Fischli and David Weiss first developed for Skulptur Projekte Münster in 1987 and subsequently showed in exhibitions at the Guggenheim Museum, New York and Museo Jumex, Mexico City (2016). An aluminum version of the work was permanently installed in Zurich last year. This exhibition is the first to focus on the architectural reference system at the heart of the artists’ work with a selection of sculptures, photographs, and archival material. 

Peter Fischli & David Weiss – HAUS Sprüth Magers is pleased to present HAUS, a solo exhibition by Fischli Weiss, the Swiss artist duo known since the 1980s for their films including Der geringste Widerstand (The Least Resistance) and ambiguous sculptural everyday objects.  At the core of this new exhibition is Haus (House), a work Peter Fischli and David Weiss first developed for Skulptur Projekte Münster in 1987 and subsequently showed in exhibitions at the Guggenheim Museum, New York and Museo Jumex, Mexico City (2016). An aluminum version of the work was permanently installed in Zurich last year. This exhibition is the first to focus on the architectural reference system at the heart of the artists’ work with a selection of sculptures, photographs, and archival material. 
Kunst über Kunst
Kunst ber Kunst
Berlin - Fasanenstrasse 61
until 04-08-2019

Kunst über Kunst?  Saâdane Afif, John M Armleder, Hans-Peter Feldmann, Sylvie Fleury, General Idea, Louise Lawler, Michel Majerus, Mathieu Mercier, Jonathan Monk, Giulio Paolini, Bernd Ribbeck / Salvo, Rob Scholte, Sturtevant, Wolfgang Tillmans The exhibition KUNST ÜBER KUNST shows works—some dating back to the 1960s—that each thematically reflect the work of other artists. The references span straightforward quoting, acclaim, over-embellishment, association or outright appropriation. KUNST ÜBER KUNST certainly does not seek an encyclopaedic approach; instead, the exhibition explores the subject by means of select examples of contemporary art.  Even though this artistic strategy may be seen as a typical phenomenon of Postmodernism, historically there has always been »internal« artistic referencing—direct copying or plain painterly studies are two such examples. Not in any way diminishing the vividness of the exhibition, the topic and focus of KUNST ÜBER KUNST is of a more conceptual nature. The presented artworks' origins are being approached from a broad variety of personal artistic positions. With their varying »sources« in mind, it is a shared intellectual and creative effort of contemporary positions to generate authentic, characteristic statements. Last but not least such interconnectedness with an external oeuvre often show a notable form of »collegial« respect, even revealing a particular form of admiration of their »original source«.

Kunst über Kunst?  Saâdane Afif, John M Armleder, Hans-Peter Feldmann, Sylvie Fleury, General Idea, Louise Lawler, Michel Majerus, Mathieu Mercier, Jonathan Monk, Giulio Paolini, Bernd Ribbeck / Salvo, Rob Scholte, Sturtevant, Wolfgang Tillmans The exhibition KUNST ÜBER KUNST shows works—some dating back to the 1960s—that each thematically reflect the work of other artists. The references span straightforward quoting, acclaim, over-embellishment, association or outright appropriation. KUNST ÜBER KUNST certainly does not seek an encyclopaedic approach; instead, the exhibition explores the subject by means of select examples of contemporary art.  Even though this artistic strategy may be seen as a typical phenomenon of Postmodernism, historically there has always been »internal« artistic referencing—direct copying or plain painterly studies are two such examples. Not in any way diminishing the vividness of the exhibition, the topic and focus of KUNST ÜBER KUNST is of a more conceptual nature. The presented artworks' origins are being approached from a broad variety of personal artistic positions. With their varying »sources« in mind, it is a shared intellectual and creative effort of contemporary positions to generate authentic, characteristic statements. Last but not least such interconnectedness with an external oeuvre often show a notable form of »collegial« respect, even revealing a particular form of admiration of their »original source«.
Beasts of the Times
Beasts of the Times
Berlin - Argentinische Allee 30
until 25-08-2019

Beasts of the Times Lynn Chadwick, Katja Strunz, Hans Uhlmann Haus am Waldsee and Georg Kolbe Museum have prepared an exhibition in two parts. It will be on view from May to September 2019 in both of the former residential buildings and gardens. Lynn Chadwick – Beasts of the Times will reintroduce the British sculptor Lynn Chadwick (1914 – 2003) as one of the leading artists of the post-war period by way of a retrospective and in a charged relationship with two German positions in sculpture. This first museum exhibition of Chadwick in Germany gathers around sixty sculptures, a range of drawings and graphic works as well as an extensive amount of archive materials. Georg Kolbe Museum presents the œuvre of Lynn Chadwick, which has won numerous awards since the 1950, in a broad, chronological spectrum with thematic focuses. In relation to this, Haus am Waldsee traces a motif-oriented arc offering works by Hans Uhlmann (1900 – 1975) and Katja Strunz (*1970) as interlocutors in a dialogue with the British sculptor. While the show at Georg Kolbe Museum is an in-depth retrospective, the counterpart at Haus am Waldsee addresses the aspect of folding and fragmentation that defines Chadwick’s work from a present-day perspective. An exhibition in cooperation with Georg Kolbe Museum, Berlin.  

Beasts of the Times Lynn Chadwick, Katja Strunz, Hans Uhlmann Haus am Waldsee and Georg Kolbe Museum have prepared an exhibition in two parts. It will be on view from May to September 2019 in both of the former residential buildings and gardens. Lynn Chadwick – Beasts of the Times will reintroduce the British sculptor Lynn Chadwick (1914 – 2003) as one of the leading artists of the post-war period by way of a retrospective and in a charged relationship with two German positions in sculpture. This first museum exhibition of Chadwick in Germany gathers around sixty sculptures, a range of drawings and graphic works as well as an extensive amount of archive materials. Georg Kolbe Museum presents the œuvre of Lynn Chadwick, which has won numerous awards since the 1950, in a broad, chronological spectrum with thematic focuses. In relation to this, Haus am Waldsee traces a motif-oriented arc offering works by Hans Uhlmann (1900 – 1975) and Katja Strunz (*1970) as interlocutors in a dialogue with the British sculptor. While the show at Georg Kolbe Museum is an in-depth retrospective, the counterpart at Haus am Waldsee addresses the aspect of folding and fragmentation that defines Chadwick’s work from a present-day perspective. An exhibition in cooperation with Georg Kolbe Museum, Berlin.  
Civilization: The Way We Live Now
Civilization: The Way We Live Now
Beijing - Jiuxianqiao Road
until 15-09-2019

Civilization: The Way We Live Now Civilization: The Way We Live Now presents more than 250 works by over 120 of the world’s most renowned photographic artists, offering a complex and sprawling vision of contemporary life. The images gathered here, produced in the past 25 years, speak to the changes brought about by globalization, and draw attention both to the increasing amount of complexity and conflict, and to the unprecedented degree of interdependence, that characterize life today. They attest, as well, to the development of the medium of photography, and its ability to document these sweeping changes. Organized in collaboration between UCCA and the Foundation for the Exhibition of Photography, the Beijing presentation of Civilization is curated by William A. Ewing and Holly Roussell. In his 2011 book, Civilization, the historian Niall Ferguson notes: “These days most people around the world dress in much the same way: the same jeans, the same sneakers, the same T-shirts… It is one of the greatest paradoxes of modern history that a system designed to offer infinite choice to the individual has ended up homogenizing humanity.” This paradox lies at the core of “Civilization,” which strives to explain the “complex whole” that is modern society, in all its spiritual and material richness. The photographers in this exhibition depict, reveal, examine, criticize and otherwise reflect our hyper-modern and complex social terrain, from Edward Burtynsky’smassively transformed landscapesto Lauren Greenfield’s revealing urban portraits,from Toshio Shibata’s highly ordered tableaus to Xing Danwen’s electronic pollution. The exhibition is divided into eight sections. “Hive” explores the systems of cohabitation and collaboration that have developed in urban settings. “Alone Together” documents the solidarities and estrangements found within communities, as well as the effect of the internet on sociality. “Flow” testifies to the accelerated production and widening wealth gap in the post-industrial world. “Persuasion” explores the power of symbolic capital, from marketing strategies to consumption habits, from religious beliefs to personality cults. “Control” examines humanity’s ability to create order, resolve disputes, and organize political and social structures. “Rupture” focuses on the breakdown of this order, and the conflicts between individuals and collectives. “Escape” follows the ascent of recreational culture, where relaxation, entertainment, adventure, and thrill-seeking offer freedom from the given. Finally, “Next” presents visions of the future, questioning teleological narratives of development. Max Aguilera-Hellweg, Andreia Alves de Oliveira, Evan Baden,Murray Ballard,Olivo Barbieri, Mandy Barker, Olaf Otto Becker, Valérie Belin, Daniel Berehulak, Peter Bialobrzeski, Michele Borzoni, Priscilla Briggs, Paul Bulteel, Edward Burtynsky, Alejandro Cartagena , Philippe Chancel, Che Onejoon, Olivier Christinat, Lynne Cohen, Lois Conner, Gerco de Ruijter, Richard de Tscharner, Natan Dvir, Roger, Eberhard, Mitch Epstein, Adam Ferguson, Vincent Fournier, Andy Freeberg, Lee Friedlander, Matthieu Gafsou, Andreas Gefeller, George Georgiou, Christoph Gielen, Katy Grannan, Lauren Greenfield, Han Sungpil, Nick Hannes, Mishka Henner, Candida Höfer, Dan Holdsworth, Hong Hao, Pieter Hugo, Jo Choonman, Chris Jordan, Yeondoo Jung, Nadav Kander, KDK, Mike Kelley, Kim Taedong, Alfred Ko, Irene Kung, Benny Lam, An-My Lê, Michael Light,  Mauricio Lima, Pablo López Luz, Christian Lünig, Vera Lutter, Alex MacLean, David Maisel, Ann Mandelbaum, Edgar Martins, Jeffrey Milstein, Mintio, Richard Misrach, Andrew Moore,  David Moore, Richard Mosse, Michael Najjar, Walter Niedermayr, Jason Sangik Noh, Simon Norfolk, Hiroshi Okamoto, Neil Pardington, Trent Parke, Cara Phillips, Robert Polidori, Sergey Ponomarev, Cyril Porchet, Mark Power, Giles Price, Reiner Riedler, Simon Roberts, Andrew Rowat, Victoria Sambunaris, Sato Shintaro, Dona Schwartz, Paul Shambroom,  Sheng-Wen Lo, Toshio Shibata, Alec Soth, Henrik Spohler, Will Steacy, Thomas Struth, Larry Sultan, Shigeru Takato, Eric Thayer, Eason Tsang Ka Wai, Andreas Tschersich,  Amalia Ulman, Brian Ulrich, Penelope Umbrico, Carlo Valsecchi, Reginald Van de Velde, Cássio Vasconcellos, Massimo Vitali, Robert Walker, Richard Wallbank, Wang Qingsong, Patrick Weidmann, Thomas Weinberger, Damon Winter, Michael Wolf, Paolo Woods and Gabriele Galimberti, Raimond Wouda, Xing Danwen, Anne Zahalka, Luca Zanier,  Zhang Xiao, Robert Zhao Renhui, Francesco Zizola  

Civilization: The Way We Live Now Civilization: The Way We Live Now presents more than 250 works by over 120 of the world’s most renowned photographic artists, offering a complex and sprawling vision of contemporary life. The images gathered here, produced in the past 25 years, speak to the changes brought about by globalization, and draw attention both to the increasing amount of complexity and conflict, and to the unprecedented degree of interdependence, that characterize life today. They attest, as well, to the development of the medium of photography, and its ability to document these sweeping changes. Organized in collaboration between UCCA and the Foundation for the Exhibition of Photography, the Beijing presentation of Civilization is curated by William A. Ewing and Holly Roussell. In his 2011 book, Civilization, the historian Niall Ferguson notes: “These days most people around the world dress in much the same way: the same jeans, the same sneakers, the same T-shirts… It is one of the greatest paradoxes of modern history that a system designed to offer infinite choice to the individual has ended up homogenizing humanity.” This paradox lies at the core of “Civilization,” which strives to explain the “complex whole” that is modern society, in all its spiritual and material richness. The photographers in this exhibition depict, reveal, examine, criticize and otherwise reflect our hyper-modern and complex social terrain, from Edward Burtynsky’smassively transformed landscapesto Lauren Greenfield’s revealing urban portraits,from Toshio Shibata’s highly ordered tableaus to Xing Danwen’s electronic pollution. The exhibition is divided into eight sections. “Hive” explores the systems of cohabitation and collaboration that have developed in urban settings. “Alone Together” documents the solidarities and estrangements found within communities, as well as the effect of the internet on sociality. “Flow” testifies to the accelerated production and widening wealth gap in the post-industrial world. “Persuasion” explores the power of symbolic capital, from marketing strategies to consumption habits, from religious beliefs to personality cults. “Control” examines humanity’s ability to create order, resolve disputes, and organize political and social structures. “Rupture” focuses on the breakdown of this order, and the conflicts between individuals and collectives. “Escape” follows the ascent of recreational culture, where relaxation, entertainment, adventure, and thrill-seeking offer freedom from the given. Finally, “Next” presents visions of the future, questioning teleological narratives of development. Max Aguilera-Hellweg, Andreia Alves de Oliveira, Evan Baden,Murray Ballard,Olivo Barbieri, Mandy Barker, Olaf Otto Becker, Valérie Belin, Daniel Berehulak, Peter Bialobrzeski, Michele Borzoni, Priscilla Briggs, Paul Bulteel, Edward Burtynsky, Alejandro Cartagena , Philippe Chancel, Che Onejoon, Olivier Christinat, Lynne Cohen, Lois Conner, Gerco de Ruijter, Richard de Tscharner, Natan Dvir, Roger, Eberhard, Mitch Epstein, Adam Ferguson, Vincent Fournier, Andy Freeberg, Lee Friedlander, Matthieu Gafsou, Andreas Gefeller, George Georgiou, Christoph Gielen, Katy Grannan, Lauren Greenfield, Han Sungpil, Nick Hannes, Mishka Henner, Candida Höfer, Dan Holdsworth, Hong Hao, Pieter Hugo, Jo Choonman, Chris Jordan, Yeondoo Jung, Nadav Kander, KDK, Mike Kelley, Kim Taedong, Alfred Ko, Irene Kung, Benny Lam, An-My Lê, Michael Light,  Mauricio Lima, Pablo López Luz, Christian Lünig, Vera Lutter, Alex MacLean, David Maisel, Ann Mandelbaum, Edgar Martins, Jeffrey Milstein, Mintio, Richard Misrach, Andrew Moore,  David Moore, Richard Mosse, Michael Najjar, Walter Niedermayr, Jason Sangik Noh, Simon Norfolk, Hiroshi Okamoto, Neil Pardington, Trent Parke, Cara Phillips, Robert Polidori, Sergey Ponomarev, Cyril Porchet, Mark Power, Giles Price, Reiner Riedler, Simon Roberts, Andrew Rowat, Victoria Sambunaris, Sato Shintaro, Dona Schwartz, Paul Shambroom,  Sheng-Wen Lo, Toshio Shibata, Alec Soth, Henrik Spohler, Will Steacy, Thomas Struth, Larry Sultan, Shigeru Takato, Eric Thayer, Eason Tsang Ka Wai, Andreas Tschersich,  Amalia Ulman, Brian Ulrich, Penelope Umbrico, Carlo Valsecchi, Reginald Van de Velde, Cássio Vasconcellos, Massimo Vitali, Robert Walker, Richard Wallbank, Wang Qingsong, Patrick Weidmann, Thomas Weinberger, Damon Winter, Michael Wolf, Paolo Woods and Gabriele Galimberti, Raimond Wouda, Xing Danwen, Anne Zahalka, Luca Zanier,  Zhang Xiao, Robert Zhao Renhui, Francesco Zizola  
Doug Aitken
Doug Aitken
Beijing - 2 Jiuxuanquao Road
until 04-08-2019

Doug Aitken   Faurschou Foundation is pleased to present a solo exhibition of American artist, Doug Aitken, at Faurschou Beijing. It is the first solo exhibition of the artist in mainland China.   Aitken has developed a multimedia oeuvre that spans a wide array of mediums, integrating film, sound, photography, sculpture, performance, happenings, and site-specific installations. This exhibition features three installations including the video work NEW ERA.   Aitken’s body of artwork takes the viewer into a different world, which explores ideas and takes you places that language cannot fully articulate. Through image, forms, and sound, the artworks conceptualize the idea of a current world that is completely kinetic and synchronized, yet at other times a landscape that is vastly isolating.   Entering the first room of the gallery, NEW ERA creates a hexagonal space of alternating mirrors and projections, which take the 1973 invention of the very first cellular telephone by Martin Cooper as a starting idea. The narrative within this work disintegrates and abstracts, mirroring how the diametrically opposed notions of connectivity and freedom have been underlined in this paradigm-shifting moment in history.   In the second room, the viewer steps directly into 3 Modern Figures (don’t forget to breathe), an installation of three human figures resting on a raw wooden floor. These are not heroic figures but a candid snapshot of modern individuals frozen as if time had stopped. In the empty core of the sculptures, light emanates and pulses.    In the third darkened room stands a 12-foot rock and concrete sculpture with visual parallels to a brutalist monument, titled Crossing the Border. The slab of stone and concrete is cut in the shape of a silhouetted image of Gandhi. Echoing in the large room, we hear patterns of dripping water, the water appearing out of openings in the rock figure.   Connecting three works in the sequence of three rooms, this exhibition starts with the invention of the cellular phone, reflects the way humans are both in and out of sync in this age of technology and ends with Crossing the Border. The exhibition creates a fragmented narrative of today’s digital contemporary landscape. In this landscape, Aitken's works are signposts, making the viewer pause, stop and evaluate their surroundings.

Doug Aitken   Faurschou Foundation is pleased to present a solo exhibition of American artist, Doug Aitken, at Faurschou Beijing. It is the first solo exhibition of the artist in mainland China.   Aitken has developed a multimedia oeuvre that spans a wide array of mediums, integrating film, sound, photography, sculpture, performance, happenings, and site-specific installations. This exhibition features three installations including the video work NEW ERA.   Aitken’s body of artwork takes the viewer into a different world, which explores ideas and takes you places that language cannot fully articulate. Through image, forms, and sound, the artworks conceptualize the idea of a current world that is completely kinetic and synchronized, yet at other times a landscape that is vastly isolating.   Entering the first room of the gallery, NEW ERA creates a hexagonal space of alternating mirrors and projections, which take the 1973 invention of the very first cellular telephone by Martin Cooper as a starting idea. The narrative within this work disintegrates and abstracts, mirroring how the diametrically opposed notions of connectivity and freedom have been underlined in this paradigm-shifting moment in history.   In the second room, the viewer steps directly into 3 Modern Figures (don’t forget to breathe), an installation of three human figures resting on a raw wooden floor. These are not heroic figures but a candid snapshot of modern individuals frozen as if time had stopped. In the empty core of the sculptures, light emanates and pulses.    In the third darkened room stands a 12-foot rock and concrete sculpture with visual parallels to a brutalist monument, titled Crossing the Border. The slab of stone and concrete is cut in the shape of a silhouetted image of Gandhi. Echoing in the large room, we hear patterns of dripping water, the water appearing out of openings in the rock figure.   Connecting three works in the sequence of three rooms, this exhibition starts with the invention of the cellular phone, reflects the way humans are both in and out of sync in this age of technology and ends with Crossing the Border. The exhibition creates a fragmented narrative of today’s digital contemporary landscape. In this landscape, Aitken's works are signposts, making the viewer pause, stop and evaluate their surroundings.
Stephen Willats
Stephen Willats
Zrich - Lwenbru Areal, Limmatstrasse 270
until 18-08-2019

Stephen Willats – Languages of Dissent The work of the British conceptual artist Stephen Willats (b. London, 1943) interrogates structures of community life and social interaction. Exploring the modular architecture of social housing projects, he spotlights forms of individual creative adaptation that defy the uniformity and functionality of the spaces. Such dissent with normative parameters is especially Interesting to Willats because it is where individuality reveals itself and selfdetermination is articulated. He finds similar modes of nonconformist expression in London’s experimental underground club scene and in places on the urban periphery where teenagers seek escape from institutional or conformist pressures. His understanding of what art is and does is reflected in a collaborative and interdisciplinary practice that takes inspiration from sciences beyond the realm of art. Since the 1960s, his work has been influenced by cybernetics, the study of reciprocal relations in dynamic systems, which helps him think through autonomous forms of organization and their structures of control and communication. Providing him with both a method and an aesthetic vocabulary, it is fundamental to his redefinition of the social function and agency of art.

Stephen Willats – Languages of Dissent The work of the British conceptual artist Stephen Willats (b. London, 1943) interrogates structures of community life and social interaction. Exploring the modular architecture of social housing projects, he spotlights forms of individual creative adaptation that defy the uniformity and functionality of the spaces. Such dissent with normative parameters is especially Interesting to Willats because it is where individuality reveals itself and selfdetermination is articulated. He finds similar modes of nonconformist expression in London’s experimental underground club scene and in places on the urban periphery where teenagers seek escape from institutional or conformist pressures. His understanding of what art is and does is reflected in a collaborative and interdisciplinary practice that takes inspiration from sciences beyond the realm of art. Since the 1960s, his work has been influenced by cybernetics, the study of reciprocal relations in dynamic systems, which helps him think through autonomous forms of organization and their structures of control and communication. Providing him with both a method and an aesthetic vocabulary, it is fundamental to his redefinition of the social function and agency of art.
Klara Liden
Klara Liden
Basel - Rebgasse 27
until 27-07-2019

Klara Liden – Now Two Three  The show starts with a blockade: the front door of the gallery is locked. One has to pass through the driveway with the bas relief of soldiers fighting to enter the gallery through the back door, where four current video works are on view. A Walk in the Park is the centerpiece. The artist walks down the Ringstrasse in Vienna carrying a large metal frame covered with a tarpaulin — the kind used to screen construction sites and as hoardings for ads (often promoting real estate companies, contractors or the future building). They are picture carriers, like canvases or like the gallery’s dislodged wall protruding obliquely into the gallery space to serve as a projection surface. The display draws attention to the potential movability of any architectural structure. The white tarpaulin in the video looks pristine — occasionally it shows an imprint of the artist’s body. It recalls Lidén’s Poster Paintings, for which she took posters from various sites in the city and pasted over the multiple layers in white, thus erasing their direct informative content. (One of Lidén’s first artistic actions was to remove all the billboards and advertising posters from downtown Stockholm overnight.) Given the large white surface featured in the present work, the viewer’s gaze is drawn to the edges of the picture, where we can make out site-specific information, including Viennese architecture and city squares, graffiti and gardens, fences and tram signs. The artist collaborated with Askar Brickman on the video’s rhythmic, energetic soundtrack. The second projected video, Karl Zwei Drei, is a melancholic ode to Kottbusser Tor in Berlin and to Lidén’s artist friend Karl Holmqvist, who recites a poem whilst shifting back and forth from his left foot to his right foot in the distance. The camera roams the roof of the building like a ghost. Lidén describes the situation as a dance between Karl and herself behind the camera, a waltz to the unusual numerical sequence, an asynchronous sequence of movements that mixes and meshes with the motions and sounds of the city. The yellow wooden benchin the gallery is an allusion to the yellow of the building façade and of Berlin’s U-Bahn. Out to Lunch and GTG TTYL are set indoors and are about leaving interior spaces. In the first video, the artist steps out of the refrigerator in a sterile, renovated kitchen. In the second, she performs a dance inside the Reena Spaulings Gallery, disappearing three times — interrupted, each time, by black frames. All these films are about how a body is constituted by spatial settings of an urban, institutional or private nature. Some of the videos hark back to early silent film and slapstick in their structure and in their blend of humor and melancholy. There are also several allusions to 1970s performance videos by the likes of Vito Acconci, Bruce Nauman and Martha Rosler. The dark gallery is illuminated by four hanging Jug Lamps. The pink sections on the canisters are markings used in road construction. The connotations that construction site materials evoke — their sometimes brutal, inhuman overtones — seem reinterpreted here and become metaphors for the organic. — Arthur Fink

Klara Liden – Now Two Three  The show starts with a blockade: the front door of the gallery is locked. One has to pass through the driveway with the bas relief of soldiers fighting to enter the gallery through the back door, where four current video works are on view. A Walk in the Park is the centerpiece. The artist walks down the Ringstrasse in Vienna carrying a large metal frame covered with a tarpaulin — the kind used to screen construction sites and as hoardings for ads (often promoting real estate companies, contractors or the future building). They are picture carriers, like canvases or like the gallery’s dislodged wall protruding obliquely into the gallery space to serve as a projection surface. The display draws attention to the potential movability of any architectural structure. The white tarpaulin in the video looks pristine — occasionally it shows an imprint of the artist’s body. It recalls Lidén’s Poster Paintings, for which she took posters from various sites in the city and pasted over the multiple layers in white, thus erasing their direct informative content. (One of Lidén’s first artistic actions was to remove all the billboards and advertising posters from downtown Stockholm overnight.) Given the large white surface featured in the present work, the viewer’s gaze is drawn to the edges of the picture, where we can make out site-specific information, including Viennese architecture and city squares, graffiti and gardens, fences and tram signs. The artist collaborated with Askar Brickman on the video’s rhythmic, energetic soundtrack. The second projected video, Karl Zwei Drei, is a melancholic ode to Kottbusser Tor in Berlin and to Lidén’s artist friend Karl Holmqvist, who recites a poem whilst shifting back and forth from his left foot to his right foot in the distance. The camera roams the roof of the building like a ghost. Lidén describes the situation as a dance between Karl and herself behind the camera, a waltz to the unusual numerical sequence, an asynchronous sequence of movements that mixes and meshes with the motions and sounds of the city. The yellow wooden benchin the gallery is an allusion to the yellow of the building façade and of Berlin’s U-Bahn. Out to Lunch and GTG TTYL are set indoors and are about leaving interior spaces. In the first video, the artist steps out of the refrigerator in a sterile, renovated kitchen. In the second, she performs a dance inside the Reena Spaulings Gallery, disappearing three times — interrupted, each time, by black frames. All these films are about how a body is constituted by spatial settings of an urban, institutional or private nature. Some of the videos hark back to early silent film and slapstick in their structure and in their blend of humor and melancholy. There are also several allusions to 1970s performance videos by the likes of Vito Acconci, Bruce Nauman and Martha Rosler. The dark gallery is illuminated by four hanging Jug Lamps. The pink sections on the canisters are markings used in road construction. The connotations that construction site materials evoke — their sometimes brutal, inhuman overtones — seem reinterpreted here and become metaphors for the organic. — Arthur Fink
Geumhyung Jeong
Geumhyung Jeong
Basel - Steinenberg 7
until 11-08-2019

Geumhyung Jeong – Homemade RC Toy For Homemade RC Toy, the South Korean artist and choreographer focuses her attention on the relationship between the human and the machine, creating an installation comprised of homemade robotic sculptures and documentation of the process of their making.

Geumhyung Jeong – Homemade RC Toy For Homemade RC Toy, the South Korean artist and choreographer focuses her attention on the relationship between the human and the machine, creating an installation comprised of homemade robotic sculptures and documentation of the process of their making.
Rudolf Stingel
Rudolf Stingel
Basel - Baselstrasse 101
until 06-10-2019

Rudolf Stingel From his very beginnings in the late 1980s, Rudolf Stingel (*1956) has approached painting in a conceptual and self-reflexive manner, exploring its possibilities and media-specific limits through the interplay of artistic strategies, materials and shapes. Based on his confrontation with classic pictorial themes, he develops a wealth of motif variations. Alongside various series of abstract and photorealist paintings, he creates large-scale works made of Styrofoam or cast metal, as well as spaces covered in carpets or reflective silver insulation panels. Notwithstanding their material disparities, all these works share the random or deliberate painterly traces that appear on their surface. Certain brand new paintings created only this year will be on view for the very first time. The show will also present new site-specific works using carpets and insulation panels in the museum’s exhibition and restaurant spaces. The exhibition has been conceived in close collaboration between the artist and guest curator Udo Kittelmann, a long-standing expert of Rudolf Stingel’s work.

Rudolf Stingel From his very beginnings in the late 1980s, Rudolf Stingel (*1956) has approached painting in a conceptual and self-reflexive manner, exploring its possibilities and media-specific limits through the interplay of artistic strategies, materials and shapes. Based on his confrontation with classic pictorial themes, he develops a wealth of motif variations. Alongside various series of abstract and photorealist paintings, he creates large-scale works made of Styrofoam or cast metal, as well as spaces covered in carpets or reflective silver insulation panels. Notwithstanding their material disparities, all these works share the random or deliberate painterly traces that appear on their surface. Certain brand new paintings created only this year will be on view for the very first time. The show will also present new site-specific works using carpets and insulation panels in the museum’s exhibition and restaurant spaces. The exhibition has been conceived in close collaboration between the artist and guest curator Udo Kittelmann, a long-standing expert of Rudolf Stingel’s work.
William Kentridge
William Kentridge
Basel - St. Alban-Rheinweg 60
until 13-10-2019

William Kentridge – A Poem That Is Not Our Own William Kentridge (b. 1955) is internationally celebrated as one of today’s leading artists. In addition to creating visual art, he is also a filmmaker and stage director. In more than three decades, he has built a sizable oeuvre spanning diverse media including animated film, drawing, printmaking, stage production, and sculpture. The Kunstmuseum Basel | Gegenwart now presents a grand exhibition surveying the South African artist’s work; several key pieces in the show have never been seen in Europe. Designed in close collaboration with the artist, A Poem That Is Not Our Own sheds light on his early graphic art and films from the 1980s and 1990s and brings the thematic complex of migration, flight, and processions in his oeuvre into focus. It illustrates how these themes first emerge in Kentridge’s early graphic work and grow more prominent over the years as he explores their potential in ever more opulent creations.

William Kentridge – A Poem That Is Not Our Own William Kentridge (b. 1955) is internationally celebrated as one of today’s leading artists. In addition to creating visual art, he is also a filmmaker and stage director. In more than three decades, he has built a sizable oeuvre spanning diverse media including animated film, drawing, printmaking, stage production, and sculpture. The Kunstmuseum Basel | Gegenwart now presents a grand exhibition surveying the South African artist’s work; several key pieces in the show have never been seen in Europe. Designed in close collaboration with the artist, A Poem That Is Not Our Own sheds light on his early graphic art and films from the 1980s and 1990s and brings the thematic complex of migration, flight, and processions in his oeuvre into focus. It illustrates how these themes first emerge in Kentridge’s early graphic work and grow more prominent over the years as he explores their potential in ever more opulent creations.
Rebecca Horn
Rebecca Horn
Basel - Paul Sacher-Anlage 2
until 22-09-2019

Rebecca Horn – Body Fantasies Museum Tinguely in Basel and Centre Pompidou-Metz are presenting parallel exhibitions devoted to the artist Rebecca Horn. In this way, the two institutions offer complementary insights into the work of an artist who is among the most extraordinary of her generation. In the Body Fantasies show in Basel, which combines early performative works and later kinetic sculpture to highlight lines of development within her oeuvre, the focus is on transformation processes of body and machine. The Theatre of Metamorphoses show in Metz explores the diverse theme of transformation from animist, surrealist and mechanistic perspectives, placing special emphasis on the role of film as a matrix within Horn’s oeuvre. Horn’s work is always inspired by the human body and its movement. In her early performative pieces of the 1960s and ‘70s, this is expressed via the use of objects that serve as both extensions and constrictions of the body. Since the 1980s, her work has consisted primarily of kinetic machines and, increasingly, large-scale installations that ‘come alive’ thanks to movement, the performing body being replaced by a mechanical actor. These processes of transformation between expanded bodies and animated machines in Horn’s oeuvre, which now spans almost five decades, are the focus of the Basel show. The exhibition juxtaposes performative works and later machine sculptures in order to follow the unfolding development of motifs of movement. Divided up into four themes, the Basel show traces the development of her works as «stations in a process of transformation» (Rebecca Horn), emphasizing the continuity in her work.

Rebecca Horn – Body Fantasies Museum Tinguely in Basel and Centre Pompidou-Metz are presenting parallel exhibitions devoted to the artist Rebecca Horn. In this way, the two institutions offer complementary insights into the work of an artist who is among the most extraordinary of her generation. In the Body Fantasies show in Basel, which combines early performative works and later kinetic sculpture to highlight lines of development within her oeuvre, the focus is on transformation processes of body and machine. The Theatre of Metamorphoses show in Metz explores the diverse theme of transformation from animist, surrealist and mechanistic perspectives, placing special emphasis on the role of film as a matrix within Horn’s oeuvre. Horn’s work is always inspired by the human body and its movement. In her early performative pieces of the 1960s and ‘70s, this is expressed via the use of objects that serve as both extensions and constrictions of the body. Since the 1980s, her work has consisted primarily of kinetic machines and, increasingly, large-scale installations that ‘come alive’ thanks to movement, the performing body being replaced by a mechanical actor. These processes of transformation between expanded bodies and animated machines in Horn’s oeuvre, which now spans almost five decades, are the focus of the Basel show. The exhibition juxtaposes performative works and later machine sculptures in order to follow the unfolding development of motifs of movement. Divided up into four themes, the Basel show traces the development of her works as «stations in a process of transformation» (Rebecca Horn), emphasizing the continuity in her work.
Listen to the Image, Look at the Sound
Listen to the Image, Look at the Sound
Dsseldorf - Kaistrasse 10
until 08-09-2019

Listen to the Image, Look at the Sound Cory Arcangel, Katja Aufleger, Julia Bünnagel, William Engelen, Mike Hentz, Gregor Hildebrandt, Alicja Kwade, Catherine Lorent, Emeka Ogboh, Sean Snyder, Juergen Staack Curated by Ludwig Seyfarth

Listen to the Image, Look at the Sound Cory Arcangel, Katja Aufleger, Julia Bünnagel, William Engelen, Mike Hentz, Gregor Hildebrandt, Alicja Kwade, Catherine Lorent, Emeka Ogboh, Sean Snyder, Juergen Staack Curated by Ludwig Seyfarth
Ai Weiwei
Ai Weiwei
Dsseldorf - Grabbeplatz 5
until 01-09-2019

Ai Weiwei "Everything is art. Everything is politics": with these words, the internationally acclaimed contemporary artist Ai Weiwei encapsulates the basic principle of his working approach. This motto is also the leitmotif of his largest exhibition in Europe to date, which will be on view simultaneously at the K20 and the K21 of the Kunstsammlung Nordrhein-Westfalen.  Large-scale works and extensive image wallpaper transform the museum galleries into dense, accessible installations. The close interlocking of political engagement with artistic activity in the oeuvre of this important and disputatious artist allows the contradictions of the present day to become tangible. Shown in the large exhibition halls of the K20 – for the first time together in a single exhibition and in their complete forms – are the two key works “Straight” (2008 – 2012) and “Sunflower Seeds” (2010).   

Ai Weiwei "Everything is art. Everything is politics": with these words, the internationally acclaimed contemporary artist Ai Weiwei encapsulates the basic principle of his working approach. This motto is also the leitmotif of his largest exhibition in Europe to date, which will be on view simultaneously at the K20 and the K21 of the Kunstsammlung Nordrhein-Westfalen.  Large-scale works and extensive image wallpaper transform the museum galleries into dense, accessible installations. The close interlocking of political engagement with artistic activity in the oeuvre of this important and disputatious artist allows the contradictions of the present day to become tangible. Shown in the large exhibition halls of the K20 – for the first time together in a single exhibition and in their complete forms – are the two key works “Straight” (2008 – 2012) and “Sunflower Seeds” (2010).   
Megan Rooney
Megan Rooney
Dsseldorf - Grabbeplatz 4
until 11-08-2019

Megan Rooney – Fire On The Mountain Megan Rooney (b. 1985) is an enigmatic storyteller whose work expands across painting, performance, written and spoken word, sculpture, and installation. In mostly site-specific arrangements, she combines the individual components into large-scale installations. Rooney’s references engage with materiality and the human subject and are deeply invested in the present moment: the festering chaos of politics with its myriad cruelties and the laden violence of our society, so resident in the home, in the female, in the body. After growing up between South Africa, Brazil, and Canada, Rooney has lived in London for the past ten years. She draws the subjects of her works directly from life and her surroundings. These are whimsical and in some cases grotesque everyday experiences, humorous observations, as well as gloomy scenarios, and passionate color compositions. A constitutive and recurring element in Megan Rooney’s works is the human body, which can be seen as the subjective starting point and final place of sedimentation for all these experiences. Her paintings and installations are populated with peculiar characters, body parts, and faces that raise questions regarding the vulnerability and the infirmity of the body as such and the female body in particular. The artist’s use of materials also reflects her interest in our actual and daily surroundings: Household items such as cleaning rags encounter materials used to close off construction sites; industrial barrels, dog toys, or golf clubs are combined with found objects from the urban space. Small heroics and objects that we tend to overlook take center stage in Rooney’s work while she is carefully mapping the exterior and interior landscape of our society and strengthening our sensitivity for everyday epics.

Megan Rooney – Fire On The Mountain Megan Rooney (b. 1985) is an enigmatic storyteller whose work expands across painting, performance, written and spoken word, sculpture, and installation. In mostly site-specific arrangements, she combines the individual components into large-scale installations. Rooney’s references engage with materiality and the human subject and are deeply invested in the present moment: the festering chaos of politics with its myriad cruelties and the laden violence of our society, so resident in the home, in the female, in the body. After growing up between South Africa, Brazil, and Canada, Rooney has lived in London for the past ten years. She draws the subjects of her works directly from life and her surroundings. These are whimsical and in some cases grotesque everyday experiences, humorous observations, as well as gloomy scenarios, and passionate color compositions. A constitutive and recurring element in Megan Rooney’s works is the human body, which can be seen as the subjective starting point and final place of sedimentation for all these experiences. Her paintings and installations are populated with peculiar characters, body parts, and faces that raise questions regarding the vulnerability and the infirmity of the body as such and the female body in particular. The artist’s use of materials also reflects her interest in our actual and daily surroundings: Household items such as cleaning rags encounter materials used to close off construction sites; industrial barrels, dog toys, or golf clubs are combined with found objects from the urban space. Small heroics and objects that we tend to overlook take center stage in Rooney’s work while she is carefully mapping the exterior and interior landscape of our society and strengthening our sensitivity for everyday epics.
Bas Jan Ader
Bas Jan Ader
Los Angeles - 313 North Fairfax Avenue
until 27-07-2019

Bas Jan Ader – Water's Edge From Bas Jan Ader’s childhood in Holland learning to sail on the Eems-Dollard Esturary, playing truant from school to go out on the sea with the local prawn fisherman as a teen, wearing only clothing of a particular shade of ocean blue, through his many seminal and highly influential art works to his final fateful ocean voyage at the age of 33, water has been a leitmotif  throughout his life. Water’s Edge explores how this is manifest literally and metaphorically in art works Ader made in the period of 1971 and 1972.

Bas Jan Ader – Water's Edge From Bas Jan Ader’s childhood in Holland learning to sail on the Eems-Dollard Esturary, playing truant from school to go out on the sea with the local prawn fisherman as a teen, wearing only clothing of a particular shade of ocean blue, through his many seminal and highly influential art works to his final fateful ocean voyage at the age of 33, water has been a leitmotif  throughout his life. Water’s Edge explores how this is manifest literally and metaphorically in art works Ader made in the period of 1971 and 1972.
Isaac Julien
Isaac Julien
Los Angeles - 5905 Wilshire Boulevard
until 11-08-2019

Isaac Julien – Playtime Marking Isaac Julien’s first major presentation in Los Angeles, Playtime (2013) is a captivating critique of the influence of capital in the art world. It stars James Franco, Maggie Cheung, Colin Salmon, and auctioneer Simon de Pury, among others. The seemingly disparate narratives of five vignettes demonstrate the various levels at which the flow of money has an effect on the production, dealing, and collecting of contemporary art, and the lives impacted by the system. 

Isaac Julien – Playtime Marking Isaac Julien’s first major presentation in Los Angeles, Playtime (2013) is a captivating critique of the influence of capital in the art world. It stars James Franco, Maggie Cheung, Colin Salmon, and auctioneer Simon de Pury, among others. The seemingly disparate narratives of five vignettes demonstrate the various levels at which the flow of money has an effect on the production, dealing, and collecting of contemporary art, and the lives impacted by the system. 
Sarah Lucas
Sarah Lucas
Los Angeles - 10899 Wilshire Boulevard
until 01-09-2019

Sarah Lucas – Au Naturel Over the past 30 years, Sarah Lucas (b. 1962, London, UK) has created a distinctive and provocative body of work that subverts traditional notions of gender, sexuality, and identity. Since the late 1980s, Lucas has transformed found objects and everyday materials such as furniture, cigarettes, vegetables, and stockings into absurd and confrontational tableaux that boldly challenge social norms. The human body and anthropomorphic forms recur throughout Lucas’s works, often appearing erotic, humorous, fragmented, or reconfigured into fantastical anatomies of desire. Initially associated with a group known as the Young British Artists (YBAs), who began exhibiting together in London in the late 1980s, Lucas is now one of the UK’s most influential artists. Bringing together more than 130 works in photography, collage, sculpture, and installation, Sarah Lucas: Au Naturel reveals the breadth and ingenuity of the artist’s practice. The exhibition addresses the ways in which Lucas’s works engage with crucial debates about gender and power--with a particular attentiveness to the legacy of surrealism—from her clever modifications to  everyday objects to her exploration of sexual ambiguity and the tension between the mundanely familiar and the disorientingly strange. Alongside new sculptural works created for the exhibition, Au Naturel features some of Lucas’s most important projects, including early sculptures from the 1990s that substitute domestic furniture for human body parts and enlarged spreads from tabloid newspapers from the same period that reflect objectified representations of the female body. In addition to the photographic self-portraits that Lucas has produced throughout her career, the exhibition features biomorphic sculptures including her stuffed-stocking Bunnies (1997–ongoing) and NUDS (2009–ongoing), the Penetralia series (2008–ongoing), and selections from her installations at the Freud Museum in London (2000) and the British Pavilion at the Venice Biennale (2015). These works, which complicate inscribed codes of sexual and social normativity, have never been shown together in the United States.  

Sarah Lucas – Au Naturel Over the past 30 years, Sarah Lucas (b. 1962, London, UK) has created a distinctive and provocative body of work that subverts traditional notions of gender, sexuality, and identity. Since the late 1980s, Lucas has transformed found objects and everyday materials such as furniture, cigarettes, vegetables, and stockings into absurd and confrontational tableaux that boldly challenge social norms. The human body and anthropomorphic forms recur throughout Lucas’s works, often appearing erotic, humorous, fragmented, or reconfigured into fantastical anatomies of desire. Initially associated with a group known as the Young British Artists (YBAs), who began exhibiting together in London in the late 1980s, Lucas is now one of the UK’s most influential artists. Bringing together more than 130 works in photography, collage, sculpture, and installation, Sarah Lucas: Au Naturel reveals the breadth and ingenuity of the artist’s practice. The exhibition addresses the ways in which Lucas’s works engage with crucial debates about gender and power--with a particular attentiveness to the legacy of surrealism—from her clever modifications to  everyday objects to her exploration of sexual ambiguity and the tension between the mundanely familiar and the disorientingly strange. Alongside new sculptural works created for the exhibition, Au Naturel features some of Lucas’s most important projects, including early sculptures from the 1990s that substitute domestic furniture for human body parts and enlarged spreads from tabloid newspapers from the same period that reflect objectified representations of the female body. In addition to the photographic self-portraits that Lucas has produced throughout her career, the exhibition features biomorphic sculptures including her stuffed-stocking Bunnies (1997–ongoing) and NUDS (2009–ongoing), the Penetralia series (2008–ongoing), and selections from her installations at the Freud Museum in London (2000) and the British Pavilion at the Venice Biennale (2015). These works, which complicate inscribed codes of sexual and social normativity, have never been shown together in the United States.  
David Hammons
David Hammons
Los Angeles - 901 East 3rd Street
until 11-08-2019

David Hammons The exhibition is dedicated to Ornette Coleman Harmolidic Thinker

David Hammons The exhibition is dedicated to Ornette Coleman Harmolidic Thinker
The Foundation of the Museum
The Foundation of the Museum
Los Angeles - 152 North Central Avenue
until 27-01-2020

The Foundation of the Museum: MOCA's Collection Forty years since its founding in 1979, MOCA has built one of the most legendary permanent collections in the world—a continually growing archive that reflects historical depth, recent experimentation, global awareness, and an outlook significantly informed by its home in Los Angeles. To mark the museum’s 40th anniversary, this exhibition presents a selected topography of artworks that speak to the diversity and prescience of MOCA’s collecting over the past four decades. With special emphasis on works associated with the museum’s remarkable history of exhibitions, The Foundation of the Museum: MOCA’s Collection shows the collection as a changing, mutating landscape of developments in contemporary art and curatorial focus, as well as the social and cultural backdrops that inform them. Featuring a diverse range of artists long- and newly-associated with the museum, the exhibition reflects a belief that MOCA’s histories and futures have always been multiple, ambitious, precious, and unique. 

The Foundation of the Museum: MOCA's Collection Forty years since its founding in 1979, MOCA has built one of the most legendary permanent collections in the world—a continually growing archive that reflects historical depth, recent experimentation, global awareness, and an outlook significantly informed by its home in Los Angeles. To mark the museum’s 40th anniversary, this exhibition presents a selected topography of artworks that speak to the diversity and prescience of MOCA’s collecting over the past four decades. With special emphasis on works associated with the museum’s remarkable history of exhibitions, The Foundation of the Museum: MOCA’s Collection shows the collection as a changing, mutating landscape of developments in contemporary art and curatorial focus, as well as the social and cultural backdrops that inform them. Featuring a diverse range of artists long- and newly-associated with the museum, the exhibition reflects a belief that MOCA’s histories and futures have always been multiple, ambitious, precious, and unique. 
Soul of a Nation
Soul of a Nation
Los Angeles - 221 South Grand Avenue
until 01-09-2019

Soul of a Nation: Art in the Age of Black Power 1963-1983 Soul of a Nation: Art in the Age of Black Power shines a bright light on the vital contribution of Black artists made over two revolutionary decades in American history, beginning in 1963 at the height of the civil rights movement. The exhibition examines the influences, from the civil rights and Black Power movements to Minimalism and developments in abstraction, on artists such as Romare Bearden, Barkley Hendricks, Noah Purifoy, Martin Puryear, Faith Ringgold, Betye Saar, Alma Thomas, Charles White, and William T. Williams. Los Angeles-based artists appear throughout Soul of a Nation, and more deeply in three specific galleries, foregrounding the significant role of Los Angeles in the art and history of the civil rights movement and the subsequent activist era, and the critical influence and sustained originality of the city’s artists, many of whom have lacked wider recognition. Featuring the work of more than 60 influential artists and including vibrant paintings, powerful sculptures, street photography, murals, and more, this landmark exhibition is a rare opportunity to see era-defining artworks that changed the face of art in America.

Soul of a Nation: Art in the Age of Black Power 1963-1983 Soul of a Nation: Art in the Age of Black Power shines a bright light on the vital contribution of Black artists made over two revolutionary decades in American history, beginning in 1963 at the height of the civil rights movement. The exhibition examines the influences, from the civil rights and Black Power movements to Minimalism and developments in abstraction, on artists such as Romare Bearden, Barkley Hendricks, Noah Purifoy, Martin Puryear, Faith Ringgold, Betye Saar, Alma Thomas, Charles White, and William T. Williams. Los Angeles-based artists appear throughout Soul of a Nation, and more deeply in three specific galleries, foregrounding the significant role of Los Angeles in the art and history of the civil rights movement and the subsequent activist era, and the critical influence and sustained originality of the city’s artists, many of whom have lacked wider recognition. Featuring the work of more than 60 influential artists and including vibrant paintings, powerful sculptures, street photography, murals, and more, this landmark exhibition is a rare opportunity to see era-defining artworks that changed the face of art in America.
Die Marmory Show IV
Die Marmory Show IV
Munich - Mauerkircherstrasse 186
until 03-08-2019

Die Marmory Show IV. Erratic Resistance Özlem Altin, Alexandra Bircken, Hanna-Maria Hammari, Lewis Hammond, Vera Palme, Marta Riniker-Radich, Diamond Stingily, Frieda Toranzo Jaeger Curated with Simone Neuenschwander Human bodies are incalculable entities, enigmatic biotopes. Dominated by a long tradition of disciplining, they are equally the scenes of action for resistance and the liberation of desire. Starting from modernity, they and their representations in art have resisted, with various manifestations, the seizures and definitions of what has been established in regard to physiognomy, gender, and health. In the history of the body, the question arises who its opponents are – political institutions, cultural history, religion, the principle of rationality – or the subject itself, which has internalized external logics, carrying them as part of its identity and its own desires? For every image of human physique and its expressed resistance, we must therefore ask ourselves from which particular context is being spoken from. Erratic Resistance concentrates on images of contemporary corporealities that turn against the conditioning of their respective surroundings with unpredictable strategies. The body appears as an entity that changes by leaps and bounds and withdraws from a classifying visibility through both erratic concealment and disclosure. In the search for protection, well-being and comfort, the appearing figurations concurrently demand emancipation and self-determination. Clearly aware of the advantages and disadvantages of technical acceleration and its claim to optimization, they oppose economic objectification, statistical norms, and gender classifications. In subversive battles, placeholders and substitutes of the body are used to gain direct power to act upon presupposed inscriptions. Fetishized coverings, sports devices and anthropomorphic transformations become autonomous codes that make a self-empowering politic of corporeality readable in volatile figures and materials. Solidified identifications of how bodies are expected to act and to desire are eroded by means of affective, unruly and irrational gestures. In Erratic Resistance, the works employ asymmetrical movements to constantly resist hierarchical verifications of human corporealities and the web of dependencies in which they are entangled to date.  

Die Marmory Show IV. Erratic Resistance Özlem Altin, Alexandra Bircken, Hanna-Maria Hammari, Lewis Hammond, Vera Palme, Marta Riniker-Radich, Diamond Stingily, Frieda Toranzo Jaeger Curated with Simone Neuenschwander Human bodies are incalculable entities, enigmatic biotopes. Dominated by a long tradition of disciplining, they are equally the scenes of action for resistance and the liberation of desire. Starting from modernity, they and their representations in art have resisted, with various manifestations, the seizures and definitions of what has been established in regard to physiognomy, gender, and health. In the history of the body, the question arises who its opponents are – political institutions, cultural history, religion, the principle of rationality – or the subject itself, which has internalized external logics, carrying them as part of its identity and its own desires? For every image of human physique and its expressed resistance, we must therefore ask ourselves from which particular context is being spoken from. Erratic Resistance concentrates on images of contemporary corporealities that turn against the conditioning of their respective surroundings with unpredictable strategies. The body appears as an entity that changes by leaps and bounds and withdraws from a classifying visibility through both erratic concealment and disclosure. In the search for protection, well-being and comfort, the appearing figurations concurrently demand emancipation and self-determination. Clearly aware of the advantages and disadvantages of technical acceleration and its claim to optimization, they oppose economic objectification, statistical norms, and gender classifications. In subversive battles, placeholders and substitutes of the body are used to gain direct power to act upon presupposed inscriptions. Fetishized coverings, sports devices and anthropomorphic transformations become autonomous codes that make a self-empowering politic of corporeality readable in volatile figures and materials. Solidified identifications of how bodies are expected to act and to desire are eroded by means of affective, unruly and irrational gestures. In Erratic Resistance, the works employ asymmetrical movements to constantly resist hierarchical verifications of human corporealities and the web of dependencies in which they are entangled to date.  
El Anatsui
El Anatsui
Munich - Prinzregentenstrasse 1
until 28-07-2019

El Anatsui – Triumphant Scale El Anatsui: Triumphant Scale is a major survey of the work of the acclaimed artist El Anatsui (*1944, Anyako, Ghana), perhaps Africa’s most prominent living artist. This survey — the largest ever mounted on Anatsui’s work —will occupy the museum’s entire East Wing and encompass every media in the artist’s prodigious fifty-year career. As the exhibition title suggests, the survey will focus on the triumphant and monumental quality of Anatsui’s sculptures, with the signature bottle-cap series developed over the last two decades situated at the core of the presentation. Along with these ambitious works, with their imposing physical presence and dazzling colors, the exhibition will also include wood sculptures and wall reliefs spanning the mid-1970s to the late 1990s; ceramic sculptures of the late 1970s; as well as drawings, prints, and books. In addition, Anatsui will create several new sculptures responding to the sweeping scale of the museum’s galleries, including a grand outdoor work on the building’s monumental façade.  

El Anatsui – Triumphant Scale El Anatsui: Triumphant Scale is a major survey of the work of the acclaimed artist El Anatsui (*1944, Anyako, Ghana), perhaps Africa’s most prominent living artist. This survey — the largest ever mounted on Anatsui’s work —will occupy the museum’s entire East Wing and encompass every media in the artist’s prodigious fifty-year career. As the exhibition title suggests, the survey will focus on the triumphant and monumental quality of Anatsui’s sculptures, with the signature bottle-cap series developed over the last two decades situated at the core of the presentation. Along with these ambitious works, with their imposing physical presence and dazzling colors, the exhibition will also include wood sculptures and wall reliefs spanning the mid-1970s to the late 1990s; ceramic sculptures of the late 1970s; as well as drawings, prints, and books. In addition, Anatsui will create several new sculptures responding to the sweeping scale of the museum’s galleries, including a grand outdoor work on the building’s monumental façade.  
Olaf Metzel
Olaf Metzel
Munich - Georgenstrasse 15
until 31-07-2019

Olaf Metzel – Shopping  

Olaf Metzel – Shopping  
Martin Kippenberger | Maria Lassnig
Martin Kippenberger | Maria Lassnig
Munich - Luisenstrasse 33
until 15-09-2019

Martin Kippenberger | Maria Lassnig – Body Check It is the first to confront the works of these two influential protagonists of 20th-century painting with each other. Both artists undertake a searching painterly examination of their own physical existence. The frail and fragmented body serves them as a metaphor for social and psychological conflict. Pain and suffering, absurdity and humor are inextricably interwoven in these studies of the flesh. Maria Lassnig and Martin Kippenberger sought to cast the maladies of human life into artistic form by dramatizing the female and male bodies. Their theatrical creations are self-portraits in the classical sense, but without the air of heroism which is a hallmark of the genre. Both reveal their disfigurements and the ravages of illness in depictions that are alternately mocking and self-pitying—but never fall for the trope of the eminent artist and his traditional attitudes. The exhibition is arranged to initiate intimate conversations between about one hundred selected works on loan from international collections that are rarely on public display.  

Martin Kippenberger | Maria Lassnig – Body Check It is the first to confront the works of these two influential protagonists of 20th-century painting with each other. Both artists undertake a searching painterly examination of their own physical existence. The frail and fragmented body serves them as a metaphor for social and psychological conflict. Pain and suffering, absurdity and humor are inextricably interwoven in these studies of the flesh. Maria Lassnig and Martin Kippenberger sought to cast the maladies of human life into artistic form by dramatizing the female and male bodies. Their theatrical creations are self-portraits in the classical sense, but without the air of heroism which is a hallmark of the genre. Both reveal their disfigurements and the ravages of illness in depictions that are alternately mocking and self-pitying—but never fall for the trope of the eminent artist and his traditional attitudes. The exhibition is arranged to initiate intimate conversations between about one hundred selected works on loan from international collections that are rarely on public display.  
Frank Stella
Frank Stella
Hong Kong - Ground Floor ? 2 Ice House Street
until 27-07-2019

Frank Stella – Polish Villages Lévy Gorvy is pleased to present American Master. Frank Stella- Polish Villages, an exhibition featuring ten assemblages from Frank Stella’s seminal Polish Village series (1970–74). Inspired by the 17th–19th century wooden synagogues in eastern Poland that were destroyed by the Nazis during the Second World War, the series marks Stella’s first direct engagement with the relief. The Polish Village series emerged following the artist’s first retrospective, which opened at the Museum of Modern Art in New York in March of 1970, when Stella was just 34; he was the youngest artist to receive a full-scale retrospective in the institution’s history to that date.

Frank Stella – Polish Villages Lévy Gorvy is pleased to present American Master. Frank Stella- Polish Villages, an exhibition featuring ten assemblages from Frank Stella’s seminal Polish Village series (1970–74). Inspired by the 17th–19th century wooden synagogues in eastern Poland that were destroyed by the Nazis during the Second World War, the series marks Stella’s first direct engagement with the relief. The Polish Village series emerged following the artist’s first retrospective, which opened at the Museum of Modern Art in New York in March of 1970, when Stella was just 34; he was the youngest artist to receive a full-scale retrospective in the institution’s history to that date.
Five Artists: Sites Encountered
Five Artists: Sites Encountered
Hong Kong - West Kowloon Cultural District
until 20-10-2019

Five Artists: Sites Encountered May Fung, Lee Bul, Ana Mendieta, Charlotte Posenenske, Lara Almarcegui Five Artists: Sites Encountered brings together a group of international artists whose varied approaches invite us to rethink notions of site and place. The exhibition features sculptures, installations, and films by May Fung, Lee Bul, Ana Mendieta, and Charlotte Posenenske, as well as a specially commissioned project by Lara Almarcegui. This all-female line-up spans multiple generations and geographies. The exhibition demonstrates the artists’ individual perspectives on the idea of “site” – from the intangible to the tangible and the imagined to the real. Viewed collectively, these works provoke a thoughtful dialogue with the physical site around the soon-to-be-completed M+ building and also prompt us to explore our own sense of belonging in the world.

Five Artists: Sites Encountered May Fung, Lee Bul, Ana Mendieta, Charlotte Posenenske, Lara Almarcegui Five Artists: Sites Encountered brings together a group of international artists whose varied approaches invite us to rethink notions of site and place. The exhibition features sculptures, installations, and films by May Fung, Lee Bul, Ana Mendieta, and Charlotte Posenenske, as well as a specially commissioned project by Lara Almarcegui. This all-female line-up spans multiple generations and geographies. The exhibition demonstrates the artists’ individual perspectives on the idea of “site” – from the intangible to the tangible and the imagined to the real. Viewed collectively, these works provoke a thoughtful dialogue with the physical site around the soon-to-be-completed M+ building and also prompt us to explore our own sense of belonging in the world.
McArthur Binion
McArthur Binion
Hong Kong - 3F Pedder Building ? 12 Pedder Street
until 31-08-2019

McArthur Binion – New:Work

McArthur Binion – New:Work